NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
JOHN STORER RESIDENCE (1923 - S.215)
   
Date: 1924

Title:
John Storer Residence, Circa 1924 (1923 - S.215).

Description:
Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, the home was completed in 1924. Most likely photographs shortly after the completion of construction. Wright's son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home as well as designing the landscape. The entrance of the home is reached by the stairs in the foreground. Possibly photographed by Kameki Tsuchiura. Published in Wright in Hollywood, Sweeney, p.63.

Size:
7 x 5 B&W Photograph.


S#:
0164.01.1016
   


Date: 1995

Title:
John Storer Residence, 1995 (1923 - S.215).

Description:
The Storer Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s second textile block home in California: 1) Millard (La Miniatura), 3) Freeman, 4) Ennis. The house was originally designed in 1922 for Charles P. Lowes, Eagle Rock, California, but was never built. Wright adapted the plan, made modifications and designed it for the Storer property. A two-story home, the Entrance, Dining Room, Kitchen, two Bedrooms and Terraces are on the main floor. The upper level includes the Living Room, directly above the Dining Room, two bedrooms as well as two Terraces. From the street, the Living and Dining rooms appear to be a single room, with unbroken windows running from ground to roof. Wright’s son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home. There are four different textile blocks designs were used to construct the Storer House and are 16" x 16" square. Glass was added to the perforated blocks allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. Glass was added to the exterior perforated blocks, and illuminated at night. Wright also added landscape walls to create Terraces and Planting areas surround the house. Horizontal and vertical steel rods were woven around each block. The horizontal and vertical grooves between each block were filled with concrete, locking the blocks in place. Wright specified the concrete block mix of four parts building sand and decomposed granite to one part Portland cement. The window design included wood sash bars, and flat lead painted white. Set of 24 photographs taken during a trip to California in 1995.

Size:
Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image.


ST#:
1995.83.1015 1-24


  Continue to additional photographs.
   
   
   
JOHN STORER RESIDENCE (1995)
   
The Storer Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright's second textile block home in California: 1) Millard (La Miniatura), 3) Freeman, 4) Ennis. The house was originally designed in 1922 for Charles P. Lowes, Eagle Rock, California, but was never built. Wright adapted the plan, made modifications and designed it for the Storer property. A two-story home, the Entrance, Dining Room, Kitchen, two Bedrooms and Terraces are on the main floor. The upper level includes the Living Room, directly above the Dining Room, two bedrooms as well as two Terraces. From the street, the Living and Dining rooms appear to be a single room, with unbroken windows running from ground to roof. Wright's son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home. There are four different textile blocks designs were used to construct the Storer House and are 16" x 16" square. Glass was added to the perforated blocks allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. Glass was added to the exterior perforated blocks, and illuminated at night. Wright also added landscape walls to create Terraces and Planting areas surround the house. Horizontal and vertical steel rods were woven around each block. The horizontal and vertical grooves between each block were filled with concrete, locking the blocks in place. Wright specified the concrete block mix of four parts building sand and decomposed granite to one part Portland cement. The window design included wood sash bars, and flat lead painted white.
       Frank Lloyd Wright wrote: "The Concrete block? the cheapest (and ugliest) thing in the building world. It lived mostly in the architectural gutter as an
  imitation of 'rock face' stone. Why not see what could be done with the gutter-rat? Steel wedded to it cast inside the joints and the block itself brought into some broad, practical scheme of general treatment then why would it not be fit for a phase of modern architecture? it might be permanent, noble, beautiful. It would be cheap...
       "All that imagination needed to make such a scheme feasible was a plastic medium where steel would enter into inert mass as a tensile strength. Concrete was the inert mass and would take compression. Concrete is a plastic material -- susceptible to the impress of imagination. I saw a kind of weaving coming out of it. Why not weave a kind of building? Then I saw the 'shell.' Shells with steel inlaid in them. Or steel for warp and masonry units for 'woof' in the weaving. For block size -- say manhandled units weighing 40 to 50 pounds -- all such units or blocks for either weaving or shells to be set steel-wound and steel-bound. Floors, ceilings, walls all the same -- all to be hollow...
       "We would take that despised outcast of the building industry -- the concrete block -- out from underfoot or from the gutter -- find a hitherto unsuspected soul in it -- make it live as a thing of beauty -- textured like the trees. Yes, the building would be made of the 'blocks' as a kind of tree itself standing at home among the other trees in its own native land." Frank Lloyd Wright, An Autobiography, 1932, p.235, 241.
       This set of 24 photographs taken during a trip to California in 1995. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image.
 

1) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the Southeast. The Bedroom is on the left, the Dining and Living rooms are seen to the right. They appear to be a single room, with unbroken windows running from the ground to the roof. Windows are separated by vertical block columns. The Storer Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s second textile block home in California: Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-1)

 
John Storer Residence, circa 1924. Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, the home was completed in 1924. Most likely photographs shortly after the completion of construction. Wright's son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home as well as designing the landscape. The entrance of the home is reached by the stairs in the foreground. 7 x 5 B&W Photograph.
 
2) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the Southeast. The Bedroom is on the left, the Dining and Living rooms are seen to the right. They appear to be a single room, with unbroken windows running from the ground to the roof. The Entrance is just to the right of the Bedroom. Windows are separated by vertical block columns. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-2)
 
2B) Detail of the Bedroom and Living and Dining rooms.
 
3) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. Four styles of textile blocks are visible within the gate pier. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-3)
 
3A) Detail of the gate pier.
 
4) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. The drive leads past the gate, and around to the back of the house where the back entrance and garage are. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-4)
 
5) John Storer Residence, 1995. View of the southern perimeter wall, from the Southwest. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-5)
 
6) John Storer Residence, 1995. Detail of the perforated textile blocks. Imbedded glass is illuminated at night. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-6)
 
7) John Storer Residence, 1995. Address plaques embedded in the southern perimeter wall. 8159 Park Hill is the home to the East. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-7)
 
8) John Storer Residence, 1995. Address plaques embedded in the southern perimeter wall. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-8)
 
9) John Storer Residence, 1995. The Bath is on the left, Bedroom in the center, and the Living and Dining Rooms on the right. There is a Terrace above the bedrooms that cover both. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-9)
 
9A) John Storer Residence, 1995. Detail of the covering over the Terrace.
10) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. The Bath is on the left, Bedroom in the center, and the Living and Dining Rooms on the right. There is a Terrace above the bedrooms that cover both. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-10)
11) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. Wright wove horizontal and vertical steel rods around each block, and filled the horizontal and vertical grooves between each block with concrete, locking the blocks in place. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-11)
12) John Storer Residence, 1995. Wright specified the concrete block mix of four parts building sand and decomposed granite to one part Portland cement. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-12)
13) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. The house was originally designed in 1922 for Charles P. Lowes, Eagle Rock, California, but was never built. Wright adapted the plan, made modifications and designed it for the Storer property. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-13)
14) John Storer Residence, 1995. Four different textile blocks designs were used to construct the Storer House. Block were 16" x 16" square. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-14)
15) John Storer Residence, 1995. The Living and Dining Rooms almost appear to be a single room. Tall vertical columns span both floors and are separated by windows. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-15)
15A) John Storer Residence, 1995. Detail of the Living Room windows. Frank Lloyd Wright used wood sash bars to create the design of the windows. He also specified flat lead painted white, Monograph 4. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-15)
16) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. The Bedrooms are on the left, the Living and Dining Rooms are in the center and almost appear to be a single room. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-16)
17) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the Southeast. The home has four bedrooms. There are two bedrooms on the lower level to the west (left) side of the Dining Room. The other two bedrooms are just above on the west side of the Living Room. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-17)
18) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the Southeast. "The Concrete block? the cheapest (and ugliest) thing in the building world. It lived mostly in the architectural gutter as an imitation of 'rock face' stone. Why not see what could be done with the gutter-rat? Steel wedded to it cast inside the joints and the block itself brought into some broad, practical scheme of general treatment then why would it not be fit for a phase of modern architecture? it might be permanent, noble, beautiful. It would be cheap." Frank Lloyd Wright, An Autobiography, 1932, p.235. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-18)
18B) John Storer Residence, 1995. Detail of the upper bedroom. Frank Lloyd Wright used wood sash bars to create the design of the windows and doors. He also specified flat lead painted white, Monograph 4.
19) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the Southeast. "All that imagination needed to make such a scheme feasible was a plastic medium where steel would enter into inert mass as a tensile strength. Concrete was the inert mass and would take compression. Concrete is a plastic material -- susceptible to the impress of imagination. I saw a kind of weaving coming out of it. Why not weave a kind of building? Then I saw the 'shell.' Shells with steel inlaid in them. Or steel for warp and masonry units for 'woof' in the weaving. For block size -- say manhandled units weighing 40 to 50 pounds -- all such units or blocks for either weaving or shells to be set steel-wound and steel-bound. Floors, ceilings, walls all the same -- all to be hollow." Frank Lloyd Wright, An Autobiography, 1932, p.235. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-19)
20) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. "We would take that despised outcast of the building industry -- the concrete block -- out from underfoot or from the gutter -- find a hitherto unsuspected soul in it -- make it live as a thing of beauty -- textured like the trees. Yes, the building would be made of the 'blocks' as a kind of tree itself standing at home among the other trees in its own native land." Frank Lloyd Wright, An Autobiography, 1932, p.241. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-20)
21) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. The drive leads past the gate, and around to the back of the house where the back entrance and garage are. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-21)
22) John Storer Residence, 1995. Built into the hillside, Frank Lloyd Wright added walls to create Terraces and Planting areas surround the house. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-22)
23) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. Perforated textile blocks, imbedded with glass are illuminated at night. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-23)
24) John Storer Residence, 1995. Viewed from the South. Four styles of textile blocks are visible within the gate pier. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image. (ST#1995.83-24)
 
 
 
Date: 1996

Title: Storer House Block, 1996 (1923 - S.215).

Description: Designed in 1923 for the John Storer House, this decorative panel is a reproduction of a concrete block that was used though out the house. Wright's idea for the Storer House and other in the area, was to create a building system that was unique and indigenous to the area in which he was building, in this way, he said the building would be "organic" He created a system of construction in which individual cast concrete blocks were "wove" together to create the "fabric" of the house. Many of the blocks had plain, flat surfaces, however other were modeled to create interesting shadows and textures, both on the interior and the exterior. Our block is a perforated, patterned block that was used for light grilles, room divided and a kind-of "curtain wall" in the bedrooms of the house. Cast aluminum, sandblasted and lacquered, or copper plated and patinated. 16" square. (Manufacturer’s description.) Produced by Historical Arts & Casting, West Jordon, UT. Original retail cost $170.00.

Size: 16" square.

ST#:
1996.79.1216
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
   
 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2015