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Wright Studies
Joseph and Helen Husser Residence, Chicago (1899 - S.046)
 

 

  Introduction    John Marshall Williams    Floor Plan    Architectural Review, June 1900  
  Husser Residence Circa 1900    Architectural Record, March 1908    Purcell Photographs 1908 
  Reconstruction of East Elevation    Wasmuth Plate IV (1910)    Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten (1911) 
  Leaded Glass    Windows and Doors    Light Fixtures    Concrete Vases    Dining Room Table & Chairs 
  Related Items    Corrections    Books & Articles 
 
 
Introduction
     
In Frank Lloyd Wright's An Autobiography, he described the Husser home as "characterized to a certain extent by the Sullivanian idiom, at least in detail" (p.127). Wright designed the Husser home five years after the Winslow Residence (1894), three years after the Heller Residence (1896) and two years after the Furbeck Residence (1897). It was his last commission utilizing Louis Sullivan's exterior ornamentations as he moved toward and perfected his prairie styled homes.
       According to their wedding announcement dated March 22, 1894, Joseph J. Husser moved from Zurich, Switzerland to America for religious reasons. "He was forced to leave home because he changed from the Catholic to the Protestant faith. He will teach Christian Science here." The announcement in the paper read "Married Her Father's Butler." Although Joseph married into one of the wealthiest families in Chicago after working as a butler for nearly a year, the announcement continued, "He comes of a highly connected family and speaks five languages fluently."
       It seems that Helen Husser was the driving force behind hiring Wright to design their home. It is not conclusive, but it begs the question, was the home a gift from John Marshall to his daughter?
       Wright placed an announcement in the July 2, 1899 issue of The Economist. "F. L. Wright has designed for Helen W. Husser a two-story residence to be built at 178 to 182 Buena Avenue. It will extend over an area of 73x 28 feet, and the cost is given at $18,000. In the June 1900 issue of "The Architectural Review", Plate XXXVII was entitled "House for Mrs. Helen W. Husser", but within that same plate, part of the text reads "Dwelling for Mr. Joseph W. Husser, Buena Av, Lake View Suburban Lot...". The March 1908 issue of "The Architectural Record" also entitles a photograph "Mrs. Helen W. Husser, Buena Park, Chicago". This bears a look at Helen's father and Joseph's employer and father-in-law, John Marshall Williams.
       Joseph J. Husser, most likely born in Switzerland, moved from Zurich to America during the early 1890s. He came from a highly connected family, most likely well educated, and was fluent in five languages. As indicated in his wedding announcement, he became a butler for the John M. Williams household in April 1893. A butler at the turn-of-the-century managed the household and would be considered a personal assistant today. He married Helen Williams in March, 1894. By 1897 the Lakeside Directory of Chicago listed Joseph as an executive for his father-in-law's real estate firm located at 140 Dearborn. He was very involved with the Christian Science movement, and in 1901, the Lakeside Directory mentions his involvement and lists the same address. After John Williams past away, he maintained offices in the same building. In 1906 the "Directory of Directors" for the City of Chicago listed Husser as a director of the Park Manufacturing Co. located on Jackson Blvd. As a director he maintained his office at 140 Dearborn.
       Helen Williams' parents were married in 1850. According to census records she may have been born around 1860 in
 

Chicago, the youngest of seven surviving children. If indeed she was born in 1860, she would have been 34 years old when she married Joseph in 1894. Shortly after their marriage, she became a member of the Christian Science Church on June 30, 1894.
       Contacting Wright in 1899, Helen and Joseph most likely moved into their new home halfway through 1900. In Spencer's June 1900 article in The Architectural Review, he comments "A very recent innovation not yet in place is the facing of gold enamel and glass mosaic for one of the Husser fireplaces." This would indicate that the home was built, lacking some of the finishing details.
       When her father past away in 1901, court documents filed March 24, 1901, indicated that the bulk of her father's two million dollar estate was divided between his surviving children and deceased children's children. She could  possibly have inherited close to $300,000, a small fortune in 1901 (8-10 Million in 2010 dollars).
       According to Irma Strauss, the Husser Residence was a source of pride to Wright. On Charles Ashbee's first visited with Wright in 1900, he wrote "...his Husser house over which he took me, showing me every detail with the keenest delight, is one of the most beautiful and most individual of creations that I have seen in America".
       By 1910 when Wright published the 100 plate Ausgefuhrte Bauten, he choose to only include details of the Husser Residence on Plate IV. In 1911, when he published "
Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", he included three photographs of the Husser Residence, but that same year he eliminated them from "Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago".
      Not much can be found about their life in the Wright designed home. They sold the home in February 1923. When the home was originally built, it was located about half a block from the sandy shores of lake Michigan. Lake Shore Drive was added just after the turn of the century. The extensive land fill along the shore line east of Lake Shore Drive, eventually become a golf coarse. The shore of Lake Michigan, which once could be viewed from the first level, was now obscured. Today, the area is crowded with apartment buildings, obscuring any view of lake Michigan from where the Husser Residence once stood.
       A building permit was issued in 1924 and the Husser Residence was demolished. The Dining Room table and chairs and a few photographs are all that survive.
       The 1930 census recorded that Joseph J. and Helen G. Husser lived in Los Angeles. Like many retired couples, they may have owned two homes at the beginning of the 1920's, finally selling their Chicago home in 1923. In 1919, there was a Joseph J. Husser listed as the First Vice President of the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra. Whether the same, this could place the Hussers in the LA area 1915-1920s.
      February 2012

 
 
 

John Marshall Williams (1921- 1901)

     
John Marshall Williams was born on December 6, 1821 in Alorrisville, NY. His early life was spent in Morrisville, N.Y., where  as a young man he became successful in the map business traveling throughout the East, South and Midwest. But he had a desire to move West. At the invitation of his brother, he traveled to Chicago in the Spring of 1848, where he opened a lumber yard, purchasing timber in Michigan. Due to illness, he sold his business and headed west to mine. He struck gold, but the work was hard. He invested in capitol in food and goods, and supplied the camps in California. Upon hearing of his father's death, headed back to New York, and on July 17, 1850 married Elizabeth C. Smith. They moved back and settled in Chicago. He became a successful business man in lumber, groceries, commodity trading and hardware. He invested in property, was a major stockholder in the First National Bank of Chicago, and a founder of the Elgin Watch Company. He invested in lumber lands in Michigan, and as his lumber land became cleared, rich iron deposits were discovered, and he  

John Marshall Williams Circa 1894

proceeded to develop the valuable mines in Michigan. Personally he was very active in his local church, and supported religious and mission work in Chicago. His estate was valued at two million dollars at his death. John Williams past away at his home near Mountain View, CA on March 9, 1901 at the age of 79.

 

     
     
     
Floor Plan
 
Floor plan for the First level. Above the Stable to the left (North) is the Hay Loft (West side) and the Man's Room or Servants Room on the east side. Just to the right are two Servants rooms and a Porch. Next is the Kitchen area which includes the Kitchen, Pantry and an alcove which served as a smaller informal Breakfast Dining Room. Just to the right of the Kitchen area is the Dining Room that faced East and a Study that faced West. Much like the windows in Wright's Oak Park Dining Room, the windows allowed light, but did not offer expansive views of the lake. Wright choose rather to keep the it a more intimate setting. To the right was the Stair Bay (West side). The Entrance to the home was on the lower level of the Stair Bay, which lead into the Lower Hall. Double stairways gave access to the main level and lead to an Entrance Hall or "foyer" situated between the Dining and Living Rooms. The Living Room offered expansive views of Lake Michigan. The Covered Porch is on the far right.  Courtesy of Henry-Russell Hitchcock, 1942.
 
 
 

The Architectural Review - June 1901

     
      During the final stages of the completion of the Husser Residence, Robert C. Spencer, Jr. describes the home in the June 1900 issue of The Architectural Review. "Among the house plans those for Mr. Husser and Mrs. Devin (project) are interesting examples of the ground-floor treated as a basement. The limitations of narrow lots have been offset by ingenious planning for light and view, as well as for a dignified route from street to reception hall. In both these houses the interior composition is unusually broad and finished with plenty of the third dimension. Here, as in all his work, no thin and papery partitions are in evidence, yet effects of mass and depth are not forced unduly in the interest of the characteristic, plastic treatment, and  there are no hollow wall spaces which are not organized in plan to practical purpose... The ornament should be of the surface, not on the surface and there should be no tangible background at all. That is the spirit in which the rich frieze decorations of the Winslow, Heller and Husser houses are designed...
       "A very recent innovation not yet in place is the facing of gold enamel and glass mosaic for one of the Husser fireplaces. Quietly framed within broad bands of Caen stone, the combination of gold in fusion with color on porcelain have been made to delineate
  vine  trunks and a weeping profusion of wisteria sprays and pendent blossoms upon a ground dull gold below and bright gold above a suggested horizon. The white joints have been employed with great skill to delineate dainty stems and leaves of softer green and crackled gold. The sprays of blossoms are inlays of rosy white and pearly glass which fall in the airiest, sweetest fashion from the tangle of leaves above. Mr. Wright as architect, Miss Ostertag as artist, and Mr. Giannini as craftsman and burner of remarkable enamels, have co-operated to show what may be conceived and executed here above and beyond precedent. They have more than succeeded. No monochrome can even suggest the exquisite beauty of this facing in its splendent play of iridescent color, of which the public has fortunately had a view at the recent exhibition of the Architectural Club. This bit of mosaic is for the Husser home, whose interior walls are of a dull yellow brick engaged with deep toned and unvarnished wood with inlaid lines of tawny gold mosaic that mark the beginning of  a new epoch in the use of permanent and beautiful materials for domestic interiors in the west." This issue included two detailed photographs of the frieze of the Husser Residence, an illustration of the fireplace, and Plate XXXVII, seen below.
     
Published in the June 1900 issue of The Architectural Review, page 66. Left and right: Detail of the frieze of the Husser house (these two images were published upside down, shown here right side up).

 

Below: Illustration of the fireplace and gold mosaic mantel for the Husser house. Of note is the Copper Urn and Candlestick. He included them in a number of drawings and projects he worked on. The Urn was included in the Edward C. Waller house, Wright's own Home and Studio, the Dana house, the Coonley house, Browne's Bookstore and appeared in an early image of Unity Temple.

Husser Residence Fireplace. "A very recent innovation not yet in place is the facing of gold enamel and glass mosaic for one of the Husser fireplaces. Quietly framed within broad bands of Caen stone, the combination of gold in fusion with color on porcelain have been made to delineate vine  trunks and a weeping profusion of wisteria sprays and pendent blossoms upon a ground dull gold below and bright gold above a suggested horizon. The white joints have been employed with great skill to delineate dainty stems and leaves of softer green and crackled gold. The sprays of blossoms are inlays of rosy white and pearly glass which fall in the airiest, sweetest fashion from the tangle of leaves above. Mr. Wright as architect, Miss Ostertag as artist, and Mr. Giannini as craftsman and burner of remarkable enamels, nave co-operated to show what may be conceived and executed here above and beyond precedent. They have more than succeeded. No monochrome can even suggest the exquisite beauty of this facing in its splendent play of iridescent color, of which the public has fortunately had a view at the recent exhibition of the Architectural Club."  Published in "The Architectural Review", June 1900.    Continued...
 
Title: Plate XXXVII - House for Mrs. Helen W. Husser, Buena Ave., Lake View, Ill. - Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect.
Inscription Center Right: "Dwelling for Mr. Joseph W. Husser, Buena Av. Lake View Suburban Lot. One Hundred and Thirty by One Hundred Feet. Broadside to Lake Michigan. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect, 1899...   Continued...
 
Additional details...
     
Wright cropped the illustration and rearranged the text blocks.
 
Poster published in 1998. Husser House (Published by Pomegranate Communications, Inc., Rohnert Park, CA)  Frank Lloyd Wright: Joseph Husser House, Chicago, Illinois, 1899 (demolished c. 1923-1924).  Perspective and elevation; ink and ink wash on paper 21 ½ x 37 ½ in.
 
 
 
Husser Residence Circa 1900
 
Viewed from the Southwest. Circa 1900, nearing completion of construction. The Driveway leads through the Porte Cochere in the lower level of the Stair Bay (foreground) to the Stable on the far left side out of the picture. (Concrete vase missing from opening in the Porte Cochere.) The Breakfast Dining Room bay can be seen on the left of the first level. Just to the right behind the Star Bay is the Study. The entrance to the home is through the lower level of the Stair Bay. The Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives.
 
 
 
The Architectural Record - March 1908
Husser Residence Circa 1902. Caption: "Mrs. Helen W. Husser, Buena Park, Chicago". Published in "The Architectural Record", March 1908. Wright published a total of sixteen articles entitled "In The Cause of Architecture" in The Architectural Record from 1908 though 1928. This first article dated March 1908, included one photograph of the Husser home. Although published in 1908, this photograph was probably taken closer to 1902. The home directly behind the Husser home has been built, but the ivy that was visible in 1910 is not.
 
 
 
Study of William Gray Purcell Photographs (1908)
     
       William Gray Purcell (1880 - 1965) was born and raised in Oak Park. He attended Cornell University and in 1903 apprenticed with Louis Sullivan. In 1907 he formed a Architectural partnership with George Feick in Minneapolis. Two years later George Grant Elmslie joined the firm. Although never working for Wright, he followed in Wright's foot steps designing Prairie styled homes.
       According to the Archives, Purcell visited and photographed the Husser Residence in 1908.
         According to Irma Strauss, Purcell visited the home in 1911, who noted "Went through lower floor around 1911 - in bad shape by that time".
       The Northwest Architectural Archives at the University of Minnesota houses the William Gray Purcell collection. Included in the collection are five photographs of the Husser Residence. Two may be the only surviving record of the interior in existence. The three exterior photographs...
 Continued...
 

Photographs courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN.

 
 
 
Reconstruction of the East Elevation
     
       With the discovery of Purcell image three, viewed from the Southeast, we undertook the task of reconstructing drawings of the East side and elevation of the Husser Residence. Information of the east side is very limited. The Floor Plan for the Lower Level is incomplete. Records are available for the First Level, but not the second. The North end of the East side is also incomplete. Image three is out of focus and lacks clarity, but offers an invaluable record of the East side of the Husser residence.          Lower level: Wright designed the Lower level as a basement, although it was at ground level. This allowed the First floor (middle level) a better view of Lake Michigan. The Lower Level housed the utilities, heating, laundry, servant's and butler's rooms, children's playroom and entry hall. The Children's Playroom was mostly located below the Living Room. To the left of the Dining Room Bay is the entry to the back of the Entrance Hall. Double stairways gave access to the main level...  Continued...
 

Photograph (left) courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Correspondence file: Frank Lloyd Wright, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN.

 
 
 
Wasmuth Plate IV, 1910
     
In 1910 Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), published by Ernst Wasmuth, in Berlin. Each set consisted of two portfolios with a combined total of one hundred separate plates (sheets).  Printed in German. The complete set consisted of 72 plates numbered I through LXIV and included eight with a or b. 28 were tissue overlays and were attached to the corresponding plates. Each set also included a 31 page introduction, consisting of unbound   sheets, folded once.
      Plate IV “Perspective and ground plan of a city dwelling for Isadore Heller, Woodlawn Avenue. Details of Husser house, Buena Park, Chicago.” 15.75 x 25.25.
       A detail of the Husser Dining Room bay window and a covered Entrance Pergola column appeared on the top right of Plate IV. This is actually a reprint of a detail in Plate XXXVII that was originally published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
 
Plate IV “Perspective and ground plan of a city dwelling for Isadore Heller, Woodlawn Avenue. Details of Husser house, Buena Park, Chicago.” 15.75 x 25.25.
 
Detail of the second level of the Dining Room Bay (East side). Note Wright's placement of the vase and cloth tapestry draped from open window. This is actually a reprint of a detail in Plate XXXVII that was originally published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
 
Detail of the covered Entrance Pergola column. Three appeared on either side. This is actually a reprint of a detail in Plate XXXVII that was originally published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
 
 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgefuhrte Bauten, 1911
     
A year after Frank Lloyd Wright produced the "Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" (S.87), he produced "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" (Executed Buildings).   All in German, it was published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin in 1911. Wright included three photographs of the Husser Residence.
 
1) Viewed from the Southwest. Circa 1900. The Stable (lower level) is on the far left. Just to the right of the Stable on the first level are the Servants Quarters and then the Kitchen. The Dining Room (East side), Stair Bay (West side) and Entrance (West side) are in the center. The Living Room is on the right, and Covered Porch on the far right. The covered Entrance Pergola to the right of the Entrance is in the foreground on the lower level. Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level.
 
2) Viewed from the West. Circa 1900. The Stable (lower level) is on the far left. Just to the right of the Stable on the first level are the Servants Quarters and then the Kitchen. The Dining Room (East side), Stair Bay (West side) and Entrance (West side) are in the center. The Living Room is on the right, and Covered Porch on the far right. Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level. Lake Michigan can be seen in the background on the far right.
 
3) South Elevation. Circa 1910. Lower level: On the far left is the Driveway. From the street, the Drive leads to the Porte Cochere (blocked from view) which Wright designed into the lower level of the Stair Bay. The Driveway leads through the lower level of the Stair Bay to the Stable. Just to the right of the Drive is the covered Entrance Pergola. Both the Drive and the Entrance Pergola lead to the Entrance and the Lower Hall.
First level: The Covered Porch is seen in the foreground in the center. It leads into the Living Room on the First Level.
First and Second Level: The Stair Bay (West side) can be seen on the left. The main section of the house is seen in the center behind the Covered Porch, and the Dining Room (East side), can be seen on the right. Bedrooms are located on the Second (top) level.
 
 
 
Leaded Glass
     
In June 1900, when Plate XXXVII was published in The Architectural Review, construction of the Husser Residence was nearly completed. Photographic records give us scant views of any   leaded glass windows. Plate XXXVII does give us Wright's intent. The windows of the main level were drawn in leaded glass, the second level (top floor) were clear glass.  Continued...
 
 
 
 
Leaded Glass Windows and Doors
     
Very few examples exist, and those that do, give us a scant view  of the leaded glass windows and cabinet doors of the Husser Resident. In June 1900, when Plate XXXVII was published in The Architectural Review, construction of the Husser Residence was   nearly completed. Plate XXXVII give us Wright's design for the upper and lower cabinet doors of the sideboard.
       Purcell's two interior views of also offer a glimpse of the Hall cabinet doors and a Dining Room Bay...
  Continued...
 
 
 
 
Leaded Glass Light Fixtures
     
Because only two interior photographs exist, few examples of leaded glass light fixtures. But the one leaded glass example is very exquisite and complex. The same fixture is used two different ways. Two are seen on either side of the Dining Room Sideboard. The leaded glass light fixture are placed atop a pedestal. The other is on the opposite side of the Dining Room at the entrance to   the Dining Room Bay. Either side of the Bay is a single hanging leaded glass light fixture. The leaded glass shade matched the two shades of the Sideboard, but is inversed.
       The two Purcell photographs are courtesy of the William Gray Purcell Papers, Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis, MN... 
  Continued...
 
 
 
 

Concrete Vases

     
Large concrete vases were a signature design element of many of Wright's Prairie homes. Wright incorporated five large concrete vases visible in Plate XXXVII of the Husser Residence, published in the June 1900 issue of The Architectural Review. One was   placed in the West opening of the Porte Cochere. Four were placed in the covered Entrance Pergola, two on either side of the North end and two on either side of the South entrance.   Continued...
     

 
 
 

Dining Room Table & Chairs

     
To date, only one Dining Room table and eight chairs have survived the destruction of the Husser residence. According to Irma Strauss, in the Frank Lloyd Wright Newsletter, First Quarter 1979, the Husser dining room table and eight chairs were rediscover after 55 years of use in a private Chicago home. "The mother of the present owner of the beautiful, almost square, oak dining room   table and eight elegant, high slat-back chairs recalls purchasing the ensemble in 1923 from Mr. Steinberg, the proprietor of a second-hand furniture shop on the near West Side of Chicago. In the shop were a piano which had been built-in, three similar dining room tables and 24 matching chairs all of which, Mr. Steinberg reported, were from a Frank Lloyd Wright...  Continued...

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
ITEMS RELATED TO THE HUSSER RESIDENCE
 
 

Correction

     
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture", 1959, miss identifies three drawings as being for the Husser Residence.   These are incorrectly identified. They are for the Isadore Heller Residence (1896 - S.038).
 
 
 
Text and illustrations Copyright Douglas M. Steiner unless otherwise noted.
 
 
Related Books and Articles
"In the Cause of Architecture", Wright, Architectural Record, March 1908.
"Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" Wasmuth, 1910, Detail of the Husser Residence "Plate IV".
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", Wright, 1911, pages 20-21.
"An Autobiography", Wright, 1945 (London), Plate 2.
 "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", Manson, 1958, Pages vi, 68, 76-78, 114n.
"In the Cause of Architecture", 1975, Wright, pages 53-119.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Preserving an Architectural Heritage, Domino’s Collect", 1989, Hanks, pages 21, 30-31, 62, 114.
"The Leaning Power of Pizza", Forbes Personal Affairs, 1989, Matthews, Pp Cover, 4-5, 28-33.
"Frank Lloyd Wright In His Renderings 1887 -1959", Text: Pfeiffer, Bruce Brooks;
Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, Yukio, 1990, Plate 11.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887 -1901", Text: Pfeiffer, Bruce Brooks;
Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, Yukio, 1991, Pp viii, ix, 54, 86, 120, 139.
"The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion", Storrer, 1993, Page 42.
"Important Works by Frank Lloyd Wright From Domino’s Center", 1993, Christie's, Pages Cover, 42-45.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Architect", 1994, Riley, page 61, plates 32-33.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Glass Art", Heinz, 1994, page 34.
"Lost Wright" Lind, 1996, Pages 39, 52-53.
"The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright", Levine, 1996, pages 28-29.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Cassina I Maestri", Cassina, 1997, pages 30-31, 42-43.
"Frank Lloyd Wright - Field Guide, Vol 2, MetroChicago", Heinz, 1997, pages 114, 155
"Frank Lloyd Wright", McCarter, 1999, pages 39-41.
"Frank Lloyd Wright’s Stained Glass & Lightscreens", 2000, Heinz, pages 51-52.
"The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright", 2000, Heinz, pages 377, 388.
"Wright inspired Stools" (Husser), Woodworker’s Journal, June 2000, pages 32-46.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Year By Year", 2003, Thomson, page 78-79.
"On and By Frank Lloyd Wright, A Primer of Architectural Principles", McCarter, 2005, pages 44-48, 50, 53, 136-39, 142, 193, 207.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Complete Works 1885-1916", Pfeiffer: Gossel, 2011, pages 8, 103, 106.
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 
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