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THE EVE OF ST. AGNES (1896)
 
Illustrations of "The Eve of St. Agnes"
 
The Eve of St. Agnes (1856 Sampson)
 
Date: 1856

Title: 1) "When they St. Agnes' wool are weaving piously."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XIII
    He follow'd through a lowly arched way,
    Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume,
    And as she mutter'd "Well-a---well-a-day!"
    He found him in a little moonlight room,
    Pale, lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb.
    "Now tell me where is Madeline", said he,
    "O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom
    Which none but secret sisterhood may see,
"When they St Agnes' wool are weaving piously."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", Title Page. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.
Also reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes". Published by D. Appleton & Co. Broadway, New York, 1856 & 1857.
Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes". Published by Sampson Low and Son, London, 1859.
Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes". Published by Sampson Low and Son, London, Circa 1866.
Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes". Published by Cassell, Petter, Galpin, & Co., New York, 1882.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 2) "The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              I
    St Agnes' Eve---Ah, bitter chill it was!
    The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold;
    The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass,
    And silent was the flock in woolly fold:
    Numb were the Beadsman's fingers, while he told
    His rosary, and while his frosted breath,
    Like pious incense from a censer old,
    Seem'd taking flight for heaven, without a death,
Past the sweet Virgin's picture, while his prayer he saith.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 7. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 3) "The sculptured dead on each side seemed to freeze."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              II
    His prayer he saith, this patient, holy man;
    Then takes his lamp, and riseth from his knees,
    And back returneth, meagre, barefoot, wan,
    Along the chapel aisle by slow degrees:
    The sculptur'd dead, on each side, seem to freeze,
    Emprison'd in black, purgatorial rails:
    Knights, ladies, praying in dumb orat'ries,
    He passeth by; and his weak spirit fails
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 8. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 4) "At length burst in the argent revelry."
 

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              V
    At length burst in the argent revelry,
    With plume, tiara, and all rich array,
    Numerous as shadows haunting fairily
    The brain, new-stuff'd, in youth, with triumphs gay
    Of old romance. These let us wish away,
    And turn, sole-thoughted, to one lady there,
    Whose heart had brooded, all that wintry day,
    On love, and wing'd St Agnes' saintly care,
As she had heard old dames full rnany times declare.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 9. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 5) "Her maiden eyes divine, fix'd on the floor."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              VII
    Full of this whim was thoughtful Madeline:
    The music, yearning like a God in pain,
    She scarcely heard: her maiden eyes divine,
    Fix'd on the floor, saw many a sweeping train
    Pass by---she heeded not at all: in vain
    Came many a tiptoe, amorous cavalier,
    And back retir'd; not cool'd by high disdain,
    But she saw not: her heart was otherwhere;
She sigh'd for Agnes' dreams, the sweetest of the year.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 11. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 6) "Meantime, across the moors, had come young Porphyro."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              IX
    So, purposing each moment to retire,
    She linger'd still. Meantime, across the moors,
    Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire
    For Madeline. Beside the portal doors,
    Buttress'd from moonlight, stands he, and implores
    All saints to give him sight of Madeline,
    But for one moment in the tedious hours,
    That he might gaze and worship all unseen;
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss---in sooth such things have been.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 12. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 7) "And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XI
    Ah, happy chance! the aged creature came,
    Shuffling along with ivory-headed wand,
    To where he stood, hid from the torch's flame,
    Behind a broad hall-pillar, far beyond
    The sound of merriment and chorus bland.
    He startled her; but soon she knew his face,
    And grasp'd his fingers in her palsied hand,
    Saying, "Mercy, Porphyro! hie thee from this place;
"They are all here to-night, the whole blood-thirsty race!

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 13. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 8) "He followed through a lowly arched way."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XIII
    He follow'd through a lowly arched way,
    Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume,
    And as she mutter'd "Well-a---well-a-day!"
    He found him in a little moonlight room,
    Pale, lattic'd, chill, and silent as a tomb.
    "Now tell me where is Madeline", said he,
    "O tell me, Angela, by the holy loom
    Which none but secret sisterhood may see,
"When they St Agnes' wool are weaving piously."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 14. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 9) "While legion'd fairies paced the coverlet."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XIX
    Which was, to lead him, in close secrecy,
    Even to Madeline's chamber, and there hide
    Him in a closet, of such privacy
    That he might see her beauty unespied,
    And win perhaps that night a peerless bride,
    While legion'd fairies paced the coverlet,
    And pale enchantment held her sleepy-eyed.
    Never on such a night have lovers met,
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 16. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 10) "She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXII
    Her falt'ring hand upon the balustrade,
    Old Angela was feeling for the stair,
    When Madeline, St Agnes' charmed maid,
    Rose, like a mission'd spirit, unaware:
    With silver taper's light, and pious care,
    She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led
    To a safe level matting.  Now prepare,
    Young Porphyro, for gazing on that bed;
She comes, she comes again, like dove fray'd and fled.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 18. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 11) "As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXV
    Full on this casement shone the wintry moon,
    And threw warm gules on Madeline's fair breast,
    As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon;
    Rose-bloom fell on her hands, together prest,
    And on her silver cross soft amethyst,
    And on her hair a glory, like a saint:
    She seem'd a splendid angel, newly drest,
    Save wings, for heaven:---Porphyro grew faint:
She knelt, so pure a thing, so free from mortal taint.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 19. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 12) "And 'tween the curtains peep'd."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXVIII
    Stol'n to this paradise, and so entranced,
    Porphyro gazed upon her empty dress,
    And listen'd to her breathing, if it chanced
    To wake into a slumbrous tenderness;
    Which when he heard, that minute did he bless,
    And breath'd himself: then from the closet crept,
    Noiseless as fear in a wide wilderness,
    And over the hush'd carpet, silent, stept,
And 'tween the curtains peep'd, where, lo!---how fast she slept!

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 21. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 13) "On golden dishes, and in baskets bright."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXI
    These delicates he heap'd with glowing hand
    On golden dishes and in baskets bright
    Of wreathed silver: sumptuous they stand
    In the retired quiet of the night,
    Filling the chilly room with perfume light.---
    "And now, my love, my seraph fair, awake!
    Thou art my heaven, and I thine eremite:
    Open thine eyes, for meek St Agnes' sake,
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 22. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 14) "Awakening up, he took her hollow lute."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXIII
    Awakening up, he took her hollow lute,---
    Tumultuous,---and, in chords that tenderest be,
    He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute,
    In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy:"
    Close to her ear touching the melody:---
    Wherewith disturb'd, she utter'd a soft moan:
    He ceased---she panted quick---and suddenly
    Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone:
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 23. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 15) "Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXIII
    Awakening up, he took her hollow lute,---
    Tumultuous,---and, in chords that tenderest be,
    He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute,
    In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy:"
    Close to her ear touching the melody:---
    Wherewith disturb'd, she utter'd a soft moan:
    He ceased---she panted quick---and suddenly
    Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone:
Upon his knees he sank, pale as smooth-sculptured stone.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 24. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 16) "Hark! 'tis an elfin storm from faery land."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXIX
    "Hark! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land,
    Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed:
    Arise---arise! the morning is at hand;---
    The bloated wassailers will never heed:---
    Let us away, my love, with happy speed;
    There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,---
    Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead:
    Awake! arise! my love, and fearless be,
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 26. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 17) "Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXIX
    "Hark! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land,
    Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed:
    Arise---arise! the morning is at hand;---
    The bloated wassailers will never heed:---
    Let us away, my love, with happy speed;
    There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,---
    Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead:
    Awake! arise! my love, and fearless be,
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 27. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 18) "Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XL
    She hurried at his words, beset with fears,
    For there were sleeping dragons all around,
    At glaring watch, perhaps, with ready spears---
    Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.---
    In all the house was heard no human sound.
    A chain-droop'd lamp was flickering by each door;
    The arras, rich with horseman, hawk, and hound,
    Flutter'd in the besieging wind's uproar;
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 28. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 19) "These lovers fled away into the storm."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XLII
    And they are gone: ay, ages long ago
    These lovers fled away into the storm.
    That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe,
    And all his warrior-guests, with shade and form
    Of witch, and demon, and large coffin-worm,
    Were long be-nightmar'd. Angela the old
    Died palsy-twitch'd, with meagre face deform;
    The Beadsman, after thousand aves told,
For aye unsought for slept among his ashes cold.

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 29. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.
Reproduced in "Poetical Works of John Keats", page 199. Published by DeWolfe, Fiske & Company, Boston, 1884.

   
Date: 1856

Title: 20) "O'er the Southern moors I have a home for thee."

Artist: Edward H. Wehnert.

Description: This volume may be the first time "The Eve of St Agnes" was published as a single volume. Illustrated with Twenty engravings on wood, from drawings by Edward H. Wehnert. Engraved by Horace Harral, Thomas Bolton, and James Cooper.

                              XXXIX
    "Hark! 'tis an elfin-storm from faery land,
    Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed:
    Arise---arise! the morning is at hand;---
    The bloated wassailers will never heed:---
    Let us away, my love, with happy speed;
    There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,---
    Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead:
    Awake! arise! my love, and fearless be,
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee."

(Left) Reproduced in "The Eve of St. Agnes", page 30. Published for Joseph Cundall. By Sampson Low and Son, London, 1856.

   
 
 

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