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Huntington Hartford Cottage Group Center, Scheme #2, Hollywood, CA (1948 Project)

 
  Introduction    Master Plan    1) Cottage Group Center I (P1947)    2) Hartford House (P1947)    3) Sports Club (P1947)    4) Hartford Stable (P1947) 
  5) Cottage Group Center II (P1948)    Plans for Scheme II    Art Colony 1948    Hartford Museum 1964    Related Items   Bibliography 
 
Introduction

 

Huntington Hartford was born into one of the wealthiest families in the United States on April 18, 1911. His grandfather, founded the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (A&P) in 1859. His father, Edward, had little to do with the family business; it was his uncles who built A&P into the world's leading retail grocery business. It has been estimated that in 1950, ten percent of all groceries purchased in the U.S. were at A&P stores.
       At the age of 12, he inherited $90 million, the equivalent of nearly $1.25 billion in today's dollars. Over is life time he proceeded to squander his fortune on artistic and commercial ventures as well as a number of wives.
       In 1930, John McCormack, the world-famed Irish tenor, purchased the Runyon Canyon 160 acre estate, located in the in the Hollywood Hills. He build a mansion he called it "San Patrizio." It was purchased by Huntington Hartford in 1942. He moved into the mansion and renaming the estate "The Pines". In 1947 he commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright and his son Lloyd Wright, who had offices in Hollywood, to develop the estate. This developed into five projects. 1. Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (4721); 2. Huntington Hartford House (4724); 3. Sports Club and Play Resort (4731); 4. The Stables (4737); and in January, 1948, 5. Cottage Group Hotel Scheme II (4837). Assisting Wright with the project as the landscape architect was Lloyd Wright, his

  son, who had an office in Los Angeles.
       But the project may have been doomed from the start. In August 1947, nearly 600 residents held a meeting to oppose the project which eventually was abandoned. (The Story of Hollywood, Williams, 2005, p.284) Hartford then turned to Lloyd Wright design and build a pool and pavilion overlooking Hollywood. He moved on and the projects were never completed. In 1964 he attempted to give the property to the city as a gift, but the city rejected his offer and he sold the property. In 1984, Runyon Canyon Park was purchased from the owners for use as a city park.
       Huntington Hartford, passed away on May 19, 2008 at the aged of 97.
     
 
 
Huntington Hartford Master Plan, Scheme I (Project 1947 - #4721)
 
Huntington Hartford Master Plan, Scheme I (Project 1947). As you enter the resort from the South, (bottom left), the resorts Cottage Group Center is located to the left, on the Western slope of the canyon. To the right, on the top of the Eastern ridge is the Huntington Hartford House. As you continue North, you pass a man made lake which is to the right side of the road. As you pass the resort's Cottage Group Center, Wright adds a bridge that straightens out a curve. As you continue North up to the top of the ridge, Wright adds two "View Points." Passing the second view point, you head East toward the Sports Club, perched on the ridge at the end of the road. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Detail of Huntington Hartford Master Plan, Scheme I (Project 1947). As you enter the resort from the South, the resorts Cottage Group Center is located on the Western slope of the canyon. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Drawings for a Living Architecture," Kaufmann, 1959. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Aerial view of Runyon Canyon Park as it appears today. Courtesy of Google.
 
Composite view of Master Plan superimposed over Aerial view of Runyon Canyon Park. Image of the canyon has been ghosted back. Composite adapted by Douglas M. Steiner.
 
Birds-eye view of Runyon Canyon Park looking North. Huntington's canyon is to the right of center. Courtesy of Google.
 
 
 
1) Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947 - #4721)

 

1) Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Hartford to design a cottage-group members only hotel-resort in the canyon on his 160 acres. It was designed to accommodate 130 guests. Wright placed the cottage units on the western slopes of the canyon and named it the Cottage Group Center, because of the nature of the cottage groupings rather than a single hotel building. These cottages were terraced on the canyon hillside and included cantilevered terraces and gardens, bedrooms, sitting rooms and kitchenettes. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, cafe, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the western side of the canyon while leaving the view of the eastern slope in its natural state. It appears that Wright placed his red square on the left corner of the 1947 plans. Just a few months later Wright redesigned the Cottage Group Center, placing the complex on the Eastern slope of the canyon. Scheme II was dated January 1948, and he placed the red square on the right corner of the plans. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

 

Detail of the Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). Cottages are terraced up the canyon walls. Many appear to have cantilevered terraces. Note the water feature. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Detail of the Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, cafe, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

 

Birds-eye View from the South, Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). Wright placed the cottage units on the western slopes of the canyon and named it the Cottage Group Center. These cottages were terraced on the canyon hillside and included cantilevered terraces and gardens, bedrooms, sitting rooms and kitchenettes. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, cafe, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the western side of the canyon while leaving the view of the eastern slope in its natural state. Just a few months later Wright redesigned the Cottage Group Center, placing the complex on the Eastern slope of the canyon. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Drawings for a Living Architecture," Kaufmann, 1959. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Detail of Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, cafe, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the western side of the canyon while leaving the view of the eastern slope in its natural state.
 
Detail of Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (Project 1947). The Sports Club was placed on the Eastern ridge of the canyon and can be seen in the upper right. The Huntington Hartford House was placed at the South end of the Eastern ridge, just above the entrance, and can be seen in the lower center.
 
 
 
 2) Huntington Hartford House (Project 1947 - #4724)
 
2) Huntington Hartford House, (Project 1947). As part of the overall plan for the complex, Frank Lloyd Wright adapted the Jester House plans for the Hartford House. Wright designed the Ralph Jester home in 1938, but it was never built. Wright utilized the design for the Gerald Loeb Residence (1944), but again it was never built. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. In this version for Hartford, it was more an entertainment center than a home. It lacked bedrooms, workspace and dining room but gained a lounge, changing rooms for the pool, and a circular bar that replace the master bedroom. One major feature and addition was a circular glass dome that enclosed the patio and renamed as the living room. Like the earlier variations, it remained a project. In 1974, Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Huntington Hartford House, South Elevation, (Project 1947). In this version for Hartford, it was more an entertainment center than a home. It lacked bedrooms, workspace and dining room but gained a lounge, changing rooms for the pool, and a circular bar that replace the master bedroom. One major feature and addition was a circular glass dome that enclosed the patio and renamed as the living room. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Drawings for a Living Architecture," Kaufmann, 1959. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Huntington Hartford House, North Elevation, (Project 1947). In this version for Hartford, it was more an entertainment center than a home. It lacked bedrooms, workspace and dining room but gained a lounge, changing rooms for the pool, and a circular bar that replace the master bedroom. One major feature and addition was a circular glass dome that enclosed the patio and renamed as the living room. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Drawings for a Living Architecture," Kaufmann, 1959. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
 
 
3) Sports Club and Play Resort, (Project 1947 - #4731)
 
 
Precursor to the Sports Club: A Memorial to Svet. William Wesley Peters' first wife was Svetlana Hinzenburg, Frank Lloyd Wright’s adopted daughter from Olgivanna’s previous marriage. In 1946 when Peters' son Brandoch was four years old, Svetlana and son Daniel, were killed in an automobile accident at Taliesin. Wright designed this memorial to Svet, located on the sunset terrace at Taliesin West. The triangle shape, originally of redwood, supports three plowshare discs. According to Pheiffer, "...he saw in that memorial on the sunset terrace a form that would be perfectly applicable to a building." (Monograph 7, Pheiffer, p.278.) Photograph by Douglas M. Steiner, copyright 2004.
 
3) Sports Club and Play Resort (Project 1947). Anchored to the ridge of the canyon, Frank Lloyd Wright designed a pyramid with large cantilevered bowls. "Springing from this central shaft, the trefoil of cantilevered shallow bowls of vertical concrete balance each other; a cantilevered tripod carrying three clubroom glass enclosures, capped by shallow glass domes constructed of stainless steel tube-rings and glass tubing," explained Wright. (Monograph 7, Pheiffer, p.278.) The sports complex included swimming, tennis, saunas, dining, dancing, a cinema, balconies, terraces and an apartment for Hartford and his guests. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Sports Club and Play Resort (Project 1947).  "Play Resort in Hollywood Hills for Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright. Lloyd Wright, Associate."  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Drawings," GA, 1984. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Detail of the Sports Club and Play Resort (Project 1947).  "Play Resort in Hollywood Hills for Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright. Lloyd Wright, Associate."
 
Sports Club and Play Resort (Project 1947).  "Play Resort in Hollywood Hills for Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright. Lloyd Wright, Associate."  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Three Quarters of a Century of Drawings," Horizon Press, 1976. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Detail of the Sports Club and Play Resort (Project 1947).  "Play Resort in Hollywood Hills for Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright. Lloyd Wright, Associate."
 
 
 
4) Huntington Hartford Stables (1947 - #4737)
 
 
4) Huntington Hartford Stables (Project 1947). As part of the master plan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the resort stables, and included an arena, stalls, shelter and was circular in shape.
 
 
 
5) Cottage Group Center, Scheme II (Project 1948 - #4837)
 
5) Cottage Group Center, Scheme II (Project 1948). "View From Entrance Drive." Frank Lloyd Wright originally presented the plans for the Cottage Group Center Scheme I, in October, 1947. Three months later, in January 1948, Wright totally revised the plans with Scheme II. The major difference was moving the whole complex from the West side of the canyon to the East side. Wright reasoned that morning sun cast on the western slopes would give the guests a more agreeable view of the opposite side of the canyon in the morning. Wright scaled down the size, reducing accommodations from 130 to 78 guests. Wright also moved the Sports Club from the East ridge to the West ridge. This design retained the cottage concept as in the first, thus The Cottage Group Center. These cottages were terraced on the canyon hillside and included cantilevered terraces and gardens, bedrooms, sitting rooms and kitchenettes. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, cafe, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the eastern side of the canyon while leaving the view of the western slope in its natural state. Scheme II was dated January 1948, and he placed the red square on the right corner of the plans versus the original left side of Scheme I. Illustrations courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
Viewed from the East from the west side of the canyon.
 
 
 
Cottage Group Center, Plans For Scheme II (Project 1948)
 
Set of 10 original blueprints for the Huntington Hartford Cottage Group Center, Scheme II. Huntington Hartford was born into one of the wealthiest families in the United States on April 18, 1911. His grandfather, founded the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (A&P) in 1859. At the age of 12, he inherited $90 million, the equivalent of nearly $1.25 billion in today's dollars. In 1942 Huntington Hartford purchased a 160 acres estate in the Hollywood Hills. In 1947 he commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a resort for the property which developed into five projects. 1. Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (4721); 2. Huntington   Hartford House (4724); 3. Sports Club and Play Resort (4731); 4. The Stables (4737); and in January, 1948, 5. Cottage Group Hotel Scheme II (4837). Assisting Wright with the project as the landscape architect was Lloyd Wright, his son who had offices in Hollywood. Wright presented plans for the projects in October1947. The hotel-resort was for members only, and designed to accommodate 130 guests. Wright placed the cottage units on the western slopes of the canyon and named it the Cottage Group Center, because of the nature of the cottage groupings rather than a single hotel... Continue...
     

       
       
       
Huntington Hartford Art Colony 1948
 
Frank Lloyd Wright presented his plans for the Huntington Hartford Resort complex in 1947 on 160 acres that he owned in the Hollywood Hills. Wright revised the plans in January 1948. But the project may have been doomed from the start. In August 1947, nearly 600 residents held a meeting to oppose the project. Hartford needed to obtain zoning variances for the property, but due to neighbors outspoken opposition, Hartford abandoned the project.
       Huntington wrote in 1976, "...I am reminded of a letter which Frank Lloyd Wright once wrote me in which he said that he was sorry to see how near I came ‘to doing something great and then something always happens - what is the matter?’ ." You Are What You Write, Hartford, 1976. Wright could have been referring to the resort complex he abandoned.
       He then turned his attention to utilizing the property for an arts community. According to the UCLA Library, Special Collection, which houses all the documents related to the Foundation, in December 1948, Huntington Hartford established the Huntington Hartford Foundation; its purpose was to foster community creativity in the arts through fellowships which provided subsistence, living quarters and partial supplies at the Foundation's location in Rustic Canyon, Pacific Palisades, California. Applicants for fellowships were screened by three
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

admissions committees (literary, music and art). He hired Lloyd Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright's son, to designed a studio apartment building for the property. Huntington ended the Foundation in September 1965.

     
 
 
Huntington Hartford Museum 1964
 
In 1964, Huntington Hartford hired architect Edward Durell Stone to design a museum in New York City for his art collection. He named it the Gallery of Modern Art. Salvador Dalí attended the grand opening held on March 16, 1964. Hartford showcased 19th- and 20th-century work as opposed to Abstract Expressionism, which he detested. Although it wasn't considered a stunning collection, a catalog published in 1964, "Paintings from the Huntington Hartford Collection in the Gallery of Modern Art," included Cassatt, Dali, Degas, Hopper, Monet, Pissarro, Sargent, Toulouse-Lautrec and Turner, to name a few.
       One month later, from April 27 though May 31, 1964, a Pre-Raphaelites exhibit was held at the museum which included paintings from Hartford's collection.
        From December 18, 1965 through February 28, 1966, a major Dali exhibition of 257 painting, was held at the museum and included the Hartford collection.
       Although many other exhibitions took place at the museum, it was never able to sustain itself, and Hartford closed the museum in 1969 and donated the building to the Fairleigh Dickinson University.
    
     
 
 
Related Items
   
  Hartford Cottage Group Center Blueprints, Scheme II (1948). Set of 10 original blueprints for the Huntington Hartford Cottage Group Center, Scheme II. Huntington Hartford was born into one of the wealthiest families in the United States on April 18, 1911. His grandfather, founded the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (A&P) in 1859. At the age of 12, he inherited $90 million, the equivalent of nearly $1.25 billion in today's dollars. In 1942 Huntington Hartford purchased a 160 acres estate in the Hollywood Hills. In 1947 he commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a resort for the property which developed into five projects. 1. Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (4721); 2. Huntington Hartford House (4724); 3. Sports Club and Play Resort (4731); 4. The Stables (4737); and in January, 1948, 5. Cottage Group Hotel Scheme II (4837). Assisting Wright with the project as the landscape architect was Lloyd Wright, his son who had offices in Hollywood. Wright presented plans for the projects in October 1947. The hotel-resort was for members only, and designed to accommodate 130 guests. Wright placed the cottage units on the western slopes of the canyon and named it the Cottage Group Center, because of the nature of the cottage groupings rather than a single hotel building. Three months later, in January 1948, Wright totally revised the plans with Scheme II. The major difference was moving the whole complex from the West side of the canyon to the East side. Wright reasoned that morning sun cast on the western slopes would give the guests a more agreeable view of the opposite side of the canyon in the morning. Wright also scaled down the size, reducing accommodations from 130 to 78 guests. Neighborhood opposition put the project on hold, and never gained enough traction to start up again. Note: The levels of this scheme are identified by the topographic numbers on the various levels.
   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 1) Huntington Hartford Resort Complex, Original Position (Project).

Description: Birds-eye view of the canyon toward the Southwest. Text bottom left: "Original Position." One of the two view points can be seen in the foreground on the left. A bridge can be seen on the top left. The Sports Club and Play Resort can be seen in the background on the right, on the Eastern ridge. The sports complex included swimming, tennis, saunas, dining, dancing, a cinema, balconies, terraces and an apartment for Hartford and his guests.

Size: Original 27" x 13" blueprint, 10 x 5 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-1, 0746.20.0215-1A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 2) Huntington Hartford Birds-Eye View Scheme II (Project).

Description: Viewed from the Southwest. Text: "Alternate. Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Box bottom right appears to be dated "Jan 30, 48." The Sports Club and Play Resort can be seen in the upper left corner on the Western ridge. The sports complex included swimming, tennis, saunas, dining, dancing, a cinema, balconies, terraces and an apartment for Hartford and his guests. The entrance to the Cottage Group Center can be seen on the bottom right. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, café, sun terraces, patios and gardens.

Size: Original 36" x 45.75" blueprint, 10 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-2, 0746.21.0215-2A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 3) Huntington Hartford Entrance View Scheme II (Project).

Description: Viewed from the South. Text: "View From Entrance Drive. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Frank Lloyd Wright originally presented the plans for the Cottage Group Center Scheme I, in October, 1947. Three months later, in January 1948, Wright totally revised the plans with Scheme II. The major difference was moving the whole complex from the West side of the canyon to the East side. Wright reasoned that morning sun cast on the western slopes would give the guests a more agreeable view of the opposite side of the canyon in the morning. As you enter the property, you pass through a set of Wright designed gates. Wright also moved the Sports Club from the East ridge to the West ridge which can be seen on the top left corner. This design retained the cottage concept as in the first, thus The Cottage Group Center. These cottages were terraced on the canyon hillside and included cantilevered terraces and gardens, bedrooms, sitting rooms and kitchenettes. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, café, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the eastern side of the canyon while leaving the view of the western slope in its natural state. Scheme II was dated January 1948, and he placed the red square on the right corner of the plans versus the original left side of Scheme I.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-3, 0746.21.0215-3A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 4) Huntington Hartford Plan at 565, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Automobile entrance. Text: "Plan at 565. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Level 565 is the automobile entrance. As you enter the property, you cross a bridge over a pool that is on both sides of the road. As you pull forward, you drive under a large terrace that stretches over the road. The entrance leads to the lobby, clerk’s deck, vault and manager’s office. There are areas of plantings, that are open above. From the lobby, elevators and stairs lead to level 575. Driving forward leads to underground garage as well as addition outdoor parking. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. Plantings at this level includes: Palms, magnolia and acacia. The line for Cross Section "A - A" cut through the road and managers office at this level. "C - C" cuts through the entrance and lower lobby.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-4, 0746.21.0215-4A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 5) Huntington Hartford Plan at 575, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Main lounge. Text: "Plan at 575. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." The main lounge is on this level, and Wright labels it Living Room which includes built-in seating and two fireplaces. It opens to an outdoor lounge that covers the drive below. There are built-in planting boxes. Stairs on the east side lead to the open landscape. To the North of the living room are washrooms, storage and the upper garage, with ramps that lead to the lower garage below. From the Living Room, a walkway leads to the south wing which includes three cottages. Cottage Type (1), there are two, includes a sitting room with built-in seating and fireplace, an outdoor terrace, one bedroom, kitchen, a built-in dining table, and a bath. The larger Cottage Type (3) includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. Plantings at this level include: Palms, plum, avocado, walnut, acacia, bay, pine, broadleaf, grapefruit, laurel and bamboo.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-5, 0746.21.0215-5A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 6) Huntington Hartford Plan at 585, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Dining Pavilion. Text: "Plan at 585. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room (main lounge), is the "upper part of the Living Room" and has two fireplaces. Just to the north is the cocktail lounge and bar. Continuing north is a sun gallery and the kitchen. The ceiling is covered with triangular skylights. Next is the hexagonal-shaped dining pavilion. Taking a few steps up to a raised level is an area with a fireplace. The dining room looks out at a water cascade. To the South of the upper living room a passageway leads to terraced garden, then on to a larger Cottage Type (3) which includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-6, 0746.21.0215-6A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 7) Huntington Hartford Plan at 595, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Patio. Text: "Plan at 595. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room is a patio labeled "upper part of the Living Room." To the North is the glass and copper top over the dining pavilion, as well as employee rooms and a small sitting room. At the Southern end of this plan is another large three bedroom Cottage Type (3). The layout of this three bedroom cottage differs from the two on the lower levels, but still includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. It is reached by stairs from levels 585 and 605. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-7, 0746.21.0215-7A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 8) Huntington Hartford Plan at 605, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Open Patio and bedrooms. Text: "Plan at 605. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room is an open patio labeled "upper part of the Living Room," and includes planned plantings on the roof. To the North is a single bedroom and bath, and a long terrace garden over the employee bedrooms below. To the South are eight guest rooms with fireplaces, and bathrooms. At the Southern end of this plan is another large three bedroom Cottage Type (3). The layout of this three bedroom cottage differs from the two on the lower levels, but still includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-8, 0746.21.0215-8A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 9) Huntington Hartford Plan at 615, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Upper Level. Text: "Plan at 615. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." The upper level provides additional cottages on the North and South, with Guest Bedrooms in the center. The roof above the lower "Living Room" is planted as a large Terrace Garden with a large irregular hexagon open to the patio below. To the North are three large three-bedroom Cottages Type (2). The layout of these three bedroom cottages differ from those on the lower levels. They includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The larger bedroom includes a fireplace. The five Guest Bedrooms located just next to the Living Room roof, are reached by stairs from the lower level. Each of the bedrooms include a bath and fireplace. This level of bedrooms are stepped back, so that the roof of the lower bedrooms provide a "Terrace Garden over Lower Bedrooms." Two the South are two one-bedroom cottages. Each has a sitting room and fireplace, kitchen, bedroom and bath. One has a built in dining table. Both are surrounded by lush plantings and terraces. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215 -9, 0746.21.0215-9A&B

   
Date: 1948

Title: Sheet 10) Huntington Hartford Cross Sections, Scheme II (Project).

Description: Cross Sections. Text: "Sections. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." This plan shows five cross sections, "A - A" through "E - E." A - A is on the top left, C - C is on the top right, E - E is in the center, D - D is on the bottom left, and B - B is on the bottom right. On the plans, the cross sections run from North to South: B - B; C - C; A - A in the center; E - E; D - D on the South. Of interest is B - B, the cross section of the of the Dining Room. Wright has added a spire rising from the roof made of glass and copper. There is also evidence of a water feature that cascades from the North to the South. It begins on the North by the Dining Pavilion and runs to the South, ending in the Pool at the Entrance.

Size: Original 36" x 36.5" blueprint, 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.

S#: 0746.20.0215-10, 0746.21.0215-10A&B

   
Date: Circa 1951

Title: Huntington Hartford Art Colony, New York, Circa 1951.

Description: After Huntington Hartford abandoned the resort Frank Lloyd Wright designed for the 160 acres Hartford owned in the Hollywood Hills, he turned his attention to utilizing the property for an arts community. According to the UCLA Library, Special Collection, which houses all the documents related to the Foundation, in December 1948, Huntington Hartford established the Huntington Hartford Foundation; its purpose was to foster community creativity in the arts through fellowships which provided subsistence, living quarters and partial supplies at the Foundation's location in Rustic Canyon, Pacific Palisades, California. Applicants for fellowships were screened by three admissions committees (literary, music and art). He hired Lloyd Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright's son, to designed a studio apartment building for the property. Huntington ended the Foundation in September 1965. Published in the February 4, 1952 issue of Life Magazine.

Size: 9 x 7 B&W photograph.

S#: 0857.26.0561

   
Date: 1952

Title: Life Magazine - February 4, 1952 (Published weekly by Time Inc., Chicago) (Relates to Huntington Hartford Resort, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, Project 1947-8)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Art Trouble in Paradise. Modernism upsets grocery heir’s Eden. About three years ago millionaire Huntington Hartford, 40-year-old heir to the A&P fortune, concluded that much of the violence of modern society was due to an ignorance of the arts. So he created the Huntington Hartford Foundation and on the outskirts of Los Angeles, in a hidden canyon, built a $600,000 retreat where struggling young artists, writers, composers and sculptors could live and create free from the cares of the world..." Wright’s plans for the resort were presented to Hartford in 1947, and revised in January 1948, but neighborhood opposition ended the project. It was after that (around 1949) that Hartford created his art community instead. Lloyd Wright designed a studio apartment building for the property. Includes nine photographs, one of the building designed by Lloyd Wright.

Size: 10.5 x 14

Pages: Pg 76-79

S#: 0910.31.0515

   
Date: 1964

Title: Huntington Hartford Gallery of Modern Art, New York, Circa 1964.

Description: Huntington Hartford hired architect Edward Durell Stone to design a museum in New York City at two Columbia Circle, for his art collection. He named it the Gallery of Modern Art. Salvador Dalí attended the grand opening held on March 16, 1964. Reception for the gallery was mixed. Writing for The New York Times after the gallery's opening in 1964, Ada Louise Huxtable dismissed the exterior as "a die-cast Venetian palazzo on lollipops." She did praised the interior spaces as a "conspicuous success … an achievement to command considerable admiration." Although many major exhibitions took place at the museum, it was never able to sustain itself, Hartford closed the museum in 1969 and donated the building to the Fairleigh Dickinson University. Photographed by Ezra Stoller, circa 1964.

Size: 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 1596.51.0515

   
Date: 1964

Title: Paintings from the Huntington Hartford Collection in The Gallery of Modern Art (Published by The Foundation for Modern Art, Inc., New York)

Author: Weinhardt, Carl J., Jr., Director; Potter, Margaret, Curator

Description: Catalogue composed of 50 plates which include Cassatt, Dali, Degas, Hopper, Monet, Pissarro, Sargent, Toulouse-Lautrec and Turner, to name a few. "Another important American collector has decided to share his collection with the general public..." Weinhardt. "...The public display of the Huntington Hartford Collection is a setting specially designed for it states the belief of its founder that within the broad range of artistic and affirmations expressed, which not only deserve, but will reward, a closer attention than the polite historical interest they are usually accorded." Potter. (First Edition)

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 69

S#: 1596.49.0515

   
Date: 1964

Title: The Pre-Raphaelites. A Loan Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and Their Associates. (Soft Cover) (Published by the Herron Museum of Art, Indianapolis, and the Gallery of Modern Art, New York, and includes the Huntington Hartford Collection.)

Author: Coley, Curtis G.

Description: Catalogue for an exhibition held at the Herron Museum of Art, Indianapolis and the The Gallery of Modern Art, New York, and included the Huntington Hartford Collection. "The name, ‘Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood,’ probably coined by Rossetti, was meant ot express the fundamental attitude of the group: that painting since Raphael had suffered from the formalization and synthesization which follows the adoption of too-easily-learned formulae and thee abandonment of reference to nature..." Eighty four paintings and drawings were exhibited.

Size: 7 x 10

Pages: Pp 103

S#: 1596.50.0515

   
Date: 1965

Title: Salvador Dali 1910-1965. An Exhibition in the Gallery of Modern Art. Including the Huntington Hartford Collection. December 18, 1965 - February 28, 1966. (A: Soft Cover, B: Library rebound) (Published by The Foundation for Modern Art, New York)

Author: Weinhardt, Carl J.; Rousseau, Theodore; Canton, Francisco Javier; Dali, Salvador

Description: "It is hard to believe that twenty-five years have elapsed since the Museum of Modern Art presented the first major Dali exhibition in this country. During those years the artist has continued to work at his richly productive pace. Thus it is high time for another survey, which not only covers his stylistic evolution since 1941, but one which goes back to he very beginning..." The catalogue includes 150 plates, the exhibition included 257 painting and drawings by Dali. Two versions, soft cover, and a hard cover library rebound. The hard cover includes an additional seven page Catalog Supplement. (First Edition)

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 160

S#: 1628.49.0515

   
Date: 1976

Title: You Are What You Write (Soft Cover) (Published by Collier Books. A division of Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., New York. Copyright 1973 by Hartford.)

Author: Hartford, Huntington

Description: Back Cover: "What does a person's handwriting tell us about his/her personality? How does a trained graphologist analyze a writing sample? What signs indicate sickness rather than health? An aggressive character rather than a passive one? Creativity? Egotism? A generous spirit? These questions and many more are answered in this introduction to the science of graphology." Page 86: "...I am reminded of a letter which Frank Lloyd Wright once wrote me in which he said that he was sorry to see how near I came ‘to doing something great and then something always happens - what is the matter?’ I often wonder!" The exchange may have been Wright’s response to Hartford about giving up on the resort that Wright designed in 1947-8. Original cover price $4.95. (First Edition) 

Size: 5.5 x 8.25

Pages: Pp 380

S#: 2020.21.0515

   
Date: 1991

Title: Squandered Fortune, The Life and Times of Huntington Hartford (Hard Cover DJ) (Published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York)

Author: Gubernick, Lisa Rebecca

Description: Story of the creation of that great retail empire, and of the heir who frittered away those vast holdings. The last of the brand-name scions, Huntington Hartford spent a lifetime and his millions trying to live up to his birthright. Hartford wanted to be more than just another aristocratic playboy. He was determined to change the way America thought about the arts -- Tom Wolfe called him a new Martin Luther – and his crusade included a museum in New York, a theater in Los Angeles, and a Bahamian resort island he christened Paradise. He intended Paradise Island to be a cross between St. Tropez and Dumbarton Oaks; instead it became an international capital of sleaze finance..." (Dust Jacket.) Original list price $24.95. (First Edition)

Size: 6.25 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 272

ST#: 1991.73.0515

   
Date: 2002

Title: A&P. The Story of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company (Soft Cover) (Published by Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, SC)

Author: Anderson, Avis H.

Description: "In 1859, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, known everywhere as A&P, began as a mail-order business located at 31 Vesey Street in downtown Manhattan. In 1925, A&P operated more than thirteen thousand grocery stores nationwide, with more than forty thousand employees. By 1950, approximately ten cents out of every dollar spent on food in the United States passed over A&P counters. A&P: The Story of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company tells the story of how cofounder George Huntington Hartford and his sons John and George brought A&P to a popularity with consumers that few companies have ever achieved...." (Back Cover.) Original list price $19.15. (First Edition)

Size: 6.5 x 9.25

Pages: Pp 128

ST#: 2002.104.0515

 
 
 
Bibliography
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Drawings for a Living Architecture," Kaufmann, 1959, pp 58-69
"Frank Lloyd Wright: Three Quarters of a Century of Drawings," Izzo; Gubitosi, 1976, Plate 166-169.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Drawings," GA, 1984, Plate 42.
"Treasures of Taliesin," Pfeiffer, 1985, pp 83, 86-87.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, In The Realm of Ideas," Pfeiffer, 1988, pp Cover, 82,
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1942-1950," Vol. 7, Text: Pfeiffer; Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, 1990, pp 146-155.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings. Volume 4," Pfeiffer, 1994, pp 6, 307.
"20th Century Fine Paintings, March 3, 1996," Treadway, pp Cover, 174.
"Frank Lloyd Wright, Complete Works 1943-1959," Pfeiffer; Gossel, 2009, pp 123-131, 163-166.
 
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 

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