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LAKE GENEVA HOTEL (1911 - S.171)
 

Lake Geneva was a popular destination attracting visitors from both Chicago and Milwaukee. One of the few hotels in Lake Geneva, The Whiting House, built in the early 1870s was destroyed by fire in1894.  The lake front property sat vacant for 17 years while attempts were made to reconstruct a new motel.  This was finally accomplished by Arthur L. Richards and John J. Williams.
       Arthur L. Richards was a real estate developer in Milwaukee, WI. He is well known for his association with Wright and the development of the American System-Built Homes (S.200 - 204) (1915-1917).  These homes are still being discovered today. John J. Williams was a businessman from Chicago.  Richards and Williams formed the Artistic Building Company and developed the Lake Geneva Hotel.  This was Richards first project with Wright. Designed in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the Hotel Geneva, and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn".
       In 1917, the Hotel Geneva was advertised as "New and Modern. 70 Rooms with Bath. Dancing, Swimming and Fishing. Fish or Chicken dinners. 9 Hole Golf Course Open to the Public. A. H. Thierbach, E. T. Nussbaum Owners."
       John K. Notz, Jr. writes that “in the 1920's, the Lake Geneva hotel was in its hey-day. It is said that, during the Prohibition that started in 1919 and lasted into the early 1930's, tunnels into the basements of nearby storefront buildings facilitated the movement of booze for consumption into the hotel and, when raids for Prohibition violations or gambling took place, the movement of customers out. While there are denials of that kind of activity in the local written histories such as the now defunct "Lake Geneva Magazine", such activities are more than plausible, as I have been told of biplane landings in the Winter on the frozen lake surface, for the purpose of picking up "booze" from the lake shore residences.
       "A long-time operator-owner sold it, vacant, in 1962 but

  took it back in 1965. Selling it, again, in 1966. Eric Johnson of Williams Bay, WI - then an architectural student - spent a Summer vacation measuring, cataloguing and sketching all of the hotel's panels, bricks and window sills."
       A set of images by Richard Nickel dated July 1967, shows that the restaurant had been operated as the Golden Orchid, Cantonese American Cuisine. But The Milwaukee Journal, Sept 1, 1967 reported that a tavern named the Geneva Inn belonged to George Borg, but mentions nothing about the hotel.
       Richard Nickel also captioned image #3 as the Dining Room. This may be due to the assumed use at the time this photograph was taken. As you can see from the image, this area was converted to a dining area. In Monograph V3 p189, Pfeiffer, and in Lost Wright p119 Lind, both describe this area as the Dining Room. This can not be the Dining Room, but the Lobby. The Lobby is the only room that has a row of lower windows. The original drawings indicate columns in the middle of the Dining Room. The drawings also indicate a square in the center of the Lobby area in relationship to the placement of the skylight.
       Wright’s other collaborations with Richards included: Remodeling of the Hotel Madison, Madison, Project 1911
(V3 p192); Office Building and Shop, Milwaukee, Project 1913 (V3 p236); Chinese Restaurant, Milwaukee, Project 1913 (V3 p237).
       There were many classic Prairie styled Wright details. The basic materials were wood and stucco.  Strong horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, broad overhanging eaves, horizontal rows upon rows of leaded glass windows, leaded glass light fixtures and doors, vases, and decorative poles, the prominent centrally located fireplace and chimney, terraces and porches. There was a beautiful art glass skylight ceiling in the lobby. The lobby included built-in seating, a large semicircular fireplace with a semicircular metal sculpture and fireplace andirons.
       Ownership continued to change over the years, the building deteriorated, it became vacant and in January 1970 after a fire, it was demolished.       September 2008
   
Text by Douglas Steiner, Copyright 2008.
 
 
  ADS    BOOKS    BROCHURES   CERAMICS    GLASS / LIGHTING    KEYS    LETTERHEAD & BC    MATCHES  
  HOTEL GENEVA & LAKE COMO HOTEL    MENUS    PHOTOGRAPHS    POSTCARDS    TISSUE PACK    PICTORIAL HISTORY 
  WALL SCONCES (1911)    1925    1935-45    BEHINDS THE SCENE (1961)    NICKEL (1967)    POOL 1967    LIGHT FIXTURES    ART GLASS  
  LIGHT POLE    FIREPLACE AND ANDIRONS    HISTORY THROUGH POSTCARDS    DEMOLISHED 1970 
 
 
ADS - Automobile Blue Book
 

Full Hotel Geneva Ad
Close up on illustration of the Hotel Geneva
An Ad from 1939
Date: 1917

Title: Automobile Blue Book  - 1917

Author: Hotel Geneva

Description: Hotel Geneva Ad - "Hotel Geneva.  New and Modern. 70 Rooms with Bath. Dancing, Swimming and Fishing.  Fish or Chicken dinners. 9 Hole Golf Course Open to the Public. A. H. Thierbach, E. T. Nussbaum Owners."  The Lake Geneva Inn opened for business in 1912.  It was demolished in 1970.  

Size: 4.5 x 4 Ad.  5 x 9 page.

Page: Pp 624

S#: 0138.02.0107

   
   
   
BOOKS
 
Image of the Hotel Geneva from the
"Picturesque Lake Geneva", circa 1925-1926.
Date: 1926

Title: Picturesque Lake Geneva (Published by the Wisconsin Transportation Company, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)

Author: Denison, Bonnie Burton

Description: Tourism and informational booklet concerning Lake Geneva.  Includes one photograph of the Hotel Geneva circa 1926. It also confirms owners of the Hotel Geneva as Nussbaum and Thierbach.  25,000 copies printed.  Original list price 50c. (First Edition)  

Size: 11.2 x 8.25

Pages: Pp 32

S#: 0172.01.1208

   
Date: 2005

Title: Lake Geneva in Vintage Postcards (Published by Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, SC; Chicago, IL; Portsmouth, NH; San Francisco, CA)

Author: Smeltzer, Caroly Hope; Cucco, Martha Kiefer

Description: Includes three postcards of the Hotel Geneva, page 58-59. Original List price $19.99. 6.5 x 9.25.  (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 128

ST#: 2005.20.1008

   
   
   
BROCHURES
   
Date: Circa 1917

Title: Hotel Geneva Brochure Circa 1917 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Front Cover: "Hotel Geneva. Lake Geneva Wisconsin." Flap (p.2-3): "Hotel Geneva Co. Lake Geneva Wis. A. H. Thierbach, President. E.T. Nussbaum, Secretary-Treasurer. Finest Resort Hotel of the Midwest..." Inside: "Wisconsin's Playground Supreme. Hotel Geneva - Lake Geneva Wis. Reflecting the individuality of the lake is Hotel Geneva. Situated on the very shore of Geneva Bay with its entire facade facing the beautiful lake and the majority of its cool, airy outside rooms looking out upon an unparalleled vista. Hotel Geneva is an attractive two-story, fire proof, concrete building. It has a frontage of 360 feet, with a 9-foot piazza the full length, unbroken except for the main entrance. The hotel has 70 rooms, all connected with private bath. Its lobby, with appropriate open fireplace, and the main dining room on the first floor are most attractive. An up-to-date grill room is maintained in the basement. Hotel Geneva is, beyond question, the most famous of all middle west summer resort hotels. It was planned and constructive under the personal supervision of the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright, whose purpose throughout was to bring the "out-of-doors in-doors." It's beauty is in harmony with the mansions and landscape that surround the lake... Hotel Geneva is conducted the pond the European Plan... Famous chefs cater to the epicurean tastes of those who love good food..." Includes 9 photographs of the Hotel Geneva. Also includes two price lists, July and August, and winter rates. 8 pages.

Size: 3.6 x 7.65 opens to 14.5 x 7.75. Room Tariff cards: 5 x 3.

S#:
0138.21.1118


 Detail from front cover
   

 Pages 2-3


 Detail from pages 2-3.
   

Inside Spread, details below.
   
   
   
   

 Rate Cards
   
   
Flap Back Cover

See close-ups of brochure images.

 
1950-1955 Inside
Date: Circa 1950-1955

Title: “Enjoy your summer vacation at Hotel Geneva. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.” (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.) 

Description: Flap: “Dining Room. View of the Main Dining Salon with adjoining porch overlooking the lake. We operate our own dining room, kitchen and bakery 7 A.M. to 10 P.M.  Quality Food - Varied Menu, Room Service.” “Guest Room. The rooms all have bath, clothes closet, comfortable beds, telephone, steam heat, cross ventilation, cool in summer.”  Inside: “Lounge. Unique with colored skylight, entirely fitted with French windows facing the lake, framed with over hanging trellis and flower bed beneath. Huge wood burning fireplace.  Comfortable chairs, card table corners.”  Back: “Hotel Geneva was designed by the famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, and like all his work, it is built into the landscape. Well kept lawns, flower beds and shrubbery adorn the grounds. Write, wire or telephone Chr. Hermansen’s Sons, owners and operators, Chestnut 8-4431.” (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 11 x 8.25

Pages: Pp 6 

S#: 0831.16.0209

Date: 1957

Title: Hotel Geneva Rate Schedule.  (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin) 

Description: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Summer Rates 1957, May 26th to Closing. Lake Doubles ... $14. Friday and Saturday Nights $16.00 each night.  Phone HERMANSEN CHestnut 8-4431.” (According to the American Hotel & Lodging Association Average room rate: 1930: $5.60; 1940: $3.21; 1950: $5.91; 1960: $10.81; 1970: $19.83; 1980: $45.44. (Digital version, Color not accurate) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 7.25 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 1205.29.0209

   
Back Front
Inside
Date: 1960

Title: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Rate Schedule, Summer 1960, May 27–Sept. 12.”  (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)

Description: “Lake side double bed, two persons ... $12 to $14. Friday, Saturday and Holidays add $2.00.  Call HERMANSEN CHestnut 8-4431.”  (According to the American Hotel & Lodging Association Average room rate: 1930: $5.60;  1940: $3.21;  1950: $5.91;  1960: $10.81;  1970: $19.83;  1980: $45.44.)  (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 7.25 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 4

S#: 1458.25.0209

   
Back Front
Inside
Date: 1961

Title: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Rate Schedule, Summer 1961, May 26–Sept. 10.”  (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)

Description: “Lake side double bed, two persons ... $12 to $14. Friday, Saturday and Holidays add $2.00.  Call HERMANSEN CHestnut 8-4431.”  (According to the American Hotel & Lodging Association Average room rate: 1930: $5.60;  1940: $3.21;  1950: $5.91;  1960: $10.81;  1970: $19.83;  1980: $45.44.)   (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 7.25 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 4

S#: 1483.10.0209

   
   
   
CERAMIC PLATES
 

Example of Early Hotel Geneva Plate, Circa 1915.
 
   
Back
 
Hotel Geneva Postcard Circa 1920, of same Illustration.

Date: Circa 1920

Title: Hotel Geneva Round Ceramic Plate Circa 1920 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Text on face: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Text on verso: "Painted and imported for H. Rogers & Son. Lake Geneva, Wis." In gold: "Hand Painted, The Jonroth Studios. Germany." The image is the same as a postcard published circa 1920 (3581). Building has been painted white. One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Hotel Geneva" sign and four globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. The plate is bordered in gold.

Size: 8.2" Round Plate, 1.125" deep.

S#: 0142.12.1014

   
Date: C 1920

Title: Hotel Geneva Demitasse Ceramic Coffee Cup Circa 1920 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Text on face: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Text on base: "Painted and imported Exclusively for L. C. Leonard, Lake Geneva, Wis. Hand Painted, The Jonroth Studios. Germany. The image is the same as a postcard published circa 1920 (3581). Building has been painted white. One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Hotel Geneva" sign and four globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. The cup is bordered in gold.

Size: 2.75 Round, 3.7" with handle, 2.75 tall.

S#:
0142.25.0120
   
   
Hotel Geneva Plate, Detail of Illustration.
 
Hotel Geneva Postcard Circa 1920, of same Illustration.
Date: Circa 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva Plate. 

Description: The Jonroth Studio Small hand painted ceramic plate. The back reads: "Hand Painted, The Jonroth Studios. Germany. Designed and Imported Exclusively for L. C. Leonard. Lake Geneva, Ws."

Size: 5.25 x 5"

S#: 0142.03.0402

   
Back
 
Hotel Geneva Postcard Circa 1920, of same Illustration.
Date: Circa 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva Ash Tray.

Description: The Jonroth Studio Small hand painted octagonal ash tray. The back reads: "Hand Painted, The Jonroth Studios. Germany. Designed and Imported Exclusively for L. C. Leonard. Lake Geneva, Ws." Same illustration as above.

Size: 5.25 x 5.25"

S#: 0142.04.0203

   
Date: 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva Small Square Plate Circa 1920 (1911 - S.171).

Description: The Jonroth Studio small hand painted ceramic plate. Front: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Hand painted picture of the Hotel Geneva in a 2.8" circle, text in banner below. Corners of the plate are folded toward the center. Gold designs printed on all four sides. Back: "Hand Painted, The Jonroth Studios. Germany. Designed and Imported Exclusively for L. C. Leonard. Lake Geneva, Ws."

Size: 5.1 x 5.1.

S#: 0142.10.1213

   
Hotel Geneva Round Plate Detail of Illustration
 
Hotel Geneva Round Plate (Back)
Date: Circa 1920's

Title: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis.” 

Description: Back: “H. Rogers & Son. Headquarters for Classy Souvenir. Lake Geneva, Wis. Made in Germany.”  Same illustration as above.

Size: 5.25" Round Plate

S#: 0142.05.0207

   
   
   
GLASS / LIGHTING
 
Date: 1911

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970.
       This pair of sconces were acquired from an estate in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. "We were told by my father that the pair came from the "Lake Geneva Hotel" in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where we lived. He was a police officer in Lake Geneva. He told me years ago he acquired them, when they demolished the hotel in 1970."
       There was an open covered galley, or walkway, that ran the full length of the South or front elevation of the first floor. It was lit by these outdoor light fixtures. They were still installed when Richard Nickel photographed the Hotel Geneva in 1967.
       They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. We have identified a number of light fixtures at the Hotel Geneva, and all appear to be constructed of copper, slag art glass, and except the chandeliers in the lobby, a wooden base. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. When turned on, they emit a warm glow, and the three elements, wood, copper and slag art glass complement each other beautifully. Turns on and off by a pull chain.

Size: Wooden base: 4.25" x 8.5" x .625." Slag Art Glass: 4.25" x 6." Lantern: 5.25" x 5.25" x 9.75." Overall: 12.375" H x 8.5" D x 5.25" W.

S#: 0104.27.0921 (1-2)
   

 See additional photographs...
   

 See additional photographs...
   
Date: 1991

Title: Lake Geneva Tulip Window Design

Description: Glass Etching - Lake Geneva Hotel Window Replica.  Etching of the Lake Geneva Hotel Window named “Tulip”.  Purchased during a visit to Fallingwater.

Size: Glass panel 8 x 8

ST#: 1991.38.0391

   
   
   
KEYS
 
Geneva Key 1.jpg (6496 bytes) Date: Circa 1930s

Title: Hotel Geneva Key

Description: Original Hotel Geneva Key #83

S#: 1940.00.0901

   
   
   
LETTERHEAD & BUSINESS CARDS
 
Date: Circa 1956

Title: Hotel Geneva Business Card, Circa 1956.

Description: "Hotel Geneva. Allen C. Hermansen. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin."

Size: 2 x 3.5

S#: 1147.12.0409

   
   
   
MATCHES
 
Date: Circa 1930s

Title: Match Book:

Description: "Hotel Geneva on Beautiful Lake Geneva in Wisconsin."  Produced by Federal Match Corp, New York which was in business during the 1920-30s, and was absorbed into the Universal Match Corp. between 1939-1940 (according to information provided by the American Matchcover Collecting Club).  Inside: "Hotel Lake Como, Hotel Geneva, Serving Only The Best Food, C. Hermansen & Sons." (Three Copies)

Size:

S#: 0249.11.1206, 0249.14.0207, 0249.15.0207

   
   
   
SIDE NOTE: HOTEL GENEVA AND LAKE COMO HOTEL
 
Date: 1939

Title: Ad in the "Danish Brotherhood in America" 1939, page 16. 

Description: Christ Hermansen & Sons operated both the Hotel Geneva and the Lake Como Hotel.

See History of the Lake Como Hotel

   
Date: Circa 1919

Description: Lake Como Hotel, D. J. Notter, Manager.  P. O. Address, Lake Geneva, Wis., R. F. D. No. 2, Box 76.  Telephone, Lake Geneva 900 W. I.  Postmarked 1919.

Lake Como Hotel, 1920s.

   
Date: Circa 1920s

Description: Lake Como Hotel, 1920s.

   
Date: Circa 1950s

Description: A Real Photo Postcard: "Pretty Garden at Hermansen's, Lake Como Hotel, Lake Geneva, Wis.  J-264."  Real photo postcard post marked 1953.

   
Date: Circa 1950s

Description: A Lake Como Hotel Real Photo postcard, late 1950s.  “S1053. Sun Pier at Hermansen's Lake Como Hotel - Lake Geneva, Wis.”  Back: “Vacationers on long pier stretching out into Lake Como.”

   
Description: Lake Como Hotel, Hermansen, Lake Geneva, Wis.  Good For 25c In Trade.
   
   
   
MENUS
 
Date: April 2, 1947

Title: Menu Hotel Geneva Dining Room Dinner Menu, April 2, 1947. (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin) 

Description: According to Allen Hermansen, the Dining Room in the Hotel Geneva was a high-end restaurant, with white table cloths and a seven course dinner starting at $1.75. Dinner menus were printed daily. “Martini .50. Broiled Filet of Mackerel 1.75.  Blue Ribbon Steak $3.00.” (Digital version, Color not accurate) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 7.5 x 9.5

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0720.06.0209

   
Back Cover
 
Inside
Date: 1955

Title: Hotel Geneva Menu 1955.

Description: “Hotel Geneva. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin” (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)  "A La Carte. Afternoon - And - Late Supper.  Bar - And - Dining Room.” Inside Left:  “Appetizers: Fresh Shrimp Cocktail .75, Soups, Salad Bowls, Sandwiches: Club House 1.50, Hot Sandwiches: Hamburger & Fries 1.25, Sirloin teak 2.50.” Inside Right: “Beverage Menu: Dry Martini .60.” Back: “Hermansens.  Hotel Geneva, Annex Bar, Lake Como Hotel, Atlantic Ocean House.”  (Digital version, Color not accurate) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 8.5 x 11.7

Pages: Pp 4

S#: 1092.20.0209

   
Date: September 7, 1956

Title: Hotel Geneva Dining Room Dinner Menu, September 7, 1956. (Published by the Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin) 

Description: According to Allen Hermansen, the Dining Room in the Hotel Geneva was a high-end restaurant, with white table cloths. Dinner menus were printed daily. “Martini .60. Broiled Fresh Lake Superior White Fish $3.25. Broiled New York Cut Sirloin Steak $4.75.” (Digital version, Color not accurate) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.

Size: 7.5 x 10

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 1148.03.0209

   
   
   
PHOTOGRAPHS
 
Date: 1916

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1916 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Not Dated. View of the entrance to the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911. Drive is gravel. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Globes have been added to the pedestals on either side of the stairs leading to the lobby.

Size: Original 3.25 x 2.25 B&W photograph.

S#:
0136.14.0721
   
Date: Circa 1920s

Title: (Photograph)  Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.  (circa 1920) 

Description: The American flags have been removed and there is a small sign just above the "Hotel Geneva" that says "Dancing".

Size: 2.75 x 4.5

S#: 1920.00.0105

   
Date: Circa 1920

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1920 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Viewed from the South, the Hotel Geneva can be seen in the background to the right of the water slide. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Hotel Geneva in 1911.

Size: Original 4.25 x 2.5 B&W photograph.

S#:
0142.28.1220
   
Date: Circa 1921

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1921 (1911 - S.171).

Description: "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. A sign has been added to the exterior wall of the dining room. Brooks Photographs. Image used for a post card.

Size: 5 x 3 B&W photograph.

S#: 0144.06.0114

   
Date: 1921

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1921 (1911 - S.171).

Description: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. It is a photograph, but possible of postcard #0141.04. It is picking up a slight dot pattern. Photo in leather photo album and includes 16 small photographs of Lake Geneva.

Size: Album 4.8 x 2.6, Original B&W photographs 2.75 x 1.75.

S#: 0144.07.1115

   
Detail of The Hotel Geneva.
 
Date: Circa 1925

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1925 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Photographed from a boat on the lake just to the left of the Wrigley Drive Bridge. Boat rental shack can be seen in the foreground. The Hotel Geneva can be seen in the background. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the left. Photographed by P. L. Huckins, Chicago. Image used in a postcard.

Size: Original 8 x 5 B&W photograph.

S#: 0171.12.0912

   
Date: C 1931-32

Title: Hotel Geneva 1931-32 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Two females sitting on stairs in front lobby. Entrance is to the left and right of the lobby. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows." Acquired from a private scrap book, other photographs dated 1931-32. Original 8 x 5 B&W photograph.

Size: 4.75 x 3.25.

S#: 0300.08.0514

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva Entrance Circa 1938 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Lobby is in the center. Dining Room is to the left on the first floor. "Hotel Geneva" lettered is across the front of the Lobby above the windows, and neon lighting has been added to each letter. Decorative light pole bases are tied into built-in pedestals with a vase. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals and smaller on the corners of the balcony.

Size: 10 x 7 B&W photograph.

S#: 0460.15.1213

   
Date: January 1961

Title: Hotel Geneva Terrace, January 1961.

Description: Looking West along enclosed Southwest Terrace. Originally Terrace was not enclosed. The Dining Room is on the right. The wall sconces on right are original. Windows, ceiling light fixtures and the radiator on the right were added after enclosure. (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See additional details)  See details of the original outdoor light fixture.

Size: Original 3.5 x 3.5

S#: 1483.11.0209

   
Date: January 1961

Title: Hotel Geneva Engine Room, January 1961.

Description: This panel controlled the Boiler System. Notice the illustration on the right on the Boiler Systems. The Panel indicates that there were two Boiler Systems. (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See additional details)

Size: Original 3.5 x 3.5

S#: 1483.12.0209

   
Date: January 1961

Title: Hotel Geneva Boiler System, January 1961.

Description: The Boiler System was controlled by the panel in the Engine Room. Al Hermansen indicated that it was a coal operated system. The Hotel Geneva was kept open during the winter of 1961 as a test for the Eisenhower Administration. They were looking at the site as a possibility for the Air Force Academy. Many politicians and press visited. Coal trucks delivered coal daily. It was built as a summer Hotel, hence there was no insulation. (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See additional details)

Size: Original 3.5 x 3.5

S#: 1483.13.0209

   
Date: 1966

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisc. 1966 (1911 - S.171).

Description: View of the Hotel from the Southwest. Caption pasted to verso: "The Geneva Inn, a resort hotel at Lake Geneva designed by the lake Frank Lloyd Wright, reportedly is being purchased by Assemblyman George M. Borg (R - Delavan) at a price of more than $200,000. The two-story building, one of Wright’s early examples of horizontal prairie architecture, was constructed in 1912 at a cost of $100,000. It has 70 guest rooms and extends along the lake shore. The Lake Geneva landmark has had several owners over the years. In 1939, it was sold to a Milwaukee firm at the sheriff’s sale for $10,407 plus about $10,000 in unpaid taxes, and has changed hands several times since. Borg said his offer to purchase has been excepted by Hobart and Inar Hermanson, also owners of the Lake Como hotel, and that he hoped to take occupancy by Oct. 1. However he declined to comment on plans for the building or future use of the site. – Journal Photo." Stamped on clipping: "Sep 11 1966." Ownership continued to change over the years, the building deteriorated, it became vacant and in January 1970 after a fire, it was demolished. Note: name on the front of the building is now "Geneva Inn." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Journal.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#:
1679.22.0619
   
Date: 1967

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisc. 1967 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Part of a set of six photographs by Richard Nickel. Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911. Strong horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, broad overhanging eaves, horizontal rows upon rows of leaded glass windows. The Lobby is on the far left. The roof line of the first floor is extend to the right covering a large porch. There was an open covered galley, or walkway, that ran the full length of the South or front elevation of the first floor. It was lit by outdoor light fixtures. There is one to the left of the entrance on the far right, and two between each set of windows. They are also visible on the open balcony that sets over the lobby. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1967. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. See set of six photographs.

Size: 10 x 8 B&W photograph

S#:
1720.77.1121
   
Date: 1967

Title: Hotel Geneva 1967.

Description: Photograph published in the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal, December 10, 1967, page 20. "Later owners have added such un-Wrightian touches as Polynesian decorations inside an a swimming pool at the entrance. Like Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, built a few years later, it may be doomed. The present owner, former State Sen. George Borg, is considering whether to tear it down or to remodel it. Wright students hope to save it." Note: Name has been changed to "Geneva Inn". Photograph by Donald Nusbaum.

Size: 9 x 3 B&W Print, High Res image.

S#: 1720.08.0410

   
Date: 1967

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisc. 1967 (1911 - S.171).

Description: View of the Hotel Geneva Art Glass window from the Lobby looking out toward the pool. Lake Geneva can be seen in the background. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911. Hand written on verso: "Camera looks thru window of bar to swim pool." Stamped on verso: "George E. Kosholler." "1967, Jul 13." Hand written on verso: "(Frank Lloyd Wright - Bldgs designed by him.) Lake Geneva Inn." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Journal.

Size: Original 5 x 7 B&W photograph.

S#:
1720.76.0921
   
Date: 1981

Title: Hotel Geneva Sconce, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin (1911 - S.171) 1981.

Description: Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911, the hotel opened in 1912. Lamp face is metal and art glass, wall mount is of wood. The sconce is turned on via a pull chain. The art glass softens the glare of the bulb. This photograph was published in "Frank Lloyd Wright", Kelmscott Galleries, 1981, page 13. Photographed by Quiriconi-Tropea Photographers. Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. See additional Hotel Geneva light fixtures.

Size: Two original 8 x 10 B&W photographs.

ST#: 1981.74.0413

   
Date: Circa 2005

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 1911 Bare Bulb Light Fixture, Circa 2005 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Photograph of original bare bulb light fixture from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970. These bare bulb fixtures were the main ceiling light in each of the 70 bedrooms within the hotel. They were also used in the lobby around the massive skylight perimeter. Detailed photographs taken in 1967 by Richard Nickel, show these fixtures "in situ" with the pull chains and bare bulbs. Courtesy of Urban Remains, Chicago. See additional Hotel Geneva light fixtures.

Size: 5 x 7 Color photograph.

ST#:
2005.56.1121
   
Date: 2009

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 1911 Wall Sconce, 2009 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Photograph of original wall sconce from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970. These sconces could be seen throughout the lobby and dining room. Constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood, with pivoting center panel and two leaded glass panels at each side. 7" wide x 6" deep x 9.5" high. This sconce sold on December 6, 2009 for $3500, Treadway Toomey Galleries, John Toomey Gallery, Oak Park, IL Courtesy of John Toomey Gallery. See additional Hotel Geneva light fixtures.

Size: 8 x 10 Color photograph.

ST#:
2009.57.1121
   
   
   
POSTCARDS
 
  Designed in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970.  Very few photograph exist of the Hotel Geneva, so postcards have become a very good record.  Even in her book "Lost Wright", by Carla Lind, the only image published of the Hotel Geneva is the post card below dated 1938 The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.
   
Date: Circa 1890

Title: (Side Note) The Whiting House.

Description: “Boat Landing, Lake Geneva, Wis.”  Back: Made in Germany. James Leonard, Pub., Lake Geneva, Wis. C.E. Wheelock & Co., Peoria, ILL, Exclusive Importers. 190565". PM 6/9/13. The Whiting House, built in the early 1870s was destroyed by fire in 1894. This is the original property where the Hotel Geneva was built in 1911-12.  I believe this to be an early four color collotype printing process.  

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#: 0009.02.1208

   
Date: Circa 1912

Title: "The Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Circa 1912 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright’s original illustration for the proposed Hotel Lake Geneva in 1911. This early drawings included a proposed three story section on the East end that was never built. Illustration was exhibited at the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute on May 5, 1913. It was published in the Architectural Record, June 1913 Designed in 1911 "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. Back: "Motor to Lake Geneva. Just the right distance an the roads in good shape. Stop at ‘The Geneva’ the finest resort hotel in the middle west. European plan. Every room with bath. Large dining rooms. Meals a la Carte. You will like them." Printed message on the left, typed address on the right. Used as a direct mail advertisement. P.M. May 1, 1913, just in time for the summer season. Published by Acmegraph Co., Chicago. (#) 11910. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4.

S#: 0114.10.0712

   
Date: Circa 1912

Title: "The Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Circa 1912 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright’s original illustration for the proposed Hotel Lake Geneva in 1911. This early drawings included a proposed three story section on the East end that was never built. Illustration was exhibited at the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute on May 5, 1913. It was published in the Architectural Record, June 1913. Designed in 1911"The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. Back: Hand written on the left, "Believe me this is some place." P.M. Sep 3, 1914. Published by Acmegraph Co., Chicago. (#) 11910. Second copy unused. Verso: "Published by Acmegraph Co., Chicago. [Place Stamp Here Domestic One Cent Foreign Two Cents] (#) 11910 (Number smaller than postmarked version). 5.4 x 3.4.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#: 0114.13.1113, 0114.20.0816

   
Date: 1912

Title: 3464. "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis., circa 1912.

Description: Designed in 1911, The Geneva opened in August 1912. "Light Poles" are at full height. Lack of "Hotel Geneva" lettering above Lobby windows. Globe lights not installed yet. Down spouts above Lobby windows have not been installed. (Published by E. A. Bishop, Pub. Racine, Wis. Made in U. S. A.) On back, C. T. Photochrom. R-37748. Post marked Aug 23, 1913.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#: 0114.08.0212

   
Date: Circa 1912

Title: "The Geneva" Lake Geneva, Wis. Circa 1912-13.

Description: "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva". This card was produced before the transition period. This card was reprint later, with the new name change. This may be one of the earliest images of the Hotel Geneva. Notice the lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases. Possible decorative flag flying from left "Light Pole" as seen in the original drawings. "Light Poles" are at full height. Back: "Post Card. (Left) This space may be used for correspondence. (Right) For address only." (2213. Published by V. O. Hammon Pub. Co., Chicago.) (Two copies)

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#: 0114.12.0513, 0114.19.1115

   
Date: Circa 1912

Title: "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis., circa 1912.

Description: Designed in 1911, The Geneva opened in August 1912. "Light Poles" are at full height. Lack of "Hotel Geneva" lettering above Lobby windows. Globe lights not installed yet. Down spouts above Lobby windows have not been installed. (Published by V. O. Hammon Pub. Co., Chicago.) Verso: 2213. Published by V. O. Hammon Pub. Co., Chicago. "Motor to Lake Geneva. Just the right distance an the roads in good shape. Stop at ‘The Geneva’ the finest resort hotel in the middle west. European plan. Every room with bath. Large dining rooms. Meals a la Carte. You will like them. Open the year ‘round" Printed message on the left, typed address on the right. Used as a direct mail advertisement. P.M. May 1, 1913, just in time for the summer season.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5.

S#:
0114.23.1017
   
Date: Circa 1914

Title: Lake Geneva Hotel Circa 1914 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Designed in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. Text on face: " "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis." Street almost appears not to be paved. This also appears to be heavily airbrushed. Postcard #0104.02, 1914-1915 is the exact same image, with the two front light poles intact, and missing leaves and flowers. Text on verso: "Post Card. Address. Plate 4102." Postmarked "Sep 15, 14." 

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#:
0124.25.0217
   
Date: Circa 1914-15

Title: "Hotel ‘Geneva’ Lake Geneva, Wis." Circa 1914-15 (1911 - S.171).

Description: "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva". This card most likely produced during the transition period, hence the title of [ Hotel "Geneva" ]. This also appears to be reprint of an earlier postcard, with the new name change. This may be one of the earliest images of the Hotel Geneva. Notice the lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases. Possible decorative flag flying from left "Light Pole" as seen in the original drawings. "Light Poles" are at full height. Back: "Post Card. (Left) This space may be used for correspondence. (Right) For address only." (Published by V. O. Hammon Co., Chicago.)

Size: 5.5 x 3.5.

S#: 0124.20.0812

   
Date: Circa 1914-15

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1914-1915 (Published by C.R. Childs, Chicago). 

Description: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. 19019-r.”  This may be one of very first photos taken of the Hotel Geneva, even taken as early as 1912 while it was still called the "The Geneva".  Notice the lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases.  Later pictures show the addition of large round lights at the entrance.  The two tall decorative poles at the entrance (far right) were dramatically shortened in later pictures. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0104.02.0906

   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Lake Geneva Hotel Circa 1915 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Designed in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. Text on face: " "The Hotel Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis." Street almost appears not to be paved. This also appears to be heavily airbrushed. Postcard #0104.02, 1914-1915 is the exact same image, with the two front light poles intact, and missing leaves and flowers. White bordered postcards began in 1915. Text on verso: "Post Card. Address. K. C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee 4102." Postmarked "Aug 17 1922."

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#:
0128.50.0217
   
Date: Circa 1915-1920

Title: Lake Geneva, Wis. Photo Package. 

Description: Package of 10 Genuine Photographs, Lake Geneva, Wis. One photo of Hotel Geneva.  Grogan Photo Systems, Inc.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 1.75 x 2.75"

S#: 0104.03.0602

   
Date: Circa 1915-1920

Title: Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Photo Package. 

Description: Package of 10 Genuine Photographs, Lake Geneva, Wis. One photo of Hotel Geneva.  Grogan Photo Systems, Inc. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 1.75 x 2.75"

S#: 0104.04.0307

   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1915 (Hammon Publishing Co.) 

Description: Text on face: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. Name has changed to "Hotel Geneva". The top of the "Light Poles" have been trimmed. Large white globes have been added to the front corners above the Lobby. Printed using the Photogravure process.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.4 x 3.5.

S#: 1911.00.0402

   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1915 (Hammon Publishing Co.)

Description: Text on face: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. Similar to S#1911.00, also produced by Hammon, but bushes in front to the left are shorter. Either not as mature, or they have been trimmed. Name has changed to "Hotel Geneva". The top of the "Light Poles" have been trimmed. Large white globes have been added to the front corners above the Lobby as well as larger white globes atop the pedestals on either side of the lobby. Printed using the Photogravure process.

Size: 5.4 x 3.5

S#:
0128.53.0118
   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1915.

Description: Real photo PC.  (J.J. Gregory - Cedar Rapids, Ia)  Actual photographic Postcard. Name has changed to "Hotel Geneva". The top of the "Light Poles" have been trimmed.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1910.00.1104

   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Hotel Geneva. Circa 1915. 

Description: Real photo PC. Published by AZO.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1910.01.1202

   
Date: Circa 1916

Title: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Circa 1916 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Envelope: "Colored Souvenir of Lake Geneva and Young Men’s Christian Association College Camp. Price Twenty Five Cents. V.O. Hammon Pub. Co.,Chicago." Inside: Souvenir strip of twenty postcard images printed on both sides and folded in an accordion fold. Hotel Geneva is the top image. This image first appeared in 1912. First known as the Training School of the YMCA (1890-1896) and subsequently as the Secretarial Institute and Training School (SITS) (1896-1903). It became the YMCA College or Association College (1913-1933), and was finally named George Williams College in 1933 in honor of the man who founded the YMCA movement in 1844. The strip also includes the interior of Yerkes Observatory, athletic field, water sports, residences of John J. Mitchell, Wm. J Wrigley, Jr., and S. B. Chapin. The N.W. Military Academy was established on the shored of Lake Geneva in 1915. (Published by V. O. Hammon Co., Chicago.)

Size: Envelope 6.25 x 4.25, Folder 6 x 4. Folder: Pp 20.

S#: 0132.19.1213

   
Date: Circa 1917-1918

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1917-18 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Text of face: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. 1454." Text on verso: "Pub. By Arnold’s Drug Store, Lake Geneva, Wis. Photo-Tone Mfg. By The Sturgis Lithograph Co., Sturgis, Mich." In the foreground is a singular pole with a crosspiece. Hanging from the cross piece is a sign that reads "Hotel Geneva." To the right is a lamp post with a single globe. To the right is a three stepped entrance column with a single light mounted to the tallest column. Many flags would indicate the time period during world war I. Five flags are visible including the two above the lobby. There are round glass globes above the lobby as well as on top of the columns in front of the lobby. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. There is a smoke stack above the chimney.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#:
0138.34.0320
   
Date: Circa 1919

Title: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis.” “Published by Lake Geneva Dry Goods Co. #21016 N”

Description: Circa 1919. Postmarked Sept. 24, 1919. B&W image, hand tinted and printed in four color. Printed by E. C. Kropp Co. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0141.01.1008

   
Date: Circa 1919-21

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1919-1921 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Text on face: "3581. Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." Building has been painted white. One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. The earliest postmark seen to date using this image is August 1921. Verso: "E. A. Bishop. Publisher Racine, Wis. Made in U. S. A. R-80820. Post Card. Message May Be Written On This Side. Address Only On This Side."  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5.

S#: 0141.04.1101

   
Date: Circa 1919-21

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1919-1921 (1911 - S.171). (Minor changes to S#0141.04.)

Description: Text on face: "3581. Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin" Building has been painted white. One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. Verso: (Text and layout varies from S#141.04.) "E. A. Bishop. Publisher Racine, Wis. Made in U. S. A. R-80820. Post Card. This Space for Writing Message. This Space for Address Only." One cent Franklin stamp affixed to back.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5.

S#: 0141.05.0712

   
Date: 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva 1920's. 

Description:  The earliest postmark found to date is August 26, 1921. (VO Hammon Publishing Co.)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.  See original photograph.

Size:

S#: 1920.00.0102

   
Date: 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva 1920's B&W Souvenir Booklet.  Horace C. Baker Co., Inc. Green Bay, Wis. 

Description: Right side of post card is a booklet with small hinge flap for sealing. Inside is accordion fold with 12 B&W photos of Lake Geneva, Wis. One includes Hotel Geneva.   The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1920.03.0704

   
Date: 1920's

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. – 21.  E. C. Knopp Co., Milwaukee. 

Description: #24783-N  Post Marked Aug 8, 1930.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1920.02.0404

   
HG SovFldrC.jpg (23845 bytes) Date: 1921

Title: "Greetings from Lake Geneva." 

Description: Mini (half size) Souvenir Folder of Lake Geneva, Wis. Postage required: One Cent. (Published by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis.) #2329.  Post Marked Aug 1921. One image inside of Hotel Geneva. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 4.25 x 3.12

S#: 0144.01.0606

   
HG SovFldrC.jpg (23845 bytes) Date: 1926

Title: "Souvenir Folder of Lake Geneva, Wis." 

Description: Postage required: One Cent. (Published by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis.  (c) C.T. & Co.) #2789.  Inside images #56466.  Post Marked Sept. 1, 1926.  One half size image inside of Hotel Geneva.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 6.25 x 4.24

S#: 1926.00.1101

   
Date: 1930's

Title: Hotel Geneva PC 1930's (E.A. Bishop Publisher #3582, 4A-H193)

Description:   The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1930.00.0102

   
Date: 1935

Title: Hotel Geneva, 1935.

Description: “View from the Municipal Recreation Building, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 5A-H328”  Back: Bishop Post Card Co., Racine, Wisconsin.  C.T. Art-Colortone.  (P.M. 7/7/50)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0397.05.0807

   
Date: 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva 1938. 

Description: “1944 Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. E. A. Bishop. 8A-H609”   Back: Copyright by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis.  C.T. Art-Colortone.  Two copies.  (P.M. 8/4/46 & 8/22/44)  (Have verified a 7/11/39 postmark.)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0460.07.0102, 0460.08.0807

   
Date: 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva 1938. (Published in 1952, first published in 1938.)

Description: View of Hotel Geneva from Flatiron Park looking South. Verso: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. E. F. Godfrey, Lake Geneva, Wis. Genuine Curteich - Chicago ‘C. T. Photochrom’ Post Card (Reg. U.S. Post Off.). 2C-P2587. (Printed 1952.)

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0460.19.1014

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva 

Description: “Lake Geneva, Wis. 18 Miniature Postcards from original photographs.”  “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.”  Set includes one postcard of the Hotel Geneva.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 4.5 x 3

S#: 0142.02.0906

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.”  

Description: This may have been sold separately or as part of of the above set of 18.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 4.5 x 3

S#: 0142.01.0703

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva Circa 1938 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Face: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. #B-1286". Back: "Post Card. (Right) Address. Box: EKC, Place Stamp Here. All rights reserved - The L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee" (Originally published by EKC. "B-1287" missing "L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee." So set was probably originally published by by EKC, then republished by L. L. Cook at a later date.) Real Photo Post Card. Would have been produced the same time as B-1287 & B-1290.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0460.14.1213

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva (Published by L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee)  

Description: “Beautiful Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis.  #B-1290".  Most likely photographed circa 1938. Real Photo Post Card,  Postmark 8/27/47.  Would have been produced the same time as B-1287The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0531.03.0806

   
Date: Circa 1938

Title: Hotel Geneva

Description: "Lake Geneva, Wis. From Hotel Geneva. B-1287". Most likely photographed circa 1938. Postmarked Aug. 12, 1943.  Real Photo Post Card. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0595.02.0305

   
Date: 1938

Title: "Greetings from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin." 

Description: Souvenir Folder.  Postage required: One and a half Cents.  Published by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis. #D-4314.  One is Post Marked June 24, 1938.  One image inside of Hotel Geneva.  (Two Copies)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 6.2 x 4.24

S#: 1938.00.0102, 1938.02.0103

   
Date: 1939

Title: "Greetings from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin." 

Description: Souvenir Folder.  (Published by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis. #D-5746.  One image inside of Hotel Geneva.  (Note: Later number than 1938 version, but images date from around 1912-1915.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 6 x 4.24

S#: 1939.00.0306

   
Date: 1939

Title: “Greetings from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin”

Description: Souvenir Folder of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Inside: “View from Recreation Building.” Image Circa 1935.  Folder Circa 1939. Postage required: One and a half Cents. Published by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis. #D-5746. One image inside of Hotel Geneva.  (Note: Same number as 1939 version, but images similar to 1938 versions.). The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 6 x 4.2

S#: 0501.15.0109

   
Date: Circa 1939

Title: Hotel Geneva, Circa 1939.

Description: “716 - Where Are You?  Mark the spot and Mail this card to a Friend.  Scenes on an Auto Trip around Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.  107732-N.”  Back: Copyright by E. A. Bishop, Racine, Wis.  (P.M. 6/6/42)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.6

S#: 0501.13.0807

   
Date: 1943

Title: Hotel Geneva 1943. 

Description: Post Card of Hotel Geneva, Curteich-Chicago "C.T. Art-Colortone", E.F. Godfrey, OC-H1943.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1943.00.0702

   
Date: Late 40's

Title: Hotel Geneva Post Card

Description: (A "Natural Color Card" E.C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee, Wis.  #7285)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1945.00.1002

   
Date: Circa 1945

Title: "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. 6" Circa 1945 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Tree to the left of the Lobby and tall evergreens in front of the lobby are consistent with #0531.03. "Hotel Geneva" lettering over lobby only outlined. Smaller globes above lobby are missing, but larger on stair pedestals are still there. Single light posts along river front. Smoke stack and lobby gutters are gone. Awning is above the entrance to the dining room on the far left. Real Photo Post Card. Back: "Post Card. (Left) Correspondence. (Right) Address. Box: EKC, Place Stamp Here" (Published by EKC.)

Size: 5.4 x 3.5.

S#: 0647.16.0712

   
Date: Circa 1945

Title: "Andy Gump Monument, City Park, Lake Geneva, Wis. 11" Circa 1945 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Andy Gump was a character in the Chicago Tribune comic strip. He was so popular that as a thank you, the Tribune had a statue made of Gump and placed it on Sidney Smith's property in Lake Geneva. Past away in 1935, the town, moved it to the downtown city park. Hotel Geneva can be seen in the background. Viewed from the Southeast. Part of the S#647.16 Series. Real Photo Post Card. Back: "Post Card. (Left) Correspondence. (Right) Address. Box: EKC, Place Stamp Here" (Published by EKC.)

Size: 5.4 x 3.5

S#: 0647.21.0214

   
Date: Circa 1945

Title: "View from the Riviera, Lake Geneva, Wis. 40" Circa 1945 (1911 - S.171).

Description: Most likely photographed from one of the docks in front of the Riviera. Hotel Geneva can be seen in the background. Viewed from the Southwest. Part of the S#647.16 Series. Real Photo Post Card. Back: "Post Card. (Left) Correspondence. (Right) Address. Box: EKC, Place Stamp Here" (Published by EKC.)

Size: 5.4 x 3.5

S#: 0647.22.0214

   
Date: 1948

Title: Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. 1948. 

Description: Fairbanks Card Company, Brookline, Mass.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0746.11.0307

   
Date: 1950's

Title: K-1 - Hotel Geneva at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin,

Description: E. F. Godfrey, Lake Geneva, Wis. #OC-K400.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1950.00.0404

   
Date: 1950's

Title: Hotel Geneva Post Card 

Description: (Colourpicture Publishers, #P22375.  Wisconsin Post Card Co.)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1950.01.0702

   
Date: 1951

Title: Hotel Geneva.

Description: “12 - View from the Municipal Recreation Building, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin”.  "Genuine Curteich, Chicago ‘C. T. Photochrom’ Post Card (Reg. U.S. Post Off.)". 1C-P1888.  (Published in 1951 by Curt Teich, Chicago)  The C.T. Guide indicates that "The ‘P’ indicates the ‘C.T. Photochrom’ process. Most of the cards printed with this new process were reprints of cards the Teich Company produced in other styles."  This is a reprint of the 1935 (5A-H328). This is the same image, but the boat has been added, and the three strollers on the sidewalk have been removed from this version. The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0857.05.1208

   
Date: 1953

Title: Hotel Geneva Post Card

Description: (A genuine Kodachrome reproduction.  L.L. Cook Co.  1953.  #405.  #67711.)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 0987.04.0303

   
Date: 1955

Title: Hotel Geneva.

Description: “Hermansen’s Hotel Geneva. A fine Resort Hotel on the Lake - in town. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Copyright 1955, The L. L. Cook Co. #88163. From a Natural Color Transparency. The L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee, Wis.” June 12, 1956. According to Allen Hermansen, the car on the left in this image was a brand new car he had just purchased.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.4 x 3.5

S#: 1092.19.1008

   
Date: Circa 1960 (1955 image)

Title: Hotel Geneva, Circa 1960.

Description: Back: "Hermansen’s Hotel Geneva. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright 1912." Note: This image first published in 1955. According to Allen Hermansen, the car on the left in this image was a brand new car he had just purchased. By 1960 the standard size was 4 x 6. Gift from Allen Hermansen.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

S#: 1458.28.0709

   
Date: 1960's

Title: Hotel Geneva Post Card 

Description: (Colourpicture Publishers, #P44734.  Wisconsin Post Card Co.)  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.

Size:

S#: 1960.00.0103

   
Detail of Aerial View
 
Date: Circa 1967

Title: Hotel Geneva, Aerial View Circa 1967.

Description: Back: "Aerial View of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Showing Municipal Building, Boat Docks and Bathing Beach. The lake covers and area of 5.504 acres with 26 miles of shoreline. A Summer Paradise. Published by Wisconsin Post Card Co., Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147. Johnson Printing, Inc., Eau Claire, Wisconsin. #J4561." P.M. July 30, 1971. Note: Swimming pool can be seen in front of Hotel Geneva Lobby. By December 1967, a swimming pool could be seen in photographs of the Hotel Geneva.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 1720.11.1010

   
   
   
TISSUE PACKAGE
 
Date: Circa 1950

Title: Hotel Geneva Kleenex Package. Circa 1950's.

Description: "Hermansen’s Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. In Town, on the lake, Complete Resort Facilities. Phone Chester 8-4431." Inside: "This is not ordinary paper... both sides of this handy Kleenex polishing papers are treated with silicone. Either side will do. There is no waste, because you don’t tear them off - you pull them out, whole, ready to use. Rub your glasses and the dust, dirt and smears disappear... leaving a protective coating of silicone on the lens. Not to be used on plastics. Try one and see... better. Kleenex T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. Off., I.C.P.Co."

Size: 2.6 x 3.3.

ST#: 0831.17.0409

   
   
   
PICTORIAL HISTORY
   
The Whiting House, built in the early 1870s was destroyed by fire in 1894.  This is the original property where the Hotel Geneva was built.  Boat landing with Whiting House in background.  Shows original lagoon in front of the Whiting House.  Postcard printed in Germany and published by James Leonard Publishing, Lake Geneva, Wis.  See additional information about the Whiting House.
 

Original aerial view drawing drawing. "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1907-1913", Vol. 3, Pfeiffer, Futagawa, Yukio, 1991, page 189-191.

 
Postcard using Wright's original drawing.  Published by Acmegraph Co., Chicago, IL  Early drawings included a proposed three story section on the East end, which was never built.
 
"The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis. This may be one of the earliest images of the Hotel Geneva.  Published by V. O. Hammon Co.,  Chicago, IL.  Circa 1912.  The History of the Hotel Geneva viewed through Post Cards.
 
Drawing submitted by Wright and published in the Architectural Record, June 1913, p572.
 
Also published in the the Architectural Record, June 1913, p573.  Wright’s other collaborations with Richards included: Remodeling of the Hotel Madison, Madison, Project 1911 (V3 p192).
.
Hotel Geneva 1915. From “Lake Geneva”, Published by Morrison and Rogers, Lake Geneva, Wis.
Copyright 1915, by C. MacKay Morrison.  (See Ceramic Plate)
   
   
   
WALL SCONCES (1911)
   
Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970.
       This pair of sconces were acquired from an estate in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. "We were told by my father that the pair came from the "Lake Geneva Hotel" in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where we lived. He was a police officer in Lake Geneva. He told me years ago he acquired them, when they demolished the
  hotel in 1970."
       There was an open covered galley, or walkway, that ran the full length of the South or front elevation of the first floor. It was lit by these outdoor light fixtures. They were still installed when Richard Nickel photographed the Hotel Geneva in 1967.
       They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. We have identified a number of light fixtures at the Hotel Geneva, and all appear to be constructed of copper, slag art glass, and except the chandeliers in the lobby, a wooden base. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. When turned on, they emit a warm glow, and the three elements, wood, copper and slag art glass complement each other beautifully. Turns on and off by a pull chain.
   
1) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
2) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
3) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
4) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
5) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
6) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
7) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
8) Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Wall Sconces (Pair) 1911 (1911 - S.171). Pair of wall sconces from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. They are constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood. Slag art glass is an opaque pressed glass with colored streaks, usually white and/or cream streaks. (S#0104.27.0921 1-2)
 
View of the wall sconce 1961. Hotel Geneva Terrace, January 1961. Looking West along the enclosed Southwest Terrace. Originally the Terrace was not enclosed. The Dining Room is on the right. The wall sconces on right are original. Windows, ceiling light fixtures and the radiator on the right were added after enclosure. (S#1483.11.0209)
 
Detail of the wall sconce 1967. Viewed from the Southeast. Strong horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, broad overhanging eaves, horizontal rows upon rows of leaded glass windows. The Lobby is on the far left. (S#1720.77.1121)
 
Detail of the wall sconce 1967. Viewed from the Southeast. (S#1720.77.1121)
 

Additional 1911 Hotel Geneva Light Fixture. Hotel Geneva Sconce, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, photograph 1981 (1911 - S.171). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911, the hotel opened in 1912. Lamp face is metal and art glass, wall mount is of wood. The sconce is turned on via a pull chain. The art glass softens the glare of the bulb. This photograph was published in Frank Lloyd Wright Kelmscott Gallery, Kelmscott Galleries, 1981, page 13. Photographed by Quiriconi-Tropea Photographers. Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. (ST#1981.74.0413)

 
Additional 1911 Frank Lloyd Wright sconce from the Geneva Inn, Lake Geneva, WI.Photographed in 2004. Single glass pivoting shade on a brass fixture with original wood back plate, restored finish, glass mint. 7” x 7” x 9.”  Sold by the Treadway Toomey Galleries, May 23, 2004. Another example of this type of sconce is in Frank Lloyd Wright Kelmscott Gallery, Elliott 1981, page 13. 
 
Additional 1911 Hotel Geneva Light Fixture. Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 1911 Bare Bulb Light Fixture, Photograph Circa 2005 (1911 - S.171). Photograph of original bare bulb light fixture from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970. These bare bulb fixtures were the main ceiling light in each of the 70 bedrooms within the hotel. They were also used in the lobby around the massive skylight perimeter. Detailed photographs taken in 1967 by Richard Nickel, show these fixtures "in situ" with the pull chains and bare bulbs. Courtesy of Urban Remains, Chicago. (ST#2005.56.1121)
Additional 1911 Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 1911 Wall Sconce, Photographed 2009 (1911 - S.171). Photograph of original wall sconce from the Hotel Geneva. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970. These sconces could be seen throughout the lobby and dining room. Constructed of copper, slag art glass and wood, with pivoting center panel and two leaded glass panels at each side. 7" wide x 6" deep x 9.5" high. This sconce sold on December 6, 2009 for $3500, Treadway Toomey Galleries, John Toomey Gallery, Oak Park, IL Courtesy of John Toomey Gallery. (ST#2009.57.1121)
   
HOTEL GENEVA (1925)
   

These images are from the Eric Milton Nicholls Collection and may be some of the earliest documented photographs of the Hotel Geneva, including an excellent photograph of the

  "light pole" and possibly one of the only photographs of the East end of the building.  The NLA dates these images circa 1925. Courtesy of the National Library of Australia.
 
1: Viewed from the Southwest. The entrance to the Hotel was up a wide set of stairs with a decorative “light pole” and vase on either side. Then up a flight of stairs on the left and right of the Lobby, to the Open Gallery that ran the full length of the South side of the building. And finally through a set of doors just to the right or left. As Wright often did, he obscured or hid the entrance from view.  In pencil on verso: "1925,6,20, Wisc., Geneva Hotel 1912, 49".  NLA dates this photograph 1925.
 
1a: Detail. The entrance to the Hotel was up a wide set of stairs with a decorative “light pole” and vase on either side. Then up a flight of stairs on the left and right of the Lobby, to the Open Gallery that ran the full length of the South side of the building. And finally through a set of doors just to the right or left. As Wright often did, he obscured or hid the entrance from view.
 
2: Viewed from the South. The decorative “light pole” and vase in the foreground are very visible.  The base is most likely constructed of wood and leaded glass. The “globe” light fixtures to the right did not exist in earlier images. It appears that the entrance at the top of the stairs on the left side of the Lobby has been enclosed. In pencil on verso: "Lake Geneva Wisc., 1925,6,20, 49".  NLA dates this photograph 1925.
 
2a: Detail of the decorative “light pole” and vase.  The base is most likely constructed of wood and leaded glass. The “globe” light fixtures to the right did not exist in earlier images. It appears that the entrance at the top of the stairs on the left side of the Lobby has been enclosed.
 
2b: Detail of the decorative “light pole” . The graininess of the image is due to enlarging image to enhance detail of the Light Pole.
 
2c: Detail of the decorative “light pole” base and vase.  The base is most likely constructed of wood and leaded glass. The graininess of the image is due to enlarging image to enhance detail of the Light Pole base and vase.
 
3: Viewed from the East. At the top of the stairs is a covered porch.  Veering to the left, you enter of open galley that runs the length of the South side.  In pencil on verso"Lake Geneva Wisc., 1925.6.20. Inn. 49.? [initials]".  NLA dates this photograph 1925.
 
3a: Detail. At the top of the stairs is a covered porch.  Veering to the left, you enter of open galley that runs the length of the South side.  In pencil on verso"Lake Geneva Wisc., 1925.6.20. Inn. 49.? [initials]".  NLA dates this photograph 1925.
 
   
   
GILMAN LANE (1935-1945)
   

Little can be found about Gilman Lane. He photographed buildings in the Chicago area including many of Wright’s work. His photographs were given to the Oak Park Public Library after his death in 1961.  These Lane images were photographed

  1935-1945. They are important because they give a picture of the Hotel Geneva in a more original state before changes were made. Gilman Lane images courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library, Gilman Lane Collection.
   
 
1: Viewed from the Southwest. Strong horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, broad overhanging eaves, horizontal rows upon rows of leaded glass windows. The Dining Room is on the left, the lobby is on the right. Compare this view to Nickel #2.
 
1a: The open Gallery or Terrace that ran along the side side was later enclosed on the West end of the building (see Nickel 2a).
 
1b: Detail of the Lobby/Loggia. An addition was added to the West side of the Lobby which enclosed the stairs. The trellis that ran along the South end of the Lobby was later removed. The wall enclosure is visible just to the right (west) of the Lobby. It was later removed. The “globe” light fixtures did not exist in earlier images.
 
2: Viewed from the Southwest. The entrance to the Hotel was up a wide set of stairs with a decorative “light pole” and vase on either side. Then up a flight of stairs on the left and right of the Lobby, to the Open Gallery that ran the full length of the South side of the building. And finally through a set of doors just to the right or left. As Wright often did, he obscured or hid the entrance from view.
 
2a: Detail of the entrance to the Hotel Geneva. The “globe” light fixtures did not exist in earlier images.
 
2b: Detail of the entrance to the Hotel Geneva and the decorative “light pole” (see 3d detail) to the right. Early images show the vertical pole to be 4.5 to 5 times the height of the decorative “light pole” base. When comparing the size of the cars to the right, it shows you the size of the “light pole” base.
 
3: Viewed from the South. The decorative “light pole” and vase on the left is very visible. The “globe” light fixtures did not exist in earlier images. It appears that the entrance at the top of the stairs on the left side of the Lobby has been walled off. The shadow seems to indicate that. The lower row of windows in the front of the Lobby (South side) are very visible in this image.
 
3a: Detail of the decorative “light pole” and vase on the left. Early images show the vertical pole to be 4.5 to 5 times the height of the decorative “light pole” base. The “globe” light fixtures did not exist in earlier images. It appears that the entrance at the top of the stairs on the left side of the Lobby has been walled off. The shadow seems to indicate that. The lower row of windows in the front of the Lobby (South side) are very visible in this image.
 
3b: Detail of the South side of the Lobby. The lower row of windows are very visible on the left side.
 
3c: Detail of the Lobby entrance on the right side.
 
3d: Enlarged detail of the decorative “light pole” and vase on the left. The “light pole” base was built into the vase pedestal. It seems to be made of wood and leaded glass. It may have been a decorative light fixture to light the stairs at night. (See “birdhouse” below.)
 
3e: Enlarged detail of the Southwest corner of the Lobby. The lower row of windows are very visible on the left side.
 
   
   
BEHIND THE SCENES (1961)
   

Hotel Geneva Terrace, Engine Room and Boiler System.  Looking West along the enclosed Southwest Terrace, the Terrace was not originally enclosed. The Dining Room is on the right. The wall sconces on right are original. Windows, ceiling light fixtures and the radiator on the right were added after enclosure.
       The Engine Room panel controlled the Boiler System. Notice the illustration on the right on the Boiler Systems. Panel indicates that there were two Boiler Systems.

         The Boiler System was controlled by the panel in the Engine Room. Al Hermansen indicated that it was a coal operated system. The Hotel Geneva was kept open during the winter of 1961 as a test for the Eisenhower Administration. They were looking at the site as a possibility for the Air Force Academy. Many politicians and press visited. Coal trucks delivered coal daily. It was built as a summer Hotel, hence there was no insulation. Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy.
 
Hotel Geneva Terrace, January 1961. Looking West along the enclosed Southwest Terrace. Originally the Terrace was not enclosed. The Dining Room is on the right. The wall sconces on right are original. Windows, ceiling light fixtures and the radiator on the right were added after enclosure. See details of the original outdoor light fixture. (S#1483.11.0209)
 
Hotel Geneva Engine Room, January 1961. This panel controlled the Boiler System. Notice the illustration on the right on the Boiler Systems. Panel indicates that there were two Boiler Systems. (S#1483.12.0209)
 
Hotel Geneva Boiler System, January 1961. The Boiler System was controlled by the panel in the Engine Room. Al Hermansen indicated that it was a coal operated system. The Hotel Geneva was kept open during the winter of 1961 as a test for the Eisenhower Administration. They were looking at the site as a possibility for the Air Force Academy. Many politicians and press visited. Coal trucks delivered coal daily. It was built as a summer Hotel, hence there was no insulation. (S#1483.13.0209)
 
 
 
HOTEL GENEVA BY RICHARD NICKEL (1967)
 

This set of six images were photographed by Richard Nickel in 1967, for the Historic American Building Survey (HABS). Nickel (1928-1972) was killed in April 1972, when a stairwell in the Chicago Stock Exchange building collapsed on him. HABS began in 1933 and has been administered jointly by the Library of Congress and the National Park Service. The Library of

  Congress has digitized photographs, drawings and other data from the project. A number of HABS photographs were taken by Chicago photographer and preservationist Richard Nickel. This collection of six photographs are available from the The Library of Congress.
 
1: Viewed from the Southeast. Strong horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, broad overhanging eaves, horizontal rows upon rows of leaded glass windows. The Lobby is on the far left. See details of the original outdoor light fixture. (S#1720.77.1121)
 
1a: Center of the South side facing the lagoon and Lake Geneva. Original drawings indicate, and early photographs have an Enclosed Garden that extended from the Lobby on the left to the stairs on the right. This was removed. The Ladies Lounge is on the far right, first floor. The broad overhang over the first floor covers the Open Gallery. See details of the original outdoor light fixture.
 
1b: Southeast corner. Broad overhanging eaves and extended covered porch tie into the Open Galley that runs along the South side. It is accessible from the stairs seen on the left. The interior room on the South East corner on the second floor is seen in image #5. See details of the original outdoor light fixture.
 
2: Viewed from the Southwest. The Dining Room is on the left, the Lobby is on the right. Many revisions have been made.
 
2a: Many revisions have been made. The original street entrance to the Dining Room is actually to the far left under the awning. The entrance under the sign originally lead to an open Gallery along the South side just like in image #1. The glass windows enclosing the gallery on the whole right side of the first floor were added.
 
2b: An addition to the West side of the Lobby enclosed the stairs. Vases have disappeared as well as the wall enclosure just to the left (west) of the stairs that ran South.
 
3: Nickel captioned this image as the Dining Room. This may be due to the assumed use at the time this photograph was taken. As you can see from the image, this area was converted to a dining area. This may be due to the assumed use at the time this photograph was taken, this was converted to a dining area. But, this can not be the Dining Room, but the Lobby. The Lobby is the only room that has a row of lower windows. The original drawings indicate columns in the middle of the Dining Room. The drawings also indicate a square in the center of the Lobby area in relationship to the placement of the skylight.
 
3a: Detail of the ceiling.
 
3b: Detail of the art glass skylight.
 
3c: The walls on the left are an addition.
 
3d: Beautiful example of the extensive art glass that enhanced the lobby.
 
4: Detail of the Southeast corner of the Lobby.
 
4a: Detail of the hanging lights.
 
4b: Detail of the art glass Tulip window design.
 
5: Bedroom in the Southeast corner on the second floor.
 
5a: Detail of the art glass on the second floor.
 
5b: Detail of the art glass on the second floor.
 
6: Fireplace in the Lobby. The lobby included built-in seating, a large semicircular fireplace with a semicircular metal sculpture and fireplace andirons. It is similar to the fireplaces in the Meyer May and Coonley house.  Similar Andirons.
 
6a: Detail of the large semicircular fireplace with a semicircular metal sculpture.
 
6b: Detail of the semicircular metal sculpture and fireplace andirons. Similar Andirons.
 
6c: Detail of the built-in seating and wall sconces.
 
 
 
SWIMMING POOL 1967
 

Hotel Geneva 1967. Photograph published in the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal, December 10, 1967, page 20. "Later owners have added such un-Wrightian touches as Polynesian decorations inside and a swimming pool at the entrance. Like Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, built a few years

  later, it may be doomed. The present owner, former State Sen. George Borg, is considering whether to tear it down or to remodel it. Wright students hope to save it." Note: Name has been changed to "Geneva Inn". 
 

In February 2009 Allen Hermansen sent us a copy of the March/April 1988 issue of Lake Geneva Magazine. It contained an article “No Rooms Available.” It included a photograph with a caption that read "In the last days the Lake Geneva Hotel...". What peaked my interest was the chain link fence on the left, but having no other information assumed it was part of the "last days of Lake Geneva Hotel, and part of the demolition process. 1

Caption: In the last days the Lake Geneva Hotel, stripped of its ornaments and trellises, fell into disrepair, with even its bushes untrimmed, its only profitable feature was a swinging singles bar called Snoopy’s.  Photograph by Alyn W. Hess.
 
In April 2010 we received a copy of the December 10, 1967 issue of the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal "The Wisconsin Legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright." Page 20 included an image with a swimming pool in front of the Lobby. The chain link fence now made sense.
Hotel Geneva 1967. Photograph published in the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal, December 10, 1967, page 20. "Later owners have added such un-Wrightian touches as Polynesian decorations inside and a swimming pool at the entrance. Like Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, built a few years later, it may be doomed. The present owner, former State Sen. George Borg, is considering whether to tear it down or to remodel it. Wright students hope to save it." Note: Name has been changed to "Geneva Inn".
 
George Borg. The Milwaukee Journal, Sept 1, 1967 reported that a tavern named the Geneva Inn belonged to George Borg, but mentions nothing about the hotel. Note: the image above clearly indicates that the Hotel Geneva is clearly the Geneva Inn.

The Milwaukee Journal - Aug 6, 1971 reported that Borg, 38, the millionaire grandson of the inventor of the automobile clutch, resigned from the senate in August, 1967, less than a year after being elected to his first term. The Hotel Geneva was demolished in 1970. In 1971 Borg operated the Riviera Inn at Lake Geneva.

 
But this raises a few other questions and observations:

July 1967: Richard Nickel documents Hotel Geneva. The restaurant in the "Dining Room" is "The Golden Orchid Cantonese American Cuisine". The "Lobby" exterior above the windows lacks the original "Hotel Geneva" lettering that existed for years and also the newer lettering "Geneva Inn" that George Borg added. The "Entrance" sign is empty, indicating that the restaurant may not be open. The sunken swimming pool exists, as does the diving board, but lacks the chain link fence. The three spot lights at the top of the "Lobby" aimed down at the pool are there. Foliage on the trees is lacking, indicating that it is more like winter than summer. The three foot high decorative wrought iron fencing placed above the "Planter" most likely was placed there to guard the windows during "swim play".

 
Detail. The "Lobby" exterior above the windows lacks the original "Hotel Geneva" lettering that existed for years and also the newer lettering "Geneva Inn" that George Borg added. The sunken swimming pool exists, as does the diving board, but lacks the chain link fence. The three spot lights at the top of the "Lobby" aimed down at the pool are there. Foliage on the trees is lacking, indicating that it is more like winter than summer. The three foot high decorative wrought iron fencing placed above the "Planter" most likely was placed there to guard the windows during "swim play".
 
According to Al Hermansen, "We had a bar, but it was down in the basement. We converted part of the lobby to a bar". Photograph by Richard Nickel dated July 1967.
 
Details of the sunken pool, decorative wall and flower pots can be seen in this photograph, a detail of the above. Photograph by Richard Nickel.
 
Sept 1, 1967. According to Al Hermansen, George Borg changed the name to the Geneva Inn. "Inns were popular at the time, like the Holiday Inn." The Milwaukee Journal, Sept 1, 1967 reported that a tavern named the Geneva Inn belonged to George Borg, but mentions nothing about the hotel. Note: the image above clearly indicates that the Hotel Geneva is clearly the Geneva Inn. The Milwaukee Journal - Aug 6, 1971 reported that Borg, 38, the millionaire grandson of the inventor of the automobile clutch, resigned from the senate in August, 1967, less than a year after being elected to his first term. The Hotel Geneva was demolished in 1970. In 1971 Borg operated the Riviera Inn at Lake Geneva.
 
December 10, 1967. Published in the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal, page 20. "Later owners have added such un-Wrightian touches as Polynesian decorations inside and a swimming pool at the entrance. Like Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, built a few years later, it may be doomed. The present owner, former State Sen. George Borg, is considering whether to tear it down or to remodel it. Wright students hope to save it." Note: Name has been changed to "Geneva Inn".
 
Conclusion. Richard Nickel's 1967 image and the Geneva Inn 1967 image seem to cast doubts that both could have been taken in the summer of 1967. It is clear that the Geneva Inn image is the summer of 1967. This would tend to indicate that it was either photographed a year earlier, or as was Nickel's habit, recording buildings that were in jeopardy of being demolished.  One clue could be in a caption Ted Schaefer wrote in the Lake Geneva Magazine. "In the last days of the Lake Geneva Hotel... its only profitable feature was a swinging singles bar called Snoopy’s." This could have been the reason the "Geneva Inn" was painted over. When Nickel photographed the Hotel, the restaurant was clearly the "The Golden Orchid Cantonese American Cuisine". This would also indicate that it was not the summer of 1967. When we contacted the Richard Nickel Committee and Archive, the organization, they stated "Our files indicate the name 'Lake Geneva Inn, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.'  Which is how Richard Nickel must have referred to the commission.” This would again indicate that he would have referred to the name that it was called at the time, indicating that he photographed the hotel after Borg changed the name.
 
One additional footnote to the Nickel photographs. Nickel recorded the above image as the "Dining Room" when in reality it was the "Lobby". According to Al Hermansen, "We had bar, but it was down in the basement. We converted part of the lobby to a bar". The actual "Dining Room" was through a door on the far right. With tables and chairs it is easy to see why he had that impression. But a small clue is also present. In the detail below, Part of the ceiling "wall paper" or "covering is hanging down and water damage is evident. If the hotel had been operational at the time, it would have at least been cut off.
 
 
 
       Milwaukee Journal - Sept 1, 1967. "Lake Geneva to Suspend Borg Bar License. The city council Friday night voted to suspend the class B liquor license for a tavern here belonging to George Borg, Delavan, for 10 days beginning after Labor Day weekend. Borg resigned recently as a state Senator. The Action followed complaints by Lake Geneva’s mayor and police chief that minors were being allowed to loiter in the tavern, the Geneva Inn."

       Milwaukee Journal - Aug 6, 1971. "Borg Injured in Motorcycle Crash. Former Republican State Sen. George Borg was reported in critical condition Friday at University Hospital here with injuries suffered Wednesday when his motorcycle crashed into a pole and struck a tree near Lake Geneva. Borg, 38, the millionaire grandson of the inventor of the automobile clutch, resigned from the senate in August, 1967, less than a year after being elected to his first term. He previously had served three terms in the Assembly. He now operates the Riviera Inn at Lake Geneva."
 
Text by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2008, 2010
 
 
 
LIGHT FIXTURES
 
1: Frank Lloyd Wright sconce from the Geneva Inn, Lake Geneva, WI.1911, single glass pivoting shade on a brass fixture with original wood back plate, restored finish, glass mint. The Geneva Inn was demolished in 1970, 7” x 7” x 9”, very good condition.  Sold by the Treadway Toomey Galleries, May 23, 2004.

Another example of this sconce is in "Frank Lloyd Wright Kelmscott Gallery", Elliott 1981, page 13.  When comparing the two versions, the Treadway version looks like the glass has been replaced but the base, arm and frame look authentic, but this has not been verified.

 
2: Detail of the hanging lights in Lobby.  An additional "Glass and Brass Lantern" can be seen in: "Important Works by Frank Lloyd Wright From Domino’s Center", Christie's 1993, page 78.
 
3: Detail of the wall sconce in Lobby.
 
4: Bare Bulb Fixture.  This was the main ceiling light in the bedrooms (see 4b below) and in the lobby around the massive skylight (see 4c below).
 
4b: Bedroom in the Southeast corner on the second floor.  Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
4c: Detail of the art glass skylight and the Bare Bulb Fixtures (shown above) in the Lobby. Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
5: Decorative “Light Pole” Base.  The decorative “light pole” base was built into the vase pedestal. It may have been a decorative light fixture to light the stairs at night.
 
5a: I had the opportunity to speak with Al Hermansen, and he confirmed that the decorative “Light Pole” did indeed contains lights. “We had a heck of a time changing the lights inside the base.”  Detail of photograph by Lynn Anderson.  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
6: Globe Light Fixtures.  The “globe” light fixtures do not exist in earlier images.

Decorative “Light Pole”.  Early images show the vertical light pole to be 4.5 to 5 times the height of the decorative “light pole” base.

 
6b: These glass globe lights did not appear in images until sometime around 1919-1921.  There were two sizes, a smaller size that sat upon the outside corners of the lobby, pictured, and a larger globe that sat top the pedestals on either side of the entrance. Al Hermansen said that every winter the globes were stored indoors. They would joke, “It’s time to take Frank’s balls inside now.” Photograph by Alyn W. Hess.  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
6c: The hotel lobby’s banks of leaded-glass casement windows opened to a view of the front terrace and the lake. Photograph by Lynn Anderson. (The big outside globe was not an original Wright artifact.)  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
 
 
ART GLASS
 
1: Detail of the Lobby art glass skylight.  This design is consistent with the row of lower windows in the Lobby.  Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
1a: Roofing the front lobby and drenching it with multicolored light was a stained glass skylight designed by Wright himself. Photograph by Lynn Anderson 1959-1960.  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
2: Detail of the Lobby windows.  The upper row of "Tulip" and lower row of art glass windows.  The design of the lower windows are consistent with the skylight in the Lobby.  Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
2a: The hotel lobby’s banks of leaded-glass casement windows opened to a view of the front terrace and the lake. Photograph by Lynn Anderson 1959-1960. (The big outside globe was not an original Wright artifact.)  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
2b: Lobby windows seen from the outside. Oak beams and trellises and flowers in the window-pots gave a warm rustic touch to the front entrance of the famous hotel. Photograph by Lynn Anderson 1959-1960.  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
3: Detail of the upper row of art glass "Tulip" windows in the Lobby.  Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
4: Detail of the second floor windows.  Photographed by Richard Nickel 1967.
 
5: Exterior view.  Exterior view of the upper art glass windows and the Lobby art glass windows.
 
6: Decorative “Light Pole” Base.  The decorative “light pole” base with built in art glass.
 
7: Frank Lloyd Wright Art Glass.  Lake Geneva Inn.  Mr. Wright designed the Lake Geneva Art Glass to make a natural transition from the inside and outside. Wright named the "Tulip" design because of the flower shape pattern in the center.  Oakbrook Esser Studios.
 
 
 
LIGHT POLE
 

The Hotel Geneva Decorative "Light Pole" and The Darwin D. Martin "Birdhouse" (1904 - S.100). One of the small details of the Martin complex is the “Birdhouse” Wright designed. Although this Hotel Geneva element is not a “Birdhouse”, the design is very similar. It is most likely to constructed of wood and leaded glass. Early images show the vertical pole to be 4.5 to 5 times the height of the decorative “light pole” base. Original aerial view drawing shows the decorative “Light Pole” setting on a much

  larger pedestal. It also showed a vase setting on a pedestal at each corner of the Lobby. The “globe” light fixtures do not exist in earlier images. The decorative “light pole” base was built into the vase pedestal. It may have been a decorative light fixture to light the stairs at night. These images of the Hotel Geneva are from a Real Photo Post Card Published by L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee and a photograph by Lynn Anderson from No Rooms Available.
 
1: Darwin D. Martin “Birdhouse” designed in 1904.
 
2: Real photo post card of the Hotel Geneva (circa 1940's), published by L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee.
 
2a: Detail of the West vase and decorative “Light pole” base. It is most likely constructed of wood and leaded glass.
 
2b: Detail of the West decorative “Light pole” base which was built into the vase pedestal.
 
Original aerial view drawing drawing. "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901", Vol. 1.
 
2c: Detail of the East decorative “Light pole” base.
 
2d: Detail Lobby windows and trellis. Trellis very close to original drawing.
 
2e: It appears that neon lighting has been added to the lettering.
 
3a: The hotel in the late 1950s still boasted lush grounds and gardens surrounded its front driveway. Some architects consider it the prototype of the modern motel. Photograph by Lynn Anderson. (Note: Al Hermansen’s new 1956 Buick Special convertible is pictured in this photograph.)  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
3b: Detail: I had the opportunity to speak with Al Hermansen, and he confirmed that the decorative “Light Pole” did indeed contains lights. “We had a heck of a time changing the lights inside the base.”  From “No Rooms Available”.
 
 
 
FIREPLACE AND ANDIRONS
 

Wright often used identical or similar details in commissions of approximately the same date.  An example is the identical wall sconce used in the Little Residence, Peoria 1902 (S.070) and in the Dana Residence 1902 (S.072).  Another example is the Baluster used in the Robert W. Roloson Rowhouses 1894 (S.026) and the Nathan G. Moore Residence 1895 (S.034).
       We have identified five additional examples of Andirons similar to those designed for the Hotel Geneva.  The earliest example is the Winslow Residence 1894 (S.024).  What can be seen in the photograph below indicates that they consisted of the spheres only and lacked any supporting brackets.
       The second example is the Bradley Residence 1900 (S.052).

  These Andirons include side brackets.
       The third example is the Davenport Residence 1901 (S.068).  These are consistent with the Bradley Andirons.
       The fourth example is
one of the illustrations from "A Small House with Lots of Room in It".  Ladies Home Journal, July 1901 page 15. The illustration matches the Bradley and Davenport Andirons.
       The fifth example, according to Hanks, The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, 1979, p. 76, were a set of Andirons in the Raymond W. Evans Residence, 1908 (S.140),
matching the Bradley and Davenport Andirons.
 
Hotel Geneva (1911 - S.171)
 
Hotel Geneva Lobby Fireplace. The lobby included built-in seating, a large semicircular fireplace with a semicircular metal sculpture and fireplace andirons. The fireplace is similar to the Meyer May and Coonley house fireplaces.  Photograph by Richard Nickel in 1967.
 
Detail of the Hotel Geneva semicircular metal sculpture and fireplace Andirons.  The are similar to the Andirons in the E. Arthur Davenport Residence, 1901 (S.068).  Photograph by Richard Nickel in 1967.
 
 
William Herman Winslow Residence (1894 - S.024)
 
William H. Winslow House Reception Hall (1894).  Photographed in 1894, printed in 1959.  Chicago Architectural Photographing Company, Chicago.
 
Detail of the Winslow Andirons.  This is the earliest example of this style of Andirons.  The Sphere is similar in size, but lacks any side support brackets.
 
 
B. Harley Bradley Residence (1900 - S.052)
 
Fireplace and Andirons from the B. Harley Bradley Residence Living Room, 1900 (S.052).  Image courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten, Wright 1911, page 83.
 
 
E. Arthur Davenport Residence (1901 - S.068)
 
Fireplace and Andirons from the E. Arthur Davenport Residence Living Room, 1901 (S.068).  Courtesy GI 9: Global Interior #9 Futagawa 1975.
 
Detail of the Fireplace and Andirons from the E. Arthur Davenport Residence Living Room, 1901 (S.068).  Courtesy GI 9: Global Interior #9 Futagawa 1975.  For an additional photograph also see Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901 Volume 1, 1991 page 209.
 
Fireplace and Andirons from the E. Arthur Davenport Residence Living Room, 1901 (S.068).  Image courtesy The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, Hanks 1979, p. 76, fig. 66. According to Hanks, Andirons of this design were also used in the Raymond W. Evans Residence, 1908 (S.140).
 
 
Ladies' Home Journal, July 1901
 
One of the illustrations from "A Small House with Lots of Room in It".  The illustration matches the Bradley and Davenport Andirons.  Ladies Home Journal, July 1901 page 15.  (Published by The Curtis Publishing Company, Philadelphia)
 
Detail of the illustrations from "A Small House with Lots of Room in It".  The illustration matches the Bradley and Davenport Andirons.  Ladies Home Journal, July 1901 page 15.  (Published by The Curtis Publishing Company, Philadelphia)
 
 
Raymond W. Evans Residence, 1908 (S.140)
 
 According to Hanks, The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, Hanks 1979, p. 76, Andirons matching the Bradley and Davenport Andirons were also used in the Raymond W. Evans Residence, 1908 (S.140).
 
 
 
GENEVA INN HISTORY IN POSTCARDS
 

Designed in 1911 as "The Geneva Inn", "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. During its final years it was known as "The Geneva Inn". It was demolished in 1970. There are very few photographs of the Hotel Geneva, so postcards become a good record. Even in the book "Lost Wright", by Carla Lind,

  the only image used is the post card published in 1938. The problem is dating post cards chronologically. Few cards were dated.  Curt-Teich dated their cards with a code, but that date indicated when the post card was published, not photographed.  Post marks give you a general idea when a card was published, but post cards could last for over a decade, so postmarks are not reliable. Our attempted is to place these post cards in chronological order.
     
1: Circa 1912. "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis. Frank Lloyd Wright’s original illustration for the proposed Hotel Lake Geneva in 1911. This early drawings included a proposed three story section on the East end that was never built. Illustration was exhibited at the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute on May 5, 1913. It was published in the Architectural Record, June 1913 Designed in 1911 "The Geneva" opened in August 1912. Within two years, it changed hands due to financial difficulties. By the end of 1914 and the beginning of 1915 the name was changed to the "Hotel Geneva", and it stayed the Hotel Geneva most of its life. Back: "Motor to Lake Geneva. Just the right distance an the roads in good shape. Stop at ‘The Geneva’ the finest resort hotel in the middle west. European plan. Every room with bath. Large dining rooms. Meals a la Carte. You will like them." Printed message on the left, typed address on the right. Used as a direct mail advertisement. P.M. May 1, 1913, just in time for the summer season. (Published by Acmegraph Co., Chicago.)
 
2: Circa 1912. "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis. This may be one of the earliest images of the Hotel Geneva. Notice the lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases. Possible decorative flag flying from left “Light Pole” as seen in the original drawings. “Light Poles” are at full height. Lack of “Hotel Geneva” lettering above Lobby windows. Globe lights not installed yet. Down spouts above Lobby windows have not been installed. (Published by V. O. Hammon Co., Chicago, IL.)
 
2b: Circa 1912. 3464. "The Geneva," Lake Geneva, Wis., circa 1912. Designed in 1911, The Geneva opened in August 1912. "Light Poles" are at full height. Lack of "Hotel Geneva" lettering above Lobby windows. Globe lights not installed yet. Down spouts above Lobby windows have not been installed. (Published by E. A. Bishop, Pub. Racine, Wis. Made in U. S. A.) On back, C. T. Photochrom. R-37748. Post marked Aug 23, 1913.
 
2c: Circa 1914-15. Reprinted in the 1939 Souvenir Folder, it is now titled the Hotel Geneva. (E.A. Bishop Publisher D-5746)
 
3: Circa 1914-1915. “Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. 19019-r.” This may also be one of the earliest images of the Hotel Geneva. Notice the lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases. “Light Poles” are at full height. Lack of “Hotel Geneva” lettering above Lobby windows. Globe lights not installed yet. Down spouts above Lobby windows have not been installed. 1914-1915 (Published by C.R. Childs, Chicago).
4: Circa 1914-1915. This is the same image as #3, but hand touched to include foliage. The “Light Poles” have been retouched over.
 
5: Hotel Geneva 1915. Lack of any landscaping, even in the large vases. “Light Poles” are at full height. Lack of “Hotel Geneva” lettering above Lobby windows. Globe light or small vase possibly on the left stair pedestal. Down spouts above Lobby windows are installed. Very good view of the lower Lobby windows. From “Lake Geneva”, Published by Morrison and Rogers, Lake Geneva, Wis. Copyright 1915, by C. MacKay Morrison.
 
6: Circa 1916-1919. Light Poles have been reduced in height. “Hotel Geneva” lettering above Lobby windows have been added. Sign and lamp post added in the street. Landscaping has begun. Possible flower vase has been added to the stair pedestal. A sign is visible on the left exterior of the Dining Room, a possible sign for the restaurant. The earliest postmark I have seen to date is September 14, 1922.  (Recently verified a P.M. as early as 1919.) Published by V.O. Hammon Publishing Company, which published pictorial postcards from 1904 until 1923.
 
7: Circa 1916-1919. One flag is visible on the top right corner of the Lobby. Flower vase has been added to the stair pedestal. A plaque has been added to pedestal to the left of stairs. Small globe lights are visible under side of the trellis. Sign has been removed from the outside of the Dining Room. Landscaping is flourishing. Published in 1934 (4A-H193). (E.A. Bishop Publisher #3582, 4A-H193)
 
8: Circa 1919-1921. Building has been painted white. One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals. Landscaping is flourishing. The earliest postmark I have seen to date using this image folder) is August 1921. (E.A. Bishop Publisher #3581, R-80820)
 
9: Close up of the Lobby. Planter on the right foreground seen in close up of aerial view drawing (below), but does not appear in later images. Medium globe lights on the corner of the upper Lobby/Terrace. Awning frame also visible in the upper Lobby/Terrace. Flags have appeared and may have been added during WWI. Real photo PC, Published by AZO between 1910-1930. http://www.playle.com/realphoto/photoa.php
 
10: Original aerial view drawing. "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901", Vol. 1.
 
11: Circa 1920-1923. Striped awning has been added to the left side of the Lobby. Awning frame also visible in the upper Lobby/ Terrace. Glass or screens have enclosed the Gallery. A smoke stack appears by the chimney. Published by V.O. Hammon Publishing Company, which published pictorial postcards from 1904 until 1923
 
12: Circa 1920-1923. Published by V.O. Hammon Publishing Company, which published pictorial postcards from 1904 until 1923.
 
13: Circa 1920-1924. Very similar time frame to #11. Awning on left side of Lobby is rolled up. Real photo Post Card. (J.J. Gregory - Cedar Rapids, Ia)
 
13a: Circa 1926.  Image from Picturesque Lake Geneva (Published by the Wisconsin Transportation Company, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 1926)
 
14: Very similar to #13, but flags have been removed. Stripes on awning very visible. Horizontal evergreen trees, 5-6 feet tall, are visible in the right Planter.
 
15: Circa 1935. Viewed from the Municipal Recreation Building. Bridges across the lagoon have been built as well as the rockery along the lagoon’s edge. Published in 1935 (5A-H328), PM July 7, 1950.
 
16: Circa 1938. Viewed from across the lagoon. Horizontal evergreen trees, 8-10 feet tall. Smoke stack either removed or retouched out. Globe lights removed or retouched out as well as the Lobby gutters. Arched windows above Lobby. Published in 1938 by E. A. Bishop (8A-H609), PM Aug 22, 1944.
 
17: Awning on the left side of the Lobby has been changed. Automobiles are of an older vintage. Tree to the left of the Lobby and tall evergreens are consistent with #16. Brick at street entry in the bottom right has been added. (Published by L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee) “Beautiful Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis. #B-1290". Real Photo Post Card, Postmark August 27, 1947.
 
17a: "Scene at Lake Geneva." Circa 1940s. 
 
18: E.C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee, Wis. #7285.
 
19: Street sign and lamp post are gone. Brick entry has been added to both sides of the drive. Flags have been added to the upper terrace of the Lobby. Published by Fairbanks Card Company, Brookline, Mass.
 
20: Circa 1950. Single lamp post has been added in the street. Vertical evergreen trees in front of the Lobby have been removed. Automobiles are of an older vintage. Published by the E.F. Godfrey in 1950, OC-H1943.
 
21: Circa 1950. This is one of the earlier glossy color photographs, so either the color is off, or the building has been painted golden yellow. The tall evergreens are back in front of the Lobby. Lettering above the Lobby has been changed to an outlined text. Published by E. F. Godfrey, Lake Geneva, Wis. in 1950, #OC-K400.
 
22: Circa 1953. Color is clearly back to a white color. Flags on the two corners of the Lobby Terrace have been removed. Clear size relationship of the stair pedestal with the woman standing next to it on the left. Published by L.L. Cook Co. in 1953. (#405. #67711.)
 
22a: Circa 1955. Hotel Geneva. “Hermansen’s Hotel Geneva. A fine Resort Hotel on the Lake - in town. Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Copyright 1955, The L. L. Cook Co. #88163. From a Natural Color Transparency. The L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee, Wis.”
 
23: Circa 1950s. The tall evergreens in front of the Lobby are very tall. Published by Colourpicture Publishers, #P22375. Wisconsin Post Card Co. Most likely Mid 50's.
 
 
 
DEMOLISHED 1970
 
Date: 1988

Title: Lake Geneva Magazine - March/April 1988 (Published Bimonthly by R. James Beam, dba Lake Geneva Magazine, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin)

Author: 1, 3, 4) Schaefer, Ted   2) Meehan, Patrick J.

Description: 1) “No Rooms Available. Once-Famous Lake Geneva Hotel Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Checks out of Local History.” “The lobby - roofed by a stained glass skylight and lit by handing lamps designed by Wright - included a alcove with a massive open wood-burning fireplace between built-in upholstered benches. All his life Wright loved fireplaces and according to some Wright scholars, the Lake Geneva Hotel fireplace, with its arching brick sunburst pattern, was one of his best.”   
2) “Origins of the Lake Geneva Hotel.” 
3) More Wright Designs Built Near Delavan Lake  
4) Johnson Wax Building Showcases Wright’s Unique Style. Includes thirteen photographs and one Illustration. Original cover price $3.50.  (Digital version)

Size: 8.4 x 10.8. 

Pages: Pp 6-13

ST#: 1988.42.0209
   

(Note, the Lake Geneva Magazine is not longer being publishing, I have
copied excerpts of the text, but give all credits available.)

 
Lake Geneva Magazine - March/April 1988
Published Bimonthly by R. James Beam, dba Lake Geneva Magazine, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin

Excerpts from:
“No Rooms Available”, Pp 6-13
By Ted Schaefer

No Rooms Available: Once-Famous Lake Geneva Hotel Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright Checks out of Local History.

       ...late summer of 1912 - a stunningly different but equally memorable (as the Whiting House) resort hotel was occupying spot and officially opened for diners and overnight guests. Wright’s long, low, cream- colored two-story building with its red cantilevered roofs overhanging it’s banks of leaded glass windows stretched from Broad Street to Center Street, sending terraces, gardens, and lawn toward the lakefront. The Lake Geneva Hotel’s interior was just as remarkable. The spacious dining room gleamed under a lighted, multicolored art-glass ceiling, its south side carrying a large outdoor terrace. According to local newspaper accounts, “The dining room, furnished with brown fiber rush chairs, has an inviting appearance. The lobby and loggia are also furnished in rush fiber in green with green leather cushions for the chairs, divans and settees. Green and brown are the prevailing tones throughout the hotel.”

‘The lobby - roofed by a stained glass skylight and lit by handing lamps designed by Wright - included a alcove with a massive open wood-burning fireplace between built-in upholstered benches. All his life Wright loved fireplaces and according to some Wright scholars, the Lake Geneva Hotel fireplace, with its arching brick sunburst pattern, was one of his best.’

       In its early days the hotel and its dining room did a booming business. State one newspaper report, “On Saturday over fifty applications for rooms had to be turned down, while the restaurant has been serving almost the limit of dinner.” Current Lake Geneva resident Einar Anderson, 94, remembered the hotel restaurant ... “The prices were high because it was the best hotel in town, and it catered to the people who had money.”
       ...Despite its aura of prosperity, however, the hotel - always alarmingly expensive to operate and maintain - soon showed signs of financial stress: from 1912 to 1915, for instance, it went through three different pair of owners. At a March 1914 sheriff’s sale it sold for a mere $57,780.83. (A second foreclosure sale in February 1939 gave the resort to the Schroeder hotel organization for $42,000.)
       ...A mythic character easily earned that appellation was the hotel’s most colorful, most popular, most controversial proprietor, Hobart “Hobe” Hermansen, who ran the hospice from 1941 to 1966.
       ...It was during the Hermansen reign that Frank Lloyd Wright would occasionally visit his old hotel for lunch or dinner, or even for an overnight stay, according to O’Brien and Hermansen’s nephew, Allen. Wright and his wife, Olgivanna, were good friends with the P.K. Wrigleys and usually stayed on their estate when the came to Lake Geneva, but a look at the building was sometimes a part of the itinerary.

...’By the mid-1960s it was increasingly evident the Lake Geneva Hotel was dying. The windows leaked. The water stained wallpaper was peeling. Grime gathered. Fissures appeared in the stucco. The front terrace grew concrete block walls and an ugly kidney-shaped swimming pool.'

       ...Hermanson sold the hotel to the White River Corporation in 1962, foreclosed on the new owner in 1965, then sold it back to them again in 1966.
       ... When plans were announced to raze the hotel...  A committee of architectural heritage elicited promises from the White River Corporation that the lobby would be carefully dismantled - fireplace, benches, oak beams, skylight, leaded glass casement windows - so it could be reassembled someday in a university museum.
       ...The Wright-designed artifacts, meanwhile were being sold, given away, and stolen.
       ...Lynn Johnson...  a former Wright apprentice at Taliesin and currently an architect/designer with Thompson Associates...  studied and photographed the Lake Geneva Hotel in 1959-60, and found it quite impressive. “I always thought it was quite dramatic...  The most sticking thing about it was the overhang on that veranda along the lower rooms - I think it was ten- or twelve-foot overhang, which was really extraordinary for the time.
       ...Milwaukee architect Dan Thompson said, One of my professors at Iowa State actually took his summer vacation in Lake Geneva just to stay in the building. He felt the most notable thing about it - other than it was a Wright building - was the fact that it was the forerunner of the modern motor hotel. It was considered the prototype, really: the first of an entire trend catering to the motoring public.”  Remembered Thompson, who grew up in Fontana, “As a kid, this building didn’t hit me as a building, it hit me as a place, a really interesting place, because the building was married to the site so well.
       “And it just fit - it felt as though it has been there forever.”
 

Photographs by Lynn Anderson and Alyn W. Hess.  Captions by Ted Schaefer. (Notes: When indicated are added by Douglas Steiner)
 
The west side of the hotel on Broad Street housed an elegant first floor restaurant and a basement tavern where gamblers convened. Photograph by Lynn Anderson.
 
The hotel in the late 1950s still boasted lush grounds and gardens surrounded its front driveway. Some architects consider it the prototype of the modern motel. Photograph by Lynn Anderson. (Note: Al Hermansen’s new 1956 Buick Special convertible is pictured in this photograph.)
 
Detail: (Note: I had the opportunity to speak with Al Hermansen, and he confirmed that the decorative “Light Pole” did indeed contains lights. “We had a heck of a time changing the lights inside the base.”)
 
In the last days the Lake Geneva Hotel, stripped of its ornaments and trellises, fell into disrepair, with even its bushes untrimmed, its only profitable feature was a swinging singles bar called Snoopy’s.  Photograph by Alyn W. Hess. (Additional information about the Hotel Geneva.)
 
Detail: (Note: These glass globe lights did not appear in images until sometime around 1919-1921.  There were two sizes, a smaller size that sat upon the outside corners of the lobby, pictured, and a larger globe that sat top the pedestals on either side of the entrance, where an upside vase sits in the above image. Al Hermansen said that every winter the globes were stored indoors. They would joke, “It’s time to take Frank’s balls inside now.”)
 
The hotel lobby’s banks of leaded-glass casement windows opened to a view of the front terrace and the lake. Photograph by Lynn Anderson. (The big outside globe was not an original Wright artifact.)
 
Roofing the front lobby and drenching it with multicolored light was a stained glass skylight designed by Wright himself. Photograph by Lynn Anderson.
 
Oak beams and trellises and flowers in the window-pots gave a warm rustic touch to the front entrance of the famous hotel. Photograph by Lynn Anderson.
 
 
The hotel was a difficult building to demolish, but it finally tumbled down in January 1970. Two years later a concrete high-rise condominium took its place. Photograph by Lynn Anderson.
 
   
 
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