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HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)

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HOTEL GENEVA   
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LARKIN BUILDING   
MADISON WISC   
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY  
MARTIN, DARWIN   
MIDWAY GARDENS   
MILE HIGH   
MOORE RESIDENCE  
NAKOMA 
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OAK PARK HOMES 
  
OLGIVANNA WRIGHT    
PARK INN    
PETERS (WES) 
PHOTOGRAPHERS    
PICTORIAL ESSAYS   
POPE-LEIGHEY 
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PRICE TOWER & HOMES    PRINTING PROCESS  
ROBIE HOUSE   

ROLOSON ROWHOUSES    
SCHUMACHER   
SC JOHNSON  
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER 
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP    TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST    
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER  
WENDINGEN  
WISCONSIN  
WRIGHT CHILDREN  
 
WRIGHT, FRANK LLOYD
   
WRIGHT & 
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS   
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT 

 

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PHOTOS 1885 - 1919
 
   1885-1919    1920-1929    1930-1939    1940-1949    1950-1959    1960-1969    1970-1979    1980-1989    1990-1999    2000-2009    2010-2014 
 
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WRIGHT STUDIES (IN DEPTH PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAYS)
 
PHOTOGRAPHIC CHRONOLOGY OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT PORTRAITS
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1885
1885
Wright at 18. Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait (circa 1885).  Photographer E.R. Curtiss,  Wisconsin Historical Society.  High-res digital 4 x 5 image. 0001.01.0706
1886
Circa 1886
Wright at 19. Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait (circa1886). In January 1886, Wright was admitted to the University of Wisconsin. In early 1887 Wright left Madison for Chicago. 5.75 x 7.1. Print, High res digital image. 0001.02.0310
1887
1887
Wright at 20. Portrait of Wright shortly after he arrived in Chicago.  Published in "An Autobiography, Frank Lloyd Wright", Wright, 1977, page 64f. Dated at age 20. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Secrest, 1992, page 80. Dated at age 20. 4.25 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 0004.01.0509
1889
1889
Wright at 22.  Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait (circa 1889).  International Newsreel Photo - Received 9/20/29.  Typed caption on back: "Friends incorporate F.L. Wright, Architect.  Chicago Ill... Frank Lloyd Wright, internationally famous architect who is now an institution under the charter of Frank Lloyd Wright, Inc., following the establishment of the corporation by his friends.  Wright may now give his talent free play unhampered by domestic or financial matters.  He is said to have invented a method that will revolutionize skyscrapers."  Time line: Wright arrived in Chicago in 1887.  Set up his own practice in 1893.  Original silver gelatin photo.  6 x 8. 0009.01.0401
1890
1890
Wright at 23, Wright Family, Summer 1890. On June 1, 1889, Catherine and Frank were married in Chicago, Illinois. She was 17 years old. During the Summer of 1890, at one of the family gatherings, this photograph was taken on the front steps of Wright’s newly completed home. Always aware of appearance, Wright placed an oriental carpet on the stairs, and a tennis racket in his Aunt’s hand. (L to R) Uncle Jenkin Lloyd Jones and his wife Aunt Susan Lloyd Jones; Wright’s sister Jane; Catherine holding Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. (Lloyd); his mother Anna Wright; his sister Maginel; Wright; and Mary, the daughter of Jenkin and Susan. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Monona Terrace", Mollenhoff; Hamilton, 1999, page 61, Dated late 1890. 6.75 x 5.5. Print, High res digital image. 0011.01.0310
1892
1892
Hillside Home School I 1892 (1897 - S.001). Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887 and ran it until 1915 when it closed. The private school accepted students between the ages of seven and seventeen. It espoused non-conventional teaching methods, and was the first coeducational school in the nation. After attending the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wright headed for Chicago in 1887 and accepted a position as draftsman in the architectural firm of Joseph Lyman Silsbee. That year, his Aunt’s drafted him to design a school building for them, a large Shingle styled building, reflected the designs of his mentor Silsbee, and in the style of his first project, Unity Chapel, in Spring Green. It was demolished in 1950. Photographed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 3.75 x 7 B&W photograph. 0013.08.1213
1893
Circa 1893
Rookery Building Lobby circa 1893. View of the Lobby looking toward the stairs. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Photographed before Wright remodeled the lobby. Published by the S. L. Stein Publishing Co. 12 x 9.6. 0013.03.0512
1894
1894
William H. Winslow House (1894).  Photographed in 1894, printed in 1959.  Chicago Architectural Photographing Company, Chicago.  This is the actual print that was used for producing the image on page 117 in the June 1959 “Architectural Record”.  Original gelatin silver photograph printed from the original negative.  Printed in 1959 by Henry Fuermann and Sons.  The original image was published in June 1900 "The Architectural Review" page 62.  Also published in “In The Nature of Materials” 1942 Henry-Russell Hitchcock plate 27; “Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910" 1958 Grant Carpenter Manson page 66; “Frank Lloyd Wright: A study in Architectural Content” 1966 Norris Kelly Smith page 70; “Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier” 1994 Richard A. Etlin page 42; “Frank Lloyd Wright: Architect” 1994 Terence Riley page 115; "Frank Lloyd Wright and The Meaning of Materials", 1994 Patterson page 34;  “The Decorative Designes of FLW”, 1979, Hanks, pp 12.  8 x 10. 1275.07.0706
1895
1895
Wright at 28. Portrait of Wright in 1895. Frank Lloyd Wright: Wright was about 28 at the time this picture was taken, circa 1895.  Just two years earlier he had left the employment of Louis Sullivan and begun his independent practice of architecture. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, His Life and His Architecture", Twombly, 1979, page 23 but dated 1889. Courtesy National Library of Australia. 3.25 x 5.6 Print, High res digital image. 0018.01.0509
1895
Wright at 28. 1895. "A self-photograph. No ‘picture-taker’ could satisfy him. So he rigged up his camera with a long rubber tube, and at the right moment, squeezed the bulb! It was the year 1895." John Lloyd Wright, published in "My Father Who is on Earth", 1946, page 18. Stamped on verso, "August 26, 86". Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. 0018.02.1210
Circa 1895
Rookery Building Lobby circa 1895. View of the Lobby looking toward the Balcony. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Photographed before Wright remodeled the lobby. Courtesy Chicago Historical Society. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0018.26.0512
1898
1898
"Down The Valley" Spring Green, Wisconsin 1898. Photographed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright printed a series of photographs for an album showing the Hillside Home School (S.001 - 1887) run by his Aunts in Spring Green, Wisconsin. The album included a number of horizontal panoramic prints. Five of which are part of the CCA, Canadian Centre for Architecture collection. Each print was titled in Wright’s handwriting. When placed side-by-side, three of the images; "N.W", "Down the Valley", and "Bryn Mawr" form a panoramic view of the Jones Valley looking north. A number of these photographs are also part of the Wisconsin Historical Society collection. Clipping pasted on verso: " ‘Down the Valley’ (Spring Green, Wis.) c. 1898, by Frank Lloyd Wright." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph, (cropped). 0032.04.0911
1898
Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace (1895 - S.004) circa 1898. After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Possibly staged and photographed just after completion. Brick fireplace with a circular opening. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. Cubed stones balance the opening and set on the hearth. Tucked behind the large vase on the far left is a Sullivanesque frieze, similar to the Winslow door panel or the panel that faces the Roloson row houses. A Wright designed studio arm chair is to the left of the fireplace. A large floor matt with an Native American pattern sets in front of the fireplace, a smaller runner is draped over the chair. Wright commissioned Orlando Giannini to paint three American Indian murals in his Oak Park home in in 1895. John Lloyd Wright wrote, " ‘Skinny’ Giannini from Italy painted American Indians in brilliant colors on the walls of Papa’s bedroom... Papa liked Indians!" "My Father Who is on Earth," 1946, page 34. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038)...  Continue...  See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0032.15.0514
1898
Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace Detail of Heller Frieze (1895 - S.004) circa 1898. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. Winged maiden set within a Sullivanesque design. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0032.16.0514
1899
Wright’s Oak Park Studio(1895 - S.004) circa 1899. Wright hung four Heller frieze panels above fireplace on the left. After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Brick fireplace with a circular opening is on the left. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Studio is filled with drawing boards, sculptures (3 visible), drawings and plants. An art glass piece hangs in the window. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0036.03.05144
1900
C 1900
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) Circa 1900. Viewed from the Northwest during the winter. The 16-room home included six bedrooms, four baths, and six wood burning fireplaces. James Charnley was a wealthy lumberman who was a personal friend of Louis Sullivan. Frank Lloyd Wright was the chief draftsman at the time for the architectural firm of Adler and Sullivan. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 0041.05.1011
C 1900-10
Francis Apartments (Circa 1900-10). Francis Apartments, 4304 Forestville Ave. Chicago, Illinois (1895 - S.032). Designed by Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Looking west on East 43rd Street, Forrestville Avenue is on the left. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0094.16.0711
Circa 1900
Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio (1895 - S.003) circa 1900. Wright Weed Holders, Studio Chair with Richard Bock Sculpture in Oak Park Studio. Possibly staged by Wright. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, page 65. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, page 98. The chair was from Wright's Studio. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist", Bock, 1989, page 67. Wright used this photograph in his announcement of his first exhibition in 1902. Most likely photographed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Original 6.7 x 10 B&W photograph. 0041.08.0712
C 1900
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1895/1923 - S.034) Circa 1900. Original 1895 structure. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. 333 Forest Avenue, Oak Park. Viewed from the Northeast. Superior Street is seen in the foreground. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0041.06.0112
Circa 1900
Romeo and Juliet Windmill circa 1900 (1896 - S.037). Designed in 1896 for Wright’s two aunts Ellen and Jane Lloyd-Jones and the Hillside Home School, it was completed in 1897. They requested it to stand in harmony with Hillside Home School I, the building he had designed for them ten years earlier. Wright’s 60 foot tall structure functioned as a windmill and a belvedere. The design combined a diamond-shaped column wedged into an octagonal structure, symbolizing the embrace of Shakespeare's lovers. Photographed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 3 x 7 B&W photograph. 0041.14.1213
1900
Wright at 33. Circa 1900. Wright wearing a hat, looking to the left. 5 x 6.2 Print, High res digital image. 0041.01.0609
C 1900-1910
Miriam Noel Wright. Circa 1900-1910 (30-40 years old). Miriam wearing a hat, facing slightly to the right. Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute, Phil Fedderson collection. (Note: AIA Monthly Bulletin, Michigan Society of Architects - December 1959) (Phil H. Fedderson: A native of Clinton and a graduate of Iowa State University in Ames, Phil Feddersen gained his work experience with Alden Dow of Midland, Michigan before opening his own architectural firm in Clinton 1959. Like Dow, Feddersen has been strongly influenced by the later work of Frank Lloyd Wright.) Many of Feddersen’s designs exhibit the "organic" design philosophy of Wright. Published in “Many Masks” Gill, 1987, page 235. 5 x 7 Print. High res digital image. 0041.02.0609
1901
1901
Fine Arts Building April 1901. Browne's Bookstore (1907 - S.141), which opened for business during the last few months of 1907, was located on the left side of the seventh floor as you faced the building. The W. Scott Thurber Art Gallery (1909 - S.154) occupied the fifth floor of the Annex adjacent on the right. The reader board above the door on the left reads "The Studebaker, Castle Square Opera Co. Pirates of Penzance". The May 1, 1901 issue of "The Dial" ran an ad, "The Studebaker. Fine Arts Building... 3D Year. Castle Square Opera Company. Week of April 29 - Pirates of Penzance." The "Pirates of Penzance" was performed two times. Construction began in late 1887 on the Auditorium building (left) and in late 1889 it held its grand opening. 8 x 10 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0048.01.0311
Circa 1901
Henderson Residence (1901 - S.057) circa 1901. View of the Living Room, Fireplace and Library from the Dining Room. The Henderson Residence was one of Wright’s earliest Prairie styled homes and the only one in Elmhurst. In1900, with the Bradley Residence (S.052) and the Prairie style fully blossomed. In 1901 came the Willits Residence (S.054). There was a slight departure with the Hickox Residence (S.056). But the Henderson Residence is authentic Prairie. In essence the Henderson Residence was his fourth Prairie styled house. The massive twelve foot wide brick fireplace centers the home. The deep beams span the width of the Living Room. Two-light gas wall sconces and built-in cabinets line the Library wall. The radiator were left exposed. Most likely photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 7.3 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Henderson Residence. 0048.04.0712
1902
1902
Frederick Carlton Robie 1902 Wedding photograph. Frederick was born on August 14, 1879 in Chicago, Illinois. His father was Fred C Robie. He entered Purdue University in September 1895 while he was only 16. He left in February 1899, before graduating to work for his father. He met Lora Hieronymus at a dance at the University of Chicago. Frederick and Lora continued their relationship, and on June 30, 1902 they were married. Their first child Fred Robie Jr. was born in February 19, 1907. They had a second child, a daughter by the name of Lorraine. They purchased the lot at 5757 Woodlawn on April 8, 1908 for $13,500. They contacted Wright in 1908 and by March 1909 plans were complete. Construction was complete, and they moved in during the early part of 1910. Frederick worked for his father, and when he past away on July 18, 1909, the businesses had to be sold to pay back the debts his father had incurred. Lora Robie moved out of the home in April 1911, and took both children with her. Frederick sold the house in December 1911 to David Lee Taylor, president of the advertising agency Taylor-Critchfield Co. Frederick and Lora were divorced in March, 1912. David Lee Taylor past away in October 1912. His wife sold the house in November 1912 to Marshall Dodge and Isadora Wilber. They had two daughters, Marcia and Jeannette... Continue... 0052.04.0212
1902
Lora Hieronymus Robie 1902 wedding photograph. Photographed by Kessberger & George. Lora Hieronymus was born on May 14, 1878 in Peoria, Illinois. Her father was Benjamin R. Hieronymus. She began attending the University of Chicago in 1896 and met Frederick Robie at a dance at the University. She graduated in June of 1900 and returned to Springfield where her family now lived and taught ninth grade at the Lawrence School. The Lawrence School was named after Rheuna D Lawrence, president of the board, after his death in 1901. He was the father of Susan Lawrence Dana (1902 - S.072). Frederick and Lora continued their relationship, and on June 30, 1902 they were married. Their first child Fred Robie Jr. was born in February 19, 1907. Their daughter Lorraine was born on December 2, 1909. Financial struggles took its toll, Lora Robie moved out of the home in April 1911, and took both children with her. She headed back home to Springfield Illinois and took up teaching to support her children. She filed for divorce in January 1912, claiming infidelity, and was granted a divorce in March, 1912. She became the dean of girls at Springfield High School in the 1920s, then opened a bookstore in 1927. She even broadcast a weekly book review on the radio. She became the manager of the book department at Myers Brothers Department Store... Continue... 0052.05.0212
1903
  Wright at 36. Circa 1903. Portrait of Wright slightly facing to the right, resting his head on his hand. May have been photographed at the same one dated 1905 (Wright at 38), but his hair does not have the touch of gray. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright" Thomas, 1997, page 6 and dated 1903. 4 x 5 Print, High res digital image. 0054.02.0609
1905
C 1905-08
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Circa 1905-08 (1896 - S.038). Appears to have been taken after plate 43, published in "In The Nature of Material", Hitchcock, 1942, and at the same time as a photograph published in the November 1908 issue of House Beautiful. It appears to have been photographed just after completion of the home, with a few minor details not finished. Photographed during the winter, there are no vines on the front of the home, like those in the AB 1911 image (circa 1910).The three trees on the left, and one on the right are seen in AB 1911 photograph. The exterior light fixture to the right of the entrance seen in 1913 has not been installed. Although the gutters have been installed, the down spout on the east side of the Southeast corner seen in AB 1911, are missing, but the house numbers have been installed. The vase sits on a low pedestal, just behind the bushes, centered in the entrance sidewalk. Courtesy of the City of Chicago. 10 x 7.6 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0058.09.0514
1905
Wright at 38. Circa 1905. Wright slightly facing to the right. This portrait has been dated circa 1926, which would place Wright at 59. A more accurate date would be circa 1905. A very similar portrait is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings", Volume 1, Pfeiffer, page 2. 5 x 7 Print, High res digital image. 0058.03.0609
1905
Martha “Mamah” Bouton Borthwick Cheney (June 19, 1869 - August 15, 1914).  Mamah Borthwick was born in Boone, Iowa.  She received a BA at the University of Michigan, and later worked as a librarian in Port Huron, Michigan.  In 1899, she married Edwin Cheney, an electrical engineer from Oak Park, Illinois, USA.  They had two children: John (1902) and Martha (1905).  Edwin commissioned Wright to design them a home in 1903.  In 1909, Mamah and Frank left their respective spouses and traveled to Europe, settling in Italy for about a year.  Upon their return, they settled at Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin.  On August 15, 1914, one of Wright's recently hired domestic workers murdered Mamah, both her children, three of Wright's associates, and a son of one of the associates.  He set fire to one wing of Taliesin, and murdered the seven people with an ax as they tried to escape the fire.  At the time, Wright was overseeing work on Midway Gardens in Chicago. Catherine Wright refused to give Wright a divorce until November 13, 1922.  Note on Verso, dated 11/15/22 (two days after divorce was granted) “Old love of famous architect who is divorced.  Photo is of Mamah Borthwick Cheney who fled with Frank Lloyd Wright to a ‘Love Hegira’ in Japan, and who died in the flames of the 'Love Bungalow' of herself and Wright... Continue... 0058.02.0307
1905 
Ward W. Willits Dining Room, Highland Park, Illinois (1901 - S.054) Circa 1905. Wright designed dining room table and chairs. Three styles of chairs are visible, low and high back chairs, and a third with a raised seat, possibly for young children. But the raised seat version may actually be the low back chair setting on a base. The Willits had four children. Ward W. Willits was the president of the Adams and Westlake Company, a brass and bronze foundry. Orlando Giannini, an artist who designed art glass and murals for Wright, also worked for Adams and Westlake. In 1905, Willits and his wife accompanied Frank and Catherine Wright on their first trip to Japan. Courtesy Ryerson & Burnham Archives, Art Institute of Chicago. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 0058.06.1013
1906
Circa 1906
William R Heath Residence (1904 - S.105) Buffalo, NY, circa 1906. Viewed from the Northwest. One of Wright’s larger prairie styled homes. Main entry on the far left, children’s entry seen in the center. The covered Porch and Living Room are on the far left, the Maid’s bedrooms are on the right. Bedrooms are on the second level. Heath was an attorney for the Larkin Company and was married to Mary, the sister of one of the company’s cofounders Elbert Hubbard. Darwin Martin, a longtime friend of Wright’s, began working for the Larkin Company in 1878. He was instrumental in the selection of Wright for the design the Administration Building for the Larkin Company (S.093) in 1903. The following year, 1904, Darwin Martin (S.100) hired Wright to design a home in Buffalo NY. Wright next designed a home for Martin’s sister and her husband, George and Delta Barton (S.103) on an adjacent lot. That same year, Wright designed a home for the Larkin Company’s attorney, William Heath. Original 10 x 7.2 B&W photograph. 0064.06.0712
Circa 1906
William R Heath Residence (1904 - S.105) Buffalo, NY, circa 1906. Viewed from the Northwest. One of Wright’s larger prairie styled homes. Main entry on the far left, children’s entry seen in the center. The covered Porch and Living Room are on the far left, the Maid’s bedrooms are on the far right. Bedrooms are on the second level. Heath was an attorney for the Larkin Company and was married to Mary, the sister of one of the company’s cofounders Elbert Hubbard. Darwin Martin, a longtime friend of Wright’s, began working for the Larkin Company in 1878. He was instrumental in the selection of Wright for the design the Administration Building for the Larkin Company (S.093) in 1903. The following year, 1904, Darwin Martin (S.100) hired Wright to design a home in Buffalo NY. Wright next designed a home for Martin’s sister and her husband, George and Delta Barton (S.103) on an adjacent lot. That same year, Wright designed a home for the Larkin Company’s attorney, William Heath. Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0064.07.0712
Circa 1906
William R Heath Residence (1904 - S.105) Buffalo, NY, circa 1906. View of the Living Room fireplace which covers the North wall. The massive sandstone mantel reads "The reality of the house is order. The blessing of the house is contentment. The glory of the house is hospitality. The crown of the house is Godliness." Sandstone cubes balances the fireplace opening. A pair of art glass light fixtures are positioned symmetrically from the ceiling on either side of the fireplace. On the far right is an example of an art glass wall sconce, used earlier in the Dana Residence (1902 - S.072) and the George Barton Residence (1903 - S.103). Original 10 x 7.6 B&W photograph. 0064.08.0712
1906
Wright at 39. Circa 1906. Portrait of Wright slightly facing to the right. Hair has just a touch of gray. May have been photographed at the same one dated 1905 (Wright at 38). Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings" Volume 1, Pfeiffer, page 2; “Many Masks” Gill, 1987, page 180. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. 7 x 8.2 Print, High res digital image. 0064.02.0609
1907
1907-1908
Catherine Tobin Wright. Circa 1907-1908. Catherine and her youngest child Robert Llewellyn Wright (1903-1985) age 4-5. Catherine Tobin Wright in a dress designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. See similar photograph without Robert in "The decorative designs of Frank Lloyd Wright", Hanks, page 25. (Note: Robert Llewellyn Wright was born on November 15, 1903 in Oak Park, IL, and passed away on February 22, 1986 in West Bethesda, MD. He married Elizabeth Bryant Kehler on July 29, 1933. He was buried in Unity Chapel Cemetery, Spring Green, WI.) Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute, Mrs. Robert L. Wright collection. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography", Secrest, 1992, page 191, dated 1907. 5 x 6.5 Print. High res digital image. 0080.07.0609
Circa 1907
Larkin Administration Building (1903 - S.093) circa 1907. Designed by Wright in 1903, and built in 1906. Photographed after completion circa 1907, it became the focal point of the Larkin Company. The building was constructed of dark red brick, utilizing pink tinted mortar. The entrance of the building was flanked by a waterfall-like fountain. Above the fountains was a bas-relief by Richard Bock, who also designed the globes at the top of the central exterior piers of the building. The globes were removed by 1941 due to structural problems associated with their weight. Original 5.25 x 4.25 B&W photograph. 0080.13.0712
1907
Pebbles and Balch Store Remodeling (1907 - S.131). This exterior photograph was taken just after completion of the remodel and was acquired by Grant Manson. The exterior was first published in "In The Nature of Materials: 1887 - 1941", Hitchcock, 1942. Hitchcock indicated "Photo courtesy of Grant C Manson". Manson could not have taken them in 1907-08, he would have been only three to four years old at the time. He published this photograph in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", 1958. In Manson's Illustration Credits, he indicates that "Another source of illustrations of erected buildings of the Oak Park Period are the remaining photographs of the set made around 1910 by Henry Fuermann of Chicago...", but is not specific as to the origin of the image. The clerestory windows with wood muntins (thin bands of wood), are similar to the earlier Peter Beachy Residence Remodel (S.117) and the Frederick D. Nichols Residence (S.118), both in 1906. Wright designed the large show window as an enclosed display area, blocking exterior activity, giving privacy to clients shopping inside. Wright compensated for the blocked daylight by an unobstructed band of clerestory windows. Of interest are the two exterior light fixtures. They are very similar to the fixtures... Continue...  For more information see our Wright Study on Pebbles and Balch Remodel. 0080.11.1011
1907
Pebbles and Balch Store Remodeling (1907 - S.131). This interior photograph was taken just after completion of the remodel and was acquired by Grant Manson. The interior photograph was first published in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", 1958. In Manson's Illustration Credits, he indicates that "Another source of illustrations of erected buildings of the Oak Park Period are the remaining photographs of the set made around 1910 by Henry Fuermann of Chicago...", but is not specific as to the origin of the image. Wright designed the large show window as an enclosed display area, blocking exterior activity, giving privacy to clients shopping inside. Wright compensated for the blocked daylight by an unobstructed band of clerestory windows. The interior reflected Wright’s prairie style. Bands of horizontal trim, natural wood and warm earth tones and stained glass lighting fixtures. The interior glass fixture seems to be a scaled down, less complex fixture than the Browne’s Bookstore (S.141) fixture. All the wood cabinetry was designed by Wright. There were wood framed cabinets with glass doors for displaying decorative objects to entice any homeowner in Oak Park. Being a "paper-hanger’s" shop, Wright also designed some of the cabinetry to hold and display rolls of wallpaper... Continue...  For more information see our Wright Study on Pebbles and Balch Remodel. 0080.12.1011
1908
1908
Photo of Minnehaha Falls.  F.L. Wright Photo, St. Paul. Copyright 1908. Not a Frank Lloyd Wright photograph. 1908.00.1201
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Exterior Entrance Circa 1908. Exterior view of entry from hallway. Glass, envelopes the entryway. Two doors allow customers to enter. "Browne's Bookstore" is on the glass above the left door. Two Copper Weed Holders are seen inside display case. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 8 x 8 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.09.0311
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Interior Entrance Circa 1908. The cashier's station is conveniently situated between the two entry doors. Wright designed every fixture and every piece of furniture. "Browne's Bookstore" is on the glass above the right door. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 8 x 10 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.10.0311
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Front Cove Circa 1908. View of front Cove. Browne sought to combine the best features of a well-equipped bookstore with those of a choice home library. Built-in seating, high-backed chairs and tables, stained glass windows and light fixtures, and a view of Lake Michigan from these seventh floor windows. Wall and ceiling trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 7 x 10 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.11.0311
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Viewed From Front to Back Circa 1908. Alcoves were arranged along the left side; each alcove had chairs, a table and reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom were easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye. Every fixture and every piece of furniture was specially designed by Wright and manufactured to order. The cases, tables, chairs, and wall trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Wright also lowered the ceiling in the main room. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 8 x 9 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.12.0311
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Viewed From Entry to Back Circa 1908. View from entry to back. Alcoves were arranged along the left side; each alcove had chairs, a table and reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom were easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye. Set between every tier of shelves, at right angles to the wall are long library tables, with dependent reading lamps and high-backed chairs. The cases, tables, chairs, and wall trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Wright also lowered the ceiling in the main room. Wright adorned the top of a book shelf with his familiar Winged Victory Statue and quotations on the wall. Moving from one room to the next, Wright would often lower the ceiling, giving the effect of immensity as you moved into the next room. Wright dropped the ceiling in the space between the two rooms, while continuing the ceiling above. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 8 x 10 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.13.0311
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) View of Cove Circa 1908. Each Cove included a built in table, four high-backed chairs and a reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom could easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye (PW). The book tier on the left shows the design of the lighting system just above the top shelf. Not only were the upper shelves recessed, but the lower shelves were slightly slanted, angling the books upward. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. Original 8 x 9.8 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.27.0712
1908
Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) View Toward Fireplace Circa 1908. The smaller room contains no shelving other than on either side of the fireplace, and is arranged with cases and tables for the display of fine bindings and special editions. A large fireplace and comfortable easy-chairs give this the appearance of an attractive living-room. Every fixture and every piece of furniture in both rooms has been specially designed and manufactured to order. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. 8 x 10 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0085.14.0311
1908
Coonley Residence (1907 - S.135 ) 1908. View of the Pool and Terrace. Avery and Queene Ferry Coonley are on the right. Their daughter Elizabeth is playing by the pool in the center. Verso: "Photographed by Clarence Fuermann, The Chicago Architectural Photographing Co." Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", Wright, 1911, p 119. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0085.20.0112
Circa 1908
Hillside Home School II circa 1908 (1902 - S.069). View from the Southwest. Three students can be seen in front of the building. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887 and ran it until 1915 when it closed. The private school accepted students between the ages of seven and seventeen. It espoused non-conventional teaching methods, and was the first coeducational school in the nation. After attending the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wright headed for Chicago in 1887 and accepted a position as draftsman in the architectural firm of Joseph Lyman Silsbee. That year, his Aunt’s drafted him to design a school building for them, Hillside Home School I, a large Shingle styled building, reflected the designs of his mentor Silsbee, and in the style of his first project, Unity Chapel, in Spring Green. As the school grew, so did the need for more space. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. (Plate X, Ausgeführte Bauten.) It eventually became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 7 x 4 B&W photograph. 0085.29.1213
1908
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence (1899 - S.046). Purcell Exterior Image #1, 1908. Viewed from the Southwest. Photographed from the driveway of the Southern end of the Entrance Pergola, circa 1908. The Pergola leads into the lower level of the Stair Bay. The entrance to the home is through the lower level of the Stair Bay. The Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level. The Sullivanesque frieze wraps horizontally under the eves. The top half of the frieze extends out approximately six to twelve inches. The arches were also of a Sullivanesque design. The Husser residence was a blend of Wright's Prairie style and the last usage of Sullivanesque details by Wright. The openings of the Covered Porch were enclosed. Wright placed large vases on either side of the entrance to the covered Pergola. William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the Husser Residence in 1908. Courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN. 4x5 B&W Photograph from original digital scan. See our Wright Study on the Husser Residence. 0085.22.0312
1908
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence (1899 - S.046). Purcell Exterior Image #2, 1908. Viewed from the South. Circa 1908. Lower level: On the left is the Driveway. From the street, the Drive leads to the Porte Cochere which Wright designed into the lower level of the Stair Bay. The Driveway leads through the lower level of the Stair Bay to the Stable. Just to the right of the Drive is the covered Entrance Pergola. Both the Drive and the Entrance Pergola lead to the Entrance and the Lower Hall. First and Second Level: The Stair Bay can be seen above the Porte Cochere. Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level above the main part of the house. William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the Husser Residence in 1908. Courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN. 4x5 B&W Photograph from original digital scan. See our Wright Study on the Husser Residence. 0085.23.0312
1908
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence (1899 - S.046). Purcell Exterior Image #3, 1908. Viewed from the Southeast. Circa 1908. Lower level: Wright designed the Lower level as a basement, although it was at ground level. This allowed the First floor (second level) a better view of Lake Michigan. The Lower Level housed the utilities, heating, laundry, servant's and butler's rooms, children's playroom and entry hall. The Children's Playroom was mostly located below the Living Room. To the left of the Dining Room Bay is the entry to the back of the Entrance Hall. Double stairways gave access to the main level and lead to an Entrance Hall or "foyer" situated between the Dining and Living Rooms on the First level. First and Second Level: The Covered Porch on the far left. The Living Room is just to the right. The Dining Room Bay is on the right. Between the Living and Dining Rooms is the Entrance Hall or "foyer". Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level. William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the Husser Residence in 1908. Courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest...  Continue...  See our Wright Study on the Husser Residence. 0085.24.0312
1908
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence (1899 - S.046). Purcell Interior Image #1 (#4), 1908. Robert C. Spencer, Jr. describes the home in the June 1900 issue of The Architectural Review. He wrote, "...the Husser home, whose interior walls are of a dull yellow brick engaged with deep toned and unvarnished wood with inlaid lines of tawny gold mosaic..." As you pass through the archway on the left, there are double sets of leaded glass cabinet doors on either side. A stairway leads down to the Lower Hall and Entrance. In the center, wood spindles create a partition, blocking the view of the stairs that lead down to the Lower Hall and Entrance. The built-in Sideboard is just to the right of the spindles. Six upper leaded glass doors are bordered on either side by a leaded glass light fixture atop a pedestal and larger wooden column with a carved capital. The triple-row checkerboard pattern is carved into the horizontal shelf set between the upper and lower Sideboard doors. The Kitchen is accessed to the left of the Fireplace. The Dining Room Fireplace is on the right. William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the...  Continue...  See our Wright Study on the Husser Residence. 0085.25.0312
1908
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence (1899 - S.046). Purcell Interior Image #2 (#5), 1908. Robert C. Spencer, Jr. describes the home in the June 1900 issue of The Architectural Review. He wrote, "...the Husser home, whose interior walls are of a dull yellow brick engaged with deep toned and unvarnished wood with inlaid lines of tawny gold mosaic..." Standing in the Dining Room Bay, the Living Room is to the far left. The entry to the Kitchen is through the doorway just to the left of the Fireplace. Two matching vertical panels adorn either side of the fireplace. A Built-in cabinet sets off the Dining Room Bay and encompasses a single hanging leaded glass light fixture. Wright would have envisioned a planter or sculpture atop the cabinet. The checkerboard pattern is carved into the cabinet's top. A Dining Room Bay window and Built-in seating is to the right. William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the Husser Residence in 1908. Courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN. 4x5 B&W Photograph from original digital scan. See our Wright Study on the Husser Residence. 0085.26.0312
1908
Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago. Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Wright’s display consisted of a long horizontal panel suspended above the ground, held up on each end by a pair of vertical pedestals. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 6.5 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0085.16.1211
1908
Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago. Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. The print was held in a tall vertical frame that intersected the base, and floated above the surface it was placed on. The low base was designed to hold a small vase for flower arrangements or other decorative items. The overall design was very consistent with Wright’s prairie style. Although very vertical in appearance, this first Print Stand appears to be about three feet in height and was designed to be placed off the ground at eye level. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 7.25 x 9 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0085.17.1211
Circa 1908
Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago. Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. The print was held in a tall vertical frame that intersected the base, and floated above the surface it was placed on. The low base was designed to hold a small vase for flower arrangements or other decorative items. The overall design was very consistent with Wright’s prairie style. Although very vertical in appearance, this first Print Stand appears to be about three feet in height and was designed to be placed off the ground at eye level. 5.75 x 9.75 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0085.18.1211
Circa 1908
Robie House, Dining Room, Dining Table and Six Chairs (1906 S.127) Circa 1908. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, Interior view of Dining Room - 1908. Title: Dining table & six side chairs in interior of the Frederick C. Robie House, Chicago. Medium: Oak. Exhibition: The Arts & Crafts Movement in America 1876-1916. Date of Exhibition: Feb 24 - April 22, 1973. Lender’s name as it should appear: Lent by the university of Chicago." Published in the Chicago Tribune February 18, 1973 and October 12, 1986. Originally published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", Wright, 1911. Possibly photographed by Henry Fuermann & Sons. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0085.19.1211
Circa 1908
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park Circa 1908. Unity Temple during construction, nearing completion. Construction material along Lake Street. Viewed from the Southwest, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, and the Entrance is in the center. Lake Street is on the left, North Kenilworth Avenue in the foreground. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. Original 10 x 6.7 B&W photograph. 0085.21.0112
1909
1909
Portrait of Mrs. E. H. (Mamah Borthwick) Cheney. Chicago Tribune Photograph. Published in the Chicago Tribune on August 6, 1911 at the time of her divorce and in 1914 at the time of her death. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography" Secrest,1992, page 196; "Frank Lloyd Wright, An Interpretive Biography", Twombly, 1973, page 92. (Note: Mamah Borthwick married Edwin Cheney when she was thirty.  Could this possibly be her wedding photograph? 1899?) 4.25 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 0085.05.0509
1909
Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park (1903 S.094) 1909. Published in the Chicago Daily News in 1909. Taken by a Chicago Daily News photographer. Erected by the Oak Park Horse Show Association. Dedicated and presented to the Village July 24, 1909. Photographed and first published after the presentation. Note height of horse trough. Plants growing on top. Wrought iron fence beyond fountain. Home is visible in the background. 8.25 x 6 Print. High res digital image. 0086.04.0310
Circa 1909
Thurber Art Galleries (1909 - S.154), circa 1909. View of the smaller Viewing Gallery looking toward the Southwest. The woodwork was of fumed oak, with bronze worked into the grain and inlaid with a line of white holly. The floors were designed especially to reflect the light, composed of white magnasite. Around the edge of the floor was a band of dull yellow-toned magnasite, bringing the golden wall color down into the floor. The two colors were divided by a narrow strip of inlaid brass. The walls of both galleries were covered with cork gilded in a low-toned bronze dadoed by a higher-keyed gilded rough plaster. Each gallery had a skylight, composed of oblong pieces of dull grayed white glass, with smaller oblong pieces of rich yellow and a few small squares of black, set in brass leadings of various widths, and were different in each gallery. The furniture was designed by Wright. Photographed by Published in "International Studio", February, 1910. 10 x 7.4 B&W Print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Thurber Art Galleries. 0086.05.0911
Circa 1909
Thurber Art Galleries (1909 - S.154), circa 1909. View of the built-in portfolio booths in the larger Print and Reproduction Gallery. They were seven and one-half feet high and included viewing spaces, desks that fold up and down, drawer spaces, and innovative viewing portfolio screens that slid up and down within the wall on the right. There were no fixtures of any sort. Electric lights were concealed in the portfolio booths, so that the source of light was hidden and diffused. The furniture was designed by Wright. Published in "International Studio", February, 1910. 10 x 7.6 B&W Print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Thurber Art Galleries. 0086.06.0911
1910
Circa 1910
Peter A. Beachy Residence, Oak Park (1906 - S.117) Circa 1910. View of the exterior front looking East. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the James Fargo House to create the Prairie styled Beachy Residence. Little remains of the original structure. The Entrance is on the left side of the home. The Living Room is in the foreground on the first level. The master Bedroom is directly above the Living Room. Built-in planters are to the left and right of the front. Photographed between 1906 and 1916 by J. W. Taylor. Original 10 x 8 B&W Photograph. Acquired from The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. 0094.29.0613
1910
Coonley Living Room (1907 - S.135 ) Circa 1910. View of the right side. Copper Urn on the right. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. 8 x 5.5 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0094.09.0311
1910
Coonley Living Room (1907 - S.135 ) Circa 1910. View of the left side. Copper Urn on the left. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. 8.5 x 6.5 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0094.10.0311
1910
Coonley Living Room Hall (1907 - S.135 ) Circa 1910. Hallway viewed from Living Room. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. 10 x 7.5 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0094.11.0311
1910
Coonley Living Room Hall (1907 - S.135 ) Circa 1910. Hallway looking toward Living Room. Two Urns were placed symmetrically in the Living Room. Wright used this same symmetry in the Waller Dining Room and possibly his own Dining Room. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. 10 x 7.5 Print. High res digital image. For more information see our Wright Study on Browne’s Bookstore. 0094.12.0311
Circa 1910
Dana-Thomas Residence (1902 - S.072). Flower in the Crannied Wall Sculpture Circa 1910. The Dana-Thomas House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1902 for Susan Lawrence Dana. The back of the sculpture is inscribed with the following poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson. "Flower in the crannied wall. I pluck you out of the crannies. I hold you here, root and all, in my hand. Little flower—but if I could understand. What you are, root and all, and all in all. I should know what God and man is." Photographed by Frederick O. Bemm, who was a staff photographer for the Art Institute of Chicago and later owned and operated a studio. Original 5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0094.28.0513
Circa 1910
Hillside Home School II circa 1910 (1902 - S.069). View from the Southwest. A bridge is seen in the foreground. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887 and ran it until 1915 when it closed. The private school accepted students between the ages of seven and seventeen. It espoused non-conventional teaching methods, and was the first coeducational school in the nation. After attending the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wright headed for Chicago in 1887 and accepted a position as draftsman in the architectural firm of Joseph Lyman Silsbee. That year, his Aunt’s drafted him to design a school building for them, Hillside Home School I, a large Shingle styled building, reflected the designs of his mentor Silsbee, and in the style of his first project, Unity Chapel, in Spring Green. As the school grew, so did the need for more space. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. (Plate X, Ausgeführte Bauten.) It eventually became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0094.36.1213
1910's

Hillside Home School Copy Negative and Contact sheet (circa 1910)

1910.00.0604
Circa 1910
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Front exterior viewed from the street, looking South circa 1910. As you entered the sidewalk on the left, you passed the Garden Wall with it's pedestal that begged for a urn. A large prairie styled Robie House urn would have fit perfectly. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the art glass front door. The Reception Room is on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room is in the center foreground with art glass doors that exit out to an enclosed Terrace. The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall on the right. Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Most likely photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0094.24.0612
Circa 1910
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Back exterior viewed from the back yard, looking North circa 1910. The Kitchen and back Entrance is on the left. The Dining Room is in the center foreground with art glass doors that exit out to the Terrace. On the right side stairs lead down to the back yard. From the Living and Dining Room, five wide stairs lead down to the Reception Room on the right. Note: the house across the street seen on the left still exists. Upper level. A door at the top of the stairs leads out to the Balcony over the Kitchen on the left. Bedrooms and the Bath are in the center, The Balcony over the Kitchen on the east (right) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the large Bedroom in the center. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Most likely photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 9.7 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0094.25.0612
Circa 1910
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). View of the Living Room from the Reception Room circa 1910. As you opened the art glass front door, you entered the Reception Room. Wright chose wood and stucco for the exterior of the home. Behind the camera to the left were built-in seats. Above the coat closet and front door to the right, were a pair of clerestory art glass windows. On either side of the five wide stairs were built-in oak book cases, which opened up in the front and back. At the top of the stairs the Dining Room was to the left. Entering the hall straight ahead, enclosed by a pair of vertical spindled screens, you could turn left to go to the Kitchen, or take the stairs to the right to reach the second level. The Living Room on the right. The large, prairie styled Fireplace was located in the Living Room to the right, covered most of the west wall. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0094.26.0612
Circa 1910
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). View of the Living Room from the Dining Room circa 1910. Art glass doors in the Living Room on the left, opened out to an enclosed Terrace. The west (left) wall of the Living Room was covered by the fireplace. The east (right) wall of the Living Room included three "high windows" that fell in line with the two in the Reception Room. On either side of the wide stairs were built-in oak book cases, which opened up in the front and back. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0094.27.0612
Circa 1910 
Isabel Roberts Residence Living Room (1908 - S.150) circa 1910. Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. View of the two story Living Room toward the fireplace, from the west. The Dining Room is to the left, screened porch to the right. Open balcony is in the background above. Two Wright designed side chairs are visible, One in the doorway on the left, and in front of the book shelf on the right. An arm chair is just to the right of the fireplace. A Wright designed desk is to the right. Of interest is the unidentified side chair on the left. Possibly a Wright design, but not confirmed. A second is in the background on the right. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Chicago" (Sonderheft), 1911, p.59. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0094.30.1013
Circa 1910 
Isabel Roberts Residence Living Room (1908 - S.150) circa 1910. Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. View of the Living Room fireplace looking north toward the dining room. An arm chair is just to the left. The Dining Room is to the through the door in the center. A side chair can be seen to the right of the doorway. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Ausgefuhrte Bauten", 1911, p.67, and "Frank Lloyd Wright Chicago" (Sonderheft), 1911, p.60. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0094.31.1013
1910
Robie House Entrance Hall, Lower Level (1906 - S.127) 1910. Looking Southeast. A Wright designed high back chair and entry table are on the left. Oak with leather upholstered seat and back. The back legs have square feet and caps. Laid across the Wright designed entry table is a runner designed by Wright with the pattern from the leaded glass windows. The carpets were also designed by Wright. The leaded glass doors in the center lead to the Playroom. The stairs lead up to the main level. Photographed by Henry Fuermann & Sons. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0094.32.1013
1910
Robie House Living Room (1906 - S.127) 1910. Looking West. The Robies were moved into the home by May 1910. This was photographed after the completion of construction and furnishing the home. Four distinct chairs are visible in this photograph. A) An armchair on the left; B) A matching armchair rocker; C) A side chair behind the rocker; D) An upholstered armchair on the right, very similar to an upholstered armchair in the May house photographed circa 1910 (see "Frank Lloyd Wright and George Mann Niedecken", 1999, p. 38). Wright designed some of the Robie House furniture, some was in conjunction with George Mann Niedecken, and some may have been designed by Niedecken for the Robie House. A double pedestal lamp sets on the table to the left. The left half of this photograph was published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", 1911, p. 114, and "Frank Lloyd Wright Chicago" (Sonderheft), 1911, p. 96. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0094.33.1013
1910
Wright’s Oak Park Playroom (1895 S.003) C1910. Photographed by Henry Fuermann & Sons. Published in "In The Nature of Material" Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 16, credited to Fuermann; also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910" Manson, 1958, page 47, credited to Fuermann and dated 1910. Caption on verso: "Abundant use of wood and stone in living room of Wright’s own Oak Park home, built in 1895, sowed seeds for natural building materials often seen in today’s homes. Wall mural over fireplace recalls popularity of this type of interior decorating treatment today. Hanging lamps over chairs near fireplace may be forerunners of today’s pulley lights. Chicago Architectural Photography Co. Photo. (Stamped) Mar 27, 1957. " Noted changes from photograph published in House Beautiful, February 1897: Built-in window seats on left and right are removed; Windows on left cover have been sealed off; Four light fixtures have been added; Two leaded glass cabinets have been added.4 on either side of fireplace. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 0094.06.0310
1910
Mamah Borthwick Cheney. Circa 1910-1914. She appears to be just a little older in this photograph than in the other two available photographs. Note: she was 45 at the time of her death (1914). She would have been 41 years old in 1910. Published in “Many Masks” Gill, 1987, page 207. 4.75 x 6.5 Print, High res digital image. 0094.05.0609
Circa 1910
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) Circa 1910. Viewed from the Northwest, from Rogers Avenue. The covered Porch is on the left, Living Room in the center, and Dining Room on the far right. The entrance is on the right side of the Living Room. The Bedrooms are on the second level, seen above and behind the covered Porch and Living Room. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", 1911. Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 0094.22.0412
Circa 1910
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) Circa 1910. Viewed from the West, from the corner of Sheridan Road and Rogers Avenue. The covered Porch is on the left, Living Room in the center, and Dining Room on the far right. The entrance is on the right side of the Living Room. The Bedrooms are on the second level, seen above and behind the covered Porch and Living Room. Most likely photographed by Henry Fuermann at the same time and S#94.22. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago", (Sonderheft) 1911. Original 8.1 x 5.75 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 0094.23.0412
Circa 1910
Thurber Art Galleries (1909 - S.154), circa 1910. View of the smaller Viewing Gallery looking East toward Lake Michigan. The floors were designed especially to reflect the light, composed of white magnasite. Around the edge of the floor was a band of dull yellow-toned magnasite, bringing the golden wall color down into the floor. The two colors were divided by a narrow strip of inlaid brass. The walls of both galleries were covered with cork gilded in a low-toned bronze dadoed by a higher-keyed gilded rough plaster. Each gallery had a skylight, composed of oblong pieces of dull grayed white glass, with smaller oblong pieces of rich yellow and a few small squares of black, set in brass leadings of various widths, and were different in each gallery. The furniture was designed by Wright. Published in "International Studio", April, 1911. 10 x 7.2 B&W Print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Thurber Art Galleries. 0094.17.0911
Circa 1910
Thurber Art Galleries (1909 - S.154), circa 1910. View of the larger Print and Reproduction Gallery looking East toward Lake Michigan. Wright "carefully considers every detail of room size and height, the lighting by day and night, placing of doors and windows, the breaking up of the wall surfaces, the design and use of each piece of furniture..." (I.S.) The built-in portfolio booths were seven and one-half feet high and include portfolio screens, drawer space, tables, desks and seats. There were no fixtures of any sort. Electric lights were placed above the skylights and concealed in the portfolio booths, so that the source of light was hidden, diffused and softened "as to have the effect of daylight". Each gallery had a skylight, composed of oblong pieces of dull grayed white glass, with smaller oblong pieces of rich yellow and a few small squares of black, set in brass leadings of various widths. The furniture was designed by Wright. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Company. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", 1911. 10 x 7.4 B&W Print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Thurber Art Galleries. 0094.18.0911
Circa 1910
Thurber Art Galleries (1909 - S.154), circa 1910. View of the larger Print and Reproduction Gallery looking West. Wright "carefully considers every detail of room size and height, the lighting by day and night, placing of doors and windows, the breaking up of the wall surfaces, the design and use of each piece of furniture..." (I.S.) The built-in portfolio booths were seven and one-half feet high and include portfolio screens, drawer space, tables, desks and seats. There were no fixtures of any sort. There were electric lights placed above the skylights and concealed in the portfolio booths, so that the source of light was hidden, diffused and softened. This larger gallery had two skylights, composed of oblong pieces of dull grayed white glass, with smaller oblong pieces of rich yellow and a few small squares of black, set in brass leadings of various widths. The furniture was designed by Wright. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Company. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", 1911. 10 x 6.5 B&W Print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Thurber Art Galleries. 0094.19.0911
1911
1911 Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio (1895 S.003) 1911. "In December of 1911 he left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin 1 for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine. This wall was constructed to add privacy to the garden and ‘Library’. "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages38-40. Stamped on verso: "Dec 2 - 1911". Photographed by "Bu... & At..., Press Photographers, Chicago." Clipping on verso: "Although Frank Lloyd Wright’s home in Oak Park today serves as a museum, it was built in 1889 for about $6,000. In 1911, workers built the brick fence that assures privacy." 10 x 8 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 0104.07.0410
1911
Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio, Bedroom for Mrs. Wright. (1895 - S.003) 1911. "In December of 1911 Wright left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. In 1911, Wright’s original two-story drafting room was converted to a living room on the first floor, and four bedrooms for his children on the second. His office which was adjacent to the drafting room on the first floor was converted to a dining room, and a second level was added above it creating a bedroom for Mrs. Wright. The fireplace was added, tying it into the original drafting room chimney. The windows on the left look out over Chicago Avenue. A Wright designed slant-back chair is visible against the wall under the windows. A stubbed wall is visible on the far right. To it’s right, two steps lead down to a landing and out to the hallway. Courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, Oak Park. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0104.14.1013
1911
Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio, Bedroom for Children. (1895 - S.003) 1911. "In December of 1911 Wright left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. In 1911, Wright’s original two-story drafting room was converted to a living room on the first floor, and four bedrooms for his children on the second. This was Catherine’s Bedroom, the northeast bedroom, looking northeast. Three pieces of furniture are visible. A) Left: Slant back side chair. Wright designed them for his home in Oak Park, 1904. Front and back legs are straight. The back legs have feet, the top is capped. Oak, leather upholstered seat, 40.25 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). B) Japanese Print Table, designed by Wright in 1898. Used in Catherine’s room as a desk. 48.5 (H) x 44 (W) x 26.25 (D). C) In front of desk: Low back chair. Designed by Wright circa 1908. Very similar to the Isabel Roberts Side Chair (1908), but shorter. The main difference is an additional horizontal trim along the base of the seat which runs along...  Continue... 0104.15.1013
C 1911-25 Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio Master (North) Bedroom (1889 - S.002) Circa 1911-1925. Looking North after 1911 renovation by Wright. The Master Bedroom looking North, shows the vault ceiling and mural painted by Orlando Giannini. "In December of 1911 he (Wright) left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine..." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. This could explain the single beds and sealed doors to the balcony. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons Photographic Company. The Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust dates this photograph circa 1911-1925. The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives, dates this photograph circa 1890-1910 and acquired their copy of the photograph in 1933. Clipping pasted to the verso: "What seems to be an Indian brave commands the space above rectangular bedroom windows", stamped "May 11, 86". Second clipping pasted to verso: "A bedroom in his Oak Park home: elegance even in the most modest spaces", stamped "Feb 9, 92"...  Continue... 0104.13.1211
1911 (Side Note) Hoquiam Library, Hoquiam, Washington.  After living in the State of Washington for over 30 years, I was surprised to find such a fine example of a prairie style building right here in my back yard.  I was even more surprised when I discovered it was built in 1911.  Originally funded by the Andrew Carnegie Foundation, (funding secured in 1910), it's on the National Register of Historic Places and is known as a rare example of the Prairie Style of Architecture found in the Pacific Northwest.  The original building was designed by the architectural firm of Claude & Starck, Madison, Wisconsin.  Louis Claude was a former associate and lifelong friend of architects Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright.  Claude & Starck's work reflects this influence.  This firm was selected by Miss Macpherson, the first Librarian.  She had previously worked in the Evansville, Wisc. Library which was also designed by them.  After additional research I was surprised to five additional libraries from the same design.  The library was formally dedicated on August 25, 1911.  In 1991, the building was enlarged and remodeled by Tonkin/Koch Architects of Seattle.  They did an excellent job of duplicating and blending the with original design.  The original frieze mold was still available through a University of Minnesota Library which houses the...  Continue... 2007.03.0207
1912
Circa 1912 Robie House exterior viewed from the Southwest. (1906 S.127) Circa 1912. Heavily airbrushed photograph, home on far left in background removed as well as tree trunks in foreground. Published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Robie House". Pipes and wire fence are visible along the West porch. Photographed by Clarence Fuermann. According to the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, the date of view is circa 1912. Original 10 x 8 silver gelatin B&W photograph. Acquired from Kelmscott Gallery. 0114.09.0612
1912 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1912. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). View of the South and East side and the garage. Hand written on verso: "By Frank Lloyd Wright. Westcott House, Springfield, Ohio, 1912. 1340 E. High Street. Present owner Roscoe Pierce, who bought house in 1927." In dating this photograph the date written on the back (1912), presents a few questions. A brief history: When Burton Westcott’s father passed away in 1907, he inherited the Westcott Carriage Co. located in Richmond, Ohio. He converted the company to the Westcott Motor Car Co. and produced the first two-seater (seen on the far right) in 1909. By 1911 they were producing a larger sedan, seen to the left of the two-seater. Around 1915, Burton moved the company from Richmond to Springfield, about 190 miles to the west. Westcott would have been driving the latest models of his vehicles, but it is difficult to date the vehicles in the photograph. Production continued until 1925, so this photograph would have been taken between 1910-1925, so most likely 1912 is correct. The Oak Park Public Library attributes this photograph to Grant Manson. Manson was born in 1904. That would have place Manson at 8 years old. So most likely Manson acquired the photograph but did not take it...  Continue... 0114.06.1011
1912 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1912. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the South. Dining Room on the left, Living Room in the center, Sitting Room on the far right, first floor. Photographed at the same time as S#114.06. Noted that the second floor "Veranda" (balcony) has been enclosed, which was not originally intended by Wright. Acquired from the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 4.75 x 2.75 B&W Print. 0114.07.1011
1913
Circa 1913
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance, Chicago, Circa 1913 (1896 - S.038). View from the Southeast of the entrance. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels with a quatrefoil design. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. The Art Institute of Chicago dates this photograph before 1914. Ida Heller, Isidore Heller’s wife, past away in 1909. Isidore Heller lived in the home a few more years, but sold it and moved in 1913. Not confirmed, but the gentleman in the photograph could be Isidore Heller. (Note lamp to the right of the entrance. Changed in later images.) Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 6 x 10 B&W photograph.  See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0120.15.0514
1913 Francis W. Little House Living Room 1913.  “200B. Francis W. Little House, ‘Northome’ R.F.D. 3, Wayzata, Minn. 1913 - Living Room.”  Photographic copy of Plate 200b, “In The Nature of Material” Hitchcock, 1942.  Verso label: “The Living Room from the Francis Little House, Wayzata, Minn. 1912-1914.  Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  The Emily C. Chadbourne Bequest.  Photo by Hollis, courtesy Henry-Russell Hitchcock.”  8 x 10 silver gelatin photo. 0120.03.0207
1914
C 1914 Harry S. Adams Residence (1913 - S.179) Circa 1914. Wright’s first proposal was more extensive than the finished project, and was dated September 4, 1912. Wright’s second proposal was dated May 31, 1913. Both were rejected as too elaborate, and the third scaled down proposal was one of Wright’s last prairie homes to be completed. 710 Augusta Blvd., Oak Park. Viewed from across the street. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Original 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 0124.16.0112
C 1914-15 Mrs. Lydia Avery Coonley Ward. The Mother of Wright client Avery Coonley (1907 - S.135) Circa 1914-15. Lydia Avery Coonley was born in Virginia on Jan 31, 1845 to Benjamin Franklin and Susan Look Avery. Lydia Avery Coonley became a writer, publishing many poems. One poem entitled "Indian Summer", was published in the Nov 3, 1894 "The Outlook". She compiled a number of poems and published "Singing Verses for Children". She was also the author of "Under The Pines and Other Verses", published in 1895 by another client of Wright’s, Chauncey Williams, of Way & Williams. She also wrote and published "Washington and Lincoln". She was active in the women’s movement, and was president of the Chicago Women’s Club from 1895-1896. On March 18, 1897, Lydia Avery Coonley, a wealthy Chicago widow, married Naturalist Henry Augustus Ward. Original 3 x 4.25 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the New York Public Library. 0124.15.0112
1914 Wright at 47. Circa 1914. Portrait of Wright facing slightly to the left. This was taken about the time he was completing Midway Gardens. Published in "An Autobiography, Frank Lloyd Wright", page 192a. 4.6 x 7 Print, High res digital image. 0124.09.0709
1914 Midway Garden Sprite.  Chicago Architectural Photographing Company, Chicago.  Original gelatin silver photograph printed by photographer Clarence Fuermann (1883-1983).  Printed in the early 1960s from the original negative (1913-14).  Clarence Fuermann of Henry Fuermann and Sons.  The original image was published in “The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright” 1925, page 76, center.  8 x 10. For more information see our Midway Gardens Study. 1407.01.0406
Circa 1914 Midway Garden (1913 - S.180) Male Sprite 1913-14. Male sprite holding a geometric dodecahedron, in the Northeast corner of the Winter Garden. This sculpture appeared only once in the Midway Gardens. In the May, 1915 issue of "The International Studio" the caption read "Sprites designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, executed by Alfonso Iannelli". A dispute arose between Iannelli and Wright as to who designed the sculptures. Published in "Life Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright", 1925, page 77. Original 4 x 10.5 B&W photograph. Photographed by Clarence Fuermann. 0124.17.0712
Circa 1914 Midway Garden (1913 - S.180) Female Sprite 1913-14. Female Sprite holding triangle in the Northwest corner of the Winter Garden. This sculpture appeared only once in the Midway Gardens. In the May, 1915 issue of "The International Studio" the caption read "Sprites designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, executed by Alfonso Iannelli". A dispute arose between Iannelli and Wright as to who designed the sculptures. Published in "The International Studio", May, 1915, page LXXXI. Original 4 x 10.5 B&W photograph. Photographed by Clarence Fuermann. 0124.18.0712
Circa 1914 Midway Garden (1913 - S.180) Female Sprite 1913-14. Female sprite holding a sphere, in the Southeast corner of the Winter Garden. This sculpture appeared only once in the Midway Gardens. In the May, 1915 issue of "The International Studio" the caption read "Sprites designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, executed by Alfonso Iannelli". A dispute arose between Iannelli and Wright as to who designed the sculptures. Original 4 x 10.5 B&W photograph. Photographed by Clarence Fuermann. 0124.19.0712
1914 Midway Gardens Summer Garden 1914. Photographed by Henry Fuermann & Sons in September 1914. The Southeast corner of the interior, viewed from the North Terrace looking out over the Summer Garden. The Winter Garden on the left, the South Belvedere is in the center, and the South Arcade is on the right. Vases, Totem poles and Light Tree are visible in the foreground. Label pasted to verso: "Photo caption: Nostalgia buffs will get a glimpse of the past at the flower show where ‘Memories of Midway Gardens’ has been recreated by the Chicago School of Architecture Foundation. This unique entertainment complex was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1914 and located near the University of Chicago. The original Midway Gardens (pictured here) was a center for good entertainment, food and music and was designed by Wright as a synthesis of architecture, sculpture and painting. The mini-Midway gardens at the Flower Show was designed by Joe Karr and Associates who designed the courtyard garden at Glessner House, home of the Chicago School of Architecture Foundation, 1800 S. Prairie Avenue." Stamped on verso: Mar 29 1973". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0124.14.1211
1914 Midway Garden Entrance (1914).  Chicago Architectural Photographing Company, photographer Clarence Fuermann (1883-1983), Chicago, (Note: "Domino's Collection" page 152;  "In The Nature of Materials", page xvi, no. 194).  Purchased from "The Architectural Forum". Note on back indicates it was used by Arthur Drexler - MOMA. This image published in “Frank Lloyd Wright: Writings and Buildings” 1960, Edgar Kaufmann and Ben Raeburn, page 120.  “Frank Lloyd Wright and Midway Gardens” 1998, Paul Kruty, page g. "Frank Lloyd Wright: Preserving an Architectural Heritage, Domino’s Collection" David A. Hanks, page 89.  8 x 10. For more information see our Midway Gardens Study. 1407.02.0706
1914 Midway Gardens 1914. Photographed by Henry Fuermann & Sons in 1914. Cottage Grove Avenue viewed from the Northeast. The Winter Garden to the left side of this image, the Tavern is on the right. Both towers are prominent above the Winter Garden. Patterned concrete blocks, Two Queen of the Gardens and three Sprite statues are visible. Caption on face: "The Chicago Architectural Photographing Co. Midway Gardens, Cottage Grove Avenue at 60th Street, Chicago, Illinois, 1914. Demolished." Stamped on verso: "Field Enterprises, Inc. Oct 1968." published in “Frank Lloyd Wright: Writings and Buildings” 1960, Edgar Kaufmann and Ben Raeburn, page 120.  “Frank Lloyd Wright and Midway Gardens” 1998, Paul Kruty, page g. "Frank Lloyd Wright: Preserving an Architectural Heritage, Domino’s Collection" David A. Hanks, page 89. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. For more information see our Midway Gardens Study. 0124.12.0911
1914 Exotic Dancers, Midway Gardens 1914.  Photographed by Collins (emboss on verso of board).  Possibly a publicity photograph or souvenir a that could be purchased as a keepsake, 4.75 x 3.6, mounted to decorative board 6.76 x 5.8.  Photograph 4.75 x 3.6. For more information see our Midway Gardens Study. 0124.03.0407
1914 Puppet Theater 1914. The Puppet Theater was displayed at an exhibition of Wright’s work entitled "The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright" at The Art Institute of Chicago in 1914. The Puppet Theater was designed in 1908 for his son Llewellyn. The engraved masque reads, "To Fashion Worlds in Little - Making Form As God Does One With Spirit - So God Makes Use Of Poets", an adaptation of a passage from Richard Harvey's "Taliesin". This quote was used three years before Wright began building Taliesin I in 1911. Also visible in the photograph is a Coonley Playhouse window (1912 - S.1912) and three Print Stands. The shorter version seen on the left behind the Puppet Theater and the taller version seen on the right. A smaller desk top Print Stand can be seen in the center. 7.75 x 10 B&W print. Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0124.13.1211
1915
C 1915 Avery Coonley Playhouse (1912 - S.174) interior, circa 1915. View of the interior from the East end toward the Fireplace. In 1906, Mrs. Coonley formed the Cottage School in Riverside, Illinois, a private independent school. In 1912, Wright designed the Coonley Playhouse to accommodate the growth of the Cottage School. The Fireplace and Stage are in the background. The Kitchen is through the folding doors on the left. The Workshop is through the folding doors on the right. Wright designed art glass decorate the clerestory windows. Wright designed tables and chairs fill the Assembly area. Photographed by Henry Feurmann. Original 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0128.13.0613
C 1915-1920 Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Front exterior viewed from the street, looking South circa 1915-1920. As you entered the sidewalk on the left, you passed the Garden Wall with it's pedestal that begged for a urn. A large prairie styled Robie House urn would have fit perfectly. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door. The Reception Room is on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room is in the center foreground with art glass doors that exit out to an enclosed Terrace. The symmetrical Garden Wall on the far right. Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) above the Reception Room was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. The Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0128.11.0612
C 1915-20 Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Package.  Package of 10 Genuine Photographs, Lake Geneva, Wis.  One photo of Hotel Geneva (1.75 x 2.75").  Grogan Photo Systems, Inc. 0104.03.0602
C 1915-20 Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Package.  Package of 10 Genuine Photographs, Lake Geneva, Wis.  One photo of Hotel Geneva (1.75 x 2.75").  Grogan Photo Systems, Inc. 0104.04.0307
1915 Larkin Building. Darwin D. Martin's desk designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in the Larkin Administration Building (1905) atrium, Buffalo, New York, August 3, 1915 (Martin was CEO of Larkin).  It shows Martin's desk on his return from a family vacation to Yosemite.  The "Welcome Home" flowers are in a Rookwood(?) vase.  In the early 1980s the Kelmscott Gallery acquired this photograph from the estate of Darwin. D. Martin.  It beautifully illustrates Wright's concept of a common workspace for executives and employees.  The desk by Van Dorn Iron Works Company had "drawers of various sizes and designed to provide space for specific forms and papers".  The chair is designed with painted steel and an oak seat. The photograph is so clear that “Tuesday August 3" is visible on a number of desk calendars.  According to the Graycliff Conservatory, Inc., Scott Elliott (Kelmscott Gallery) donated an impressive collection of historic photographs of the Darwin D. Martin family, including a photo album and journal of the Martin family's cross country trip to California including Yosemite National Park in 1915.  The Larkin Company was a mail-order house that sold soap and other household products.  The building was demolished between February and July 1950.  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Larkin Building, Myth and Fact" Quinan, 1989, page 50.  Original silver gelatin 1915 photograph.  Photographer unknown.  7.5 x 7.75. 0128.02.0107
1915 Dining Room, Taliesin II, 1915. Taken at the same time as a photograph published in "Architectural Record", October, 1915. This was taken after rebuilding from the fire of August 15, 1914, but before August, in time to go to production for publishing in October, 1915. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons, most likely in July or August, 1915. Dated incorrectly, but courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0128.09.1211
1916
1916
Robie House Entrance Hall, Lower Level (1906 - S.127) 1916. Looking Southeast. A Wright designed entry table is on the left, a high back chair is on the right. Laid across the Wright designed entry table is a runner designed by Wright with the pattern from the leaded glass windows. A Winged Victory Statue, a Wright favorite, sits atop the runner. The leaded glass doors in the center lead to the Playroom. The stairs lead up to the main level. The Oak straight back chair seat and back is upholstered with leather. The back legs have square feet and caps. The carpets were also designed by Wright. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0132.16.1015
1916 Robie House, Wilbers seated in Living Room (1906 - S.127) 1916. Seated on the left, Mrs. Isadora Wilber and Jeannette, seated on the right, Mr. Marshall D. Wilber. Stamped on Verso: Feb 1963, Field Enterprises, Inc. Hand written: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Mr. & Mrs. Marshall D. Wilber and daughter Jeannette (age 10). The second (third) owners of Robie House. Photo taken 1916." Robie sold the house in December 1911 to David Lee Taylor. Taylor died in October, 1912 and his wide sold the Robie House to Marshall Dodge Wilber in November 1912. "...the Wilbers loved the place and preserved everything as it was originally built. Commenting on the occasion when he accompanied the older Wright to dinner, he continued: "The old brown-stained furniture and woodwork was cleaned and polished. The soft autumn shade on the sand-finished wall panels had been maintained. The special light fixtures and leaded glass windows were clear and bright.. After we left, Dad said to me: 'You see John, that's an example of a house that has character, it grows more valuable as it grows older."' John Lloyd Wright, biography page 148. Wilber sold the house to the Chicago Theological Seminary on June 9, 1926. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 65. 7.25 x 5.75 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 0132.08.0410
1916 Robie House, Wilbers seated in Living Room (1906 - S.127) 1916. Stamped on Verso: Feb 1963, Field Enterprises, inc. Hand written: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Mr. & Mrs. Marshall D. Wilber and daughter Jeannette, age 10. 2nd (3rd) owners of Robie House - 1916." Robie sold the house in December 1911 to David Lee Taylor. Taylor died in October, 1912 and his wide sold the Robie House to Marshall Dodge Wilber in November 1912. "...the Wilbers loved the place and preserved everything as it was originally built. Commenting on the occasion when he accompanied the older Wright to dinner, he continued: "The old brown-stained furniture and woodwork was cleaned and polished. The soft autumn shade on the sand-finished wall panels had been maintained. The special light fixtures and leaded glass windows were clear and bright.. After we left, Dad said to me: 'You see John, that's an example of a house that has character, it grows more valuable as it grows older."' John Lloyd Wright, biography page 148. Wilber sold the house to the Chicago Theological Seminary on June 9, 1926. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 silver gelatin photograph. Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House”, Hoffmann 1984, page 71. 0132.05.0310
1916 Robie House, Mrs. Wilber poses in the Living Room (1906 - S.127) 1916. Hand written on verso: "Mrs. Marshall D. Wilber, wife of second (third) owner of Robie House, shown in house in 1916." Stamped on verso: "Sun Times, Jan 5 1963". Clipping on verso: "In 1916, the wife of the second owner of Robie House, Mrs. Marshall D. Wilber, posed in the home’s living room." 5.75 x 7.25 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 0132.09.0410
1916 Robie House.  View from the Dining Room and South Aisle, toward the Living Room, 1916. Original Dining Room Table. Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House”, Hoffmann 1984, page 74, “The Robie House of Frank Lloyd Wright”, Connors 1984, page 31. Photographed by Clarence Fuermann. 1) Photograph printed circa mid 1960s on Agfa paper.  Verso: “The Office of Public Relations, The University of Chicago”. Original silver gelatin photograph. 10 x 8.  2) Original silver gelatin photograph. 10 x 8. Acquired from Kelmscott Gallery. Two copies. 0132.04.0707 0132.13.0612
1916 Robie House, Dining Room (1906 - S.127) 1916. Stamped on Verso: Feb 1963, Field Enterprises, Inc. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 71, "The Robie House of Frank Lloyd Wright", Connors 1984, page 33. Original 10 x 8 silver gelatin photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 0132.06.0310
1916 Robie House Dining Room (1906 - S.127). View of the Dining Room looking Southeast, 1916. Built-in cabinetry on the left, dining table and chairs on the right. The Kitchen is through the doorway on the left. The dining alcove can be seen in the background. This photograph was taken at the same time as S#132.06. Stamped on verso: "Feb 4, 1963". Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 77. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original B&W 10 x 8 silver gelatin photograph. 0132.12.1211
1916 Robie House, Jeannette Wilber standing in Hall (1906 - S.127) 1916. Stamped on Verso: Feb 1963, Field Enterprises, Inc. Hand written: "Frank Lloyd Wright Robie House. Mrs. Jeannette Wilber Scofield shown in Robie House, 5757 S. Woodlawn, at age of 10, as Jeannette Wilber, photo made in 1916." Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 62. 7.25 x 5.75 Print, High Res image. From the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 0132.07.0410
1916
Robie House, Hallway, main level (1906 S.127) 1916. Looking west, built-ins are to the left and right. The Living Room is in the background through the opening. The Guest Room is on the right. Three side chairs are visible in this photograph as well as others dated 1910 and 1916. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0132.18.1013
1916 Robie House, Jeannette in Rumpus Room (1906 - S.127) 1916. Caption on Verso: "Early-Day Rumpus Room. Among dozens of innovations introduced by Frank Lloyd Wright is his Robie House, which he completed in Chicago in 1909 was this ground level family room, forerunner of today’s rumpus room. Playing with doll house (left) is Jeanette Wilber, whose family was third to occupy dwelling. Now Mrs. Jeanette Wilber Scofield, of Riverdale, California., she remembers it as a ‘beautiful house.’ Associated Press Photo, 2/6/63." Stamped on verso: "Feb 8 - 1963". Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 56. Original 9 x 7 Print. Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. 0132.10.0511
1916 Robie House, Jeannette Wilber in Bedroom (1906 - S.127) 1916. Jeanette Wilber’s family was the third to occupy the Robie House. Stamped on verso: "Feb 4 1963". Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 87. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 0132.11.0811
1916
Robie House Guest Bedroom (1906 - S.127) 1916. The Guest Bedroom is on the main level, north side of the home. The image is looking West, the Living Room windows can be seen through the windows on the left. A Wright designed slant back chair can be seen is on the left, a matching slant back rocker is in the center. Two pieces of the Wright designed bedroom furniture are visible, the bed, bottom left, and the dresser on the right. The detail of the dresser and bed frame match the details of the chair in the 1910 and 1916 entryway photographs. The Side Chair in the foreground on the right has been identified as a Wright design by the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. Donald Hoffman also identifies it as a Wright design on page 81 "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", and is visible on page 65, top (1910) which was also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, and page 63 (1916). The small table in the background on the left is not a Wright design. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Original 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. Wright Chairs. 0132.17.1013
1917
1917
Henry J. Allen drawings for Dining Room Table and chairs 1917 (1916 - S.205). "Furniture Details - Henry J. Allen Residence. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Plan for Dining Room Table: 8' 0" x 3' 6". Plan for Chair 18" x 18". Allen was a Governor of Kansas and editor of the Wichita Beacon. Designed in 1916, the Allens moved into the home in 1918 and continued to live in the home until 1947. Frank Lloyd Wright considered the Allen Residence ‘among my best,’ and is considered the last of the Prairie Houses. Courtesy of the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. 10 x 8 Color photograph. 0138.07.0314
1917
Henry J. Allen drawings for the Dining Room Light Standard 1917 (1916 - S.205). "Henry J. Allen Residence. Frank Lloyd. Dining Room Light Standard " . Allen was a Governor of Kansas and editor of the Wichita Beacon. Designed in 1916, the Allens moved into the home in 1918 and continued to live in the home until 1947. Frank Lloyd Wright considered the Allen Residence ‘among my best,’ and is considered the last of the Prairie Houses. Courtesy of the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. 6 x 10 Color photograph. 0138.08.0314
Circa 1917 Dining Room, Taliesin II, circa 1917-19. This photograph was first published in "The Nature of Materials: 1887 - 1941, The Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright" Hitchcock, 1942, plate 177. Hitchcock mistakenly dates this photograph at 1911 (pg xvi). One of the many items in the photograph is an Imperial Hotel Coffee Service. Very similar to a photograph published in "Architectural Record", October 1915, page 395, which was the very first published interior of Taliesin II. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1907-1913 Volume 3" ill 275 and dated 1911. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. 10 x 8 B&W Photograph. For further information see our Wright study on: Imperial Hotel Monogram, Japanese Print Stand. 0138.04.1209
Circa 1917 Living Room, Taliesin II, circa 1917-19. Taken around the same time as a photograph of the Dining Room published in "Architectural Record", October 1915, page 395, which was the very first published interior of Taliesin II. Also published in "Wright Studies, Taliesin 1911-1914", Menocal, 1992, page 111, and dated circa 1915. Possibly photographed by Henry Fuermann. 10 x 7.25 B&W Photograph. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand. 0138.05.1211
1918
1918 “Independence Day Dance. The Midway Garden.  Music By Kelton’s Music Makers. Wed., July 3"  In July of 1916 the name was changed to “Edelweiss Gardens” but in this poster it is still called “Midway Garden”.  It was referred to by “Midway Garden” (singular).  2.75 x 4.5. 0139.03.0407
1919
1919 Wright at 52. Portrait of Wright facing slightly to the left. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1914-1923 Volume 4", Pfeiffer, Futagawa, 1990, page 2. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 8 x 10 Print, High res digital image. 0141.02.0709
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