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JAPAN
 
  BOOKS ABOUT JAPAN & PRINTS    DECORATIVE DESIGNS    JIYU GAKUEN GIRLS' SCHOOL    ELVEHJEM    JAPANESE PRINTS  
  HEMISPHERES    JAPANESE ARCHITECT    ORIENTATIONS    VIEWS / FIGGE ART MUSEUM 
 
BOOKS ABOUT JAPAN & PRINTS
 
Date: 1906

Title: Hiroshige: An Exhibition of Colour Prints from the collection of Frank Lloyd Wright (Published by The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago)

Author: Wright, Frank Lloyd

Description: The Art Institute of Chicago. March the twenty-ninth, Nineteen hundred six. An exhibition catalog listing the prints in the exhibition. Introduction by Frank Lloyd Wright. While in Japan, Wright invested heavily in Japanese Prints as well as other items. One year later Wright exhibited over two hundred Hiroshige woodcut colour prints. He also purchased Japanese paper while in Japan which Wright used for the exhibition catalog. This solo exhibition was a first for Wright and for Hiroshige’s work. Soft Cover. (First Edition)  (Sweeney 60)

Size: 5.5 x 10

Pages: Pp 12

S#: 0060.00.0405

   
Date: 1908

Title: The Art Institute of Chicago. Catalogue of a Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints March 5 to March 25 1908.  Catalogue for a major exhibition of 655 Japanese prints held at the Art Institute of Chicago. (Soft Cover)  (Published by The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago)

Author: Art Institute of Chicago

Description: Committee in charge and major contributors were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. Introductory essay by Gookin. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Included 205 Wright prints, 24 illustrations of prints of which Wright owned 7.  Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute.  (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 132

S#: 0080.02.0304

   

(Title Page)

Date: 1912

Title: The Japanese Print: An Interpretation  (Hard Cover) (Published by The Ralph Fletcher Seymour Co., Fine Arts Building, Chicago)

Author: Wright, Frank Lloyd

Description: Tan cover, text printed in dark blue or black, decorative crane design is printed in green. End paper is a thick fibrous paper. Text is printed on rice paper, both sides. Title page is a repeat of the cover, but text and crane appear to be printed in black. Title page verso: Copyright 1912, Ralph Fletcher Seymour Company. Sweeney indicated that three versions were printed by Seymour in 1912. Wright was displease with the first edition and all but a few copies were destroyed.
       In 1905,
Frank Lloyd Wright toured Japan. In 1906, Wright exhibits his collection of Japanese Hiroshige Prints at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1908, Wright and three other major collectors exhibit their Japanese Prints at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute.
       In 1910, Wright published Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, consisting of large unbound plates, 25.2" x 16". In 1911, Seymour published an English version of the introduction, as a seven page booklet, 4.5" x 6". The Japanese Print was the first book written, published and bound as a book by
Frank Lloyd Wright .
       "By 1912, Wright had become a nationally known expert on Japanese printmaking, well on his way to assembling what Clay Lanaster, a scholar of Japan’s influence in the United States, called ‘one of the most important collections... in the world.’ "
Frank Lloyd Wright Essential Texts, Twombly, 2009, pp 135-136.
       Ralph Fletcher Seymour wrote, "
Frank Lloyd Wright once wrote a monograph entitled ‘The Japanese Print’ which appeared in a tall, thin 35 page book, printed on Japan paper. The first materialization of this essay did not please the author and with characteristic imperativeness he demanded its destruction and the production of a new edition more in accord with his notions. There are a few copies of the first bad lot, which like a batch of unwanted kittens sent out to be eliminated, nevertheless survived. They certainly belong in any Wright collection. " Some Went This Way, 1945, p. 125.
       During the Imperial Hotel commission, Wright "functioned as an unofficial dealer during his trips to Japan, buying for his own collection and for others. He personally caused print prices to inflate, where Japanese authorities estimate he spent about $250,000 on prints alone." Robert Kostka, The Prairie School, No 4, 1967.
       Wright wrote, "Japanese prints intrigued me and taught me much... Japanese art, I found, really did have organic charter, was nearer to the earth and a more indigenous product of native conditions of life and work therefore more nearly ‘modern’ as I saw it, than any European civilization alive or dead." An Autobiography, 1932, pp. 194. (First Edition)
(Sweeney 109)

Size: 5.25 x 8.3

Pages: Pp 35

S#: 0109.00.0214

   
AntColPrints 1.jpg (22161 bytes) Date: 1917

Title: Antique Colour Prints from the Collection Frank Lloyd Wright  (Soft Cover)  (Published by The Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago)

Author: Wright, Frank Lloyd; Arts Club

Description: (First Edition)  (Sweeney 137)

Size:

Pages: Pp 14

S#: 0137.00.1099

   
Date: 1927

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Collection of Japanese Antique Prints  (Soft Cover)  (Published by The Anderson Galleries, New York)

Author: Anderson Galleries

Description: Sale number 2120. To be sold by order of Bank of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. An auction catalogue, of 346 prints owned by Wright. Forward by Wright.  Original PB List Price "A Priced Copy of this Catalogue may be obtained for One Dollar for each Session of the Sale".  (First Edition)  (Sweeney 187)

Size:

Pages: Pp 163

S#: 0187.00.0104

   
Date: 1962

Title: Japanese Prints Exhibition (Soft Cover (Published by Los Angeles Municipal Art Commission, Los Angeles)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright, L.A. Municipal Art Department

Description: Catalog for an exhibition of Wright’s Japanese Prints at the L.A. Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, from January 10 - Feb. 4, 1962. Also includes a reprint from the 1917 Arts Club of Chicago, Sweeney 137.  (First Edition) (Sweeney 1495)

Size:

Pages: Pp 16

S#: 1495.00.1102

   
Boxed Slip Cover

Cover

Date: 1967

Title: The Japanese Print: An Interpretation  (Hard Cover - Boxed Slip Cover)  (Published by Horizon Press)

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright

Description: Original HC List Price $30.00.  (First Edition)  (Sweeney 1686)

Size:

Pages: Pp 144

S#: 1686.00.0102

   
Date: 1967

Title: Oriental Art. Snuff Bottles. Bronzes, Jades. Pottery & Porcelains. Paintings. Furniture & Decorative Objects. (Produced by Parker, Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York)

Author: Parker, Bernet Galleries, Inc.

Description: Estate of the Late Senator Theodore Francis Green and other Owners. Public Auction December 14 and 15. A total of 499 items, which included 119 items sold by an "Arizona Educational Institution" (The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation). Item [148] "Japanese Carved and Lacquered Statue of Daruma" 22.5 inches tall, pictured on page 19, is clearly pictured in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography" Farr, 1961, plate 20, on the top shelf in the Studio at Taliesin. Purchased for $2,100 by Mrs. Mary Griggs Burke (husband was Jackson), a collector of Japanese art. According to a June 16, 2006 Release from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Mrs. Burke’s first important purchase of Japanese art occurred in 1956 when she purchased an Edo period screen at auction that was once owned by Frank Lloyd Wright. The Burke collection now has holdings of more than 900 works of art, making it one of the largest privately held collections outside Japan. Her grandfather was Chauncey Wright Griggs (Tacoma, Washington). Chauncey Wright Griggs had a Grandson, Chauncey L. Griggs who Frank Lloyd Wright designed a home for in 1945. Catalog includes 28 photographs. Also includes auction results. Original cover price $1.00. (First Edition)

Size: 7 x 10.25

Pages: Pp 92

S#: 1720.05.0110

   
Date: 1969

Title: Fine Japanese Prints.  Auction catalog for the Estate of the late Blanche B. McFetridge, Property formerly in the Frank Lloyd Wright collection. November 20-21, 1969.  (Soft Cover)  (Published by Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc. New York)

Author: Parke-Bernet Galleries

Description: Includes preface about Wright and prints. Auction includes 433 prints and catalog includes 36 illustrations. Also included is final bids.  Original SC List Price $3.00, By Mail $4.00. Two copies. (First Edition)  (Sweeney 1771)

Size: 7 x 10.25

Pages: Pp 128

S#: 1771.00.0304, 1771.01.0512

   
Date: 1979

Title: Wrightian Architectural Archives Japan.

Description: Join us as we breath new life into a lapsed legacy. "One hundred years after Frank Lloyd Wright made his seminal first trip to Japan in 1905, the nonprofit Wrightian Architectural Archives Japan was founded to ensure that his legacy of innovative, organic design would live on... Our goal is to create a living museum and national archives where Wright fans and scholars from around the globe can come together to make new discoveries..." Informational brochure for membership in the organization. Includes ten photographs. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 5.8 x 8.25

Pages: Pp 4

ST#: 1979.29.0811

   

Date: 1983

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright and Japanese Prints: The Collection of Mrs. Avery Coonley (Soft Cover) (Published by The American Institute of Architects Foundation, The Octagon, Washington, D.C. This catalog has been made possible by the Waldron Faulkner Memorial Catalog Fund.) (Note: Mrs. Waldron (Elizabeth Coonley) Faulkner, is the daughter of Avery and Queene Ferry Coonley.)

Author: Meech-Pekarik, Julia; Introduction: Stein, Susan R.

Description: Catalog for the Exhibition held at The Octagon from April 26 through July 3, 1983. "In 1926, the Bank of Wisconsin foreclosed on Wright’s mortgage, taking possession of Taliesin and its contents. To ward of bankruptcy, Wright was forced to sell many of his Japanese prints at auction through the Anderson Galleries in New York City, in 1927. Mrs. Coonley, impelled not only by the beauty of the Japanese prints but by the desire to be of financial assistance to Wright, purchased many of the prints shown in the present exhibition at the Anderson Sale and acquired others from the architect personally..." Includes five photographs, seven reprinted Japanese prints, and a list of 45 Objects in the Exhibition. (First Edition)

Size: 4.24 x 12.9

Pages: Pp 14

ST#: 1983.30.0214

   
Date: 1990

Title: Japanese Prints and Textiles: Phoenix Art Museum.

Description: A brochure for two simultaneous exhibitions at the Phoenix Art Museum. A) "Surimono: Japanese Prints from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives" October 6, 1990 - January 27, 1991. "Early in his century, architect Frank Lloyd Wright formed a large collection Japanese prints. From this collection some 750 surimono survive in the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives; 60 of these prints are on view here in their first public showing." B) "Japanese Textiles from the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives" October 9, 1990 - January 13, 1991. "This is he first public exhibition of Edo period (1615-1868) textiles and garments purchased by Frank Lloyd Wright during his many visits to Japan, including the time he was supervising the construction of the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo (1913-22)." Three illustrations including varnished illustration in background of front and back cover. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 4 x 9

Pages: Pp 4

ST#: 1990.85.0711

   
Date: 1995

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright Collection of Surimono  (Hard Cover - DJ)

Author: Mirviss, Joan B.

Description: Original HC List Price $70.00.  (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 313

ST#: 1995.04.1000

   
Date: 1995

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright and Japanese Art. March 11 - June 1995. Phoenix Art Museum.

Description: "Japanese art and culture played an important role in Frank Lloyd Wright’s career. Over his lifetime (1967-1959) he amassed a tremendous collection of Asian art for himself and assisted with the development of other major Japanese print collections... Frank Lloyd Wright and Japanese Art gathers together for the first time prints, screens, textiles and ceramics once owned by Wright. As a whole, they provide insight to Frank Lloyd Wright’s taste and an opportunity to enjoy Japanese art through his eyes." Includes eight lectures and seminars concerning Wright. Three were held at Taliesin West, and presented by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, Penny Fowler and Margo Stipe. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 4.25 x 10.4

Pages: Pp 8

ST#: 1995.56.0711

   
East-Heinz 1.jpg (31723 bytes) Date: 1996

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fifty Views of Japan (Soft Cover) (Published by Promegranate Artbooks)

Author: Edited by Birk, Melanie

Description: (1905 Photo Album)  Original SC List Price $20.00.  (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 128

ST#: 1996.11.0199

   
Date: 2001

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Art of Japan  (Hard Cover - DJ) (Published by Japan Society & Harry N. Abrams, Inc.)

Author: Meech, Julia

Description: Original HC List Price $60.00.   (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 304

ST#: 2001.34.0704

   
Date: 2005

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Architecture of Japanese Prints. October 22, 2005 - January 22, 2006. Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (Published by The Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, University of California, Los Angeles.)

Author: Peter, Carolyn

Description: Catalog for the exhibition held at the Hammer Museum of Art. "Late in life, the legendary American architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) reminisced with group of apprentices at Taliesin: ‘I remember when I first met the Japanese prints. The art had a great influence on my feelings and thinking... When I saw the print and I saw the elimination of the insignificant and simplicity of vision, together with the sense of rhythm and the importance of design, I began to see nature in a totally different way.’ "  Included one photograph and five Japanese prints. (First Edition) Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 7.75 x 9

Pages: Pp 6

ST#: 2005.30.0711

   
   
   
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
 
Date: 1908

Title: 1908 Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Description: Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Wright’s display consisted of a long horizontal panel suspended above the ground, held up on each end by a pair of vertical pedestals. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand.

Size: 10 x 6.5 B&W print.

S#: 0085.16.1211

   
   
Date: 1908

Title: 1908 Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Description: Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. The print was held in a tall vertical frame that intersected the base, and floated above the surface it was placed on. The low base was designed to hold a small vase for flower arrangements or other decorative items. The overall design was very consistent with Wright’s prairie style. Although very vertical in appearance, this first Print Stand appears to be about three feet in height and was designed to be placed off the ground at eye level. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand.

Size: 7.25 x 9 B&W print.

S#: 0085.17.1211

   
Date: Circa 1908

Title: 1908 Japanese Print Exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Description: Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints from March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, titled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. The print was held in a tall vertical frame that intersected the base, and floated above the surface it was placed on. The low base was designed to hold a small vase for flower arrangements or other decorative items. The overall design was very consistent with Wright’s prairie style. Although very vertical in appearance, this first Print Stand appears to be about three feet in height and was designed to be placed off the ground at eye level. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand.

Size: 5.75 x 9.75 B&W print.

S#: 0085.18.1211

   
Date: 1914

Title: Puppet Theater 1914.

Description: The Puppet Theater was displayed at an exhibition of Wright’s work entitled "The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright" at The Art Institute of Chicago in 1914. The Puppet Theater was designed in 1908 for his son Llewellyn. The engraved masque reads, "To Fashion Worlds in Little - Making Form As God Does One With Spirit - So God Makes Use Of Poets", an adaptation of a passage from Richard Harvey's "Taliesin". This quote was used three years before Wright began building Taliesin I in 1911. Also visible in the photograph is a Coonley Playhouse window (1912 - S.1912) and three Print Stands. The shorter version seen on the left behind the Puppet Theater and the taller version seen on the right. A smaller desk top Print Stand can be seen in the center. Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand.

Size: 7.75 x 10 B&W print.

S#: 0124.13.1211

   
Date: 2010

Title: Japanese Print Stand adaptation, 2010.

Description: In 1908 Wright loaned over two hundred prints to an extensive exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints, March 5-25, 1908, at The Art Institute of Chicago, entitled A Loan Exhibition of Japanese Colour Prints. The committee in charge, and major contributors, were Clarence Buckingham, Frederick W. Gookin, J. Clarence Webster and Frank Lloyd Wright. It was the largest exhibit of Ukiyo-e prints ever displayed in America. Wright designed the exhibition installation for the Art Institute. Included with the designs for the exhibition was a Japanese Print Easel or Stand. In November, 2010 my son-in-law, James C. Rust gave us a table top version of the Print Stand. Not having original plans to work with, he created a very accurate adaptation of the shorter table top Print Stand. Thirty-six inches in height, eight in width and twelve inches in depth, it is made of oak, stained with walnut, and coated with a satin finish. What once was an obscure two dimensional element, comes to life as a detailed three dimensional object illustrating the mind of Frank Lloyd Wright. Gift from James C. Rust. For more information see our Wright Study on the Japanese Print Stand.

Size: 36H x 8W x 12D

ST#: 2010.06.1110

   
   
   
JIYU GAKUEN GIRLS' SCHOOL, TOKYO (1921 - S.213)
 
Photograph circa 1930, courtesy of "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen". Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School (1921 - S.213). The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School began on April 15th, 1921 with thirty students. "The name’s literal translation ‘school-garden of liberty’, was given to the school by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. It may be added that the name, which truly represents the spirit of the school, was taken from a passage in the Bible, ‘The truth shall make you free’ ". "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930, pp 2-3. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani in 1921. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. Arata Endo pasted way in 1951. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began n January 1999 and was completed in September 2001.
   
Date: 1930

Title: Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen (Soft Cover)

Author: Wright, Frank Lloyd

Description: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, Class of 1923.  Introduction by Wright. Includes history of School as well as photos of the school. (First Edition)

Size: 7 x 10

Pages: Pp 64

S#: 0229.01.0405

   
Date: 1990

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, Tokyo, Japan, 1990 (1921 - S.213).

Description: Label taped on verso: "APN Illustrations, New York. (For use Sun., Dec. 9, 1990 with Michael Hirsh’s Tokyo APN story slugged Japan-Land.) Building of Tomorrow. Yuko Hani stands in front of the ‘Building of Tomorrow,’ the Jiyu Gakuen school house Frank Lloyd Wright built 69 years ago near the northwestern section of metropolitan Tokyo. Ms. Hani heads a group of Jiyu Gakuan alumni, who are seeking to raise funds to save the building from its sagging foundation. 11/20/90. Stf/Katsumi Kasahara." Acquired from the archived of the Associated Press.

Size: Original 11 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1990.90.0911

   
Date: 1993

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, Tokyo, Japan, 1993 (1921 - S.213).

Description: Caption on face: "07 May 93 -- Tokyo: Front view of Myonichikan 07 May, a former women’s school was designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright before WWII. AFP Photo. Junji Kurokawa - 07/05/93." After completing the Imperial Hotel, Frank Lloyd Wright designed three residences and this school between 1917-1921. The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School was his final project in Japan. Photographed by Junji Kurokawa. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 8.25 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1993.69.0811

   
Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, undated set of seven photographs circa 1995
 
  Date: Circa 1995

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School (1921 - S.213). Undated set of seven photographs, descriptive sheet and envelop.

Description: The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School began on April 15th, 1921 with thirty students. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Frank Lloyd Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. Arata Endo pasted way in 1951. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photographs by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. He was born in 1927. He attended the Jiyu Gakuen School after it became coed. He worked with his father, and at 30 years old, in 1957 became Wright’s last apprentice from Japan. After returning to Japan he became an architect. He past away in 2003. These photographs were most likely taken in the 1990s before renovations were competed in 2001. Gift from Randolph Henning.

Size: Photographs 6 x 4. Descriptive sheet 16.5 x 5.8 folded to 4.1 x 5.8. Envelope 6.4 x 4.5.

ST#: 1995.57.1111

   
Title: Photo 1

Description: Birds-eye view of complex in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, and two classrooms on either side. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. Directly across the street, out of view on the left, is the Auditorium designed by Arata Endo. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 2

Description: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 3

Description: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 4

Description: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 5

Description: Interior view of Class Room. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Wright’s design included two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 6

Description: Side view in the spring of the additional classrooms on the left. Most likely taken in the 1990s. These additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. The Auditorium can be seen in the background across the street. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms, and also responsible for the design of the Auditorium which was designed in the late 1920s. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Photo 7

Description: Auditorium designed in the late 1920s. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was responsible for the design of the Auditorium. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo.

Size: 6 x 4.

   

Title: Description

Description: Descriptive sheet and envelope. "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930. Text in English and Japanese.

Size: Descriptive sheet 16.5 x 5.8 folded to 4.1 x 5.8. White envelope 6.4 x 4.5.

   
Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, undated set of eight postcards
 

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School (1921 - S.213). Undated set of eight postcards, descriptive sheet and envelop.

Description: The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School began on April 15th, 1921 with thirty students. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Frank Lloyd Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930.  Gift from Randolph Henning.

Size: Postcards 5.9 x 4.1. Descriptive sheet 5.9 x 12 folded to 5.9 x 4. Envelope 4.75 x 6.7.

ST#: 2001.55.1111

   
Title: Postcard 1: Early Birds-eye View.

Description: Possibly the winter of 1950-1960s. Original entry gate has been replaced. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   

Title: Postcard 2: Front view in the spring.

Description: The trees seen above have matured. Original entry gate has been restored. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   

Title: Postcard 3: Front view in the summer.

Description: Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration. Balcony roof overhang brace has been removed. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Postcard 4: Side view in the summer of the additional classrooms on the right.

Description: Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration at the same time as PC3. These additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Postcard 5: View of the two-story Living Room/Classroom from under the second floor balcony.

Description: Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating this two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included the Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. The light fixtures and furniture were designed by Wright.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Postcard 6: View of the two-story Living Room/Classroom windows.

Description: Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating this two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included the Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. The furniture were designed by Wright.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Postcard 7: View of the Dining Hall. Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration.

Description: Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included the Assembly Hall on the first floor and this Dining Hall on the second floor. The light fixtures were designed by Wright.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Postcard 8: View of Class Room.

Description: Most likely taken after the 2001 restoration. Wright’s design included two classrooms where on either side of the main building.

Size: 5.9 x 4.1

   
Title: Descriptive sheet.

Description: "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930. Text in English and Japanese. Includes illustration of Floor Plan.

Size: 5.9 x 12 folded to 5.9 x 4.

   

Title: Envelope

Description: Envelope for containing eight Postcards and Descriptive sheet.

Size: 4.75 x 6.7.

   
Date: 2007

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School exterior, 2007. (1921 - S.213).

Description: While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen on the far left. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photograph by Jmho, August 21, 2007.

Size: Original 10 x 5.6 photograph.

ST#: 2007.64.1111

   
   
Date: 2007

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School two-story Living Room/Classroom exterior, 2007. (1921 - S.213).

Description: While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photograph by Jmho, August 21, 2007.

Size: Original 10 x 7 photograph.

ST#: 2007.65.1111

   
Date: 2008

Title: Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School two-story Living Room/Classroom interior from the second floor balcony, 2008. (1921 - S.213).

Description: The glass and furniture were designed by Wright. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of a larger building in the center incorporating this two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photographed August 27, 2008.

Size: Original 10 x 7 photograph.

ST#: 2008.15.1111

   
   
   
ELVEHJEM MUSEUM OF ART, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, MADISON
 
Date: March 5, 1981

Title: Wisconsin State Journal - March 5, 1981

Author: Anonymous

Description: Elvehjem acquires 2,800 Japanese prints.  Bequested from Nobel Prize winner John H. Van Vleck to the Elvehjem Museum of Art at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Size:

Pages: Pp 5, Section 2

ST#: 1981.07.1004

   
   
Date: 1982

Title: Hiroshige: 100 Famous Views of Edo

Author: Mead, Katherine Harper

Description: Catalog for exhibition by the Elvehjem Museum of Art at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Elvehjem gifted 2,800 Japanese prints.  Many came from Frank Lloyd Wright collection.  (First Edition)  SeeFireworks at Ryogoku Bridge

Size:

Pages: Pp 49

ST#: 1982.18.1004

   
Date: 1985

Title: The Elvehjem

Author: Anonymous

Description: Exhibitions: Japanese Woodblock Prints and Master Drawings from the Permanent Collection.  (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 4

ST#: 1985.12.1004

   
   
   
JAPANESE PRINTS
 
Date: 1858

Title: “Fireworks at Ryogoku Bridge” from the series “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo”. 

Artist: Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige

Description: Original Japanese woodblock print, first printed 1858.  This was part of the last series of landscapes produced by the Japanese woodblock-print artist Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige (1797-1858). These designs of Edo, or modern Tokyo, are among the most familiar images of Japanese art in the world, which ultimately numbered 118.  Many copies were printed until the wooden blocks wore out.  Unknown printing date of this print.  8.5 x 13.25.  Wright owned one of these prints.  See "The Japanese Print”, Wright 1967, Plate 2, Page 35.  "Hiroshige: 100 Famous Views of Edo" Page 45, Plate 98.

Size: Image area 8.5 x 13.25.

ST#: 2006.07.0706

   
   
   
HEMISPHERES
 
Date: 2005

Publication: Hemispheres - Feb 2005 (United Airlines in-flight magazine. Published Monthly by Pace Communications, Inc. Greensboro, NC) 

Author: Illingworth, Montieth, M.

Description: A) “Frank Lloyd Wright in Japan.” On the centennial of Wright’s first visit to Japan, author reveals the underappreciated impact of the East on this icon of Western architecture.  Includes six photos and
illustrations.
B) "Tour Wright's Japan."  12-day guided tour.
C) "Wright Angles."  List of Wright books.
D) "It's All Wright."  Wright as a collector of Japanese prints.
Original cover price 7.50.

Size: 8 x 11

Pages: Pp 6, 46-51

ST#: 2005.03.0405

   
   
   
JA - JAPAN ARCHITECT
 
Date: 1967

Title: Japan Architect - November 1967 (Published monthly in English by Shinkenchiku-Sha Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan)

Author: Higuchi, Kiyoshi

Description: "The Significance for Today of Wright’s Architecture (Part 2). Residential building is one of the main themes of contemporary architecture. Before the emergence of modern architecture, designers concerned themselves with memorial buildings like shrines and temples and with the residence of the ruling classes... Both Wright and Le Corbusier began their creative lives in residential design work, and each drew up his own ideal image f the city... Wright developed his great architectural system from the nature and society of the United Stated; we too... must give birth to our own great system..." Original cover price US $1.75.  (Sweeney 1698)

Size: 8.75 x 11.75.

Pages: Pp 17-20

S#: 1698.00.0912

   
   
   
ORIENTATIONS
 
Date: March 1995

Publication: Orientations

Author: Meech, Julia

Description: The Spaulding Brothers & Frank Lloyd Wright: Opportunity of a Lifetime (Japanese print Collection)

Size:

Pages: Pp 36-49

ST#: 1995.10.0501

   
   
   
VIEWS FROM THE FIGGE ART MUSEUM
 
Date: Fall 2009

Publication: Views from The Figge Art Museum - Fall 2009 (Published by The Figge Art Museum, Davenport, IA)

Author: Anonymous

Description: The Wright Stuff. Starting November 21, exhibition on works by Frank Lloyd Wright. A large selection of his work will be on display, including Imperial Hotel coffee service and drapery from the Hurtley House, Oak Park, Illinois, c. 1902. The collection will include an array of architectural drawings, stained glass, furniture, vases, carpets and other works. Includes one photograph of the Imperial Hotel Coffee Service. Digital and printed version.

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pg 4

ST#: 2009.11.1209

   
   

 

 

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