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WRIGHT STUDIES

Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Illinois (1896 - S.038)

 
  Introduction    Heller I (1896)    Elevation & Frieze 1896    Heller Capitals    Capital 1896    Architectural Review 1900    Floor Plan  
  Frieze Circa 1898-99    Circa 1900-05    Circa 1905-08    HB 1908    AB 1910    1911 (C 1910-11)    1913    Circa 1938-40 Manson  
  Circa 1938-40 Lane    1961 Scott    1964-65 HABS    2013 Interior    Bibliography 
 
 
Introduction
     

Isidore H. Heller was born in Austria in 1847 and his wife, Ida, was born in Wisconsin in 1857. Heller immigrated to Chicago, and with his partners Christian Wolf and George J. Sayer, formed Wolf, Sayer & Heller, Inc., one of the leading suppliers of butchers' and packers' supplies, with offices in New York, Chicago and Montreal. In 1905 Heller patented a Meat Slicing Machine (pat. no. 894,829), and in 1908 he patented a Second Meat Slicing machine (pat. no. 939,417). The "Butchers', Packers' and Sausage Makers' Red Book", published by Wolf, Sayer & Heller in 1913, paints a clear picture of the supplies and equipment available from their company.
       After attending the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Frank Lloyd Wright headed for Chicago in 1887 and accepted a position as draftsman in the architectural firm of Joseph Lyman Silsbee. Later that year, he applied for and secured a position in the office of Alder and Sullivan. While they concentrated on commercial buildings like the Auditorium Theater, Wright became responsible for many of the residential homes, including Sullivan's own Bungalow (1890 - S.005), Charnley Bungalow (1890 - S.007) and Residence (1891 - S.009) and the Albert Sullivan Residence (1892 - S.019). Wright also took on "Bootlegged" commissions designed on the side. Most include the McHarg (1891 - S.010); McArthur (1892 - S.011); Clark (1893 - S.013); Blossom (1892 - S.014); Emmond (1892 - S.015); Thomas Gale (1892 - S.016); Parker (1892 - S.017); Harlan (1892 - S.018); Orrin Goan (project 1893); Peter Goan (1893 - S.029); Walter Gale (1893 - S.020) and the Municipal Boathouse (1893 - S.022). Sullivan became aware of these in 1893, he charged Wright with breach of contract.
       Heller may have become acquainted with Wright in Sullivan's office. In 1893 Sullivan was commissioned to design a warehouse for Wolf, Sayer & Heller at 310 N. Peoria Street, Chicago, which still exists today.
       Like the Winslow home, the Heller residence was an important step in Wright's development of a true Prairie Style. Like the Winslow, Roloson and Francis Apartments, distinct Sullivanesque elements remained, a merging of the old and new. Wright wrote of this in his Autobiography, "...saw the making of the Winslow plans... The Husser and Heller home, the Lexington Terraces, the Wolff Lake Resort. A number of other buildings all characterized to a certain extent by the Sullivanian idiom, at least in detail. I couldn't invent the terms of my own overnight. At that

  time there was nothing in sight that might be helpful. I had no Sullivanian models, even for any of these things." 1932, page 127.
       In 1895 Wright installed a carved stone plaque outside his Oak Park office which included his logo, a Celtic cross within a circle, within a square. This design element was incorporated into the top of the entrance gates in the Francis Apartments (S.032), designed in 1895. He also incorporated the logo on his Letterhead, added it to the bottom right-hand corner of the title page for "The Eve of St. Agnes" and later was added through-out "The House Beautiful".
       In 1895, when Wright designed  the Francis Apartments (S.032), he elaborated the same theme by overlapping geometric circles in a Sullivanesque pattern. Wright repeated this pattern when he designed the title page of "The Eve of St. Agnes", framing his winged females within decorative foliated circles. According to Hanks, the design for the title page was an interpretation of Beaux-Arts female figures.
       The following year, 1896, when Wright designed the Heller House (S.038) he adapted his drawing from the title page, creating a three-dimensional friezes. The plaster friezes were created by sculptor Richard Bock. Wright was so pleased with the result he place four panels above the fireplace in his Oak Park Studio.
     Like the Winslow house, Wright mixes stone and brick to the exterior of the entrance. But unlike the Winslow house, Wright adds stone columns to the Heller residence. The column capitals are Sullivanesque in style. There are columns on each floor, and each is different. Whereas the capitals of the Charnley residence (1891) are minimal, the Heller capitals in comparison are elaborate.
       The columns on the first floor are large stone columns, octagonal in shape, with its unique Sullivanesque capitals. The columns on the second floor are large, square and constructed of brick with square Sullivanesque capitals. The columns on the third floor are small in size, round, with a larger Sullivanesque capitals.
       At a glance, the columns on the third floor are vaguely similar to the columns in the Winslow reception hall. In some respects the Husser residence came much closer in relationship to the columns and capitals of the Heller residence.
       Sadly, Ida Heller past away in 1909 at the age of 52. Isadore Heller lived in the home a few more years, but sold it and moved in 1913.
       May 2014
 
 
Isidore Heller I, 1896
 
Isidore Heller I, 1896.
 
Isidore Heller I Detail (above, final perspective below), 1896. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation dates the Heller Residence as designed in 1896. Paul Krudy, "Prelude To The Prairie Style," 2005, dates the design as 1897. To date, we have found no information to indicate why this first variation was rejected, and why changes were made. There are many significant changes. On the east side (street side), the Living Room was originally extended, creating a balcony above. The window was one large opening, versus four vertical openings. Major changes were made to the second floor roof line, encompassing the whole second floor, eliminating the three quatrefoil designs above the balcony. On the South side, the Dining Room on the left, was also originally extended mirroring the living room, creating a balcony above. The window was one large opening, versus four vertical openings. It was also scaled back, imitating the new design of the Living Room. The window in the Reception Room was round. The Living Room window on the South side was also one large opening, versus five vertical opening. The original third floor exterior surface was plain, Wright added the maiden friezes to the surface. For a three dimensional model of Heller I, see "Prelude To The Prairie Style," Krudy, 2005,
Detail from The Architectural Review. Vol. VII., No. 6. Plate XXXV (below).
The Heller House, Woodlawn Ave., Chicago, Ill. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect.
Copyright, 1900, By Bates & Guild Company..
 
 
 
Heller I South Elevation and Frieze, 1896
 
Isidore Heller I, South Elevation 1896. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture," Wright, 1959, this illustration is identified incorrectly as the Husser Residence. The Dining Room on the left, is extended, mirroring the living room (right), creating a balcony above. The window is one large opening, versus four vertical openings as built. The Dining Room was also scaled back, imitating the new design of the Living Room. The window in the Reception Room is round. The Living Room window on the South side is one large opening, versus five vertical opening as built. The original third floor exterior surface was plain, Wright added the maiden friezes to the surface in the final.
 
Isidore Heller I Detail South Elevation 1896.
 
Isidore Heller Frieze 1896. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture," Wright, 1959.
 
Isidore Heller Frieze detail 1896.
 
 
 
Heller Residence Capitals
 
First Floor: Isidore Heller Residence Entrance Capital. The large limestone columns are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. Photographed by Harold Allen. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
 
Second Floor: Isidore Heller Residence, details of the second floor capitals. Two variations appear on the second floor. Variation "A" appears four times. A pair of capitals above the Living Room (above) and the second pair are above the Dining Room, both on square brick columns. Variation "B" (below) is a slight variations. atop six round or octagonal bricks columns. Two second floor images courtesy of Tom Bantle, Panoramio.
 
Third Floor: Isidore Heller Residence, detail of the third floor capitals. Pairs of colonettes are topped with large, spreading ornamental Sullivanesque plaster capitals. Courtesy of Tom Bantle, Panoramio.
 
Third Floor: Isidore Heller Residence, detail of the third floor capitals. Pairs of colonettes are topped with large, spreading ornamental Sullivanesque plaster capitals. Plaster capitals show deterioration. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
 
Interior Hall: Detail of Reception Room column. Octagonal oak columns set atop square oak pedestals, both decorated at the top with matching Sullivanesque filigree trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
 
 
 
Heller Residence Plaster Sullivanesque Capital Fragment, 1896
 

Isidore Heller Residence, (1896 - S.038) Chicago. Original exterior third floor painted plaster Sullivanesque capital fragments, two halves. These were removed and salvaged during restoration. Extreme damage to the plaster and paint, due to Chicago weather conditions, has been seen as early as 1964. There are three variations of Sullivanesque capitals on the exterior of the Heller residence. On the first floor, two capitals at the entrance.

  A second version is on the second floor, in two slight variations. The first atop four square brick columns, and the second atop six round or octagonal bricks columns. The third variation is on the third floor. Six pairs of smaller colonettes are topped with large, spreading ornamental Sullivanesque plaster capitals. 12" wide x 5" deep x 7.25" high. Acquired from the Toomey/Treadway Galleries, Oak Park.  Continue...
 
 
 
 
The Architectural Review, The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright
June 1900, Plate XXXV
 
The Architectural Review. June, 1900, Vol. VII., No. 6. Plate XXXV.
The Heller House, Woodlawn Ave., Chicago, Ill. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect.
Copyright, 1900, By Bates & Guild Company.
FP

Detail of the Plot Plan. Detail of the Floor Plan. (Text added.)
 
Detail of Southeast View of Home. "Exterior walls faced with vitrified buff Roman brick. Between second and third story sill, course grey brick alternate with buff. Attic story treated in high relief. Soffits panelled with perforated apron dropped inside outer band. Triinmings grey stone. Roof covering of flat red tiles. All horizontal joints white. Vertical joints color or brick."
 

Detail of East View of Home. "The Heller Dwelling, Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. Lot, one hundred seventy five by seventy five feet. Built in I896."      Detail of Winged Maiden Frieze.
 
Detail of Living Room Interior. Weed holder is on the left side of fireplace mantel, a Winged Victory Statue is in the center. Two Wright designed chairs sit on either side of the fireplace. A Wright designed end table and stereotypical built-in seating on the right. "Interior walls of rough sand finish. Trimmed in quartered and waxed white oak. Plaster saturated with pure color. Floor finish and furniture of one wood and color throughout. Lighting fixtures in main rooms wooden standards with globes worked in brass and opalescent glass. Interior color scheme bronze and dull green."
 
Detail of Arm Chair. Although this chair was designed by Wright, there is no evidence it was ever produced. Detail of End Table and Built-in Seating. Although designed by Wright, there is no evidence that either were ever produced.
 
Detail of "Elevation of Dining Room Fireplace."
 
Detail of "Electric Light Standard, Sideboard and Sideboard Plan."
 
Detail of "Glass and Loggia Colonnade."
 
Winged Maiden Frieze Circa 1898-99
 
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace (1895 - S.004) circa 1898. After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Possibly staged and photographed just after completion. Brick fireplace with a circular opening. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. Cubed stones balance the opening and set on the hearth. Tucked behind the large vase on the far left is a Sullivanesque frieze, similar to the Winslow door panel or the panel that faces the Roloson row houses. A Wright designed studio arm chair is to the left of the fireplace. A large floor matt with an Native American pattern sets in front of the fireplace, a smaller runner is draped over the chair. Wright commissioned Orlando Giannini to paint three American Indian murals in his Oak Park home in in 1895. John Lloyd Wright wrote, " ‘Skinny’ Giannini from Italy painted American Indians in brilliant colors on the walls of Papa’s bedroom... Papa liked Indians!" "My Father Who is on Earth," 1946, page 34. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Studio Fireplace Detail of Heller Frieze (1895 - S.004) circa 1898. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. Winged maiden set within a Sullivanesque design. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1895 - S.004) circa 1899. Wright hung four Heller frieze panels above fireplace on the left. After securing a commission with the Luxfer Prism Company, Wright built a new Studio attached to his home in 1898. Brick fireplace with a circular opening is on the left. A brick column balances out each side, possibly set at 45 degrees (?), base and capped with stone. On the upper face of the fireplace hangs four frieze panels sculptured by Richard Bock for the Heller Residence in 1896. According to Richard Bock, Wright asked him to design a small panel for Mrs. Heller (1896 - S.038). "As an inducement to do the freeze he asked me to model a portrait statue of his son John, which was intended for the children’s playroom in the home he was building in Oak Park. The figure was about two feet tall and was to represent a goldenrod. John Wright was then about four years old and the most contentious model I have ever encountered... It eventually turned out to be an attractive piece of sculpture of a very angelic child." "Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67. Studio is filled with drawing boards, sculptures (3 visible), drawings and plants. An art glass piece hangs in the window. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1900-05
 
Heller Residence published in "In The Nature of Material", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 43. Although published in 1942, this may be the earliest record of the home. It appears to have been photographed just after completion of the home, with a few minor details not finished. Photographed during the summer, there are no vines on the front of the home, like those in the AB 1911 image (circa 1910). Possibly photographed by Henry Fuermann after completion of the home. The three trees on the left, and one on the right are seen in AB 1911 photograph. The exterior light fixture to the right of the entrance seen in 1913 has not been installed. Although the gutters have been installed, the downspout on the east side of the Southeast corner seen in AB 1911, are missing, as are the house numbers. Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", Manson, 1958, page 75.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1905-08
 
This image appears to have been taken after Plate 43, published in "In The Nature of Material" (above), Hitchcock, 1942, and at the same time as a photograph published in the November 1908 issue of House Beautiful (below). It appears to have been photographed just after completion of the home, with a few minor details not finished. Photographed during the winter, there are no vines on the front of the home, like those in the AB 1911 image (circa 1910). The three trees on the left, and one on the right are seen in AB 1911 photograph. The exterior light fixture to the right of the entrance seen in 1913 has not been installed. Although the gutters have been installed, the down spout on the east side of the Southeast corner seen in AB 1911, are missing, but the house numbers have been installed. The vase sits on a low pedestal, just behind the bushes, centered in the entrance sidewalk. Courtesy of the City of Chicago.
 
Detail of the vase from the image above. The vase sits on a low pedestal, just behind the bushes, centered in the entrance sidewalk. Courtesy of the City of Chicago.
 
 
 
The House Beautiful, November 1908 (Circa 1905-08)
 
Photographed at the same time as the above. Note shadow at the entrance of the home. House Beautiful caption:  "Another house by Frank Lloyd Wright with a rich attic frieze in stucco." Note: there is no exterior light to the right side of the entrance. Photographed in the winter, no foliage. Published in "The House Beautiful," November 1908. Courtesy of The House Beautiful.
 
 
 
Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, Tafel IV & V, 1910
 
Tafel IV (Plate 4), Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin, 1910. Wright chose the same perspective of the earlier drawing published in The Architectural Review, June 1900. Also included on the plate is the Heller floor plan and column detail for the Husser Residence (1899).
 
Detail Tafel IV (Plate 4), Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, 1910. Wright chose the same perspective of the earlier drawing published in The Architectural Review, June 1900.
 
Tafel V (Plate 5), Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin, 1910. Top, Francis Apartments and floor plan. Bottom, detail of the Heller Column.
 
Detail Tafel V (Plate 5), Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin, 1910. Heller Column.
 
 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten, 1911 (Circa 1910-11)
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1910-11. Veins cover the front of the home. The downspouts have been installed. The three trees on the left are consistent with the earlier images, but have grown. The vase sits on a low pedestal, just behind the bushes, centered in the entrance sidewalk. Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten, page 17, published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin, in 1911, but most likely photographed 1910 (lead time in preparation for the 1911 publishing date). Photographer unknown. Also published in Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago, (Sonderheft), page 15, published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin, 1911.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1913
 
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance, Chicago, Circa 1913. View from the Southeast of the entrance. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels, each with a quatrefoil design. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. The Art Institute of Chicago dates this photograph before 1914. Ida Heller, Isidore Heller’s wife, past away in 1909. Isidore Heller lived in the home a few more years, but sold it and moved in 1913. Not confirmed, but the gentleman in the photograph could be Isidore Heller. (Note lamp to the right of the entrance. Changed in later images.) Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1938-40, Manson
 
Isidore Heller Residence Street View, Chicago, Manson Circa 1938-40. Viewed from the East. Photographed during the winter, no foliage. Ivy vines still cover front of the house. The Living Room is on the first floor, one of five bedrooms is on the second floor. The bedroom windows open to a ledge. The Playroom is on the third floor. The side entrance on the North side can be seen on the far right. A short fence can be seen along the sidewalk. It also continues toward the house on the far left, similar to the Gilman Lane images. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Lane images, but less foliage. Possibly photographed by Grant Manson. Part of the Grant Manson collection. He took many of his photographs between 1937 and 1941 while researching for his doctoral dissertation titled "Frank Lloyd Wright's Work Before 1910", which was later published as "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", 1958. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Circa 1938-40, Lane
 
Isidore Heller Residence Street View , Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Southeast. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. Ivy vines still cover front of the house. The Living Room is on the first floor, one of five bedrooms is on the second floor. The bedroom windows open to a ledge. The Playroom is on the third floor. A short fence can be seen along the sidewalk. It also continues toward the house to the right of the stairs and walk. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Manson image, but more foliage. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates similar Lane images Circa 1935-1945. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance, Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Entrance viewed from the Southeast. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels, each with a quatrefoil design. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. The light fixture has been replaced with one more in sync with the design of the home. Photographed by Gilman Lane at the same time as other Lane images. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates similar Lane images Circa 1935-1945. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Southwest. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. Ivy vines cover the south side of the house. The Kitchen is on the far left. The Dining Room is in the center, the Reception Room is on the right. The main entrance is to the far right, out of the picture. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. Bedroom windows open to a ledge. The Playroom is on the third floor. A short wall that runs along the south boundary can be seen in the foreground. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Manson image, but more foliage. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates this Lane images circa 1935-1945. Caption on verso: "I. Heller House, 1897, 5132 Woodlawn, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect. Imaginative articulation of space and surface treatment, and linear trim all expressive of home, sheltering and exciting at once." Stamped on verso: "Feb 8, 1960". The same year Wright designed the Heller Residence, he designed the title page for "The Eve of St. Agnes". Wright adapted the winged female figures from the title page for the Heller House Frieze.
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence 1961, By Laird Scott

 

During 1961-62, Laird Scott was a Senior photography major at the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology. "Our class was given the assignment of providing many of the photos for the first edition of 'Chicago's Famous Buildings: A Photographic Guide to the City's Architectural Landmarks and Other Notable Buildings', published in 1965. The editor of the book was Arthur Siegel,

  who was also one of our photography teachers. The book was a guidebook to Chicago architecture. As buildings have been demolished, they have been removed from subsequent editions." It was in 1961 that Scott photographed the Isidore Heller Residence. Courtesy of Laird Scott.  Continue...
 
 
 
Isidore Heller Residence, 1964-65 HABS, Allen, Nichols

 

The Isidore Heller House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for a narrow city lot in the Hyde Park district of Chicago. It belongs to a stylistic category of Wright’s work that has been termed 'Monitor' referring to the third story which is raised above the main eaves and capped by a smaller hip roof. The arcade and frieze of this story contains elaborate Sullivanesque ornament and sculptural figures, the latter executed by Richard Bock.
       The Living, Dining, and Reception Rooms as well as the Kitchen are on the first floor. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. Playroom is on the third floor. The large brick tower houses an elevator that services the basement and all three floors. The elevator tower and back entrance were not part of the original drawings published in 1900, and both may have been added when Wright added the elevator in 1909. The The Roman brick on the first floor is buff, the second and third floors, above the

  horizontal stone trim alternates buff and gray bricks. The Living Room windows are bordered with horizontal stone. The square panels below the Living Room windows match the billet molding framing the main entrance.
       The North (back) entrance sets on a thick limestone foundation, very similar to the foundation of the Husser Residence (1899). The art glass windows, different than those of the stairway, repeats the design element in the upper Sullivanesque panels, seen between the winged maidens.
       The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels, each with a quatrefoil design. The light fixture has been replaced with one more consistent with the design of the home. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. Continue...
 
 
 
Heller Residence Interior Photographs, 2013

 

According to Chicago building records, Isidore Heller was issued a permit in 1897 for a three-story brick dwelling, 26 feet front, 98 feet deep, and 41 feet high on 5130 to 5132 Woodlawn Avenue. Adams was the recorded contractor. Construction cost for the home was estimated at $12,000.

         In 2013, the Heller Residence was listed for just under $2,500,000. These excellent images of the Heller Residence were photographed for the listing. An excellent representation of the Heller Residence, exquisitely restored. Courtesy of Urban Search Realty.  Continue...
 
 
Text copyright Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2014.
 
 
Heller Residence Objects, Photographs, Books...
 
 
Bibliography
 
"The Eve of St. Agnes", Keats, Wright, 1896.
"The House Beautiful", Gannett, Wright, 1896-76.
"The Architectural Review". June 1900, Vol. VII., No. 6. Plate XXXV.
"The House Beautiful," Spencer, November 1908, Pp 133-137
"Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright,"  Wright, 1910, Tafel IV (Plate 4).
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten", Wright, 1911, p 17.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago", Wright, 1911, p 15.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, An Autobiography," Wright, 1932p 127.
"In The Nature of Materials: 1887 - 1941", Hitchcock, 1942, p. 27-8, Plates 43-44.
"My Father Who is on Earth," Wright, John Lloyd, 1946, page 34.
"Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910: The First Golden Age", Manson, 1958, pp. 68, 75-6, 80, 92, 183.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Drawings for a Living Architecture," Wright, 1959, pp 166, 246.
"Frank Lloyd Wright: A Biography," Farr, 1962, pp 69-71, 91.
"Historic American Buildings Survey," Rudd, 1964.
"Chicago’s Famous Buildings," Siegel, 1965, #52.
"The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright", Hanks, 1979, pp 32, 54, 170.
"Memories of an American Artist," Bock, 1989, page 67.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901", Vol. 1, Text: Pfeiffer; Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, 1991, pp 86-89.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Between Principle and Form," Laseau; Tice, 1992, pp 76-7
"The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion", Storrer, 1993, p 36.
"The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright", Levine, 1996, pp 28-29.
"Heller House," Pomegranate, 1998
"Frank Lloyd Wright", McCarter, 1999, pp. 39-40.
"Documentation, Analysis, and Interpretation of The Interior Finishes of Wright’s Heller House," Wolf, 2000.
"Frank Lloyd Wright’s Chicago", O'Gorman, 2004, pp 96-99
"National Register of Historic Places, Heller Residence," Wolf, 2004.
"Prelude To The Prairie Style, Eight Models of Unbuilt Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1893-1901", Kruty, 2005
"On and By Frank Lloyd Wright, A Primer of Architectural Principles", McCarter, 2005
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Complete Works 1885-1916", Pfeiffer; Gossel, 2011, pp 74-77.
 
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 

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