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Wright Studies

Loren B. Pope Residence, Falls Church, Virginia (1939 - S.268)

 
  Drawings (1964)    Floor Plan    Photographs (1964)    Photographs (1969) 
 
Loren B. Pope Residence Drawings HABS (1964)
 
Set of nine drawings of the Pope-Leighey House by the National Park Service for the Historic American Building Survey (HABS) 1964. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. An example of Wright's "Usonian House," the structure, in danger of demolition in 1965 for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County, was saved, moved and   restored by Mrs. Robert A. Leighey, The National Trust for Historic Preservation and The National Park Service. This important American Architectural Monument was relocated at Woodlawn Plantation, near Mount Vernon. All drawings courtesy of The Library of Congress. (Sweeney 2092)
 
1) Pope-Leighey House, Plot Plan, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 1 of 9, 1964. "Usonian House." Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. An example of Wright's "Usonian House," the structure, in danger of demolition in 1965 for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County, was saved, moved and restored by Mrs. Robert A. Leighey, The National Trust for Historic Preservation and The National Park Service. This important American Architectural Monument was relocated at Woodlawn Plantation, near Mount Vernon. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-1)
 
2) Pope-Leighey House, Floor Plan, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 2 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-2)
 
2A) Detail of the Floor Plan, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 2 of 9, 1964.
 
3) Pope-Leighey House, East Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 3 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-3)
 
3A) Detail of the East Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 3 of 9, 1964.
 
4) Pope-Leighey House, South Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 4 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-4)
 
4A) Detail of the South Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 4 of 9, 1964.
 
5) Pope-Leighey House, West Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 5 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-5)
 
5A) Detail of the West Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 5 of 9, 1964.
 
6) Pope-Leighey House, North Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 6 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-6)
 
6A) Detail of the North Elevation, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 6 of 9, 1964.
 
7) Pope-Leighey House, Cross Section A-A, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 7 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-7)
 
7A) Detail of Cross Section A-A, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 7 of 9, 1964.
 
8) Pope-Leighey House, Cross Section B-B, C-C, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 8 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-8)
 
8A) Detail of Cross Section B-B, C-C, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 8 of 9, 1964.
 
9) Pope-Leighey House, Cross Section Details, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 9 of 9, 1964. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#1596.52.0715-9)
 
9A) Cross Section Details, Mount Vernon Vicinity, Virginia, Sheet 9 of 9, 1964.
 
 
 
Floor Plan
 
 
 
 
Loren B. Pope Residence Photographs (1964)
 
Set of fifteen photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, 1964. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. Mr. And Mrs. Robert A. Leighey purchased the home in 1946. In December 1963 Mrs. Leighey was notified that her home was in danger of demolition for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County. In July 1964, she signed an agreement with the National Trust to save the home. Dismantling of the home began in the fall of 1964, reconstruction was completed in June 1965. She resumed residency of the home in July 1969.
       There are many stereotypical Usonian details designed into the Pope Residence. It was constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass. Natural unfinished cypress siding runs
  horizontally. The cantilevered carport extends out over the Entrance to the home. Perforated Light Screens allow soft light into the home, and add a measure of privacy. Wright designed three cantilevered trellised roofs, at the end of the Living Room, the end of the Children's Bedroom, and the Dining Room. Wright mimicked the trellised roof just above the stairs that lead down to the interior Living Room. Of interest is the missing trellis at the end of the Living Room. It was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was rebuilt and modified, but not to original specifications. It was added back during the first reconstruction in 1965.
       Photographed by Jack E. Boucher at the original site before the home was dismantled and moved. All photographs courtesy of The Library of Congress.
 
1) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the South, of the Southwest elevation. The Carport is in the foreground. The Gallery and two bedrooms are on the far left, the Entrance is in the shadow in the center. The Sanctum (Office) is to the right of the Entrance, the Kitchen and Living Room are on the far right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-1)
 
2) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the South, of the Carport and Entrance. The Carport is in the foreground. The Gallery and two bedrooms are in the background, the Sanctum is on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-2)
 
2A) Detail of the Carport and Entrance.
 
3) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Southwest, of the Entrance. Detail of the cantilevered carport overhang and the entrance. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-3)
 
3A) Detail of the cantilevered carport overhang and the entrance.
 
4) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Southeast. Detail of the Gallery wall and the Perforated Light Screens. All exterior wood is left unfinished. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-4)
 
5) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Northwest. Detail of the cantilevered carport overhang. The Gallery wall is on the left. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-5)
 
5A) Detail of the cantilevered carport overhang.
 
6) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Northwest. The Children's room is in the center, the Gallery is on the far right. The trellised roof cantilevers out past the end of the house. Perforated Light Screens are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. All exterior wood is left unfinished. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-6)
 
6A) Detail of the cantilevered trellised roof.
 
6B) Detail of the Perforated Light Screens, turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. All exterior wood is left unfinished.
 
7) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Northwest. Detail of the trellised roof and Perforated Light Screens. They are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-7)
 
8) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the North. The Living Room is on the far left. Floor to ceiling doors open outward from the Dining Room. Two doors form the Northern corner of the Dining Room, and open outward, eliminating the corner. Two bedrooms are on the right. Note: The original Living Room's cantilevered trellised roof extending past the end of the Living Room, was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was rebuilt and modified, but not to original specifications. It was added back during the first reconstruction in 1965. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-8)
 
8B) Detail of the Living Room roof. Note: The original Living Room's cantilevered trellised roof extending past the end of the Living Room, was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was rebuilt and modified, but not to original specifications. It was added back during the first reconstruction in 1965.
 
8B) Detail of the floor to ceiling doors which open outward from the Dining Room. Two doors form the Northern corner of the Dining Room, and open outward, eliminating the corner. The trellised roof extends past the dining room.
 
9) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the Northeast. Floor to ceiling Perforated Light Screens cover this wall in the Living Room. The doors of the Living Room are in the center, and open outward. Two bedrooms are on the right. The trellised roof extends past the dining room. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-9)
 
9B) Detail of the trellised roof which extends past the dining room.
 
10) Pope-Leighey House 1964, viewed from the South. The Sanctum (office) is on the left, the Kitchen is in the center, the Living Room is on the right. Three sets of doors open outward in the Living Room. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-10)
 
11) Pope-Leighey House 1964, interior view of the hall leading to the Living Room. Bedrooms are to the left, the Kitchen is on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-11)
 
12) Pope-Leighey House 1964, interior view of the Living Room from the entrance hall. The Dining Room is on the far left, built-in shelving on the Northeast wall of the Living Room. Three sets of doors on the right open outward. Perforated Light Screens create patterns and add soft light to the interior. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-12)
 
12A) Detail of the Living Room from the entrance hall. Three sets of doors on the right open outward. Perforated Light Screens create patterns and add soft light to the interior.
 
12B) Detail of the tables in the Living Room.
 
12C) Detail of the Wright designed chairs in the Dining and Living Rooms.
 
13) Pope-Leighey House 1964, interior view of the Northern corner of the Living Room. Perforated Light Screens create patterns and add soft light to the interior. Built-in shelving is on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-13)
 
14) Pope-Leighey House 1964, interior view of the Living Room, looking toward the Entrance. Three sets of doors open outward on the left. The Entrance is in the background in the center, to the right of the Fireplace. The Dining Room is on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-14)
 
14A) Detail of the interior view of the Living Room, looking toward the Entrance. Three sets of doors open outward on the left. The Entrance is in the background in the center, to the right of the Fireplace. The Dining Room is on the right. Wright mimicked the trellised roof just above the stairs that lead down to the Living Room.
 
14B) Detail of the Fireplace.
 
14C) Detail of the Dining Room. Wright designed the table and chairs.
 
15) Pope-Leighey House 1964, interior view of the Dining Room. Floor to ceiling doors open outward from the Dining Room. Two doors form the Northern corner of the Dining Room, and open outward, eliminating the corner. Wright designed dining table and chairs are on the left. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1596.53.0715-15)
 
 
 
Loren B. Pope Residence Photographs (1969)
 
Set of twelve photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, 1969. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. Mr. And Mrs. Robert A. Leighey purchased the home in 1946. In December 1963 Mrs. Leighey was notified that her home was in danger of demolition for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County. In July 1964, she signed an agreement with the National Trust to save the home. Dismantling of the home began in the fall of 1964, reconstruction was completed in June 1965. She resumed residency of the home in July 1969.
       There are many stereotypical Usonian details designed into the Pope Residence. It was constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass. Natural unfinished cypress siding runs horizontally. The cantilevered carport extends out over the Entrance to the home. Perforated Light Screens allow soft light into the home, and add a measure of privacy. Wright designed three cantilevered trellised roofs, at the end of the Living Room,
  the end of the Children's Bedroom, and the Dining Room. Wright mimicked the trellised roof just above the stairs that lead down to the interior Living Room.
       Interior walls used "sandwich-wall" construction. The core was a vertical sheets of one-inch thick plywood. On either side was a layer of roofing felt. Over that, Wright ran 11.5-inch-wide horizontal cypress boards and 2-inch battens screwed onto both sides.
       The horizontal lines of the brick walls are scraped, vertical lines were flush with the face, creating a horizontal look.
       Of interest is the missing trellis at the end of the Living Room. It was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was rebuilt and modified, but not to original specifications. It was added back during the first reconstruction in 1965.
       Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. All photographs courtesy of The Library of Congress.
 
1) Pope-Leighey House 1969, viewed from the Northwest. Two bedrooms are on the left, the Entrance and Carport are in the center, the Sanctum (Office) is on the right. It is constructed of brick, unfinished cypress and glass. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-1)
 
1A) Detail of the view from the Northwest. Two bedrooms are on the left, the Entrance and Carport are in the center, the Sanctum (Office) is on the right.
 
2) Pope-Leighey House 1969, viewed from the Northwest. The Gallery is on the left, the Entrance and Carport are in the center, the Sanctum is on the right. Natural unfinished cypress siding runs horizontally. The cantilevered carport extends out over the Entrance to the home. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-2)
 
2A) Detail of the Entrance and Carport. Natural unfinished cypress siding runs horizontally. The cantilevered carport extends out over the Entrance to the home.
 
2B) Detail of the Perforated Light Screens. Hung from the top by a piano hinge.
 
3) Pope-Leighey House 1969, viewed from the Northwest. The Gallery is on the left, the Entrance and Carport are in the center, the Sanctum is on the right. Natural unfinished cypress siding runs horizontally. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress.  (S#1803.15.0715-3)
 
.
4) Pope-Leighey House 1969, viewed from the North. The Living Room is on the far left, the Children's Bedroom is in the foreground, the Carport is on the right. Perforated Light Screens are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. A built-in planter is on the Eastern corner of the Children's Bedroom. The trellised roof cantilevers out past the end of the house. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-4)
 
4A) Detail of the extended trellised roof. It was destroyed by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. It was rebuilt and modified, but not to original specifications. It was added back during the first reconstruction in 1965.
 
4B) Detail of the built-in planter.
 
5) Pope-Leighey House 1969, viewed from the Northeast. The Dining Room is on the left, the two Bedrooms are on the right. Perforated Light Screens are turned 90 degrees and attached like window shutters. A built-in planter is on the Eastern corner of the Children's Bedroom. Four windows on the Southeast side of the Children's Bedroom open outward. The two windows forming the corner also open outward, eliminating the corner. Doors and windows are attached with piano hinges. The trellised roof cantilevers out past the end of the house. All exterior wood is left unfinished. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-5)
 
5A) Detail of the Perforated Light Screens and trellised roof.
 
5B) Detail of the trellised roof.
6
6) Pope-Leighey House 1969, interior view of the Living and Dining Rooms. The Living Room is on the left, the Fireplace in the center, the Dining Room is on the right. The Kitchen can be seen in the background behind the Dining Room table. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-6)
 
6A) Detail of the Living Room fireplace
 
6B) Detail of the Dining Room table and chairs.
 
7) Pope-Leighey House 1969, detail of Fireplace looking toward the Dining Rooms. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-7)
 
8) Pope-Leighey House 1969, interior view of the Kitchen. One of the smaller rooms in the home, Wright enlarged the space by raising the ceiling. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-8)
 
9) Pope-Leighey House 1969, interior view of the Master Bedroom from the doorway. The Gallery is on the left, windows open outward on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-9)
 
10) Pope-Leighey House 1969, interior view of the Gallery and Children's Room doorway. The Master Bedroom is on the right. Note the Perforated Light Screens on the left and right side of the Gallery. The left open to the outside, the right to the Master Bedroom. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-10)
 
11) Pope-Leighey House 1969, interior view of the Sanctum (Office), which is just to the right of the Entrance. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-11)
 
12) Pope-Leighey House 1969, detail of the recessed lighting fixture near the Entrance. The Sanctum is on the right. Photographed by Jack E. Boucher after after the house was dismantled, moved reconstruction. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. (S#1803.15.0715-12)
 
12A) Detail of the brickwork. Horizontal lines are scraped, vertical lines are flush with the face, creating a horizontal look.
 
12B) Detail of the interior wood walls. Wright designed the interior walls as "sandwich-wall" construction. The core was a vertical sheets of one-inch thick plywood. On either side was a layer of roofing felt. Over that, Wright ran 11.5-inch-wide horizontal cypress boards and 2-inch battens screwed onto both sides.
 
 
 

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