ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
Wright Studies
Frank L. Smith Bank, Dwight, Illinois (1905 - S.111)

On a recent trip from Chicago to Seattle with my daughter and grandchildren, we had a few minutes to stop and see the Frank L. Smith Bank, now the First National Bank in Dwight, Illinois. It is just a few minutes off the interstate and is the only bank Wright designed that is still functioning as a bank. Colonel Frank Leslie Smith, was a prominent citizen, entrepreneur and well-liked community leader in Dwight, Illinois. His father moved to Dwight when he was 15. Frank was born there on November 24, 1867, about five months after Wright’ birth (June 8, 1867). He went to public schools in Dwight, and at the age of seventeen taught school for one year. The next four years he worked in Dwight as a clerical for the Chicago & Alton Railroad. He moved to Chicago in 1887 and worked for the Rock Island Railroad for two years and then the P. H. Bolton & Company, until 1890, when he returned to Dwight and entered into partnership with W. H. Ketcham (possibly his cousin) in the real estate and loan business. On February, 8, 1893, he married Minnie Ahern, of Dwight. In 1895, he formed a partnership with Charles L. Romberger. Romberger & Smith was one of the largest loan and real estate businesses in central Illinois, with extensive land holdings in Illinois, Mississippi and Louisiana. In 1896 he ran for Circuit Clerk. In January, 1897, he was appointed Colonel on Governor Tanner's staff, thus gaining the title, and was involved in many political activities including President McKinley 1897 inauguration in Washington. D. C. In 1900 he declined the nomination for state senator but was unsuccessful in his bid for lieutenant governor in 1904. This loss may have influenced him to devote himself more fully to his business ventures. He contacted Wright and in 1904 was presented with the first designed for a three story bank, which Smith rejected. In 1905 Wright’s second design, a one and a half story structure was accepted. Stock in the bank was purchased by the local towns people, and the bank was chartered in June, 1905. The first stockholders meeting was held in January, 1906, and two of the directors elected were Frank L. Smith and Charles L. Romberger. Smith was elected as President. He was active in the community and formed a local baseball team. In 1913 the Dwight Country Club was formed and Smith became President. In 1914 the Women’s Club was formed and his wife became

  president. He was elected to Congress in 1918 and unsuccessfully ran for other political offices. He was chairman of the board of the First National Bank of Dwight, until his death on August 30, 1950. It is fitting that in the History of Dwight the efforts of Colonel Frank L. Smith should be given a place along with those pioneers and their successors who also devoted their best efforts to the betterment of our community.”  (A real George Bailey.)
       Wright’s original 1904 design for the exterior of the bank was more elaborate and in Wright’s style than the final 1905 design. But the final design is very close to the 1901 project for “A Small Village Bank”, published in the Brickbuilder 1901 and in Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright 1910,
Tafel XII a & b. And yet even in this simple design, there are consistent Wright elements. He incorporate horizontal bands of windows, and vertical columns on either end. Most of all his ability to work with the building’s visual perspective.  When you first view the bank from a distance it appears to be a single story. But as you approach the building and the entrance becomes apparent, the building grows in size. It is reminiscent of what Wright accomplishes with hallways opening up to larger spaces. Where as the exterior may not be as “Wright” as some of his other designs, the interior is pure Wright. As you enter through the center of the building there are two lanterns atop imposing pedestals on either side of the entrance. Doors have been added to the front of the loggia where originally they were only at the end. The loggia is still wainscotted with stone, above which are plate glass windows looking into the offices on either side. There is beautiful designed prairie styled oak trim. An extensive skylights. The prairie styled fixtures and furniture were designed by Wright for the bank. One of the most unique details is the spectacular fireplace that is unique to the bank and 100% Wright.
       The interior design was modified to accommodate banking, real estate and loan offices. Major changes were made in the 1950's that destroyed many of Wright’s design elements. The interior was remodeled again in the 1960's which restored much of the original character. In the early 1990's the bank was remodeled again and enlarged as seen today.
     Text by Douglas Steiner, Copyright February 2009
 
 

   Small Village Bank 1901    First Design 1904    Bird's Eye    1918    1927    1928    Photograph By Gilman Lane 1935
 
1946   1970s    Exterior Photographs    Interior Photographs    Furniture    Lanterns    Biography 
  Additional Biographical Information    Related Books    Related Images and Articles  

 
 
A Small Village Bank, 1901
Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright, 1910.
 

Wright designed A Small Village Bank, intended to be executed entirely of concrete, similar to the Unity Temple in Oak Park.  This project was published in the Brickbuilder, August 1901.  Wright also selected this project for the Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright Tafel XII a & b. It was published by Ernst Wasmuth in 1910, in Berlin.  Each set consisted of two portfolios and 100 separate plates (sheets).  Printed in German. The complete set consisted of 72 plates numbered I through

   LXIV and included eight with a or b. 28 were tissue overlays and were attached to the corresponding plates.  Each set also included a 31 page introduction, consisting of unbound sheets, folded once.
       In 1967 Hasbrouch reprinted the August 1901 Brickbuilder in "Architectural Essays From The Chicago School: Tallmadge, Sullivan, Jensen and Frank Lloyd Wright. From 1900 to 1909"  Wright, pages 18-19.
     
Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright (Published by Ernst Wasmuth A.-G., Berlin) Tafel XII.
 
 Detail of Tafel XII, Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, First Design, 1904
 
Wright's first design in 1904 was for a three story bank, which Smith rejected.  It was more elaborate and more in Wright’s style than the final 1905 design. Things didn't changed much over the next 70 years. The buildings on the left and right are visible in the photograph by Gilman Lane. The building on the left was torn down to make room the the 1990's remodeling. The building on the right still exists.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, Bird's Eye View
 
Postcard: Bird's Eye View of Dwight, Ill., looking north-west from water tower. Very early image of the Bank. Taken before the clock was added. What is visible is the skylight on the roof.
 
Postcard: Detail of Frank L. Smith Bank. Very early image of the Bank. Taken before the clock was added. What is visible is the skylight on the roof.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, 1918
 
Postcard: "West Main St., Dwight, Ill." The clock is clearly visible on top of the building. A delivery horse and buggy.  A couple relaxes under the awning on the far left. An interesting "lamp post" in the center of the photograph.  A tree has grown up to the left of the "lamp post".
 
Postcard: Detail of Frank L. Smith Bank. West Main St., Dwight, Ill. The clock is clearly visible on top of the building.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, Circa 1927
 
Frank L. Smith Bank postcard, circa 1927. Published by AZO. Lettering on left window: "The First National Bank of Dwight. Capitol and Surplus $60,000.00. 3 per cent interest paid on savings deposits. Law - Loan - Land and Insurance Offices of Frank L. Smith. Land Man. If you deal with me you get results." Hand written on negative across the bottom: "First National Bank, Dwight, Ill. 12317." On April 13, 1926, Smith runs against Senator McKinley in primary, wins election by 102,000 majority and denies McKinley re-election to U.S. Senate. Smith wins general election. November 2, Smith wins Senate election by 67,000 votes. On December 7, 1926, McKinley passed away, before his term ended on March 3, 1927. The Governor appoints Smith to fill vacancy of William B. McKinley seat, but U.S. Senate denied his appointment. On March 4, 1927, even though elected, Senate again refused to seat Smith. Hand written on verso: "Note the name on the window. This is where he does it. Nice & cool here this A.M. Home Sat." Signed: "Albert B." Postmarked Jul 22, 1927.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, 1928
 
"West Main Street, Dwight, Ill." 1928 postcard, published by Curt Tech & Co., Chicago, Ill.  Lamp posts have been added on either side of the street.
 
Detail from 1928 postcard above. The clock, visible on top of the building, was not included on the original drawings. The square decoratively designed light fixtures on top of the pedestals on either side of the entrance are visible. Ivy has overtaken the face of the building.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, Photograph By Gilman Lane 1935-1941
 
Little can be found about Gilman Lane. He photographed building in the Chicago area including many of Wright’s work. The lanterns positioned atop the pedestals at the entrance look to be plain, and do not seem to be the same lanterns that are there today (see detail below) and see additional information about the Lanterns. The street out front is made of brick.  Photographed between 1935-1941.  Also published in "The Nature of Materials: 1887 - 1941", Hitchcock, 1942. (Courtesy Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago.)
 
Detail from above image: The lanterns positioned atop the pedestals at the entrance look to be plain, and do not seem to be the same lanterns that are there today. See additional information about the Lanterns.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, 1946
 
"West Main Street, Dwight, Ill."  1946 postcard, published by Curt Tech & Co., Chicago, Ill.
 
Detail from 1946 postcard above. The clock, visible on top of the building, was not included on the original drawings. Ivy has been removed.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank, Mid 1970s
 
This image shows the bank as Wright designed it. The clock, visible on top of the building, was not included on the original drawings.  Things haven't changed much in 70 years. The buildings on the left and right were in Wright's original 1904 drawing. The building on the left was torn down to make room the the 1990's remodeling. The building on the right still exists.
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank Floor Plan
Floor plan copyright 1993, “The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion” Storrer, William Allin, page 111.
 
 
 
Exterior Photographs By Douglas Steiner, February 2009
 

On a recent trip from Chicago to Seattle with my daughter and grandchildren, we had a few minutes to stop and see the Frank L. Smith Bank, now the First National Bank in Dwight, Illinois. It is just a few minutes off the interstate and is the only bank Wright designed that is still functioning as a bank.  Wright’s original 1904 design for the exterior of the bank was more elaborate and in Wright’s style than the final 1905 design. But the final design is very close to the 1901 project for “A Small Village Bank”, published in the Brickbuilder 1901 and in Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe

  von Frank Lloyd Wright 1910, Tafel XII a & b. And yet even in this simple design, there are consistent Wright elements. He incorporate horizontal bands of windows, and vertical columns on either end. Most of all his ability to work with the building’s visual perspective.  When you first view the bank from a distance it appears to be a single story. But as you approach the building and the entrance becomes apparent, the building grows in size. It is reminiscent of what Wright accomplishes with hallways opening up to larger spaces.
Text by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2009
 
 
 
Interior Photographs By Douglas Steiner, February 2009
 

As you approach the building and the entrance becomes apparent, the building grows in size. It is reminiscent of what Wright accomplishes with hallways opening up to larger spaces. Where as the exterior may not be as “Wright” as some of his other designs, the interior is pure Wright. As you enter through the center of the building there are light fixtures atop imposing pedestals on either side of the entrance. Doors have been added to the front of the loggia where originally they were only at the end. The loggia is still wainscotted with stone, above which are plate

  glass windows looking into the offices on either side. There is beautiful designed prairie styled oak trim. An extensive skylights. The prairie styled fixtures and furniture were designed by Wright for the bank. One of the most unique details is the spectacular fireplace that is unique to the bank and 100% Wright.  For an excellent article written just after the bank opened: First National Bank of DwightPublished in the Dwight Star and Herald, Feb. 3, 1906. The light fixtures were manufactured by Willy H. Lau, W. H. Lau & Co., Chicago.
Text by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2009
 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank Bank Furniture
 

By 1905, Wright had completed some of his most important Prairie styled homes and buildings.  The Bradley, Hickox, Willits, Henderson, Little, Dana-Thomas, Larkin, Unity Temple, and Martin, to name a few.  Wright was intimately involved in some of the smallest design elements.  This was true for the Frank L. Smith Bank.  In "The Decorative Designs of Frank

 

Lloyd Wright", there is a copy of an ink well Wright took the time to design and describe in detail.  The fixtures, the skylight, the fireplace, an ink well and the furniture were all designed by Wright for the bank. The furniture was manufactured by John W. Ayers Co., Chicago.

 
 
 
Frank L. Smith Bank Lanterns
 

Wright always intended a lantern to sit atop the entrance pedestals. Drawings indicate what Wright originally designed for the bank in 1905. The original lanterns actually produced and placed atop the entrance pedestals were slightly different in 1906. “Correspondence and bills of sale in the Frank L. Smith Collection in The Burnham Library of The Art Institute of Chicago indicated that Lau made exterior lanterns identical to ones flanking the entrance gate of the E. C. Waller estate in River Forest, Illinois…”  Hanks, page 207-208.  The Waller gates were designed in 1901 (S.065).  Wright would often use design elements from one building, in another.  An example is the Baluster used in the Roloson Rowhouses (1894) and a similar one used in the Moore Residence (1895).  Another is the same wall sconce used in the Little Residence, Peoria (1902) and in the Dana Residence (1902).
      
This is evident when you look closely at the Smith Lantern. In essence the original lanterns lacked the “Name Plate” centered in the existing lanterns today. When the “name

 

plate” is removed, it is essentially the same design as the lantern at the Waller gate. Not only is the lantern consistent but also the stonework. A third similarity between the two projects is the design for the skylight and gate.
      
The lanterns and light fixtures were manufactured by Willy H. Lau, W. H. Lau & Co., Chicago.  The lanterns were manufactured from brass.  “…on February 13, 1906, Lau wrote that he had the lanterns ready but was waiting to hear from Wright regarding the finish on the brass lanterns…  As regarding the finish on the brass lanterns we would prefer to have Mr. Wright determine that…” Burnham Library, Hanks, page 23.
      
According to Eric Stewart, a Vice President who works at the First National Bank of Dwight said, “The lanterns on the exterior were designed by Wright, but were not originally outside the bank.  There are now two of the original lanterns outside and two originals inside.

 
 
 
Frank L. Smith 1867-1950
     

Much has been recorded about Colonel Frank Leslie Smith, a prominent citizen, entrepreneur and well-liked community leader in Dwight, Illinois. His father moved to Dwight when he was 15. Frank was born there on November 24, 1867, about five months after Wright’ birth (June 8, 1867). He went to public schools in Dwight, and at the age of seventeen taught school for one year. The next four years he worked in Dwight as a clerical for the Chicago & Alton Railroad. He moved to Chicago in 1887 and worked for the Rock Island Railroad for two years and then the P. H. Bolton & Company, until 1890, when he returned to Dwight and entered into partnership with W. H. Ketcham (possibly his cousin) in the real estate and loan business. On February, 8, 1893, he married Minnie Ahern, of Dwight. In 1895, he formed a partnership with Charles L. Romberger. Romberger & Smith was one of the largest loan and real estate businesses in central Illinois, with extensive land holdings in Illinois, Mississippi and Louisiana. In 1896 he ran for Circuit Clerk. In January, 1897, he was appointed Colonel on Governor Tanner's staff, thus gaining the title, and was involved in many political activities including President McKinley 1897 inauguration in Washington. D. C. In 1900 he declined the

  nomination for state senator but was unsuccessful in his bid for lieutenant governor in 1904. This loss may have influenced him to devote himself more fully to his business ventures. He contacted Wright and in 1904 was presented with the first designed for a three story bank, which Smith rejected. In 1905 Wright’s second design, a one and a half story structure was accepted. Stock in the bank was purchased by the local towns people, and the bank was chartered in June, 1905. The first stockholders meeting was held in January, 1906, and two of the directors elected were Frank L. Smith and Charles L. Romberger. Smith was elected as President. He was active in the community and formed a local baseball team. In 1913 the Dwight Country Club was formed and Smith became President. In 1914 the Women’s Club was formed and his wife became president. He was elected to Congress in 1918 and unsuccessfully ran for other political offices. He was chairman of the board of the First National Bank of Dwight, until his death on August 30, 1950. “It is fitting that in the History of Dwight the efforts of Colonel Frank L. Smith should be given a place along with those pioneers and their successors who also devoted their best efforts to the betterment of our community.”
     
FRANK LESLIE SMITH
November 24, 1867: Born in Dwight, Ill., same year as Frank Lloyd Wright
Attended the public schools of Dwight
First job: Setting poles for the Postal Telegraph Co.
Taught school for several years, then clerked for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific and the Chicago & Alton Railroads
1891: Became real estate agent in farm land, Dwight, Illinois
1892: Married Erminie Ahern
1894: Dwight village clerk
1904: Organized and became President of the First National Bank of Dwight (Frank L. Smith Bank)
1904: Unsuccessful candidate for lieutenant governor
1905-1906: Internal-revenue collector
1915: March, declares candidacy for Governor.
1916: Unsuccessful run for the Governorship of Illinois
1921: Elected to Congress
1921-1926: Chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission
1926: April 13, Smith runs against McKinley in primary, wins election by 102,000 majority and denies McKinley re-election
1926: Frank L. Smith wins general election
1926: McKinley passed away on December 7, 1926, shortly before his term ended on March 3, 1927
1926: Governor appoints Smith to fill vacancy of William B. McKinley, U.S. Senate denied appointment
1926: November 2, wins Senate election by 67,000 votes
1927: January 20, even though elected, Senate again refused to seat him
1928: February 9, Smith abandoned effort to take seat and resigned even though he and the Governor considered him to be the rightful senator
1928: Special election called to fill Senate seat vacated by Smith due to denial
1928: Frank L. Smith reruns in the special election Primary, addresses voters on March 8, presents his defense
1928: April 10, Smith is defeated in the primary by Otis F. Glenn, who went on to win the general election.
1930: Unsuccessfully ran for Congress
Continued in real estate and insurance business
Was a practical farmer, actively managed 15,000 acres of land
Chairman of the Board of Directors, First National Bank of Dwight, Ill. until his
1950: August 30, passed away at the age of 82, interment in Oak Lawn Cemetery
     
     
     
Additional Biographical Information and Reading:
     
    See Additional Items.
     
  Frank L. Smith Portrait
Library of Congress
Published by Bain News Service
     
  History of Dwight, From 1853 to 1894
Compiled and Published by Messrs, Dustin & Wassell, editors of Dwight Star and Herald
1894
     
  The Biographical Record Of Livingston and Woodford Counties, Illinois
Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago, 1900
     
  Then and Now - Being a History of Dwight, Illinois. From 1853 to 1908
By Fred B. Hargreaves, 1908.
     
  Frank L. Smith For Governor.
1916 Political Campaign Pin
     
  Frank L. Smith Campaign for Senator
Published in 1928
     
  Politics and People:
The Case of Frank L. Smith: A Study in Representative Government.

Wooddy, Carroll Hill.  Published in 1931.  Reprinted. New York: Arno Press, 1974.  Pp 383.
     
  DWIGHT CENTENNIAL, 1854-1954
A GREAT PAST - A GREATER FUTURE
Published in 1954
     
  The First National Bank of Dwight, Dwight, Illinois.
Brochure Published by The First National Bank of Dwight, Dwight, Illinois
Published 1996
     
  First National Bank of Dwight Collection 1905-1920
Published by the Ryerson & Burnham Archives, Ryerson and Burnham Libraries
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago
Published in 1996
     
  BUILD YOUR OWN ILLINOIS MAIN STREET, ILLINOIS MAIN STREET
ILLINOIS HISTORIC PRESERVATION AGENCY, Springfield, Illinois
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, DWIGHT, ILLINOIS
Drawn By MWG, March 2007
 
 
 
Related Books
"History of Dwight, From 1853 to 1894" Messrs, Dustin & Wassell, 1894, Dwight Star and Herald.
"The Biographical Record Of Livingston and Woodford Counties, Illinois" S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago, 1900.
"Then and Now - Being a History of Dwight, Illinois. From 1853 to 1908" Hargreaves, 1908.
"Ausgeführte Bauten und Entwürfe von Frank Lloyd Wright" Wright, 1910,  Tafel XIIa&b.
"Politics and People: The Case of Frank L. Smith" Wooddy 1931
"The Nature of Materials: 1887 - 1941", Hitchcock, 1942, plates 65, 115-116.
"DWIGHT CENTENNIAL, 1854-1954" 1954
"Architectural Essays From The Chicago School: Thomas Tallmadge, Louis H. Sullivan, Jens Jensen and Frank Lloyd Wright. From 1900 to 1909" Hasbrouck, 1967, Pp 18-19.
"The Prairie School: Frank Lloyd Wright and His Midwest Contemporaries", Brooks, 1972, pp 133-139, 341.
"Studies and Executed Buildings By Frank Lloyd Wright", Wright, 1975, Tafel XIIa&b.
"The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright", Hanks, 1979, pp 21-23, 37-38, 42, 77, 98, 148, 169-170, 202, 208.
"Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906",  Vol. 2, Text: Pfeiffer, Bruce Brooks; Edited and Photographed: Futagawa, Yukio, 1986, (#1) pp 192-193, (#2) pp194-195.
"Wright Sites", Sanderson, 1991, pp 17.
"The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion", Storrer, William Allin, 1993, page 111.
"Frank Lloyd Wright and the Meaning of Material" Patterson, 1994, page 61, 66, 79, 80.
"The First National Bank of Dwight, Dwight, Illinois." The First National Bank of Dwight, 1996.
"First National Bank of Dwight Collection 1905-1920" Ryerson & Burnham Archives" 1996.
"The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright" Heinz, 2000, page pp 293, 394-395.
"Life & Works of Frank Lloyd Wright" Heinz, 2002, page 303-304.
"BUILD YOUR OWN ILLINOIS MAIN STREET, ILLINOIS MAIN STREET" MWG, 2007
 
 
 
Related Images and Articles
(Note, due to the fact that the internet is constantly changing, and items that
are posted change, I have copied the text, but give all the credits available.)
A) "The 'Village Bank' Series V", Wright, Published in The Brickbuilder, August 1901, pp160-161. Reprinted in "Architectural Essays From The Chicago School: Thomas Tallmadge, Louis H. Sullivan, Jens Jensen and Frank Lloyd Wright. From 1900 to 1909" Hasbrouck, 1967, Pp 18-19.
B) FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF DWIGHTPublished in the Dwight Star and Herald, Feb. 3, 1906.  An excellent eyewitness account describing the building in detail, just after the opening.
C) Frank L. Smith PortraitLibrary of Congress.  Published by Bain News Service.
 
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 
 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017