ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Weed Holder and Copper Urn
 
  Weed Holder    Copper Urn 
 
Copper "Weed Holder" Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright
 
Wright began experimenting with variations for designs of Weed Holders and Urns as early as 1894, "Monograph 1887-1901" Pfeiffer, 1991, pages 60-61. John Lloyd right wrote "Not satisfied with the bric-a-brac of the day, Father designed his own. The copper weed-holders pictured to the right and left of the chair are his early creations. Father liked weeds!" "My Father Who is on Earth", 1946, page 24. Examples of the Weed Holder are not as plentiful as those of the Copper Urn.
      It was one of Wright's favorite objects. He included it in a number of drawings and projects he worked on, including the Husser house, his own Home and Studio, the Dana house
  and Browne's Bookstore. By 1925, one was photographed in the Taliesin III Living Room, "Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 273.
      In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. While Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates; A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI (36); B) Coonley Plate LVI (56); and C) Coonley Plate LVIb (56b), Wright included the Weed holder in just the first Plate, the Bowne's Bookstore.
 
  Husser    Wright Home & Studio    Dana    Browne's    Stromquist 
  2001 Pewter 
 
Weed Holder. This original Weed Holder was sold at Christies Auction on December 10, 1998 for $20,700. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, executed by James A. Miller and Brother. According to author Davis A. Hanks, this copper 'weed holder' was probably designed subsequent to Frank Lloyd Wright establishing an independent practice in 1893. Its first documented appearance is in a circa1900 photograph, taken in the architect's Oak Park home. This "individual flower holder" became a familiar decorative object in his own residence and those of his clients. 29" tall. Photograph courtesy Christies.
 
Weed Holder, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Dated by Museum 1890-1900. 29.125 x 4.125 x 4.125". Photograph courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art.
 
 
 
Joseph and Helen Husser Residence, Chicago (1899 - S.046)
1) There are no records to indicate that the Copper Urn and Candlesticks were produced for the Husser Residence, but they are evident in this illustration published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
2) Detail of the Copper Urn and Candlesticks illustrated in the Husser Residence. Return to Husser Study.
Wright Home and Studio
1: Wright's Studio, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Copper Urn on far left, Weed Holder is on the far right. Published in Inland Architect, Volume XXXV, April 1900 (S.40), and also published in the "Chicago Architectural Club" 1900, p77.
2: Wright's Octagonal Studio Library, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Copper Urn is on the left, Weed Holder is in the center. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p64.
3: Wright Weed Holders, Studio Chair with Richard Bock Sculpture in Oak Park Studio. Possibly staged by Wright. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p65. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, page 98. Chair was from Wright's Studio, see image below (4).
4: Wright's Octagonal Studio Library, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Note chairs in background (left, center and right). One was used in the photograph with two Weed Holders above (3). Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p65.
 
Dana Residence, Chicago (1902 - S.072)
1a: Dana House Dining Room. Weed Holder center right. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, page 36.
 
1b: Detail of the Dana House Dining Room. Weed Holder center right.
 
2a: Dana House Entrance Hall. Weed Holder in center.
 
2b: Detail of the Dana House Entrance Hall. Weed Holder in center.
 
 
 
Browne's Bookstore, Chicago (1908 - S.141)
1a: Exterior view of Browne's Bookstore entry from hallway, 1908. Two Weed Holders can be seen inside the glass case. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911.
Int2
1b: Detail of Browne's Bookstore entry from hallway. Two Weed Holders can be seen inside the glass case, left and right.
 
2a: Wasmuth Plate XXXVI (36) “Exposition building, containing an exhibition-room and lecture-room for the Larkin Co. at the Jamestown Exhibition; and the interior of the Browne’s Book-Store. A long narrow room in a down-town building converted into a book-store. The walls and ceiling were re-formed, and alcoves with chairs and tables provided for the convenience of customers.” In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. The Copper Weed Holder is right of center.15.75 x 25.25.
 
2b: Detail of Plate XXXVI (36). There were a total of five identical coves, this being the last one on the right. Two decorative items of note in this illustration. The tall weed holder  and copper urn. While Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates; A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI; B) Coonley Plate LVI; and C) Coonley Plate LVIb, Wright included the Weed holder in just the first Plate, the Bowne's Bookstore.
 
2c: Detail of Plate XXXVI (36). The tall weed holder is on the left, the copper urn on the right.
 
 
 

Donald M. and Jane Stromquist Residence (1958 - S.429)

The original Wright designed dining room table built by Donald over forty years earlier, was "pressed into service" again in 2000. Reproduction of a Wright designed copper weed holder is sitting on the table. Return to Stromquist Study.
 
 
 
Weed Holder: Pewter 2001
Pewter with Satin Finish, 2001. Frank Lloyd Wright began experimenting with variations for designs of Weed Holders and Urns as early as 1894, "Monograph 1887-1901" Pfeiffer, 1991, pages 60-61. This is a half scale version of the original copper weed holder (14.5 inches tall, base is 2 inches wide).
 
 
 
"Copper Urn" Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright
 
Wright began experimenting with variations of the design for the Urn as early as 1894, and the design of the first designed this copper urn in the late 1890's, "Monograph 1887-1901" Pfeiffer, 1991, pages 60-61. It was one of Wright's favorite objects. He included it in a number of drawings and projects he worked on, including those for the Husser house, Edward C. Waller house, Wright's own Home and Studio, the Dana house, the Coonley house, Browne's Bookstore and appeared in an early image of Unity Temple. Eighteen inches tall, and according to Hanks, "Decorative Designs" 1979, p70-1, it was executed by James   A. Miller and Brother.
      In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates. A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI (36). B) Coonley Plate LVI (56). C) Coonley Plate LVIb (56b).
      The copper urn appears in two drawings "Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture" Kauffmann, 1959. It included in an illustration for the Dana House, page 206 and as a single object, page 238.
 
  McArthur    Husser    Waller    Wright Home & Studio    Dana    Unity Temple    Coonley    Browne's    Stromquist    2003 
 
Copper Urn. Wright first designed this copper urn in the late 1890's. It appears in several photos of the homes he created in the early 1900's. It was one of Wright's favorite objects. It is known that at least nine were made, including those for the Dana house, Edward C. Waller house, Browne's Bookstore, and pairs for both the Coonley house and Wright's own Home and Studio. 18 inches tall. This Urn was executed by James A. Miller and Brother, for the Susan Lawrence Dana House, Springfield, Illinois, circa 1903. Photograph courtesy Christies.
Warren McArthur Residence 1959 (1892 - S.011)
Original drawing of the Dining Room sideboard includes what appears to be the copper urn designed by Wright. There is no known record that one was produced for this home, and it is the earliest example of the urn found to date. Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901 Volume 1. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
Detail of the original drawing of the Dining Room sideboard that includes what appears to be the copper urn designed by Wright.
 
Joseph and Helen Husser Residence, Chicago (1899 - S.046)
1) There are no records to indicate that the Copper Urn and Candlesticks were produced for the Husser Residence, but they are evident in this illustration published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
2) Detail of the Copper Urn and Candlesticks illustrated in the Husser Residence.  Return to Husser Study.
Edward C. Waller Residence (1899 - S.047)
1: Waller Dining Room Circa 1899. Possibly the first opportunity for Wright to produce the Copper Urns. Two Urns were placed symmetrically in the Dining Room, one on either side of the build-in seating. Wright used this same symmetry in the Coonley living Room and possibly his own Dining Room. A similar photograph was published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p63. Also published in this issue are three photographs of the Urn in Wright's Home and Studio.
2: Waller Entryway Circa 1899. Copper Urn atop stairway pedestal.
2: Waller Copper Urn. Wright began experimenting with variations of the design for the Urn as early as 1894. Eighteen inches tall, it was executed by James A. Miller and Brother. Copper and galvanized tin. 18.5 x 18.5. Wright's copper and tin urn topped a newel-post in the 1899 Waller House in River forest.
Wright Home and Studio
1: Wright Dining Room Circa 1900. Copper Urn on right in window sill. Possibly a second on the left window sill. Wright symmetrically placed two Urns in the Waller Dining Room and the Coonley Living Room. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p62. Also published in "Ladies Home Journal", Jan 1903, p24.
2: Wright's Studio, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Copper Urn on far left, weed holder is in the far right. Published in Inland Architect, Volume XXXV, April 1900 (S.40), and also published in the "Chicago Architectural Club" 1900, p77.
3: Wright's Studio Octagonal Library, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Copper Urn on left, weed holder is in the center. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p64. See similar image below (4).
4: Wright's Studio Octagonal Library, Oak Park, Circa 1900. Copper Urn on left. Similar image as above (2). Note chairs in background (left, center and right). One was used in the photograph with two Weed Holders. There is a matching photograph, minus Weed Holders, replaced with a Copper Urn placed in the center of the chair is published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p65.
OP4a
5a: Wright's Oak Park Playroom, Circa 1900. Possible Copper Urn upper right. Very similar image published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, p65.
5b: Detail of Wright's Oak Park Playroom, Circa 1900. Possible Copper Urn center right.
Dana Residence, Chicago (1902 - S.072)
The copper urn appears in two drawings in "Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture" Kauffmann, 1959. It was included in an illustration for the Dana House, page 206 and as a single object, page 238.
 
1a: Dana Residence Entrance Gallery. Copper Urn in the upper left.
 
1b: Detail of the Dana Residence Entrance Gallery. Prairie grass decorates the Urn.
 
2: View toward Library. Copper Urn can be seen over the right shoulder of the Statue of David. Of note is Wasmuth Plate XXXIb, which is nearly an exact duplication of this view. The Copper urn was indicated in the illustration, but only as a round circular vase, no detail. Yet, in the working and presentation illustrations, the Copper Urn is clearly visible. See "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Dana House" Hoffman, 1996, plates 25, 27, 66-67, 119.
 
 
 
Unity Temple, Oak Park (1904 - S.096)
1a: Early image of the Unity Temple. Copper Urn on the center right. On December 8, 2002, Treadway Gallery auctioned chairs from the Browne's Bookstore. According to Treadway, the chairs were donated to Unity Temple after Browne's closed. Could this Copper Urn have been among the items donated to Unity Temple? Image courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. Published in "The Nature of Materials" Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 121. Photographed by Henry Fuermann.
 
1b: Detail of the Unity Temple Copper Urn.
 
 
 
Coonley Residence, Chicago (1907 - S.135)
1a: Coonley Living Room Circa 1910. View of the right side. Copper Urn on the right. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Similar image in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, page 124.
 
1b: Coonley Living Room detail. Copper Urn in center.
 
2a: Wasmuth Plate LVI (56) “Living room for Coonley, Riverside, Illinois.” In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. Copper Urn on the right. Of interest is how similar this illustration is to the image (1a) above. Wright was in Europe when he completed the final drawings for the Wasmuth Portfolio. This begs the question. Did Wright use the image above as a foundation for this illustration. Compare perspectives of the detail in the photograph above with the detail in the illustration below. 15.75 x 25.25.
 
2b: Detail of Plate LVI (56). Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates. A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI. B) Coonley Plate LVI. C) Coonley Plate LVIb.
 
3a: Coonley Living Room Circa 1910. View of the left side. Copper Urn on the left. Photographed by Henry Fuermann.
 
3b: Coonley Living Room detail, left side. Copper Urn is on the left.
 
4a: Coonley Hallway viewed from Living Room Circa 1910. Copper Urn in the center. Photographed by Henry Fuermann.
 
4b: Coonley Hallway detail viewed from the Living Room. Copper Urn in the center.
 
5a: Coonley Hallway looking toward Living Room Circa 1910. Copper Urn on the far left and in the center. Two Urns were placed symmetrically in the Living Room. Wright used this same symmetry in the Waller Dining Room and possibly his own Dining Room. Photographed by Henry Fuermann.
 
5b: Detail of Coonley Hallway looking toward Living Room. Copper Urn on the far left and on the right.
 
6a: Wasmuth Plate LVIb (56b) “Hallway of Coonley house, Riverside, Illinois.” In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. Copper Urn is on the left side of the illustration on the right. Of interest is how similar this illustration is to the image (5a) above. Wright was in Europe when he completed the final drawings for the Wasmuth Portfolio. This begs the question. Did Wright use the image above as a foundation for this illustration.
 
6b: Detail of Plate LVIb (56). Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates. A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI. B) Coonley Plate LVI. C) Coonley Plate LVIb.
 
 
 
Browne's Bookstore, Chicago (1908 - S.141)
1: Browne's Bookstore 1908. View of front Cove. Urn is on the right with oak leaves decorating it. Two Urns were in Browne's Bookstore.
 
2a: Wasmuth Plate XXXVI (36) “Exposition building, containing an exhibition-room and lecture-room for the Larkin Co. at the Jamestown Exhibition; and the interior of the Browne’s Book-Store. A long narrow room in a down-town building converted into a book-store. The walls and ceiling were re-formed, and alcoves with chairs and tables provided for the convenience of customers.” In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. The Copper Urn is right of center.15.75 x 25.25.
 
2b: Detail of Plate XXXVI (36). There were a total of five identical coves, this being the last one on the right. Two decorative items of note in this illustration. The tall weed holder  and copper urn. Wright included the Copper Urn in three Wasmuth plates. A) Browne's Bookstore Plate XXXVI. B) Coonley Plate LVI. C) Coonley Plate LVIb.
 
2c: Detail of Plate XXXVI (36). The tall weed holder and copper urn.
 
3a: Browne's Bookstore 1908. Smaller or second room. View toward fireplace. The Urn can be seen above the fireplace.
 
3b: Detail of Browne's Bookstore 1908. Smaller or second room. View toward fireplace. The Urn can be seen above the fireplace. Return to Browne's Study.
 
 
Donald M. and Jane Stromquist Residence (1958 - S.429)
A reproduction of Wright's designed Copper Urn is setting on a prairie styled pedestal in the Living Room, 2009. Return to Stromquist Study.
 
 
 
Reproduction Pewter Urn 2003
Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Reproduction Pewter Urn, 2003. Wright began experimenting with variations of the design for the Urn as early as 1894, and the design of the first designed this copper urn in the late 1890's, "Monograph 1887-1901" Pfeiffer, 1991, pages 60-61. It was one of Wright's favorite objects. He included it in a number of drawings and projects he worked on, including those for the Husser house, Edward C. Waller house, Wright's own Home and Studio, the Dana house, the Coonley house, Browne's Bookstore and appeared in an early image of Unity Temple. The original was eighteen inches tall. This is a one-third scale version of the original copper urn. Stamped in base, Historical Arts logo and Frank Lloyd Wright Collections logo. "Historical Arts & Casting Inc. 5580 West Bagley Park Road, West Jordan, UT 84088."
 
 
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.

 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017