ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

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OAK PARK HOME & STUDIO (1889-1897 - S.002-004)
 
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BOOKS
 
Date: 1902

Title: The Book of a Hundred Houses. A collection of Pictures, Plans and Suggestions for Householders (Hard Cover) (Published by Herbert S. Stone & Company, Eldridge Court, Chicago. Herbert S. Stone also published House Beautiful. Top edge trimmed and gilt, others uncut.)

Author: Editor: Dow, Joy Wheeler; Chapter written by: Granger, Alfred H.

Description: The article "An Architects Studio " by Alfred H. Granger was first published in the December 1899 issue of House Beautiful. It is reprinted in this volume. "An Architects Studio. When one attempts to describe almost any modern building, the first question to be asked is, ‘What style?’ ...One of the most radical of these opponents is Mr. Frank L. Wright, whose house and studio I have the privilege of describing... One’s first impression of the dining-room is its simplicity – no rugs, no curtains, and only the necessary furniture, which, however, is in perfect harmony with the room. One entire end of the room opposite the fireplace is practically of glass, laid in leading of a very delicate design, which was evidently inspired by the lotus flower. The harmony of color between the brown and the red is perfect, and is accentuated (if one can accentuate a harmony) by the color of the walls and ceiling, which are covered with arras of a soft brown, and which give to the entire room a golden tone such as one sees in a rich sunset. In the center of the ceiling is a design of exquisite tracery, through which at night a soft light filters, and gives to the whole room a warm, rich glow. Includes 5 photographs. Note: Listed in Sweeney, but not seen by the author. (First Edition) (Sweeney 35B)

Size: 7 x 8.75

Pages: Pp 207-214

S#:
0035.00B.0317
   






   

Date: 1975

Publication: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio, Oak Park, Ill  (Soft Cover)

Author: Kalec, Donald G.; Heinz, Thomas A.

Description: (First Edition)  (Sweeney 1967)

Pages: 24

S#: 1967.00.1000

1975 Version: Back

1975 Version: Front

 
   
Date: 1978

Publication: The Plan for Restoration and Adaptive Use of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio (Soft Cover)  (Published by The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, London, for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation

Description: Negotiations began in 1972 for the purchase of the property by the Foundation.  They took occupancy in July of 1974.  Forward by Arthur Drexler.  Five members of the foundation board of directors deserve special mention as prime contributors: William Dring, Thomas Heinz, Carl Hunter, Donald Kalec, John Thorpe.  Wire-bound soft cover, illustrated throughout with photos, drawings and illustrations.  Three copies.  (First Edition)

Size: 15 x 11

Pages: 82

ST#: 978.09.0902; 1978.22.0806; 1978.29.0607
   
Date: 1982

Publication: The Home & Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright in Oak Park, Il 1889-1911

Author: Kalec, Donald G.

Description: Revise, update and revision to Sweeney #1967 (First Edition)

Pages: 30

ST#: 1982.13.0702 

   
Date: 1988

Publication: The Oak Park Home and Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright  (Soft Cover)

Author: Abernathy, Ann;  Thorpe, John

Description: Original SC List Price $9.95.  (First Edition)

Pages: 48

ST#: 1988.09.0102

   
Date: 1994

Title: The Wright Family Library (Soft Cover) (Published by The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation Research Center, Oak Park, Illinois)

Author: Klinkow, Margaret

Description: "Of all the books that the Wright family acquired during their Oak Park years, a small but enlightening collection has been gathered together again in the Research Center of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. The following list includes books owned by Frank Lloyd Wright, his wife Catherine, and their children, primarily, as well as books of Catherine’s parents, the Tobins, and Frank ‘s mother, Anne Wright." (Label on back cover $7.50.) (First Edition)

Size: 7 x 11.

Pages: Pp 27

ST#: 1994.71.0513

   
Date: 1996

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (Hard Cover DJ) (Published in cooperation with The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation by Edition Axel Menges, Stuttgart, Germany)

Author: Harrington, Elaine; Photographs by Hedrich-Blessing

Description: Opus 23. "It was in his house in Oak Park that Frank Lloyd Wright made his first contributions to the modern movement. In 1889 he designed the first part of the house, in 1895 he added to it for his wife, Catherine, and their family, and in 1898 for his architectural practice. The entire building was a learning laboratory of modern architecture. While not a Prairie School house, it led to the development of the Prairie School. Wright's constant changes to this complex paralleled the evolution of his early architectural work and career. There, with his young assistants, he rethought the plan, spaces, materials, proportions, and lines of American residential architecture, creating a revolution on the Prairie. His home and studio provided the architectural environment in which to experiment with his ideas in three dimensions... Included in the book is a portfolio of historic black and white photographs of the building, a number of them taken by Frank Lloyd Wright himself." (Publisher’s description.) Photography by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. (First Edition)

Size: 11.25 x 12

Pages: Pp 56

ST#: 1996.77.0416

   
Date: 1998

Title: In Wright’s Shadow. Artists and Architects at the Oak Park Studio (Soft Cover) (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation.)

Author: Martone, Fran

Description: Produced to commemorate the centennial of Wright's Oak Park, Illinois, architectural studio, the booklet focuses on sixteen artists and architects who worked for Wright between 1898 and 1909. Mahony, Griffin, Bock, Ostertag, White, Giannini, Elmslie, Van Bergen, Sullivan, Niedecken... "One hundred years ago, Frank Lloyd Wright, arguably America’s most famous architect, founded his Oak Park, Illinois, studio. This studio was to become the birthplace of a uniquely American style of architecture eventually known as the Prairie style. This indigenous architectural style explored the use of open floor plans..."  (First Edition)   

Size: 10.75 x 7

Pages: Pp 25

ST#:
1998.92.9217
   
Date: 2001

Publication: Building A Legacy: The Restoration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Home & Studio (Soft Cover)  (Published by Pomegranate)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust; Forward by Eric Wright

Description: Original SC List Price $30.00. (First Edition)

Pages: 150

ST#: 2001.32.0504

   
Date: 2001

Title: Wright for Wright  (Hard Cover - DJ)  (Published by Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., New York)

Author: Howard, Hugh; Photographed by Straus, Roger III

Description: The buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright exercise a kind of architectural magic on the people who visit them, inspiring a sense of wonder at their visual elements, dramatic energy, and ingenious compositional features. These qualities are no more evident than in the buildings that Wright designed for himself and his family. Wright for Wright is the first book to focus exclusively on these seven houses and ten other structures. Free from the constraints of the client-architect relationship, the buildings present Wright at his unfettered best. Photographed for the first time in exquisite, full-color panoramic views by longtime Wright photographer Roger Straus, these images capture the buildings as part of the landscape-- the way Wright envisioned them. As well, Hugh Howard's insightful text reveals an intimate understanding of the great architect's art and philosophy. (Dust Jacket) First Edition. Original HC List Price $50.00. Two copies. (First Edition)

Size: 10.25 x 10.25

Pages: Pp 160

ST#: 2001.27.0603, 2001.52.0511

   
Date: 2003

Title: Oak Park in Vintage Postcards (Published by Arcadia Publishing, Charleston SC, Chicago IL, Portsmouth NH, San Francisco CA)

Author: Deuchler, Douglas

Description: "Postcard sales were big busioness in the early 20th century. In fact, by 1909 Americans were buying more than one billion postcards a year... Cheap, efficient, and relatively speedy, they were the e-mail of their day." Includes eleven vintage postcards related to Wright including: The Horse Fountain (2); Gale Residence (1); Heutley Residence (2); Wright’s Home and Studio (2); Nathan Moore Residence I (2 - including this 1906) and II (1); Unity Temple (1). Original list price $19.99. (First Edition) Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 6.5 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 128

ST#: 2003.42.0711

   
   
   
BROCHURES
 
Date: 1974

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio. (Produced by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio were designed and built by Wright between 1889 and 1898. Remodeled constantly until 1911, the buildings were the experimental models for his original, distinctively American design expression known as the Prairie Style." Informational brochure on the history of the Home and Studio, information on touring, and the Foundation. Includes five illustrations. (Second copy: Gift from Kathryn Smith.)

Size: 3.75 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 6

ST#: 1963.08.1101, 1963.08.0911

   
Date: 1980's

Description: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio", Produced by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation.

Size:

Pages: Pp 8

ST#: 1980.04.0604

   
Date: 1980s

Description: "Explore Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park", Produced by the Illinois Office of Tourism, Pp 6

Size:

ST#: 1980.06.0604

   
Date: 1986

Title: Explore, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park, Illinois.

Description: "Oak Park... contains the world’s largest collection of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture. Between 1889 and 1909, Wright built 25 structures here, including Unity Temple and his own Home and Studio. It is here that Wright developed his renowned Prairie style of low, earth-hugging dwellings that would change the course of 20th Century architecture." Includes one illustration, two maps and ten photographs. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 4 x 9

Pages: Pp 8

ST#: 1986.41.0811

   
Date: 1993

Description: "Explore Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park, Illinois" (Published by the Oak Park Tour Center).  Brochure for tour information, including maps and seven photographs.

Size: 4 x 9

Pages: Pp 8

ST#: 1993.40.0305

   
Date: Circa 1995

Title: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. Safeguarding the Creative Legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Description: The Foundation. For more than a century, the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio has reminded visitors of the genius that worked within its walls. Here, Wright conceived the Prairie style – the first of his many contributions to the development of modern architecture..." Other sections include; The Robie House Restoration; The Home and Studio; Education and Outreach; Join Us; Collections. Three additional single sheets inserted. Includes 8 photographs.

Size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 6

ST#: 1995.73.0415

   
Date: 1998

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright: Oak Park Home and Studio, Robie House (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation). 

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation

Description: Brochure for tour information, including maps and nine photographs. Two Copies.

Size: 4 x 9

Pages: Pp 8

ST#: 1998.42.0305, 1998.43.0305

   
Date: 2002

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright: Oak Park Home and Studio, Frederick C. Robie House (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust). 

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust

Description: Brochure for tour information, including maps and fourteen photographs.

Size: 4 x 9

Pages: Pp 12

ST#: 2002.58.0305

   
   
   
GLASS
 
Date: 2014

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright 125th Home & Studio Legacy Anniversary 8 oz. Champagne Flutes, 2014.

Description: Text etched on the surface: "(Logo) Frank Lloyd Wright. 125 Years, Home and Studio, 1889-2014, An American Legacy." The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust celebrated 2014 as the Legacy Year to mark the 125th anniversary of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio and the 40th anniversary of the Trust. Engraved in the base: "Luigi Bormioli," produced for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Original list price $20.00, set of two.

Size: 8 oz. 9.25" tall.

ST#: 2014.05.0814

   
   
   
LIGHT SCREENS
     
Date: Playroom Wood Light Screen

Description: Light Screen: Frank Lloyd Wright Oak Park Home and Studio Playroom Wood Light Screen.  The Playroom addition was designed in 1895.  Produced by Prairie Arts.  Adapted from Wright’s original designs, this is one of the four oak fretwork grilles that comprise the playroom's barrel-vaulted ceiling skylight.  Oak veneered panel.

Size:24" x 48"

ST#: 2000.52.0607

 

Oak Park Home and Studio Playroom Ceiling

 

   
   
   
MOVIE SCENES
   
Date: 2017

Title: Zookeeper's Wife

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Zookeeper's Wife? The Zookeeper's Wife is an account of Antonina and Jan Zabinski, keepers of the Warsaw Zoo. They were responsible for saving hundreds of people and animals during the German invasion of Poland. It was released in 2017, and filmed in Prague, Czech Republic. There is a moment in the film (left) that pans past a large Frank Lloyd Wright Oak Park Studio Concrete Urn at 1:56:28 in the film. We would love to add additional information. If anyone can shed light on this mystery, we would love to hear from you. Right: Frank Lloyd Wright's Oak Park Home and Studio, photographed by Douglas M. Steiner, June 10, 2016.
   
   
   
PHOTOGRAPHS
     
Date: 1891-92

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home 1891 to 1892 (1895 - S.002-4).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright purchased the lot in Oak Park in May 1889, drawings for the home are dated 1889. Construction did not begin until late August and was probably finished by the end of 1889 or the early part of 1890. The original working drawings of the 1889 home still exist in the Taliesin Archives. This photograph published in "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, The Plan for Restoration and Adaptive Use," 1978, page 20, and in "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 11. Caption: "West facade of home, facing Forest Avenue, about 1891 or 1892. Interlocked windows have been modified, becoming a band of casement windows. Diamond-pane art glass now appears in all the window sash. Awning used to block the western sun." Two large vases sit atop the piers on either side of the stairs. A decorative gate enclosed the porch, and begs to be a Wright design. Label pasted to verso: "The Museum of Modern Art. Wright, Frank Lloyd. House of the Architect, Oak Park, Illinois, Front of the House, 1889."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0011.10.0216

   
Date: 1898

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace (1895 - S.004) circa 1898.

Description: After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Possibly staged and photographed just after completion. Brick fireplace with a circular opening. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. Cubed stones balance the opening and set on the hearth. Tucked behind the large vase on the far left is a Sullivanesque frieze, similar to the Winslow door panel or the panel that faces the Roloson row houses. A Wright designed studio arm chair is to the left of the fireplace. A large floor matt with an Native American pattern sets in front of the fireplace, a smaller runner is draped over the chair. Wright commissioned Orlando Giannini to paint three American Indian murals in his Oak Park home in in 1895. John Lloyd Wright wrote, " ‘Skinny’ Giannini from Italy painted American Indians in brilliant colors on the walls of Papa’s bedroom... Papa liked Indians!" "My Father Who is on Earth," 1946, page 34. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Size: 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 0032.15.0514

   
Date: 1898

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace Detail of Heller Frieze (1895 - S.004) circa 1898.

Description: On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. Winged maiden set within a Sullivanesque design. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Size: 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph.

S#: 0032.16.0514

   
Date: 1899

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio(1895 - S.004) circa 1899.

Description: Wright hung four Heller frieze panels above fireplace on the left.After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Brick fireplace with a circular opening is on the left. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Studio is filled with drawing boards, sculptures (3 visible), drawings and plants. An art glass piece hangs in the window. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Size: 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0036.03.0514

   
Date: Circa 1900

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio (1895 - S.003) circa 1900.

Description: Wright Weed Holders, Studio Chair with Richard Bock Sculpture in Oak Park Studio. Possibly staged by Wright. Published in "Architectural Review" June 1900, page 65. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" 1911, page 98. The chair was from Wright's Studio. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist", Bock, 1989, page 67. Wright used this photograph in his announcement of his first exhibition in 1902. Most likely photographed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 6.7 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 0041.08.0712

   
Date: Circa 1910

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Playroom (1895 S.003)

Photographer: Henry Fuermann & Sons

Description: Published in "In The Nature of Material" Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 16, credited to Fuermann; also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910" Manson, 1958, page 47, credited to Fuermann and dated 1910. Caption on verso: "Abundant use of wood and stone in living room of Wright’s own Oak Park home, built in 1895, sowed seeds for natural building materials often seen in today’s homes. Wall mural over fireplace recalls popularity of this type of interior decorating treatment today. Hanging lamps over chairs near fireplace may be forerunners of today’s pulley lights. Chicago Architectural Photography Co. Photo. (Stamped) Mar 27, 1957. " Noted changes from photograph published in House Beautiful, February 1897: Built-in window seats on left and right are removed; Windows on left cover have been sealed off; Four light fixtures have been added; Two leaded glass cabinets have been added.4 on either side of fireplace. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print

S#: 0094.06.0310

   
Date: 1911

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio (1895 S.003)

Description: "In December of 1911 he left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine. This wall was constructed to add privacy to the garden and ‘Library’. "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages38-40. Stamped on verso: "Dec 2 - 1911". Photographed by "Bu... & At..., Press Photographers, Chicago." Clipping on verso: "Although Frank Lloyd Wright’s home in Oak Park today serves as a museum, it was built in 1889 for about $6,000. In 1911, workers built the brick fence that assures privacy." From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times.

Size: 10 x 8 Print, High res image

S#: 0104.07.0410

   
Date: Circa 1911

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home (1895 - S.002-4) Dining Room Circa 1911.

Description: Dining Room looking south. In 1911, Frank Lloyd Wright converted the home into a rental property. He added two cantilevered lights on the bay end of the Dining Room. "In December of 1911 he left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine. "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages38-40. Most likely photographed after restoration, before Wright left Oak Park. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph.

ST#: 0104.19.0814

   
Date: 1911

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio, Bedroom for Mrs. Wright. (1895 - S.003) 1911.

Description: "In December of 1911 Wright left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. In 1911, Wright’s original two-story drafting room was converted to a living room on the first floor, and four bedrooms for his children on the second. His office which was adjacent to the drafting room on the first floor was converted to a dining room, and a second level was added above it creating a bedroom for Mrs. Wright. The fireplace was added, tying it into the original drafting room chimney. The windows on the left look out over Chicago Avenue. A Wright designed slant-back chair is visible against the wall under the windows. A stubbed wall is visible on the far right. To it’s right, two steps lead down to a landing and out to the hallway. Courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, Oak Park. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0104.14.1013

   
Date: 1911

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio, Bedroom for Children. (1895 - S.003) 1911.

Description: "In December of 1911 Wright left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. In 1911, Wright’s original two-story drafting room was converted to a living room on the first floor, and four bedrooms for his children on the second. This was Catherine’s Bedroom, the northeast bedroom, looking northeast. Three pieces of furniture are visible. A) Left: Slant back side chair. Wright designed them for his home in Oak Park, 1904. Front and back legs are straight. The back legs have feet, the top is capped. Oak, leather upholstered seat, 40.25 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). B) Japanese Print Table, designed by Wright in 1898. Used in Catherine’s room as a desk. 48.5 (H) x 44 (W) x 26.25 (D). C) In front of desk: Low back chair. Designed by Wright circa 1908. Very similar to the Isabel Roberts Side Chair (1908), but shorter. The main difference is an additional horizontal trim along the base of the seat which runs along the front and sides. The Cassina Catalog, 1999, p. 40-1, lists this as 608 Coonley 1, and dates the original as 1907. Possible redesign of the Roberts 1901 side chair for Coonley 1907? Yellow birch, 27 (H) x 17.25 (W) x 14 (D). The windows on the left look out over Chicago Avenue. Courtesy Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, Oak Park. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0104.15.1013

     
Date: C 1911-1925

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home and Studio Master (North) Bedroom (1889 - S.002)

Description: Looking North after 1911 renovation by Wright. The Master Bedroom looking North, shows the vault ceiling and mural painted by Orlando Giannini. "In December of 1911 he (Wright) left Oak Park and moved to Spring Green... There he built Taliesin I for his new life with Mamah Cheney. Before leaving Oak Park, Wright extensively remodeled the home and studio. The studio was converted to a dwelling for his wife and four children still living at home. The home was converted into a rental unit to provide income for Catherine..." "The Plan for Restoration" 1978, pages 38-40. This could explain the single beds and sealed doors to the balcony. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons Photographic Company. The Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust dates this photograph circa 1911-1925. The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives, dates this photograph circa 1890-1910 and acquired their copy of the photograph in 1933. Clipping pasted to the verso: "What seems to be an Indian brave commands the space above rectangular bedroom windows", stamped "May 11, 86". Second clipping pasted to verso: "A bedroom in his Oak Park home: elegance even in the most modest spaces", stamped "Feb 9, 92". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 0104.13.1211

   
Date: Circa 1925

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002)

Photographer: Gilman Lane

Description: Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. There is a "Shield" on upper balcony. Very similar to the Grant Manson image that was taken during the winter after the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees). The "Shield" is missing in the Manson image. Dated Circa1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49. Published in "Building a Legacy", Preservation Trust, 2001, page 49.

Size: 8 x 6 Print, high res image

S#: 0171.06.0410

   
Date: Circa 1925

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002)

Photographer: Grant Manson

Description: Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. Very similar to the Gilman Lane image that was taken during the spring or fall before the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees, only four of the five thin small trees remain just in front of the porch). The "Shield" is missing in this image. The Gilman Lane image is dated Circa1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49.

Size: 8 x 6 Print, high res image

Pages:

S#: 0171.07.0410

   
Date: Circa 1928-30

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002)

Description: Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. Very similar to the Gilman Lane photograph dated 1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49. The Grant Manson image was taken during the winter after the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees). The "Shield" is missing in the Manson image. This image was taken within 2-4 years after the Manson and Lane images, judging the growth of the landscaping and trees. Hand written on verso: "Old Illinois Houses, Frank Lloyd Wright House, Oak Park, Ill." Similar to photograph published in "Building a Legacy", Preservation Trust, 2001, page 49. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print.

S#: 0215.04.0410

   
Date: 1959

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 S.004)

Photographer: Nocerino

Description: Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 4/11/59. Photographer: Nocerino. Location: Wright bldgs... 949 Chicago ave., Oak Park, Ill., Caption: building on S.W. corner of Chicago & Forest ave., or 949 Chicago ave., Oak Park, Ill." Caption on verso: " Wright built this home for himself at 949 Chicago, Oak Park, in 1891 and lived there for 19 years. (Sun-Times Photo)." Stamped: "Apr 13 1959". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times.

Size: Original 10.25 x 8 B&W Print.

S#: 1377.36.0310

   
Date: 1966

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 S.004)

Description: Clipping on verso: " By Patricia Dalton. The Clyde W. Nookers of Oak Park are not going to fight it any more. ¶ For 20 years, the Nookers have lived in the house at 951 Chicago Av., Oak Park, that Frank Lloyd Wright built in 1895 for his own family. ¶ During that time, they say, the doorbell and telephone almost never have stopped ringing. People wanted to see the inside of the house where the master himself once lived. ¶ Most of these requests were... ¶ ...saw what the former tenants had done to the house. There were layers of paint on the beautiful woods, the window frames in his former drafting room were painted a garish red, some of the walls had flowered wallpaper on them. ¶ Wright said, ‘I hope you’ll keep the old place from falling apart.’ ¶ Mr. Nooker told him that she thought the house should be preserved. ¶ ‘In Europe, it would be.’ Wright replied." Stamped "Daily News, July 5, 1966." Caption under photo on clipping "The Frank Lloyd Wright house at 951 Chicago, Oak Park". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News.

Size: Original 10.6 x 8.6 B&W Print

S#: 1679.04.0310

   
Date: 1966

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home Playroom (1895 - S.003)

Description: Clipping on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright added this two-story playroom for his children to his Oak Park home in 1895. The mural, painted by a commissioned artist following Wright’s design, shows the genie and fisherman from a story ‘Thousand and One Nights’. " Stamped on verso: "Aug 14 1966". Photographed before restoration. Shelves on either side of the fireplace are missing the original glass doors. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print.

S#: 1679.05.0112

   
Date: 1966

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Home & Studio Fireplace (1895 - S.003) 1966.

Description: View of Living Room inglenook fireplace. Caption on verso: "Wright Fireplace - This fireplace greets visitors as they enter the first Frank Lloyd Wright home, built more than 70 years ago. The inscription reads, ‘Truth is Life.’ The brick arrangement was later used in the frontage of another Wright house." Clipping on verso: "Welcome - This fireplace greets visitors as they enter the first Frank Lloyd Wright home, built more than 70 years ago. The inscription reads, ‘Truth is Life.’ The pattern of the arrangement was later used in the frontage of another Wright home in Oak Park. Wright also designed the modernistic chair with its striking use of vertical lines. These lines contract with the horizontal woodwork design on the wall, and similar linear contrast are used thruout the home." Stamped on verso: "Aug 14 1966". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print.

S#: 1679.06.0512

   
Date: 1969

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), 1969.

Description: Photographed from across the street on Chicago Ave close to the corner of Forest Ave. Exterior view of the drafting room is on the far left, the Reception Hall in the center, the Library is on the right and the Home is in the background on the right. Label pasted on verso: "Date: June 3, 1969. Photographer: Mayo. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright home, Oak Park at 951 Chicago Ave." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph.

S#: 1803.10.0212

   
Date: 1974

Title: Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 - S.004)

Photographer: Gene Pesek

Description: Label on verso: "Photographer: Gene Pesek. Date: 7-20-74. Location: 951 Chicago Ave - Oak Park. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright home open. Caption: The historic house and studio where Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked for two decades was opened to the public this afternoon. Visitors sign in or conducted tours in the hall area of the studio. A famous Wright design is the leaded glass sky-light. Guide Ellen Jacobsen tells the tour about the famous play-room where the six Wright children spent their childhood. Again we see the sky-light and another Wright design is the fire-place and the built in furniture. Exterior view of the studio on the left and the house on he right. Courtyard was off the study where Wright worked." Clipping pasted to verso: "The Oak Park studio-house where architect Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked for two decades was opened to the public Saturday. For $2 admission, the setting for his genius was made public by the Wright nonprofit citizens group at 951 Chicago, Oak Park. Studio is on the left, next to the home... Wright died in 1959." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10.5 x 8 B&W Print

ST#: 1963.07.0711

   
Date: 1975

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), 1975.

Description: Photographed from across the street on Chicago Ave. Exterior view of the drafting room is on the left, the Reception Hall in the center, the Library is on the right and the Home is in the background on the right. Clipping pasted on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, 951 Chicago Ave., Oak Park. Tribune photo Ernie Cox Jr." Stamped on clipping: "Mar 27 1975". Hand written on verso: "Ernie Cox Jr. 1/14/75". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 4.5 B&W photograph.

S#: 1996.13.0212

   
Date: 1975

Title:
Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park 1975 (1897 - S.004).

Description:
Photographed from across the street on Chicago Ave. Exterior view of the drafting room is on the left, the Reception Hall in the center, the Library is on the right and the Home is in the background on the right. Stamped on verso: "April 18." Clipping pasted on verso: "Preservation appears assured for
Frank Lloyd Wright’s original home and studio in Oak Park." (Stamped Apr 20 1975.) Second clipping pasted on verso: "Turnaround of Oak Park’s business district... The suburb’s elegant architectural treasures include Frank Lloyd Wright’s home and studio. Tribune Photo by Hardy Wieting." (Stamped Apr 18 1976.) Photographed by Hardy Wieting. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size:
Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph.


S#:
1996.22.1116
   
Date: 1975

Title: Wright’s Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004)

Photographer: Donald Kalec

Description: Photographed from the corner of Chicago Ave. and Forest. Studio is on the left, Home on the right. Label pasted to verso: "Oak Park Tour Center 848-1978. Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park, Illinois built between 1889 and 1898. Photo courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. Also written on verso: "Photo: Donald G. Kalec". Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, Illinois, 1975, Kalec, Heinz, page 1. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print

ST#: 1967.01.0711

   
Date: 1975

Title:
Home and Studio, Oak Park, 1975 (1897 - S.004).

Description:
"Two Seated Males" sculpture. Added to the exterior of the studio after 1911. When Frank Lloyd Wright built his Studio in 1898, he had Bock design the four sided Stork Pillars that appear at the Entrance to the studio. "The first work I did in the new studio (Rookery Building) was the pilasters for the entrance to Wright’s Oak Park studio, Showing storks standing among foliage beside a scroll with an architectural plan..." Memories of An American Artist," Bock, 1989/1991, p.67. He also worked on the "Boulder" sculpture at the same time. In 1911, When Wright converted his studio to Apartments, he squared off the corners of the second level, added a cantilevered rood, and added the sculptures just under the rood line. Two per side. The artist is unknown, but the are very similar to the Stork sculptures. Two seated men, arm in arm are sitting in front of the same tree form as the stork, leaves and berries. There is a long unscrolled scroll, and two small ones. Although not specified as a Bock, there are similarities. When the Restoration committee made the decision in 1977 to restore the Home and Studio to 1909, the upper story of the studio was restored to an octagon, the cantilever was removed as well as the sculptured figures. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust.

Size:
8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#:
1996.23.1116
   
Date: 1976

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004)

Photographer: Gene Pesek

Description: View of Studio. Label on verso: "Sun-Times Photog: Gene Pesek. Date: 4-15-76. Location: Oak Park., Subject: Oak Park All-American City. Caption material: Views of the famous Frank Lloyd Wright studio and house on the corner of Chicago Ave. and Forest." Stamped on verso: "Sun-Times Oct 15 1976". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10.5 x 7.3 B&W Print.

S#: 2020.07.0311

   
Date: 1977

Title:
Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, 1977 (1897 - S.004).

Description:
View of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Library from the West. Photographed before renovations. The Library is on the left, the Home on the right. Quite a few changes had been made of over the years. A few changes corrected during the restoration: Column and large vase to the left of the front entrance; Blocking off original entrance and enclosing porch; Two brick piers on either side of the enclosed porch; The semi-circular window above the upper window is missing. Stamped on verso: "Apr 4 1977." Label pasted to verso: "Oak Park Walking Tour. Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. 1889-1895." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size:
Original 10 x 8 B&W Photograph

S#:
2
033.20.1116
   
Date: 1977

Title: Wright’s Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004)

Photographer: Donald Kalec

Description: Photographed from Chicago Avenue. Caption pasted on verso: "With all the intrigue of archeology, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio in Oak Park is being fully restored at an estimated cost of $1 million." Caption written on verso: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park is the Village’s most treasured monument where preservation has become a "community value". Also written on verso: "Photo: Donald Kalec". Stamped on verso: "Sun-Times Daily News. Jan 28 1979". (Note: Dated 1977. Published in The Plan for Restoration and Adaptive Use of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, 1978, page 42. Very similar view.) Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print

ST#: 1979.23.1210

   
Date: Circa 1977

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), C 1977.

Description: Photographed from Chicago Avenue. Sculptures still visible in upper portion of Studio on the left. In 1977, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio was restored to 1909. The upper story of the studio was restored to an octagon, the cantilever was removed as well as the sculptured figures. That has not been completed here. Note: A very similar view is published in The Plan for Restoration and Adaptive Use of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, 1978, page 42. Acquired from the Metropolis Collection.

Size: Original 10 x 7 B&W Photograph.

S#:
2033.21.0617
   
Date: 1977

Title:
Home and Studio, Oak Park, 1976 (1897 - S.004).

Description:
View of Studio from the North. Of particular note are the four sculptures on the North and East facades, "Two Seated Males." When Frank Lloyd Wright built his Studio in 1898, he had Bock design the four sided Stork Pillars that appear at the Entrance to the studio. "The first work I did in the new studio (Rookery Building) was the pilasters for the entrance to Wright’s Oak Park studio, Showing storks standing among foliage beside a scroll with an architectural plan..." Memories of An American Artist, Bock, 1989/1991, p.67. He also worked on the "Boulder" sculpture at the same time. In 1911, When Wright converted his studio to Apartments, he squared off the corners of the second level, added a cantilevered rood, and added the sculptures just under the rood line. Two per side. The artist is unknown, but the are very similar to the Stork sculptures. Two seated men, arm in arm are sitting in front of the same tree form as the stork, leaves and berries. There is a long unscrolled scroll, and two small ones. Although not specified as a Bock, there are similarities. When the Restoration committee made the decision in 1977 to restore the Home and Studio to 1909, the upper story of the studio was restored to an octagon, the cantilever was removed as well as the sculptured figures. Stamped on verso: "Apr 6 1977. Chicago Tribune, Photo by Michael Budrys." Clipping pasted to verso: "The house Frank Lloyd Wright built for his family at 951 Chicago Av., Oak Park, in 1889 has had many facelifts. (Stamped Apr 21, 1977)." Photographed by Michael Budrys. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size:
Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
2033.19.1116
   
Date: 1977

Title: Wright's Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), Dining Room.

Description: Photographed during the restoration of the Dining Room which was completed in 1977. This was before the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation placed the reacquired original dining room set in the dining room. The five chairs seen in this photograph are the "Slant Back" chairs Wright designed just after the turn of the century (circa 1903). Variations appeared in a number of buildings during that time period. The Larking Building (1903), Wright’s own home (1904) and the Robie House. Caption on face: "5/2/77 -- Oak Park, Ill.: Joan Cook, a visitor on tour of the Wright house, looks at the ceiling panel which probably was the world’s first residential use of indirect electric lighting. The panel, in the dining room, was covered with rice paper to conceal bulbs. (UPI)" Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8.3 x 10.25 B&W Print.

S#: 2033.07.0112

   
Date: 1977

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), Play Room 1977.

Description: Photographed during the initial restoration of the Home and Studio. Caption on face: "5/2/77 -- Oak Park, Ill.: Illumination from skylight fills the play-room of the Frank Lloyd Wright house at 951 Chicago Ave., where he and his family lived until 1090. A sophisticated plan is underway to restore the house to its original design. It will take about a decade and cost more than $1 million. (UPI)" Stamped on verso: "Sep 4, 1977". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8.3 x 10.25 B&W Photograph.

S#: 2033.10.0912

   
Date: 1977

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), 1977.

Description: Caption on face: "5/2/77 -- Oak Park, Ill.: In original drafting room of the Wright home, Cathy Barker, director of the Oak Park Tour Center which handles tours through the house, and architect Morgan Sweeney look over restoration plans. Only bits and pieces of the original plans exist making reconstruction difficult. (UPI)" Stamped on verso: "Sep 12, 1977". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8.3 x 10.25 B&W Photograph.

S#: 2033.18.0614

   
Date: Circa 1979-80

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004)

Photographer: Don Kalec

Description: Photographed from Forest Avenue. Caption of face: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, Illinois. Now a historic house museum, the building has been restored to its 1909 architectural integrity through the efforts of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Photo by Don Kalec." Caption pasted to verso: "Guided interior tours are offered daily of one of Chicago’s most famous architectural landmarks, the Frank Lloyd Wright home and Studio in oak Park. Call 708/848-1500 for information. Tours are sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W Print

ST#: 1980.23.1210

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Home and Studio Slant Back Side Chair, Oak Park, Circa 1904. (1897 - S.004), 1981.

Description: Wright designed this slant back chair for his home in Oak Park, circa 1904. Wright designed variations of the slant back chairs for the Larkin Building, Unity Temple and Robie House. Three-quarter front view, facing to the right. Oak, leather upholstered seat. 40.5 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). This photograph was published in "Frank Lloyd Wright", Kelmscott Galleries, 1981, page 19, and in "Frank Lloyd Wright and Viollet-le-Duc", 1986, p. 55. Caption: "This chair was acquired directly from Wright’s granddaughter and is from his home." Photographed by Quiriconi-Tropea Photographers.  Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph and one 4 x 5 B&W negative.

ST#: 1981.120.0413

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Home and Studio Slant Back Side Chair, Oak Park, Circa 1904. (1897 - S.004), 1981.

Description: Wright designed this slant back chair for his home in Oak Park, circa 1904. Wright designed variations of the slant back chairs for the Larkin Building, Unity Temple and Robie House. Three-quarter front view, facing to the left. Oak, leather upholstered seat. 40.5 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). This chair was acquired directly from Wright’s granddaughter and is from his home. Photographed by Thomas A. Heinz. Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 4 x 5 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1981.121.0413

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Home and Studio Slant Back Side Chair, Oak Park, Circa 1904. (1897 - S.004), 1981.

Description: Wright designed this slant back chair for his home in Oak Park, circa 1904. Wright designed variations of the slant back chairs for the Larkin Building, Unity Temple and Robie House. Three-quarter back view, facing to the right. Oak, leather upholstered seat. 40.5 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). This chair was acquired directly from Wright’s granddaughter and is from his home. Photographed by Thomas A. Heinz. Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 4 x 5 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1981.122.0413

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Home and Studio Slant Back Side Chair, Oak Park, Circa 1904. (1897 - S.004), 1981.

Description: Wright designed this slant back chair for his home in Oak Park, circa 1904. Wright designed variations of the slant back chairs for the Larkin Building, Unity Temple and Robie House. Front view, facing forward. Oak, seat missing. 40.5 (H) x 15 (W) x 18.75 (D). Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 4 x 5 color photograph.

ST#: 1981.123.0413

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Home and Studio Low Back Dressing Chair, Oak Park, Circa 1908. (1897 - S.004), 1981.

Description: Very similar to the Isabel Roberts Side Chair (1908), but shorter. The main difference is an additional horizontal trim along the base of the seat which runs along the front and sides. Kelmscott Gallery note accompanying image: "Frank Lloyd Wright Ladies Dressing Chair (possibly for the first Mrs. Wright, Catherine). Yellow Birch Circa 1908." The Cassina Catalog, 1999, p. 40-1, lists this as 608 Coonley 1, and dates the original as 1907. Possible redesign of the Roberts 1901 side chair for Coonley 1907? If it was a redesign for Coonley, Wright may have had additional chairs manufactured at that time for his home. Three-quarter back view, facing to the right. Yellow birch, green upholstered seat, 27 (H) x 17.25 (W) x 14 (D). Acquired from Kelmscott Galleries. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 4 x 5 color photograph.

ST#: 1981.124.0413

   
Date: 1984

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park 1984. (1897 - S.004).

Description: View of the Frank Lloyd Wright Residence from the West. Clipping pasted to verso: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio at 951 Chicago Ave. in Oak Park, a Chicago suburb. The architect lived and worked here between 1989 and 1909. Tours of the building are offered at 1 and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday, 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, with slightly longer hours in summer. Admission is $3 for adults, $1.50 for children and senior citizens. Staff photos by Catherine Watson." Hand written on verso: "C. Watson 5-27-84." Stamped on clipping: "Jun 3 ‘84."

Size:
Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1984.50.1217
   
Date: 1985

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004), 1985

Description: Stamped on verso: "Apr 26, 85." Clipping pasted to verso: "Talk about architecture and sooner or later you come down to Frank Lloyd Wright. Love him or hate him, you cannot ignore the nation’s most influential architect. Much of the world around us is composed of images inspired by him. ‘Frank Lloyd Wright exploded the concept of how a house should be laid out. He was the one who completed the liberation of people’s thinking every room had to have four walls and a door,’ said Michael Herschensohn, acting director of the Chicago Architectural Foundation. ‘People doing residential design in the United States after 1908 either were rejecting Frank Lloyd Wright or interpreting his ideas in some form,’ Herschensohn said. ‘He also trained a number of architects who went on and preached his dogma.’ The first stage of that dogma was defined during the 20 years Wright lived in Oak Park, using his brown shingled home as a laboratory of building blocks to work out what he wanted to say about building houses." Caption pasted to verso: "In 1898, Frank Lloyd Wright decided he was tired of commuting to downtown Chicago to do his work. That was when he added the studio wing to his Oak Park home. He would head to the studio late at night whenever inspiration struck." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W print

ST#: 1985.34.0611

   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4).

Description: 1) View of Frank Lloyd Wright’s home from the West. The Office Library can be seen on the far left. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. West Elevation. HKB-34-1. 5031-1. H. K. Barnett." Photographed by H. K. Barnett. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#:
1986.78.1217 (1)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 2) Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4). View of fireplace inglenook in the Living Room. The seating is built-in. The oil painting on the right is an original by William Wendt. Restored to how it looked in 1909. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Stamped on face of slide: "FLW Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Inglenook. HKB-34-2. 47560N. Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing." Published in: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park," Harrington, 1996, p.33; and "Building a Legacy," Well, 2001, p.20. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (2)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 3)  View of Dining Room. The dining table and chairs were designed by FLW as was the decorative wood light grille in the ceiling. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Dining Room, 1895. HKB-34-3. 4845-4. H. K. Barnett." Photographed by H. K. Barnett. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (3)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 4) View of Master Bedroom. The mural is by Orlando Giannini. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Master Bedroom. HKB-34-4. 47560P. Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing." Published in: "The Oak Park Home and Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright," Abernathy, 1988, p.21; "Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park," Harrington, 1996, p.33; and "Building a Legacy," Well, 2001, p.20. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (4)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 5) View of Playroom. The mural above the fireplace is titled "The Fisherman and the Genie" from a story "Thousand and One Nights". The two chairs were designed by Wright for his Studio. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Playroom, 1895. HKB-34-5. 5052-2. H. K. Barnett." Photographed by H. K. Barnett. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (5)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 6) View of Studio Entrance. The Planters were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright as was the "Tree of Life" column on the far left. The sculpture "Boulder" was executed by Richard Bock. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, Oak Park, Illinois. 1898. Studio Entrance. HKB-35-1. 47560I. Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing." Published in:"Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park," Harrington, 1996, p.31. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (6)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 7) View of Reception Room. The chair on the left was designed by Wright for his Studio, as were the stork columns on the right and the leaded glass windows in the ceiling. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Reception Room. HKB-35-2. 47560G. Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing." Published in: "The Oak Park Home and Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright," Abernathy, 1988, p.35; Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (7)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 8) View of Draughting Room. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Draughting Room. HKB-35-3. 5005-1. H. K. Barnett." Photographed by H. K. Barnett. Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (8)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 9) View of Library. The floor plan of the Library is octagonal in shape. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Library. HKB-35-4. 47560B. Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing." Published in: "The Oak Park Home and Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright," Abernathy, 1988, p.36; Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (9)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1986 (1895 - S.002-4)

Description: 10) View of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Office. Photographed by Chester Brummel. Stamped on face of slide: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home, Oak Park, Illinois. 1889. Wright’s Office. HKB-35-5a. 5031-17C.Chester Brummel." Published in: "The Oak Park Home and Studio of Frank Lloyd Wright," Abernathy, 1988, p.40-41; Set of 10 - 35mm Color Slides.

Size: Original 35mm Color Slides and 8 x 10 High Res Digital Image.

ST#: 1986.78.1217 (10)
   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio Boulder Sculpture, Oak Park (1895 - S.003) 1986.

Description: Replacement of Boulder Sculpture, Label pasted to verso: "Photographer: Al Podgorski. Date 3-29-86. Location: Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, 711 Chicago (Ave). Caption: The crowning jewel of a 11 year restoration work is put in place on Frank L Wright home, replacement of Sculpture of contorted man in from of Studio, two were put in place, identical 250 pounds." Caption pasted to verso: "Workman guide one of two 250-pound sculptures into place at the entrance of the Frank Lloyd Wright home and Studio, 951 Chicago Ave., in Oak Park Another worker almost appears to have become part of the sculpture as he adjusts it for bolting to its pedestal. The two crouching figures named ‘The Boulders," were recreated from old photographs. Replicas of the original figures by Richard Bock, an artist who collaborated with Wright from 1898 to 1918, the statues depict old men attached to Earth but struggling to rise. The replicas were made of a super-durable plaster and reinforced with metal. The originals disintegrated over the years." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W print.

ST#: 1986.50.0912

   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio PlayRoom, Oak Park (1895 - S.003)

Photographer: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing

Description: The Playroom looking east, shows the barrel vault ceiling, fireplace and mural painted by Orlando Giannini. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing, in 1986. Clipping pasted to verso: "Wright added the playroom onto his house in 1895." Stamped on verso: "Sep 11, 88". Published in "The Oak Park Home and Studio", 1988, Abernathy, pages 24-25. (Note: photograph was flipped horizontally when printed. We have corrected it.) Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1986.46.1211

   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio Master Bedroom Giannini Mural, Oak Park (1895 - S.003) 1986.

Description: Wright commissioned Orlando Giannini to paint three American Indian murals in Wright’s home in Oak Park in 1895. John Lloyd Wright wrote, " ‘Skinny’ Giannini from Italy painted American Indians in brilliant colors on the walls of Papa’s bedroom... Papa liked Indians!" "My Father Who is on Earth, 1946, page 34. Giannini painted his last mural for Wright for the Chauncey Williams home (1895 - S.033). Wright also used Giannini in the design of the Husser and Martin fireplaces. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Tribune Photo by Bill Hogan". Clipping pasted on verso: "A figure believed to be an Indian squaw picks a flower, attributed to Orlando Giannini". Stamped on clipping: "May 11 ‘88". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1986.47.0212

   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park

Photographer: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing

Description: "The drafting room, Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, Illinois. Constructed in 1898, this studio was the birthplace of the Prairie School of architecture. Many famous buildings were designed in this room including Robie House and Unity Temple. Photo: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation." Photographed in 1986 after the restoration of the drafting Room. Published in "The Oak Park Home and Studio" 1988, page 45, and "Building a Legacy" 2001, page 128, dated (color). Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Daily News.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W print

ST#: 1986.35.0210

   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park, Dining Room 1986.

Photographer: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing

Description: "Dining room, the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, Illinois. This room features original Wright-designed furnishings and an intricately patterned ceiling grille. The Home and Studio has undergone a $2.1 million restoration and is open to the public for tours. Photo: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation." Photographed in 1986 after the restoration of the Dining Room. Published in "The Oak Park Home and Studio" 1988, page 16 (color). Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Daily News. Wright Chairs.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W print.

ST#: 1986.48.0512

   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio, Oak Park, Dining Room 1986.

Description: Label pasted to verso: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. Dining room of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park home restored to its 1909 design. Photo: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing, courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation." Clipping pasted to verso: "The dining room of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park home restored to its 1909 design." Stamped on clipping: "Nov 15 1989." Stamped on verso: " Hedrich-Blessing Neg No. 47560 T." The dining room includes original Wright-designed furniture and furnishings, the table and chairs, the child’s high chair, the two weed holders in the background and the intricately patterned ceiling grille. Photographed in 1986 after the restoration of the Dining Room. Published in "The Oak Park Home and Studio" 1988, page 16 (color). (Second copy)

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#:
1986.79.0218
   
Date: 1986

Title: Home and Studio Master Bedroom with Giannini Mural, Oak Park (1895 - S.003) 1986.

Description: Wright commissioned Orlando Giannini to paint three American Indian murals in Wright’s home in Oak Park in 1895. John Lloyd Wright wrote, " ‘Skinny’ Giannini from Italy painted American Indians in brilliant colors on the walls of Papa’s bedroom... Papa liked Indians!" "My Father Who is on Earth, 1946, page 34. Giannini painted his last mural for Wright for the Chauncey Williams home (1895 - S.033). Wright also used Giannini in the design of the Husser and Martin fireplaces. Published in "Building a Legacy", 2001, p. 80. Photographed by Jon Miller, Hedrich Blessing Photographers. Stamped on verso: "Date Used, Jul 23 1989". Acquired from the archives of the Los Angeles Times.

Size: Original 5 x 7 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1986.52.0214

   
Date: 1987

Title: Home and Studio Library, Oak Park

Description: "Oak Park, Ill. May 9 -- Wright’s Studio -- Arlene Sanderson, spokeswoman for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation in Oak Park, Ill. looks over building plans in the presentation room of the late architect’s home and studio in the Chicago suburb Friday. The foundation spent $2.1 million to renovate the house. (Charlie Bennett) 87 Slug: Wright House." Stamped on verso "May 13 ‘87". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10.5 B&W AP Laser Photo.

ST#: 1987.65.0910

   
Date: 1990

Title: Stork Column and Candlesticks

Photographer: Nancy Stuenkel

Description: Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times/ Photographer: Nancy Stuenkel, Date: 3/2/90." Caption pasted to verso: "Oak candlesticks ($65 a pair) adapted from playroom balusters are available at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, as is the plaster reproduction of stork columns Wright designed for the entrance to his Oak Park Studio. Both from the Gingko Tree Bookshop." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W Print.

ST#: 1990.82.0411

   
Date: 1991

Title: Wright Home and Studio Dining Room, Oak Park (1895 - S.003) 1991.

Description: Dining table and six chairs. Clipping pasted on verso: "Dining room at the Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park. Tribune photo by Carl Wagner." Stamped on clipping: "Aug 16 91". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 Color Photograph.

ST#: 1991.65.0212

   
Date: 1991

Title: Wright Home and Studio Stork Panel 1898.

Description: Printed on verso: "Date: 12/11/91. Photographer: Brown. Location: 931 Chicago Ave. Oak Park. Description: Stork Panel designed by Wright at the entrance to his studio in 1898. The architect’s drafting board in background." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 1991.63.0212

   
Date: 1992

Title: Wright Oak Park Studio Stork Panel (Tree of Life) reproductions, 1992.

Description: Two panels hung on the wall. Frank Lloyd Wright designed these panels for the columns at the entrance to his Oak Park studio in 1898. Panels covered all four sides of the column. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation began reproducing these panels in 1990. Like the originals, reproductions were made of plaster and painted to resemble bronze. Printed on verso: "1/3/92. Photographer: Brown. Description: Frank Lloyd Wright Home. Location: Oak Park." Clipping glued to background: "A stork panel from Wright’s Oak Park home." Stamped on clipping: "Feb 9 92." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1992.92.0815

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. View of Wright’s home from the West. The Office Library can be seen on the far left. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-1

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Studio entrance from the East. Entrance from the public sidewalk is attained by two opening in the brick and shingled perimeter wall that runs the length of the property along Chicago Avenue to the right. The two breaks in the wall are capped by pairs of large vases. They lead to the Terrace between the entrance and the perimeter wall. The entrance to the Studio is to the left, between two rows of four columns each, capped with the four sided Tree of Life Stork panels. The "Boulder" sculpture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and executed by Richard Bock adorns either side of the entrance. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-2

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Studio entrance from the Northeast. Entrance from the public sidewalk is attained by two opening in the brick and shingled perimeter wall that runs the length of the property along Chicago Avenue to the right. The two breaks in the wall are capped by pairs of large vases. They lead to the Terrace between the entrance and the perimeter wall. The entrance to the Studio is to the left, between two rows of four columns each, capped with the four sided Tree of Life Stork panels. The "Boulder" sculpture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and executed by Richard Bock adorns either side of the entrance. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-3

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. Detail view of the perimeter wall, vase and Boulder Sculpture. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-4

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. Detail view of the vases and Boulder Sculpture. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-5

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Studio entrance from the Northeast. The entrance to the Studio is to the left, between two rows of four columns each, capped with the four sided Tree of Life Stork panels. The plaque on the left reads "Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." His Monogram is in the bottom right hand corner. A matching plaque was installed at Taliesin Spring Green in 1911 (0104.20). The Library can be seen in the background. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-6

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Studio entrance from the North. The entrance to the Studio is between two rows of four columns each, which are capped with the four sided Tree of Life Stork panels. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-7

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Studio entrance from the Northwest. The entrance to the Studio is between two rows of four columns each, which are capped with the four sided Tree of Life Stork panels. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-8

   
Date: 1992

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992.

Description: Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. Wright continued the use of shingles and bricks on the exterior design of the Studio. View of the Northeast corner of the Drafting Room. The lower level is square, the upper level is octagonal. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner.

Size: 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

ST#: 1992.101.1015-9

   
   
   
POSTERS
 
Date: 1977

Title: Oak Park Dining Room Grille  (Produced by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: “Dining Room Ceiling Grille from the Oak Park Home ☐☐☐☐☐ Frank Lloyd Wright - 1895 ☐☐ 1977 Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.”  (First Edition)

Size: 15.5 x 30

S#: 2023.06.0307

   
Date: 1981

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio, Oak Park, Illinois (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, Oak Park)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. Dining Room in Wright’s Home and Studio. The Seventh Annual Wright Plus benefit walk included guided tours of five buildings designed by Wright. The William G. Fricke (#2033.02) House (1901), the William E, Martin House (1903), the Edwin H. Cheney House (1904), Unity Temple (1904) and the Wright Home and Studio. The restoration of the Wright Dining was completed in 1977, with the placement of the reacquired original Dining Room Set. Photographed by Barbara Karant of Sadin/Karant. Two versions of this poster were printed. Second version was entitled "Wright Plus, May 16, 1981. Produced for the seventh annual Wright Plus. Original list price $5.00. Also published as Wright Plus.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1981.25.0112

   
Date: 1984

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio, Oak Park, Illinois (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Oak Park Play Room. Also published as Wright Plus.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1984.26.0506

   
Date: 1988

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio: Oak Park, Illinois

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Oak Park Home and Studio Also published as Wright Plus.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1988.14.0902

   
Date: 1990

Title: The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio, Oak Park, Illinois (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, Oak Park)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: "In 1895 Frank Lloyd Wright added a dramatic, barrel-vaulted playroom onto his Oak Park Home." Frank Lloyd Wright Oak Park Home Playroom. Photograph by Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing.

Size: 24 x 18

ST#: 1990.110.0714

   
   
   
POSTERS: WRIGHT PLUS
   
Date: 1979

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright: Wright Plus. May 19, 1979, 9:00 - 5:00, Oak Park, Illinois (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, Oak Park, IL)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation

Description: "Tour interiors of ten spectacular structures designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries in Oak Park, Illinois." Sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, IL Poster printed with funds from the Illinois Office of Tourism and the Department of Business and Economic Development. The illustration of the Edwin H. Cheney House, a reprint from the Wasmuth Portfolio, "Ausgefüührte Bauten und Entwüürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (Studies and Executed Buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright), Plate XXX. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 16.8 x 18

ST#: 1979.25.0711

   
Date: 1981

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, with support from the Illinois Office of Tourism.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 16, 1981. 312/848-1976. Frank Lloyd Wright. Photograph of the Frank Lloyd Wright Residence Dining Room and dining room table and chairs. Photo: Sadin / Karant. Illinois Office of Tourism, Department of Business and Economic Development, printed with state and local funds.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1981.140.1015

   
Date: 1982

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, with support from the Illinois Office of Tourism.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 15, 1982. 312/848-1976. Frank Lloyd Wright art glass skylight, circa 1905, designed for the reception room of his studio. Design: David Anderson. Photograph: Ben Chin/Light Industries. Discover The Magnificent Miles of Illinois. Office of Tourism, Department of Commerce and Community Affairs, printed with state and local funds.

Size: 18 x 26

ST#: 1982.47.1015

   
Date: 1983

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 21, 1983. 312/848-1976. Frank Lloyd Wright. Frank Lloyd Wright Residence Living Room and Fireplace Inglenook. Design: David Anderson. Photograph: Ben Chin. (Two Copies)

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1983.12.1202, 1983.34.1015

   
Date: 1984

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 19, 1984. 312/848-1976. Frank Lloyd Wright Residence Playroom. Design: David Anderson. Photograph: Don A. DuBroff. Copyright The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation 1984.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1984.46.1015

   
Date: 1984

Title:
William Drummond House 1984.

Description:
William Drummond worked for Sullivan before joining Wright’s studio in 1899. He worked there on and off until 1909 when he formed his own practice. Note taped to verso: "The William E. Drummond House. Architect William E. Drummond designed this prairie styled house for himself and his family in River Forest in 1910. This house will be featured in the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation Annual Wright Plus house walk and on their River Forest walking Tour." Caption pasted to verso: "The William E. Drummond House is River Forest will be featured on The Wright Plus / Ninth Annual Housewalk May 19, sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation." Stamped on verso: "Apr 13 ‘84." Acquired from the Associated Press.

Size:
Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.


ST#:
1984.48.0915
   
Date: 1985

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 18/19, 1985. 312/848-1976. Frank Lloyd Wright Residence West Elevation. Ten Landmark Years. A benefit for The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation. Design: Marlene Vitek. Copyright 1985 The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation.

Size: 24 x 18

ST#: 1985.56.1015

   
Date: 1986

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 17, 1986. 312/848-1976. Photograph of the Frank Lloyd Wright Studio Drafting Room. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright studio drafting room restored to circa 1909. A benefit for The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation. Design: Marlene Vitek. Photograph: Peter L. Johnsen. Copyright 1986 The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1986.61.1015

   
Date: 1987

Title: Wright Plus

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois / May 16, 1987

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1987.15.0902

   
Date: 1988

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A House Walk in Oak Park, Illinois. Saturday May 21, 1988. 312.848.1976. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Oak Park, Illinois. Photograph of the entrance to the Frank Lloyd Wright Studio. Caption: The complex interplay of geometric masses and voids, basic to Wright’s architecture, is evident in the entrance to his 1898 studio. Design: Keller Lane & Waln. Photography: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing. Copyright 1988, The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1988.88.1015

   
Date: 1989

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois. Celebrating the centennial of Wright’s Oak Park home. Saturday May 20, 1989, Sunday May 21, 1989. 312.848.1976. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Oak Park, Illinois. Photograph of the West elevation of the Home and Studio. Design: Greene & Waln. Photography: Donald G. Kalec. Copyright 1989, The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation.

Size: 23 x 22

ST#: 1989.100.1015

   
Date: 1991

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright  Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois. Saturday May 18, 1991. 708.848.1500. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Oak Park, Illinois. Caption: The office of Frank Lloyd Wright ’s Oak Park studio is highlighted by autumn hues and intricate art glass. 1991, The Frank Lloyd Wright House and Studio Foundation. Design: Greene, Campbell & Waln. Photography: Chester Brummel.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1991.75.1015

   
Date: 1992

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, Oak Park)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Wright Plus. A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois. Saturday, May 16, 1992. 708.848.xxxx. Dining Room Chair, Print Table, Plaque, High Chair, Entrance Panel, Light Fixture, Teco Vase.

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1992.91.0714

   
Date: 1993

Title: Wright Plus

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois / May 15, 1993

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1993.26.0902

   
Date: 1993

Title: Wright Plus North In Glencoe (Published by The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, Glencoe Historic Preservation Commission and Glencoe Historical Society)

Description: A Housewalk in Glencoe, Illinois / Saturday, October 2, 1993 / 708.848.1500. Cosponsored by The
Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation, Glencoe Historic Preservation Commission and Glencoe Historical Society. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ravine Bluffs Bridge, Glencoe. © 1957 FLWright FDN.

Size: 24 x 18

ST#:
1993.90.0318
   
Date: 1994

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: Wright Plus. A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 18, 1991, Sunday May 21, 1989. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. 708.848.1500. Caption: William G. Fricke House. Photography: Judith Bromley. Design: Waln Communications Group.

Size: 24 x 18

ST#: 1994.91.1015

   
Date: 1995

Title: Wright Plus (Published by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation.)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation

Description: William E. Martin House Dining room (1902 - S.061). Wright Plus. A Housewalk in Oak Park, Illinois. May 20, 1995. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. The Wright designed William E. Martin House. Photograph by Judith Bromley. Designed by Waln Communications Group. Printed by Lake County Press. (First Edition)

Size: 18 x 24

ST#: 1995.60.0412

   
   
   
POSTCARDS
     
Date: Circa 1976

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, Oak Park Circa 1976.

Description: The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation was established in 1974, to acquire and preserve Wright's Home and Studio in Oak Park. In 1976, the Home and Studio was declared a National Historic Landmark. The $3 million restoration was completed in 1987. Verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, Oak Park, Illinois 60302. Built 1898. Photo by Don Kalec. Pub. By FLW Home and Studio Foundation. 66847-D" Printed by Dexter Press, West Nyack, New York.

Size: 6 x 4

S#:
2020.35.0318
   
Date: 1979

Published By: FLLW Home & Studio Foundation by Dexter Press

Description: “Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, 1898. Oak Park, Illinois 60302"  (Published by FLLW Home & Studio Foundation)  Not Dated.  Photo by Donald G. Kalec.  Made by Dexter Press, West Nyack, New York.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

ST#: 1979.16.0806

   
Date: Circa 1984

Published By: H. K. Barnett, Allison Park, PA 150101

Description: "Frank Lloyd Wright Studio 1898" Circa 1984 (1897 - S.004). Sign seen to the right: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio. Undergoing Historic Restoration to 1909 Design." Back: "Frank Lloyd Wright Studio 1898. Forest and Chicago Avenues, Oak Park, Illinois" Combining his home and work life, in 1898 Wright added this studio complex to his 1889 home. The bold geometric exterior forms are clearly expressive of the interior spaces - a two-story draughting room with suspended balcony (left), reception hall and office (center), and private octagonal library (right). (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302) FLLW-18 #131492" Very similar image published in "Building a Legacy" 2001, p. 30.

Size: 9 x 4.

ST#: 1984.40.0913

   
Date: 1985

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Frank Lloyd Wright Home - 1889.  Forest & Chicago Avenues, Oak Park, Illinois"  (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302.  #FllW-2 631562)  Not Dated.  Pub. by H. K. Barnett, Allison Park, Pa. 15101.  Using stained shingles, common brick, and diamond-paned casement windows, Wright’s first home, designed for his bride, Catherine, was one of the first shingle style housed in the midwest. To the left is the studio, added in 1898.

Size: 6 x 4

ST#: 1985.19.0806

   
Date: 1990

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Octagonal Library 1898.  Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Oak Park, Illinois.  Frank Lloyd Wright architect"  Lit with a skylight and high banded windows, the octagonal library is free of distractions from the nearby street - a perfect place for concentration study or consultation with a client.  Photo by John Miller, Hedrich-Blessing.  (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302)  FLLW-23 #33123460  (Pub. By H. K. Barnett, Allison Park, PA 15101)

Size: 4 x 5.8

ST#: 1990.61.0507

   
Date: 1990

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Studio Reception Room 1898.  Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Oak Park, Illinois. Frank Lloyd Wright, architect"  5/8/07 The intricate art glass skylight, with its tapestry-like pattern, adds a tremendous sense of excitement to the room.  Besides being a place fro receiving clients and contractors, the reception room served as a link between the draughting room to the east, Wright’s private office to the south, and the octagonal library to the west.  Photo by John Miller, Hedrich-Blessing.  (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302)  FLLW-24 #33123461  (Pub. By H. K. Barnett, Allison Park, PA 15101)

Size: 4 x 5.8

ST#: 1990.61.0507

   
Date: 1990

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Frank Lloyd Wright Home - 1889.  Forest and Chicago Avenues, Oak Park, Illinois" (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302)  FLLW-28 #33123465  (Pub. By H. K. Barnett, 915 Cedar Crest Ct., Wexford, PA 15090)  Using stained shingles, common brick, and diamond-paned casement windows,  Wright’s first home, designed for his bride, Catherine, was one of the first shingle style housed in the midwest.  To the left is the studio, added in 1898. 

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

ST#: 1990.53.1206

   
Date: 1990

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Playroom 1895.  Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Oak Park, Illinois.  Frank Lloyd Wright architect"  (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302)  FLLW-29 #36127805  (Pub. By H. K. Barnett, 915 Cedar Crest Ct., Wexford, PA 15090)  Designed by Wright for the use of his six children, the playroom is a brilliant example of how he would play with space.  But as expansive as it is, the room is really scaled and built for children.  The mural by Giannini depicts the Wright children’s favorite story of the Genie and the Fisherman from the Arabian Nights.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

ST#: 1990.54.1206

   
Date: 1990

Published By: H. K. Barnett

Description: “Frank Lloyd Wright Studio 1898.  Forest and Chicago Avenues, Oak Park, Illinois" (Published exclusively for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois 60302)  FLLW-30 #36127807  (Pub. By H. K. Barnett, 915 Cedar Crest Ct., Wexford, PA 15090)  Combining his home and work life, in 1898 Wright added this studio complex to his 1889 home.  The bold geometric exterior forms are clearly expressive of the interior spaces - a two-story draughting room with suspended balcony (left), reception hall and office (center), and private octagonal library (right). 

Size: 9 x 4

ST#: 1990.55.1206

   
A) Frank Lloyd Wright House & Studio (#3)
   
Date: 2000

Description: “The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio (1889 / 1898) served as the design laboratory of America’s best-known architect for the first 20 years of his career.”  (Produced by the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust.  In 2000, the Home and Studio Foundation changed its name to the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust to better reflect the dual stewardship of the Home and Studio and Frederick C. Robie House.)  Photo: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing.  This was a ticket for touring the Wright Home and Studio, top side was perforated and removed at he time of the tour.

Size: 5.5 x 3.6

ST#: 2000.39.0802

 

   
   
   
REPRODUCTIONS
     
Stork 1.jpg (39990 bytes) Date: 1990

Description: Stork Panel (Tree of Life). This is a reproduction of the Stork Panel at the entrance of the Oak Park Studio

Size: 14.5"W X 35"H x 3"D

ST#: 1990.00.0393

   
Date: 1990

Title: Stork Column and Candlesticks

Photographer: Nancy Stuenkel

Description: Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times/ Photographer: Nancy Stuenkel, Date: 3/2/90." Caption pasted to verso: "Oak candlesticks ($65 a pair) adapted from playroom balusters are available at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, as is the plaster reproduction of stork columns Wright designed for the entrance to his Oak Park Studio. Both from the Gingko Tree Bookshop." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W Print.

ST#: 1990.82.0411

 

   
Date: 1991

Title: Wright Home and Studio Stork Panel 1898.

Description: Printed on verso: "Date: 12/11/91. Photographer: Brown. Location: 931 Chicago Ave. Oak Park. Description: Stork Panel designed by Wright at the entrance to his studio in 1898. The architect’s drafting board in background." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 1991.63.0212

 

   
Date: 1992

Title: Wright Oak Park Studio Stork Panel (Tree of Life) reproductions, 1992.

Description: Two panels hung on the wall. Frank Lloyd Wright designed these panels for the columns at the entrance to his Oak Park studio in 1898. Panels covered all four sides of the column. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation began reproducing these panels in 1990. Like the originals, reproductions were made of plaster and painted to resemble bronze. Printed on verso: "1/3/92. Photographer: Brown. Description: Frank Lloyd Wright Home. Location: Oak Park." Clipping glued to background: "A stork panel from Wright’s Oak Park home." Stamped on clipping: "Feb 9 92." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1992.92.0815

 

   
Date: 2000

Description: "Boulder", A reproduction of the original sculpture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and executed by Richard Bock. Outside Oak Park Studio.

Size: 12"H x 14"D & 14"W

ST#: 2000.00.0300

   
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