ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
Wright Studies

Benjamin Adelman Residence, Phoenix, Arizona (1951 - S.344)

 
  Introduction    1) Adelman Laundry (P1945)    2) Albert Adelman #1 (P1946)    3) Benjamin Adelman (P1948) 
  4) Albert Adelman (1948)    5) Benjamin Adelman (1951)    6) Benjamin Adelman (P1954)    Floor Plan 1951    Natural House (1954) 
   Arizona Highways (1956)    Maynard Parker (C 1953-54)    Remodel 1957    Adelman C1957    Adelman 1963    Adelman 1968 
  Adelman 1973    Adelman 1979    Adelman 1996    Adelman 2004    Adelman 2014    Adelman Interior 2014 
  Adelman Guest House 2014   
Bibliography 
 
Introduction

 

Frank Lloyd Wright designed three homes and a laundry facility for Benjamin Adelman, and a home, two schemes for his son, Albert Adelman. He was born in Russia in 1886 and immigrated to the United States in 1903. He married his wife Regina in 1920. They had four children, Suren, Albert, Robert, and Lucielle. Benjamin Adelman past away in April 1959.

1) Adelman Laundry (Project 1945). Wright's first project for Benjamin Adelman was a commercial building for his laundry and dry-cleaning business in Milwaukee in 1945. The two-story structure was designed for an irregular shaped lot. The design was very advanced for its time. Half of the second floor and the long balcony, cantilevered over parking and a drive-through window. The large workroom on the second floor, designed with a plenum ceiling for handling large amounts of steam, was bordered with a row of clerestory windows, The building also included private offices, fur storage and employee dining room. Before it was built, they had a change in business plans, and it was never built. The plans remained a project. (FLLW #4507).

2) Albert Adelman House, Scheme #1 (Project 1946). One year after Frank Lloyd Wright began the design for the laundry facility, Benjamin's son Albert, approached Wright about designing a home for him on a lot he owned in Fox Point, Wisconsin, ten miles North of downtown Milwaukee, which is on the shores of Lake Michigan. It was an "L" shaped plan, one wing for the bedrooms with the master bedroom at the corner of the "L", and Living, Dining and Kitchen in the other wing. The Living Room featured a two story room with a Library/Balcony overlooking the living room, topped with a sun deck. The plan included a tennis court and swimming pool. This version was redesigned as Scheme #2 in 1948. (FLLW #4801).

3) Benjamin Adelman House (Project 1948). Frank Lloyd Wright designed a beautiful home on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan in Fox Point, Wisconsin. The home was to be constructed of concrete walls, much like Taliesin West, broad cantilevered roof lines, and a balcony facing the lake, cantilevered out over the bluff. This home was never built, and remains a project. (FLLW #4802).

4) Albert Adelman House, Scheme #2 (1948 - S.308). Frank Lloyd Wright modified his first design, straightening out the "L", and removing the Library/Balcony and Sun Deck above the Living Room. It was constructed of concrete block, cypress and cedar shakes. This was the first completed Wright design for the Adelman family. (FLLW #4834).

  5) Benjamin Adelman House, Phoenix, AZ (1951 - S.344). This home is considered to be the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. In 1936, Wright developed a series of homes he called Usonian. They were designed to control costs. He continued to develop the concept, and in the early 1950s he first used the term Usonian Automatic to describe a Usonian style house made of inexpensive concrete blocks. The modular blocks could be assembled in a variety of ways. Wright hoped that home buyers could save money by building their own Usonian Automatic houses. A precursor to the Usonian Automatic system were the four Textile Block homes in California, Millard (La Miniatura) S.214, Storer S.215, Freeman S.216, and the Ennis S.217.
       The basic concrete block of the Usonian Automatic system is 12 x 24 inches, and comes in a variety of styles: plain for the walls; coffered, creating a waffle pattern; perforated, with and without glass.
       This home is actually two separate buildings connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen) and Master Bedroom and Bath. The Living Room featured a geometric wall mural above the fireplace, designed by Eugene Masselink. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room, Bath and a Sitting Room with a fireplace.
       Adelman wintered at the Arizona Biltmore, which is adjacent to the western boundary. Just to the north is the Boomer Residence.
       Frank Lloyd Wright wrote "Here then, within moderate means for the free man of our democracy, worth some intelligence and by his own energy, comes a natural house designed in accordance with the principles of organic architecture." A Natural House, Wright, 1954, p.205. Adelman past away in April 1959, and the home was sold soon after. (FLLW #5101).

6) Benjamin Adelman House, Whitefish Bay, Wisc. (Project 1954). The basic floor plan for this home was the plan from the 1953 New York Exhibition House with the addition of a second story. Hand written on the perspective drawing, "Dear Father Adelman - This is how it would look from the street - The plan of the main floor is the New York exhibition house plus a second story for servants. FLLW." Wright, 1943 - 1959, Pfeiffer, p.350. Although this home was never built, the New York Exhibition House was built for the Triers in Iowa, in 1956. (FLLW #5501).

     
1) Adelman Laundry, Milwaukee, (Project 1945)

 

1) Adelman Laundry (Project 1945). Wright's first project for Benjamin Adelman was a commercial building for his laundry and dry-cleaning business in Milwaukee in 1945. The two-story structure was designed for an irregular shaped lot. The design was very advanced for its time. Half of the second floor and the long balcony, cantilevered over parking and a drive-through window. The large workroom on the second floor, designed with a plenum ceiling for handling large amounts of steam, was bordered with a row of clerestory windows, The building also included private offices, fur storage and employee dining room. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

 

 
 
 2) Albert Adelman Home, Scheme #1 (1946)
 
2) Albert Adelman House, Scheme #1 (Project 1946). One year after Frank Lloyd Wright began the design for the laundry facility, Benjamin's son Albert, approached Wright about designing a home for him on a lot he owned in Fox Point, Wisconsin, ten miles North of downtown Milwaukee, which is on the shores of Lake Michigan. It was an "L" shaped plan, one wing for the bedrooms with the master bedroom at the corner of the "L", and Living, Dining and Kitchen in the other wing. The Living Room featured a two story room with a Library/Balcony overlooking the living room, topped with a sun deck. The plan included a tennis court and swimming pool. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
Detail of the Albert Adelman House, Scheme #1.
 
 
 
3) Benjamin Adelman House, (Project 1948)
 
3) Benjamin Adelman House (Project 1948). Frank Lloyd Wright designed a beautiful home on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan in Fox Point, Wisconsin. The home was to be constructed of concrete walls, much like Taliesin West, broad cantilevered roof lines, and a balcony facing the lake, cantilevered out over the bluff. This home was never built, and remains a project. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
Detail of the Benjamin Adelman House (Project 1948).
 
 
 
4) Albert Adelman House, Scheme #2 (1948 - S.308)
 
4) Albert Adelman House, Scheme #2 (1948 - S.308). Frank Lloyd Wright modified his first design, straightening out the "L", and removing the Library/Balcony and Sun Deck above the Living Room. It was constructed of concrete block, cypress and cedar shakes. This was the first completed Wright design for the Adelman family. Courtesy of the Milwaukee Public Library.
 
 
 
5) Benjamin Adelman House, Phoenix, AZ (1951 - S.344)
 
5) Benjamin Adelman House, Phoenix, AZ (1951 - S.344). Viewed from the east, circa 1955. The Living Room is in the foreground on the left, the guest house is in the background to the right. The Arizona Biltmore can be seen in the background to the fare right. This home is considered to be the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. This home is actually two separate buildings connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen) and Master Bedroom and Bath. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room, Bath and a Sitting Room with a fireplace. Frank Lloyd Wright wrote "Here then, within moderate means for the free man of our democracy, worth some intelligence and by his own energy, comes a natural house designed in accordance with the principles of organic architecture." A Natural House, Wright, 1954, p.205. Courtesy of the Arizona Highways, February 1956.
 
 
 
6) Benjamin Adelman House, Whitefish Bay, Wisc. (Project 1954)
 
6) Benjamin Adelman House, Whitefish Bay, Wisc. (Project 1954). The basic floor plan for this home was the plan from the 1953 New York Exhibition House with the addition of a second story. Hand written on the perspective drawing, "Dear Father Adelman - This is how it would look from the street - The plan of the main floor is the New York exhibition house plus a second story for servants. FLLW." Wright, 1943 - 1959, Pfeiffer, p.350. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
Detail of the Benjamin Adelman House (Project 1954).
 
 
 
Floor Plan Benjamin Adelman House (1951 - S.344)
 

Floor plan for the Benjamin Adelman House, 1951. Courtesy of "A Natural House", Wright, 1954, Two separate buildings are connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The Garden Courts are enclosed by a block wall. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen), Master Bedroom and Bath. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room, Bath and a Sitting Room with a fireplace. Text adapted by Douglas M. Steiner.

 
 
 
Benjamin Adelman Residence - "The Natural House" (1954)

 

This home is considered to be the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. In 1936, Wright developed a series of homes he called Usonian. They were designed to control costs. He continued to develop the concept, and in the early 1950s he first used the term Usonian Automatic to describe a Usonian style house made of inexpensive concrete blocks. The modular blocks could be assembled in a variety of ways. Wright hoped that home buyers could save money by building their own Usonian Automatic houses. A precursor to the Usonian Automatic system were the four Textile Block homes in California, Millard (La Miniatura) S.214, Storer S.215, Freeman S.216, and the Ennis S.217.          The basic concrete block of the Usonian Automatic system is 12 x 24 inches, and comes in a variety of styles: plain for the walls; coffered, creating a waffle pattern; perforated, with and without glass.
       This home is actually two separate buildings connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen) and Master Bedroom and Bath. The Living Room featured a geometric wall mural above the fireplace, designed by Eugene Masselink. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence (1954-55): "Arizona Highways" (February 1956)

 

Five photographs and a floor plan of the Benjamin Adelman House was published in the February 1956 issue of the Arizona Highways.
       This home is considered to be the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. This home is actually two separate buildings connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen) and Master Bedroom and Bath. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room, Bath  and a Sitting Room with a fireplace.
         Window and door casings were painted cherokee red. Perforated blocks were used throughout the house. A low band of perforated blocks began in the Living Room and continued along the eastern Garden Court wall, then halfway along the Northern wall. Only the Living Room blocks were glazed with Glass. The upper walls of the Workspace were also perforated and glazed. The Southern wall of the walkway was perforated, but not glazed. The Eastern wall of the Guest House Gallery was perforated and glazed.
       These five photographs most likely taken in 1954-5.... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Maynard Parker (Circa 1953-54)
 
Although the Benjamin Adelman was the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, it was not the first to be built. In 1952, one year after designing the Adelman house, Wright design the second Usonian Automatic for Arthur Pieper, an apprentice, who also became his son-in-law on June 18, 1954. Pieper built his home in early 1952.
       Designed in 1951, the home was not built until 1953. Benjamin Adelman purchased a lot and a half from Jorgine Boomer. "For the consideration of Ten Dollars, and other valuable considerations, I, Jorgine Boomer, a widow, do hereby
  convey to Benjamin E. Adelman and Regina B. Adelman, his wife..." Warranty Deed, March 30, 1953.
       Construction on the Adelman House began in 1953, and was most likely completed in late 1953 or early 1954.
       This set of 15 photographs were taken after the home was completed and landscaped, and most likely in late 1953 or early 1954. They were either published in "A Natural House," Wright, 1954, or taken approximately at the same time.
       Five were published in the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful Continue...
 

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence Remodel 1957
 
Left: Original Floor plan for the Benjamin Adelman House, 1951. Courtesy of "A Natural House", Wright, 1954, Two separate buildings are connected by a covered walkway, with a perforated wall on the south side. The Garden Courts are enclosed by a block wall. The seven hundred square foot primary quarters included the Living and Dining Rooms, Workspace (kitchen), Master Bedroom and Bath. The secondary five hundred square foot guest house to the West included the Maid's Bedroom and Bath, Guest Room, Bath and a Sitting Room with a fireplace. Although not indicated on the drawing, a utility room was added and enclosed on the west side of the carport, and carport...  Continue...   Right: In 1957, Adelman contacted Wright to enlarge his cottage. The Living Room was expanded to the South and East, with a planting box on the Southeast Corner. The Master Bedroom was expanded to the South, and the Master Bath was enlarged and expanded to the West. The Entrance was also moved to the South but the door was moved from the South to the East. The original stairs were removed and also expanded to the South. They were also widened from 12 to 16" wide. The Maid's Room in the Guest Wing was converted to a Bedroom, and a closet was added to the Sitting Room and used as a Bedroom. The doors of the closet formed the corner when closed... Continue...
     
 
 
 
 
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Maynard Parker (Circa 1957-58)
     
Photograph of the Fireplace, circa 1957-58. One major change is the wood ceiling. The coffered blocks have been covered. Although the trim follows a  two foot square pattern. The pottery on the shelves is the same as the 1953-54 image #12, but rearranged. Besides documenting the fireplace, this image reveals its original details and colors. The walls are painted a light pink. The chair seats and backs are a red vinyl. A clue to the paneled ceiling could be a note written on the plans for the 1957 remodel. "Note: Cover all inside faces of all exterior walls and ceilings with 3/8" waterproof finish plywood, veneered on exposed face with... Continue...  
     
     
     
Benjamin Adelman Residence (1963)
     
Sadly, after enjoying his home for only eight years, Benjamin Adelman past away in 1959. Soon after his death, the home was sold to a private party. The landscaping is mature, around 12 year old. Although much of the home is blocked in this view, details are visible. The carport roof is held up with four block piers and cantilevers out about six feet. The Living Room is on the left, the curtains are drawn. The fireplace chimney can be seen above   the trees. The Workspace can be seen above the trees. The covered walkway has not been enclosed yet. Two planter boxes on the left side of the covered walkway are still there, although it doesn't appear to hold any plant. The Gallery's perforated blocks are glazed with glass, forming a glass-block wall. Curtains have been added and they are drawn. The Sitting Room, converted to a Bedroom is on the right. The curtains... Continue...

 

 

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By William Storrer (1968)
     
Set of three photographs of the Benjamin Adelman Residence by William Storrer, circa 1968. The exterior view is from the North. The landscaping is very mature, 17 years old. The Walkway has not yet been enclosed. The Master Bath that was enlarged in the 1957 remodel can be seen threw the perforated blocks as can the carport to its right. The Terrace, which used to end at the middle of the small pool (Parker 1953 #6), has been enlarged to the North approximately 20 feet.          The Living Room fireplace was designed by Eugene Masselink. The original coffered block ceiling, with 1 foot x 2 foot embedded blocks, has been covered with mahogany plywood. The trim follows a two foot square pattern. Storrer indicated that furniture and the Wright designed chandelier was sold in the late 1980s.
       The Workspace's lower mahogany cabinets appear to be recovered with a laminate. Upper... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Anthony Thompson (1973)
     
Benjamin Adelman Residence viewed from the North, 1973. The landscaping is very mature, 22 years old. The large trees on the left have overtaken the Living Room, blocking the view of Piestewa (Squaw) Peak. The Living Room is on the far left. The Dining area is in the center. The is one of the best exterior views of the dining area to date. The tall Workspace is seen in the center background. The covered walkway runs from the Dining area glass   doors on the left, to the Guest House on the right. The Walkway has not yet been enclosed. The perforated block wall on the right side of the walkway is left unglazed with glass. The Terrace, which used to end at the middle of the small pool (Parker 1953 #6), has been enlarged to the North approximately 20 feet. The Guest Wing is on the far right. The perforated blocks of the Gallery are glazed. Two planter boxes on the left side... Continue...
     

     
     
     
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Thomas A. Heinz (Circa 1979)
     
Set of three photographs of the Benjamin Adelman Residence by Thomas A. Heinz, circa 1979. Photographed approximately 22 years after Frank Lloyd Wright's 1957 remodel. The Master Bedroom was extended four feet South. The Entrance, which originally faced South, now faces East, and is enclosed on the South with glass. The Living Room was extended 10 feet South in 1957. Windows were added to the Southeast corner, as well   as the built-in planter. A short wall has been added to the left side of the stairs. The short wall on the right appears to be a large planter box turned at 45 degrees.
       On Wright's 1957 plans, a "Servants Room" was added to the West end of the Carport. It appears that the Carport was enclosed instead, and windows added to each corner, as well as the addition of the built-in planter on... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Anthony Thompson (1996)
     
In 1988, a major renovation and addition was completed by Fred Bloch, an architect who had worked under Edgar Tafel. The 1957 Entrance, originally on the South, which lead into the Living Room, was blocked off and replaced with perforated/glazed blocks. The entry stairs were removed. The Entrance was moved to the North side of the Living Room, and opened into a hallway.
       Originally white or silver, window cames were painted Cherokee red. The roof of the covered walkway, intersected the Workspace wall, and ended just past the doors that lead to the Terrace. It was extended over the new Entrance, and continued to the East joining the new garage.
         Originally the main house ended at the work space, and the cantilevered covered walkway was open. The Walkway was enclosed with a glass wall.
       The coffered ceiling blocks in the Living Room, originally 1' by 2', were replaced with 2' by 2' blocks. The roof of the covered walkway, which intersected the Workspace wall, and ended just past the doors that lead to the Terrace, was extended over the new Entrance, and continued to the East joining the new garage. The decorative edge of the roof with the 1' square pattern was retained.
       Dining table and chairs were... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2004)
     
In April, 2004 we had the opportunity to visit the Scottsdale area and view a number of Frank Lloyd Wright homes from a distance. The few views offer a glimpse of what remains of Wright's 1957 remodel, and a view of the major revisions by Fred Bloch.
       The 1957 entrance, originally on the South side of the house (left), has been blocked off and replaced with perforated/glazed blocks. The entry stairs that were on the left, have also been removed. The Entrance has been moved to the right side of
  the Living Room. Perforated blocks have been added to the fireplace chimney. The 1957 Living Rooms windows and built-in planter box remain intact. Glass corners are mitered.
       The original Carport is now enclosed. In 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed an addition to the back of the Carport, to be used the "Servant's Room." Instead, it appears the the Carport was enclosed instead. Windows were added to the two front corners. The Living Room was extended... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Residence - By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2014)
     
Time flies. It had been ten years since we last visited Scottsdale. This trip had three purposes. The first was to visit our youngest son and his wife, who reside in the Phoenix area. The second was to visit Taliesin West and personally meet and thank those that had assisted us in publishing "Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." The third was a desire to study and document Frank Lloyd Wright's work, in a more in-depth way then just the cursory drive by, clicking a few quick pictures (like in 2004).          We had that opportunity at the Adelman Residence. The owners were very gracious and allowed us not only to closely view the exterior, but also the interior.
       Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home in 1951 as a summer cottage. In 1957, Wright enlarged the Living and Master Bedroom of the main house. In 1988, the main home was extensively renovation and enlarged to the North by Fred Bloch, an architect who had worked under Edgar Tafel. The main house and guest wing were also joining... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Interior - By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2014)
     

       
       
       
Benjamin Adelman Guest House - By Douglas M. Steiner (April 2014)
     

       
       
       
ADELMAN ITEMS AND PHOTOGRAPHS.
 
 
 
Bibliography
 
"The Natural House", Wright, 1954.
"Arizona Highways", February, 1956, pp 20-21, 24-25.
"House Beautiful", November 1955, pp 317-318.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Three Quarters of a Century of Drawings", Izzo; Gubitosi, 1976, Plate 149.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, His Life and His Architecture", Twombly, 1979, p337.
"Treasures of Taliesin", Pfeiffer, 1985, pp 32-33.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1942-1950", Vol. 7, Text: Pfeiffer; Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, 1990, pp 89, 124-124, 402.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1951-1959", Vol. 8, Text: Pfeiffer; Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, 1990, pp 14-15, 142.
"Architectural Monographs No 18: Frank Lloyd Wright", Heinz, 1992, p.131.
"The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion", Storrer, 1993, p 366.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, West", Heinz, 1994, p54.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Field Guide, West Vol 3", Heinz, 1999, p 77.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: The Western Work", Legler, 1999, pp 52-57.
"The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright", Heinz, 2000, p.239.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Complete Works 1943-1959", Pfeiffer; Gossel, 2009, pp ___, 150.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Designs, The Sketches, Plans and Drawings", Pfeiffer, 2011, pp120-123, 380-383.
 
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017