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THE EVE OF ST. AGNES (1896)
 
Illustrations of "The Eve of St. Agnes"
 
The Poetical Works of John Keats (1854 Scharf)
   
Title: 1) "Shrine of St. Agnes - (Half-Title)"

Artist: Drawn on wood by George Scharf, engraved by James Cooper.

Description: This was the first time "The Eve of St. Agnes" was published with illustrations. Four engravings corresponded with "The Eve of St. Agnes". George Cupples writes in the Eclectic Review "A new path may be considered to open in the plan taken this season, by a very elegant edition of Keats. No less than a hundred and twenty designs... have here been on wood by George Scharf... The volume is not only a marvel of wood-engraving, while it exhibits qualities entitled to high praise, from the artistic point of view... Here Mr. Scharf, whose own designs are sometimes excellent, stands yet higher in care for correct transference to the block, with minuteness not to be surpassed..." (Apr 1860, p370).

                              XXXVIII
    "My Madeline! sweet dreamer! lovely bride!
    Say, may I be for aye thy vassal blest?
    Thy beauty's shield, heart-shap'd and vermeil dyed?
    Ah, silver shrine, here will I take my rest
    After so many hours of toil and quest,
    A famish'd pilgrim,---saved by miracle.
    Though I have found, I will not rob thy nest
    Saving of thy sweet self; if thou think'st well
To trust, fair Madeline, to no rude infidel.

(Left) Reproduced in "Poetical Works of John Keats". Published by Edward Moxon, London, 1854, page 211.

   
Date: 1854

Title: 2) "Porphyro and Angela"

Artist: Drawn on wood by George Scharf, engraved by Williams.

Description: This was the first time "The Eve of St. Agnes" was published with illustrations. Four engravings corresponded with "The Eve of St. Agnes". George Cupples writes in the Eclectic Review "A new path may be considered to open in the plan taken this season, by a very elegant edition of Keats. No less than a hundred and twenty designs... have here been on wood by George Scharf... The volume is not only a marvel of wood-engraving, while it exhibits qualities entitled to high praise, from the artistic point of view... Here Mr. Scharf, whose own designs are sometimes excellent, stands yet higher in care for correct transference to the block, with minuteness not to be surpassed..." (Apr 1860, p370).

                              XIII
    He follow'd through a lowly arched way,
    Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume,
    And as she mutter'd "Well-a---well-a-day!"
    He found him in a little moonlight room,
    Pale, lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb.
    "Now tell me where is Madeline", said he,
    "O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom
    Which none but secret sisterhood may see,
"When they St Agnes' wool are weaving piously."

(Left) Reproduced in "Poetical Works of John Keats". Published by Edward Moxon, London, 1854, page 217.

   
Date: 1854

Title: 3) "Porphyro Gazing on Madeline"

Artist: Drawn on wood by George Scharf, engraved by Cooper.

Description: This was the first time "The Eve of St. Agnes" was published with illustrations. Four engravings corresponded with "The Eve of St. Agnes". George Cupples writes in the Eclectic Review "A new path may be considered to open in the plan taken this season, by a very elegant edition of Keats. No less than a hundred and twenty designs... have here been on wood by George Scharf... The volume is not only a marvel of wood-engraving, while it exhibits qualities entitled to high praise, from the artistic point of view... Here Mr. Scharf, whose own designs are sometimes excellent, stands yet higher in care for correct transference to the block, with minuteness not to be surpassed..." (Apr 1860, p370).

                              XXVIII
    Stol'n to this paradise, and so entranced,
    Porphyro gazed upon her empty dress,
    And listen'd to her breathing, if it chanced
    To wake into a slumbrous tenderness;
    Which when he heard, that minute did he bless,
    And breath'd himself: then from the closet crept,
    Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness,
    And over the hush'd carpet, silent, stept,
And 'tween the curtains peep'd, where, lo!---how fast she slept!

(Left) Reproduced in "Poetical Works of John Keats". Published by Edward Moxon, London, 1854, page 223.

   
Date: 1854

Title: 4) "The Escape"

Artist: Drawn on wood by George Scharf, engraved by Cooper.

Description: This was the first time "The Eve of St. Agnes" was published with illustrations. Four engravings corresponded with "The Eve of St. Agnes". George Cupples writes in the Eclectic Review "A new path may be considered to open in the plan taken this season, by a very elegant edition of Keats. No less than a hundred and twenty designs... have here been on wood by George Scharf... The volume is not only a marvel of wood-engraving, while it exhibits qualities entitled to high praise, from the artistic point of view... Here Mr. Scharf, whose own designs are sometimes excellent, stands yet higher in care for correct transference to the block, with minuteness not to be surpassed..." (Apr 1860, p370).

                              XLI
    They glide, like phantoms, into the wide hall;
    Like phantoms, to the iron porch, they glide;
    Where lay the Porter, in uneasy sprawl,
    With a huge empty flagon by his side:
    The wakeful bloodhound rose, and shook his hide,
    But his sagacious eye an inmate owns:
    By one, and one, the bolts fill easy slide:---
    The chains lie silent on the footworn stones,---
The key turns, and the door upon its hinges groans.

(Left) Reproduced in "Poetical Works of John Keats". Published by Edward Moxon, London, 1854, page 228.

   
   
   

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