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Wright Studies
Samuel and Lena Kent Horner Residence, Chicago (1908 - S.142)
 
Horner Residence Circa 1935 - 1940
 
Gilman Lane photographed building in the Chicago area including many of Wright’s work. Upon his death in 1961, Lane donated his collection of over 700 photographs to the Oak Park Public Library. He left an early record of over 150 Wright buildings. In the seminal Biography of Wright's Work by Henry-Russell Hitchcock, "The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock credits Henry Fuermann and   Sons, and "another important group of photographs taken by Gilman Lane... who has been photographing Wright's work for many years..."
       These three photographs are not dated but most likely photographed during the late 1930s to early 1940s. The front Terrace was enclosed, and the landscaping has matured.
     

  Exterior Viewed from the Northeast    Exterior Viewed from the North    Exterior Viewed from the From Northwest  

     
1) Exterior Viewed from the Northeast
 
1A) Front exterior viewed from the street, looking Southwest. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows.
Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
1B) Front exterior viewed from the street, looking Southwest. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace was enclosed with a roof and windows.
Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows that open outward were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center.
 
1C) Upper level. A row of art glass windows that opened outward were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom.
 
1D) The Living Room Terrace was enclosed with a roof and windows.
Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end.
 
 
 
2) Exterior Viewed from the North
 
2A) Front exterior viewed from the street, looking South. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows. The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall on the right.
Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
2B) Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door and step into the Reception Room. Two art glass windows are directly above. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level.
 
2C) Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. Two doors can be seen to the left of the open Bedroom window. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end.
 
2D) Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center.
 
2E) The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows.
 
 
 
3) Exterior Viewed from the Northwest
 
3A) Front exterior viewed from the street, looking Southeast. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows. The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall on the right.
Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library.
 
3B) As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. The Living Room Terrace was enclosed with a roof and windows.
 
3C) Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end.
 
3D) The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall. The two Kitchen windows on the west wall can be glimpsed of on the far right. They were included on Wright's original drawings, but omitted from the drawings for "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" (Executed Buildings), 1911.
 
 
 
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Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
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Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
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Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
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Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
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Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
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Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 
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