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Wright Studies
Lockridge Medical Clinic, Whitefish, Montana (1958 - S.425)
 
Little has been published concerning this Wright building.  Designed in 1958, construction began in 1961 after a Whitefish carpenter visited Taliesin to familiarized himself with Wright’s methods. The 5,000 square foot clinic, designed on a four foot grid, opened in 1963 and functioned as a clinic for one year until Dr. T. L. Lockridge passed away in 1964. The clinic was designed as a medical clinic for Drs. Lockridge, McIntyre and Whalen, upon Dr. Lockridge’s insistence. Rumor has it that the other two doctors were unhappy with the design. One complaint was that the halls were to narrow, not allowing wheelchairs to navigate corners  

restricting entrance into the examining rooms. This might explain why the clinic vacated the property after Lockridge’s death. First State Bank made major revisions to the building and occupied it until 1980. Since 1980 many other changes have altered the building. In 2002 the building was purchased and remodeled by Frank and Sharon Morrison, and Sean and Diane Frampton for the law firm of Morrison & Frampton. While cost and practicality inhibits restoration to its original design, I appreciate the effort the Morrisons & Framptons have taken to maintain and open the building to visitors.

 
 
Historic Images
Designed in 1958, construction began in 1961 after a Whitefish carpenter visited Taliesin to familiarized himself with Wright’s methods. The 5,000 square foot clinic, designed on a four foot grid, opened in 1963 and   functioned as a clinic for one year until Dr. T. L. Lockridge passed away in 1964. The clinic was designed as a medical clinic for Drs. Lockridge, McIntyre and Whalen, upon Dr. Lockridge’s insistence.
Text and Photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2008
 
 
 
Photographs By Douglas Steiner, May 2008
Some of the exterior changes include: The floor to ceiling front door was revised. A second set of front doors on the north side of the waiting room was added. The right side of the roof over the entrance was extended approximately twelve feet or three sections. It used to be the same length as the left side. The bank added addition windows, a drive in and carport roof. At the same time, the square planter was added as well as the corner post support. The upper parapet which was designed for flowers has been capped. The long horizontal front stairs that extended toward the center of the building to the round semi-circular planter were removed. The round semi-circular planter was replaced by two smaller semi-circular planters. The white plastic orb was removed.  The trim, which originally was natural Philippine mahogany, had been painted a dark grey has been painted Cherokee red, which is closer to the original intent. A pitched roof was added, I suspect to deal with leakage problems. An addition was added to the back of the building. It was surprising to see the red tile. It appeared in the photographs from the late 1960s. Wright would give these to   the buildings that met with his personal approval. The construction was started after his death.
       But many of Wright's details remain on the outside. And they are classic Wright details. Mitered glass corners, which appear on the two outside corners of the waiting room as-well-as the clerestory windows. The six inch vertical glass windows just to the right of the exterior and interior front doors, are imbedded in the brick on the right side. These are reminiscent of many Wright buildings. The classic horizontal feel with the vertical windows. Floor to ceiling windows. Decorative cast concrete fascia. The mortar is raked about one-quarter of an inch on the horizontal joints, and flush on the vertical joints. The mortar is tinted pink, almost light purple, consistent with rocks that are native to the area. The interior has suffered extensive remodeling over the past forty five years. Little remains of Wright’s design, but what has remained is classic. The massive brick fireplace is stunning. The double clerestory windows with mitered glass corners opens up what is left of the waiting room.
Text and Photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2008
 
 
 
 Books
Date: 2012

Title: National Register of Historic Places, Lockridge Medical Clinic (Prepared by the Montana State Historical Preservation Office. Published by the United States Department of the Interior National Park Service, Washington, D.C.)

Author: Greenfield, Mary C.

Description: "The Lockridge Medical Clinic stands as a fine local testament to late Wrightian design. While both the exterior and interior have endured changes over time, the overall design. While both the exterior and interior have endured changes over time, the overall design and character-defining features remain. These include the signature elements for which Wright is known: natural materials, banks of glass, low-slung roof, strong horizontal lines, clerestory windows, and an ‘in-line’ floorplan with a central hearth... The building’s integrity of location and setting remain, and its feeling and association with the Late Wrightian style are sufficient to convey its significance under Criterion C." Our Wright Study on the Lockwood Medical Clinic was cited as a source. Includes twenty photographs and illustrations.

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 37

ST#: 2012.14.1213

 
 
 
Related Books
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1951-1959", Text: Pfeiffer, Bruce Brooks;
Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, Yukio, 1990, page 352.
The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion”, Storrer, William Allin, 1993, page 457.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: The Western Work", Legler, Dixie, 1999, page 106-109.
"The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright" Heinz, 2000, page 355, 356.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Complete Works 1943-1959", Pfeiffer; Gossel, 2009, page 535.
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
  Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
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