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PHOTOS 1940 - 1949
 
  1940   1941   1942   1943   1944   1945   1946   1947   1948   1949    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1940
C 1940
Oscar B. Balch Residence Circa 1940 (1911 - S.168). Oscar B. Balch moved to Oak Park in 1890, where he joined the firm of A. W. and S. E. Pebbles. Balch became a partner, and the name was changed to Pebbles and Balch. In 1907, Wright remodel their shop. The partnership did not last long. In 1908, a year after the shop was remodeled, Balch left to form the Balch-Linder Shop with Augustinus Linder, coincidentally just across the street. Shortly after Wright’s return from Europe, Balch called on Wright to design his home. Symmetrical in design, the Library in on the left, Living Room and Terrace in the center, Dining Room on the right. The entrance to the home is behind the Library on the left. Five bedrooms are upstairs. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 10 x 8 B&W photographs. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 0531.62.1016
Circa 1940
Peter A. Beachy Residence Dining Room, Oak Park (1906 - S.117) Circa 1940. View of the Dining Room from the Northeast. The doors on the left lead to the Veranda. The opening on the far right leads to the Living Room. The Dining Room included one long rectangular table with eight tall slat-backed chairs. On either side of the larger table were two smaller square tables, each with four shorter slat-backed chairs. Three tall and four short chairs can be seen in this photograph. In 1946 the home was converted to two-family residence, then turned back to a single family residence in 1977. Photographed by Grant Manson . See "Frank Lloyd Wright: 1885-1916, Pfeiffer, 2011 for additional images of the Beachy Residence. Original 5.75 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the Oak Park Public Library. 0531.39.0613
Circa 1940
Peter A. Beachy Residence Dining Room, Oak Park (1906 - S.117) Circa 1940. View of the Dining Room from the Southwest. The Dining Room Fireplace is on the far left. The Living Room also features a similarly designed Fireplace. The door on the right lead through the Pantry Hallway to the Kitchen. The Dining Room included one long rectangular table with eight tall slat-backed chairs. On either side of the larger table (not seen) were two smaller square tables, each with four shorter slat-backed chairs. Two tall chairs can be seen in this photograph. In 1946 the home was converted to two-family residence, then turned back to a single family residence in 1977. Photographed by Grant Manson . See "Frank Lloyd Wright: 1885-1916, Pfeiffer, 2011 for additional images of the Beachy Residence. Original 5.75 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the Oak Park Public Library. 0531.40.0613
1940
Canyon Hotel Lounge, Yellowstone National Park (c) 37776. Copyright by Haynes Inc., Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. Photographed by Frank J. Haynes. 4.75 x 3.75. Circa 1940. Original vintage photograph. (Relates to Blair Residence)  For more information on the Blair Residence see our Wright Study. 0531.25.0909
1940
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1940. View from the Northwest. Clipping on verso: "This residence, located at 1365 Astor Street, in the heart of the Gold Coast, was jointly designed by Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright more than 50 years ago. It is now owned and occupied by James B. Waller, member of a pioneer Chicago family, former alderman and civic leader. (By a staff photographer.) Stamped on verso: "Dec 6 1940". Original 10 x 8.25 B&W Print. 0531.28.1011
1940
Crystal Heights, Washington D.C. (1940 Project). Roy S. Thurman (left) and Frank Lloyd Wright are seated at a table with drawings for Crystal Heights in Washington, D.C. on September 25, 1940. Wright is gesturing with both hands as he describes the project laid out on the table in front of him. To the right is a reporter taking notes. According to Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, in August, 1940, Thurman commissioned Wright after purchasing a large tract of land known as Dean Estates, or Temple Heights in Washington D.C. Treasures of Taliesin, 1985, p.54-57. Thurman had requested a multi-use development, including a hotel with 1230 rooms, 138 residential apartments, banquet hall, Oak tree gardens, shops a large theater and parking garage. Wright’s enthusiasm for the project was evident. By September 25, he was in Washington D.C. presenting conceptual drawings for the project. But there was so much opposition to the modern looking design in Washington D.C. that did not have Greek columns, that it remained a project. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Photographed by Harris & Ewing. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.49.1015
1940
Crystal Heights, Washington D.C. (1940 Project). Frank Lloyd Wright is seated at a table, facing forward but looking to the left, with drawings for Crystal Heights in Washington, D.C. on September 25, 1940. Wright is gesturing with his right hand as he describes the project laid out on the table in front of him. Wright is wearing a three piece suit, and a gold chain with a pocket watch on the end of it, tucked in his pocket. Bottom right hand corner on face: "Harris & Ewing." Stamped on verso: "Copyright by Harris & Ewing." Typed description taped to verso: "New Informal photo of Frank Lloyd Wright. Washington D.C. Sept. 25 – Late informal of Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect, described by some as the living master of the modern school of architecture. 9-25-40." Photographed by Harris & Ewing. Original 6. X 8.5 silver gelatin B&W photograph. 0531.50.1015
1940
Crystal Heights, Washington D.C. (1940 Project). Frank Lloyd Wright is seated at a table with drawings for Crystal Heights in Washington, D.C. on September 25, 1940. Wright is facing slightly to the left, pointing to his design as he describes the project laid out on the table in front of him. According to Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, in August, 1940, Thurman commissioned Wright after purchasing a large tract of land known as Dean Estates, or Temple Heights in Washington D.C. Treasures of Taliesin, 1985, p.54-57. Thurman had requested a multi-use development, including a hotel with 1230 rooms, 138 residential apartments, banquet hall, Oak tree gardens, shops a large theater and parking garage. Wright’s enthusiasm for the project was evident. By September 25, he was in Washington D.C. presenting conceptual drawings for the project. But there was so much opposition to the modern looking design in Washington D.C. that did not have Greek columns, that it remained a project. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Photographed by Harris & Ewing. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0531.51.1015
1940
Crystal Heights, Washington D.C. (1940 Project). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940. Ground level view of Crystal Heights in Washington, D.C. presented in Washington D.C. on September 25, 1940. According to Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, in August, 1940, Thurman commissioned Wright after purchasing a large tract of land known as Dean Estates, or Temple Heights in Washington D.C. Treasures of Taliesin, 1985, p.54-57. Thurman had requested a multi-use development, including a hotel with 1230 rooms, 138 residential apartments, banquet hall, Oak tree gardens, shops a large theater and parking garage. Wright’s enthusiasm for the project was evident. By September 25, he was in Washington D.C. presenting conceptual drawings for the project. But there was so much opposition to the modern looking design in Washington D.C. that did not have Greek columns, that it remained a project. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 0531.52.1015
1940
Crystal Heights, Washington D.C. (1940 Project). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940. Birds-eye view of Crystal Heights in Washington, D.C. presented in Washington D.C. on September 25, 1940. This is the drawing in front of Wright and Thurman (0531.49), and the drawing Wright was pointing to in 0531.50. According to Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, in August, 1940, Thurman commissioned Wright after purchasing a large tract of land known as Dean Estates, or Temple Heights in Washington D.C. Treasures of Taliesin, 1985, p.54-57. Thurman had requested a multi-use development, including a hotel with 1230 rooms, 138 residential apartments, banquet hall, Oak tree gardens, shops a large theater and parking garage. Wright’s enthusiasm for the project was evident. By September 25, he was in Washington D.C. presenting conceptual drawings for the project. But there was so much opposition to the modern looking design in Washington D.C. that did not have Greek columns, that it remained a project. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 0531.53.1015
C 1940s-50s
Charles Ennis Residence, Los Angeles Circa 1940s-50s (1923 - S.217). Set of 10 35mm slides of Ennis Residence. These slides appear to be taken near the end of construction. Windows and curtains appear to be installed, but raw dirt still covers hillside, and foundation has not been covered in front of Dining Room. Exterior chain link fence enclosing the property has been installed, construction material is still scattered around the landscape. Photographs published in the November 1928 issue of Creative Art shows hillside and built-in planters in front of Dining Room covered in foliage. There is only one hitch in dating these images circa 1924-1925. In image number 7, there are trees on the 20-30 year old fir trees on the east slope of the property. "Wright In Hollywood" Sweeney...  Continue...   
0531.73.0518 (1-10)
C 1940s
Fallingwater, Kaufman House, Bear Run, Pennsylvania, Circa 1940 (S.230 - 1935). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935, the house is cantilevered over the stream. Label pasted to face: "Wright. Kaufmann House – ‘Falling Water’ (sic), Bear Run, Pennsylvania. 1936." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.67.0117
1940
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida, (1940), Sandborn, Dan (Two sizes - 3.25x4.5 & 5x7)  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.  Published in "An Autobiography, Frank Lloyd Wright" 1945, Faber & Faber London, Plate 71;  Architectural Concrete, 1942 Page 16. 1946.01.1104 1950.01.0604
C 1940
William G. Fricke Home, C 1940 (1901 S.058). Viewed from the Northwest, photographed during the Summer. Landscape is mature and in full bloom. The North elevation is dominated by the soaring height of the three story tower and tall vertical windows. Triangular bay windows are projecting between two entrances to the home, and enclose the Reception Room. Both Entrances lead to the main Hall, which feeds the Dining Living and Reception Rooms. The Kitchen is down a hallway. Like the Thomas Residence, also 1901 and in Oak Park, it is an all-stucco exterior. But unlike the Thomas Residence which is considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park, it includes elements of Wright’s transitional designs. Like the Rollin Furbeck Residence (1897), it includes elements of Wright’s transitional period. Broad overhanging eves, corners are turned at a 45 degree angle, it includes a massive central tower, there are rectangular square windows with columns and it is more vertical than Wright’s prairie styled horizontal designs. It is also a three story home. Where the Rollin columns were round, these are closer to the appearance of the square Thomas columns. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.65.1116
C 1940-49
Rollin Furbeck Residence circa 1940-49 (1897 - S.044). Viewed from across the street. The Furbeck Residence is Wright’s first home to include large picture windows in the Living Room (visible) and Dining Room. Two major changes are visible since the home was originally built. The Porte Cochere on the far left side of the home in the back has been enclosed and the driveway leading up to it had been removed. The second visible change is the low exposed walls leading up to the front porch have been removed. Photographed during the winter by John Gordon Replinger, most likely before he published his book on the Prairie School in 1951. 10 x 8 B&W photographs. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 0531.63.1016
C 1940
A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1940 (1915 - S.183). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1915 as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Albert Delvino German was a successful commodity wholesaler. But as costs escalated, construction was halted in 1921. German lost the building in 1932 due to unpaid taxes and bankruptcy, purchased it back in 1935, but lost it again in 1937. Published in In The Nature of Materials, Hitchcock, 1942, plate 203, caption: "Finer than the patterned blocks of the Midway Gardens are those of this Warehouse. They face the top storey which was for cold storage." Photographed by Gilman Lane. Note the two horse draw plows, lower left. There is a sign by the front door: "Richland Fruit Co. Office." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.57.0216
C 1940
A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1940 (1915 - S.183). Pedro Guerrero spent a year with Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship from May 1940 to May 1941, and the summer of 1940 at Taliesin. According to Picturing Wright, he visited Taliesin Spring Green again in 1947-48 and 1952-53. Judging from vehicle in the bottom left corner it would appear that image was photographed in 1940. An old-styled street lamp is visible on the far left, and a "Gas pump" is visible left of center in the foreground. Note the male peaking in the window of the warehouse. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero. 8 x 9.25 B&W photograph. 0531.66.0117
C 1940
A. W. Gridley Residence Circa 1940 (1906 - S.121) Batavia. Viewed from the Southeast. The covered porch is on the far left, the the Living Room and Terrace in the center. Set on a large rural 2.3 acres lot in Batavia, Illinois, it is on a corner lot, but set back from the street. A large two-story house, there is a covered porch on the South side, with a extensive terrace on the East. Its 5,000 square feet allows for six bedrooms and three bath upstairs, which includes the servants bedroom and bath. A perfect example of Wright’s prairie styled houses. Low-pitched roof, horizontal bands of trim and rows of casement windows. There are three Roman brick fireplaces, two on the first floor and one on the second. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.70.1217
C 1940
A. W. Gridley Residence Circa 1940 (1906 - S.121) Batavia. Viewed from the Northwest. On the first floor, the Study is on the far left. The Kitchen is in the center, the Servants room is on the right. Built in 1906, the Mrs. A. W. Gridley House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, who named it Ravine House, because of the gently sloping wild flower ravine on the south side of the original 15-acre site. With a low – pitch hip roof, projecting eaves, uninterrupted cedar trim and casement windows grouped into horizontal bands, the 14-room stucco and wood house is an excellent example of Wright’s prairie style architecture. Wright’s plan included a stucco wall surrounding the front wing which was later removed and a barn that was never built. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.71.1217
1940
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex, 1940 (1932- - S.228). View from the Southwest. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887 and ran it until 1915 when it closed. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. (Plate X, Ausgeführte Bauten.) It eventually became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. The gymnasium/theatre was on the left, two floors of classrooms and offices in the center, and a three story assembly hall on the right. Photographed during the winter. Label on verso: "Exterior of Hillside 1940." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 0531.44.0514
1940s
Hotel Geneva - 1940s (Published by L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee)   “Beautiful Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis.  #B-1290".  Real Photo Post Card,  Postmark 8/27/47.  Would have been produced the same time as B-1287.  5.5 x 3.5.  0531.03.0806
Circa 1940 
Herbert F. Johnson Residence, Wingspread (1937 - S.239), Circa 1940. During construction of the SC Johnson & Son Administration Building (1936 - S.237), H.F. Johnson commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design his expansive home in Wind Point, Wisconsin. This model of Wingspread was constructed during the summer of 1940, by the Taliesin apprentices for the exhibition "Frank Lloyd Wright: American Architect" held at The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), November 12, 1940 - January 5, 1941. See "The Show to End all Shows", 2004. Original 11 x 14 B&W photograph. 0531.41.0713
C 1940
Francis W. and Mary Little Residence I, Peoria (1902 - - S.070) Circa 1940. Exterior viewed from the South. The Living Room is on the far left, Entrance in the center, and Covered Porch to the right. 1505 W. Moss, Peoria. Francis Little was an attorney and owner of a utility company in Peoria, Illinois. He hired his friend, Frank Lloyd Wright to design his home in Peoria. He retained Wright again that year to add a Stable to the home. In 1908 they sold the home and moved to Minnesota where they hired Wright a second time to build a second home, "Northome". Construction was delayed due to Wright’s departure for Europe. Their Peoria home was purchased by Robert and Cora Clark. In 1930, it was purchased by Charles and Laura Hill Buehler. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9.5 x 7.25 B&W photograph. 0531.31.0212
C 1940
Francis W. and Mary Little Residence I, Peoria (1902 - - S.070) Circa 1940. Exterior viewed from the West. The pantry is on the far left, the kitchen n the center, and the Living Room is on the right. The Master Bedroom, situated over the Living Room, leads out to an open Balcony. 1505 W. Moss, Peoria. Francis Little was an attorney and owner of a utility company in Peoria, Illinois. He hired his friend, Frank Lloyd Wright to design his home in Peoria. He retained Wright again that year to add a Stable to the home. In 1908 they sold the home and moved to Minnesota where they hired Wright a second time to build a second home, "Northome". Construction was delayed due to Wright’s departure for Europe. Their Peoria home was purchased by Robert and Cora Clark. In 1930, it was purchased by Charles and Laura Hill Buehler. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9.25 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0531.32.0212
C 1940
William Everett Martin Residence (1902 - S.061), circa 1940, viewed from East Avenue. William Everett Martin was born in Bouckville, New York in 1863. He moved to Chicago in 1882 and formed Martin & Barton with his brother-in-law George F. Barton (1903 - S.103) which manufactured stove polish. In 1895, Darwin bought out George and moved him to the Larking Company in Buffalo, thus established a partnership with his brother William creating Martin & Martin, Inc. They manufactured polish under the brand E-Z polish for both stoves and shoes. William Martin first met Frank Lloyd Wright in late 1902 when he was searching for an architect to build his home in Oak Park, Illinois. Darwin D. Martin was so impressed with Wright and his brother's home that he commissioned Wright to the design the Larkin Company Administration Building (1903 - S.093) and his own home (1904 - S.100). William Martin would commission Wright again in 1909 to design a Pergola. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. Original 9 x 7 B&W photograph. 0531.34.0512
C 1940
Meyer S. May Residence Circa 1940 (1908 - S.148). Viewed from the South. The Living Room is on the left and the covered Veranda in the center of the first level. The Dining Room is to the right of the Veranda and Kitchen to the right. The addition from 1922 can be seen on the far right. Designed by architects Osgood & Osgood, the addition enclosed the Kitchen Veranda on the east side and adding servants quarters. Two bedrooms were added to the second floor. Bedrooms are on the second floor. Meyer S. May was married to Sophie Amberg. She past away on December 10, 1917 at the age of 38. He was a prominent clothier in Grand Rapids with A. Meyer & Sons, becoming president in 1906 of the clothing store started by his father, Abraham Meyer. He was also President of the Michigan Retail Clothiers’ Association, and involved in the National Association. He was also an original officer of the Pantlind Hotel in Grand Rapids, "one of the finest to be found in the Mid West". He was a Vice President of the Grand Rapids Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Meyer S. May past away on November 7, 1936 at the age of 65. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940. Published in "In The Nature of Material", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 162. Original 8.75 x 7 B&W photograph. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. 0531.35.0612
C 1940
Meyer S. May Residence Circa 1940 (1908 - S.148). Viewed from the South. The Living Room is on the lower level. On the second level, the Master Bedroom in on the left, with the "Morning Room" (Sitting Room) to the right. Meyer S. May was married to Sophie Amberg. She past away on December 10, 1917 at the age of 38. He was a prominent clothier in Grand Rapids with A. Meyer & Sons, becoming president in 1906 of the clothing store started by his father, Abraham Meyer. He was also President of the Michigan Retail Clothiers’ Association, and involved in the National Association. He was also an original officer of the Pantlind Hotel in Grand Rapids, "one of the finest to be found in the Mid West". He was a Vice President of the Grand Rapids Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Meyer S. May past away on November 7, 1936 at the age of 65. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940, at the same time as #531.35. Original 8.75 x 7 B&W photograph. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. 0531.36.0612
C 1940
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1895/1923 - S.034) Circa 1940. View after reconstruction. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. 333 Forest Avenue, Oak Park. Viewed from the Southwest, the porch is in the foreground. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.29.0112
C 1940
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1895/1923 - S.034) Circa 1940. View after reconstruction. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. 333 Forest Avenue, Oak Park. Viewed from the North, across the street on Forest Avenue. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 0531.30.0112
1940
Arch Oboler (Eaglefeather) a project in 1940. Arch Oboler, a writer, radio personality, director and producer, commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home in 1940, named Eaglefeather by Wright. Although the Gatehouse and Retreat were built, Eaglefeather remained a project. Text on face: "Eaglefeather. For Mr. And Mrs. Arch Oboler, Los Angeles. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Photograph of Wright's original drawing. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.45.0514
1940
Pope-Leighey House during construction, 1940, set of seven historic photographs. This set of seven photographs of the Pope-Leighey House were taken during construction by Loren Pope in 1940. Preliminary sketches were completed in October 1939. Construction began in May 1940, with Taliesin apprentice Gordon Chadwick overseeing the project. The house was completed during the early part of 1941. Photographed by Loren Pope. 10 x 8 B&W photographs. Courtesy of the William Edmund Barrett collection. For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House.
0531.47.0815 1-7
C 1940
River Forest Tennis Club, Circa 1940 (1906 - S.119). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1906, photographs published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" and "Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago" 1911, show the building in its original design. In 1920, the building was moved and enlarged. This appears to be after the move. The center Ballroom section which includes three fireplaces, has been added to. The Terrace, which originally hugged the original building has also been moved further away from it’s original position and now hugs the addition. Eventually additions were added to either end, forming a "U" shape, adding to the Men’s and women’s dressing rooms. Three large lanterns are visible, possible with the Club’s logo that Wright designed. One on a pedestal to the left by the entrance. The second close to the right corner, and the third at the stairs leading up to the Terrace. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. (See additional information on the River Forest Tennis Club: PhRtS170.htm, PhRtS170rftc.htm) 0531.55.0116
C 1940
River Forest Tennis Club, Circa 1940 (1906 - S.119). View of the Terrace and extended Ballroom. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1906, photographs published in "Frank Lloyd Wright, Ausgeführte Bauten" and "Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago" 1911, show the building in its original design. In 1920, the building was moved and enlarged. This appears to be after the move. The center Ballroom section which includes three fireplaces, has been added to. The Terrace, which originally hugged the original building has also been moved further away from it’s original position and now hugs the addition. Eventually additions were added to either end, forming a "U" shape, adding to the Men’s and women’s dressing rooms. Two large lanterns are visible on either end of the Terrace, possible with the Club’s logo that Wright designed. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. (See additional information on the River Forest Tennis Club: PhRtS170.htm, PhRtS170rftc.htm) 0531.56.0116
Circa 1940
Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park (1903 S.094) Circa 1940. Originally constructed in 1909. Photographed by Grant Manson between1937 and 1941 while he was researching for his dissertation which later became the book titled "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910". The photographs were not used in the book, but are a good record of the condition of the fountain around 1940. It shows the extreme deterioration after just thirty years. When comparing this image with Gilman Lane’s, there are slight changes. The hedge on he other side of the iron fence has filled out. The loose rocks that appeared in Lane’s between the curb and fountain have been removed and filled in. The only other visible change is the extreme deterioration. 7.6 x 4.75 Print. High res digital image. 0531.26.0310
Circa 1940
1) Clarence W. Sondern Residence during construction, circa 1939-40 (1939 - S.279). Clarence Sondern, was a laboratory director for a chemical company in Kansas City. The Sondern house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright as a Usonian home in 1939. John (Jack) Howe was the apprentice that supervised the construction. Viewed from the Southwest, the Living Room is on the left, Dining Room on the right. Brick work is completed, work has begun on the roof. Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum and the Roanoke Protective Homes Association. 10 x 7 B&W photograph.
0531.48.0915 1-5
1940
6) Clarence W. Sondern Residence Dining Room after completion, 1940 (1939 - S.279). Clarence Sondern, was a laboratory director for a chemical company in Kansas City. The Sondern house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright as a Usonian home in 1939. John (Jack) Howe was the apprentice that supervised the construction. Viewed from the North, the Dining Room table is built-in. The Workspace (Kitchen) is entered on the right side of the table. Floor to ceiling doors open outward. Wright designed the Dining Room chairs and table. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. See additional Wright designed Sondern chairs. 0531.48.0915 -6
C 1940
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) Circa 1940. Viewed from the Northwest, across the street on Rogers Avenue. Street lamp is missing it's lens. The exterior stucco has been freshly painted, as has the trim. Storm windows have been added to the covered Porch and Living Room. The front sidewalk that started at Rogers Avenue and passed in front of the Living Room to the Entrance, has been removed and the front yard has been paved. Restaurants must have a sign. but no care was taken to keep any continuity with the design of the home. A smaller sign has been added to the exterior wall to the right of the Living Room bay window. The landing at the top of the stairs has been enclosed. Photographed by Grant Carpenter Manson. Courtesy of Oak Park Public Library. Original 8 x 4.6 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 0531.33.0512
C 1940
George D Sturges House, Circa 1940 (1939 - S.272). Viewed from the East, the Living Room is on the left, the two bedrooms are in the center, the Bath is on the right. Constructed of brick and redwood, the bottom portion of the cantilevered house and deck are enclosed in redwood. The cantilevered deck is covered with a trellis. The walls of the deck slant outward. Hitchcock credits this image to Guerrero. Published in "In The Nature of Materials," 1942, Hitchcock, Plate 379. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.54.0216
1940
Saturday afternoon picnic with the Wright’s 1940. "Lunch was often held picnic fashion somewhere on the vast grounds. On one Saturday in 1940, the entire fellowship and some guests gathered on the hill below Taliesin to enjoy the summer’s bounty." Photographed by Pedro Guerrero. Published in "Pedro E. Guerrero, A Photographer’s Journey" 2007, Page 61. 6.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0531.42.0214
1940
Apprentice picnic 1940, Taliesin, Spring Green.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero.  “The daily picnics were expertly organized.  Once the food arrived at the site, everyone got into the spirit of things.  It was a relaxing informal break that was always welcome.”  Female on the left possibly Kay (Schneider) Rattenbury and on the right with his back to the camera is possibly Wes Peters.  Published in “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 88.  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph. 0531.14.0207
1940
Taliesin Draughting Room, Spring Green, 1940. In the foreground on the right is a model of Broadacre City. In the background is a photograph of the Robie House and a model of St. Mark’s in-the-Bouwerie. Pedro Guerrero was an apprentice with Frank Lloyd Wright from May, 1940 until May 1941. According to "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, Wright and the apprentices arrived in Spring Green in May, 1940 after caravanning from Taliesin West. They would spend summer and fall in Wisconsin, then head to Taliesin West, Scottsdale in as the cold set in. Another view of the draughting room at Taliesin, page 91. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero during the summer of 1940. 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 0531.46.0115
1940
Taliesin, Spring Green, 1940 (1925 - S.218). Frank Lloyd Wright looks over the model of Wingspread, the home for Herbert Johnson, in the Hillside Drafting Studio, Taliesin. The model was first shown at The Museum of Modern Art, November 1940, "In the Nature of Materials, The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright." In the background are Suntop Homes, S.C. Johnson Administration Building, and in the background, the Jester House. Published in "The Show To End All Shows," Reed and Kasizen, 2004, p.39. Also published in "Wright on Exhibit," Smith, 2017, page x. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin." Stamped on verso: "Aug 4 1941." original 11 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 0531.72.0218
1940
Taliesin circa 1940.  Possibly the entrance to Frank Lloyd Wright’s residence and forecourt from the studio (Frank Lloyd Wright Select Houses 2, Pfeiffer/Futagawa, page 38 after remodel).  In 1938 Wright designed a home for Charles L. Manson, Wausau, Wisc. (S.249), one of Wright’s uniquely designed Usonian homes.  On many occasions, Wright’s clients were invited to visit him, and this photograph was taken on one of those visits.  In August of 1940 Manson personally was invited to attend “The Playhouse Program The Playhouse Program” August 11, 18, 25, 1940 (S2040.01).  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph. 0531.18.0607
1940
Taliesin West. Garden Room interior, looking into the Cove.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero.  Published in “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 44; “Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 3" Pfeiffer 1989, Page 44; "Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly" Winter 2005, Page 18. Original 10 x 8 silver gelatin photograph. 0531.11.0207
1940
Taliesin West. Garden Room interior.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero.  Similar view in “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 45;  “Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 3" Pfeiffer 1989, Page 41.  Original 5 x 4 silver gelatin photograph. 0531.13.0207
1940
Taliesin West. Looking toward the Kitchen from the Workroom.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero.  Original 7 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. 0531.12.0207
C 1940-49
Frank Wright Thomas Residence (1901 - S.067) Circa 1940s. Viewed from across the street. Designed in 1901 by Frank Lloyd Wright. The Frank Thomas Residence is considered to be Wright’s first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park. It is also the first house in Oak Park to be completely designed in Stucco. Upon entering the archway, stairs lead up to the Terrace and main living quarters on the second level. The Living Room is to the left, Dining Room on the right. The Kitchen is strait ahead. A back stairway leads to the bedrooms on the third floor. The ground floor was for the house staff. Some of the design features included beaded molding and exquisite leaded glass windows. This images was photographed by John Gordon Replinger during the 1940s, and shows the stucco surface covered in Shingles. In 1975, the stucco surface was restored. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0531.64.1116
1940
Wright at 73. 1940. Portrait by Yousuf Karsh in New York. His left hand is holding a cigarette, his right is in his pocket. "Although seventy-three years of age, he literally breezed into my hotel suite, radiating vitality and charm, and dressed like a fashion plate." Published in "Faces of Destiny, Portraits by Karsh:, Karsh, 1946, pages 158-159. 5.5 x 6.5 print. High res digital image. 0531.22.0509
1940s
(Wright in his 70s.)  See Real Photo Postcard.  “Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin. 11195-F" Early 1940s at Taliesin.  Back: All rights reserved - The L. L. Cook Co., Milwaukee. 3.4 x 5.4. 0531.21.1007
C 1940
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak Park (1895 - S.036) C 1940-1950. View of the hall outside the Reception Room, viewed from the Living Room. The Oak Park Public Library attributes this photograph to Grant Manson. Manson took photographs of Wright buildings between 1937 and 1941 while researching for his doctoral dissertation titled "Frank Lloyd Wright's Work Before 1910". Photographed by Grant Manson. 5 x 8 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 0531.59.0916
C 1940
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak Park (1895 - S.036) C 1940-1950. View of the hall and the Reception Room, viewed from the Living Room. The Oak Park Public Library attributes this photograph to Grant Manson. Manson took photographs of Wright buildings between 1937 and 1941 while researching for his doctoral dissertation titled "Frank Lloyd Wright's Work Before 1910". Photographed by Grant Manson. 5 x 8 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 0531.60.0916
C 1940
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak Park (1895 - S.036) C 1940-1950. View of the Living Room Fireplace. The Oak Park Public Library attributes this photograph to Grant Manson. Manson took photographs of Wright buildings between 1937 and 1941 while researching for his doctoral dissertation titled "Frank Lloyd Wright's Work Before 1910". Photographed by Grant Manson. 5 x 8 x 5 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 0531.61.0916
1941
1941
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1941. View of main entrance across reflecting pool. Stamped on verso: "Tokyo, Japan", "Aug 27 1941" and "Mar 10 1967". The front and pool is heavily covered in ivy. Lilly pads are going in the pool. Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 9.25 x 7 B&W photograph. 0571.07.1013
C 1941
Loren B. Pope Residence (1939) - 8 x 10 Photo.  Photographed by Hedrich-Blessing (Ken & Bill Hedrich, Henry Blessing).  This is the actual print that was used for producing the photograph in “The Natural House” 1954 Frank Lloyd Wright page 146.  Also published in May 1964 Architectural Forum page 7.  Original 1954 gelatin silver photo, by Hedrich-Blessing. 0998.01.0706
Circa 1941
Suntop Homes Circa 1941 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. The Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is to the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed by Edward Van Altena. Acquired from and courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 8.75 x 8 B&W photograph. 0571.08.0314
1941
Wright at 74. 1941. Clipping pasted on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright. London, Jan. 2, - (AP) - Award of the Royal Gold Medal for Architecture to Frank Lloyd Wright, American architect was approved yesterday by King George. Wright, who designed the Imperial hotel in Tokyo and other noteworthy structure, makes his home at ‘Taliesin," an estate at Spring Green, Wis." For more information see Architectural Forum, February 1941, Pencil Points, March 1941, and Architectural Forum, August 1941. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 7 x 9 B&W print. 0571.05.1210
Circa 1941 
Wright at 74. Circa 1941. Wright is wearing the same suite, tie and eye glasses as the 1941 London photograph. Wright is facing right, holding a scarf in his left hand, his right is resting on his knee. His suit coat is buttoned, his eyeglasses are hanging around his neck on a cord. Scotch Pine are visible in the background. Original 4x 5 B&W photograph. 0571.06.0913
1941
Walter L. Fisher Memorial Chapter House, Chi of Sigma Chi (1941). "The Walter L. Fisher Memorial Chapter House, Chi of Sigma Chi. Hanover, Indiana. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Signed and dated bottom right, May 20, 1941. Signed and dated top left, May 30, 1941. The second fraternity House Frank Lloyd Wright designed was the Fisher Memorial Chapter House in 1941. The first project for a fraternity house was in 1924, for the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, University of Wisconsin. Both remained projects. Wright chose to resurrect the Fisher design in 1952 when asked to design a fraternity for Zeta Beta Tau. Although he modified elements of the Zeta design, it remained very similar to the 1941 Fisher design. The same basic footprint, three stories, a large Social Room, massive fireplace, circular and rooftop terraces, Library, and the entrance near the back of the fraternity house. 10 x 5 Color Photograph. Courtesy of Wright Auctions. 0571.15.0915
1941
Walter L. Fisher Memorial Chapter House, Chi of Sigma Chi (1941). Birds-eye view of the Walter L. Fisher Memorial Chapter House, Chi of Sigma Chi. Hanover, Indiana. The second fraternity House Frank Lloyd Wright designed was the Fisher Memorial Chapter House in 1941. The first project for a fraternity house was in 1924, for the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, University of Wisconsin. Both remained projects. Wright chose to resurrect the Fisher design in 1952 when asked to design a fraternity for Zeta Beta Tau. Although he modified elements of the Zeta design, it remained very similar to the 1941 Fisher design. The same basic footprint, three stories, a large Social Room, massive fireplace, circular and rooftop terraces, Library, and the entrance near the back of the fraternity house. 10 x 5.5 Color Photograph. 0571.16.0915
1942
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Exterior, viewed from the Southwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. The bedroom wing is on the left, the lower door opens to the workshop and utilities in the basement. Stairs just to the right of the door lead up to the Loggia, with four sets of floor to ceiling doors, and balcony. The Living Room and Balcony are cantilevered out over the ravine on the right. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 68. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0593.07.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Light Screen Detail. Exterior, viewed from the South. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. The master bedroom is on the left, the small cut light screen windows are cut into the master bedroom wall. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 68. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0593.08.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of Living Room from the North. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Floor to ceiling doors lead to the balcony. Wright designed Usonian chair sets to the left side of the Living Room. The Living Room and Balcony are cantilevered out over the ravine. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 69. 10 x 7.25 B&W photograph. 0593.09.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, circa 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Gregor and Elizabeth Affleck, interior view of western corner of the Living Room. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Gregor and Elizabeth sitting by the fireplace (to the right of the camera, out of view). They have the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum open to page 21. Possibly photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.10.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, circa 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of western corner of the Living Room. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Details of the built-in shelves.. Possibly photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.11.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, circa 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of the Living Room fireplace, looking North toward the Workspace. Three cantilevered shelves wrap around the corner, accordion doors separate the workspace from the Dining Room. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Possibly photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.12.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of Loggia looking Southwest. Floor to ceiling doors open to the Balcony. Windows on the far right open to the bedroom. Skylights flood the area with light. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 69. 7.75 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.13.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of gallery, looking from the entryway toward the Master Bedroom at the end. The wall on the left, slopes inward, is created by overlapping cypress boards. Built-in shelves cantilever out from the wall, just below the windows that cap the wall on the right. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 70. 7.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.14.0514
1942
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1942 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of Master Bedroom western corner. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Photographed by Joe Munroe in 1942. Munroe was a staff photographer at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from 1941 to 1943. Published as part of the photo essay in the October 1946 issue of Progressive Architecture, page 70. 7.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0593.15.0514
1942
“Anne Baxter - 20th Century Fox Player”.  February 1942.  Published by 20th Century Fox Film Corp.  Anne Baxter was born in Michigan City, Indiana, on May 7, 1923.  She was the daughter of a salesman and his wife, Catherine, who herself was the daughter of Frank Lloyd Wright.  Anne was a young girl of 11 when her parents moved to New York City.  Verso: “Play time... and it's also time for exercise too for charming 17 year old Anne Baxter, who is being groomed for stardom by 20th Century-Fox following her featured performance in ‘Swamp Water’ for that studio.”  Original 8 x 10 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0593.04.0307
1942
Taliesin West 1942, (1937 - S.241). View of the Frank Lloyd Wright’s Office and Drafting Room from the Northwest. The office is on the left, the Drafting Room on the right. The twin poles attached to the end of both buildings are missing. Photographed in 1942 by Bill Hedrich, Hedrich-Blessing. Number "18" of what appears to be part of a set of at least 19 slides (bottom left hand corner). 35mm slide mounted in plastic sleeve and 11.5 x 8 high res B&W digital photograph.


0593.17.0517 (1-2)
1943
1943
Lucius M. Boomer, 1943 (1953 - S.261). Oscar Tschirky’s Golden Jubilee Dinner, March 15 1943. Left to right: Lucius Boomer, Oscar Tschirky and Dr. Walter Damrosch. Courtesy of the Waldorf Astoria. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0595.05.1114
1943
Hotel Geneva 1943.  "Lake Geneva, Wis. From Hotel Geneva.  B-1287". Postmarked Aug. 12, 1943.  Real Photo Post Card. 5.5 x 3.5. 0595.02.0305
1944
1944
Anne Baxter.  July 1944.  Published by 20th Century Fox Film Corp. Anne Baxter was born in Michigan City, Indiana, on May 7, 1923.  She was the daughter of a salesman and his wife, Catherine, who herself was the daughter of Frank Lloyd Wright.  Anne was a young girl of 11 when her parents moved to New York City.  Verso: “Playing Heroine Roles and getting top billing in her movies is all well and good, but pretty Anne Baxter says that for just once in her career she wants to play a siren or ‘other women’ type of part...”  Original 7.5 x 9.5 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0603.03.0307
C 1944 
Wright at 77, Circa 1944. Portrait of Wright, seated, facing right, looking at camera. Original 11.75 x 16.5 B&W photograph. Note: This photograph published in Frank Lloyd Wright American Architect for the Twentieth Century. Sommer, 1993, p.7 and dates the photograph 1944. 0857.08.0113
C 1944
Wright at 77. Circa 1944. Portrait of Wright, seated, facing right, looking at camera. His head is leaning back slightly and it appears that he may be nodding off. He is wearing a three piece suite, and is holding a cane in his right hand. He is seated in an armchair, a table is to the left with a large vase of flowers. Acquired from the archives of the PM New York City Daily News and was taken between 1940-1948. (PM was a liberal leaning daily newspaper published in New York City by Ralph Ingersoll from June 1940 to June 1948 and financed by Chicago millionaire Marshall Field III.) 8 x 8 B&W photograph and an original 2.25 x 2.25 B&W negative. 0685.15.0515
1945
1945
Ennis Residence (1923 - S.217). John Nesbitt circa 1945. Newbit, (August 23, 1910 – August 10, 1960) was an actor, narrator, announcer, film producer and screenwriter Nesbitt was best known as the narrator of the MGM series Passing Parade. He was in Victoria, British Columbia. The Passing Parade, was first broadcast in 1937 and ended in 1949. He also was the host of the program So the Story Goes, which was syndicated in 1945-1946. He has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1940, Nesbitt commissioned Wright to design a home in Carmel, California, which Wright named "Sea Garden." Pfeiffer describes it as "one of the most lavish, most elegant houses he created during the last thirty years of his life" Treasures of Taliesin, 1985. Elaborate plans were drawn up for the 5,000 square foot ocean front home, but they were never executed. Nesbitt purchased the Ennis House and then commissioned Wright to remodel it in 1941. Acquired from the Hal Roach Studios, Hollywood, California. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.30.1016
1945
Guggenheim Museum Press Conference 1945. On September 20, 1945, Frank Lloyd Wright (left), Hilla Rebay and Solomon R Guggenheim (right) held a new conference at the Plaza Hotel, to unveil the model for the new Guggenheim Museum. Wright believed that the building represented "pure optimism." It would take another 15 years before the museum opened. Published in "The Guggenheim" 2009, p.157. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.24.0714
1945
Guggenheim Museum Press Conference 1945. On September 20, 1945, Frank Lloyd Wright (left), Hilla Rebay and Solomon R Guggenheim (right) held a new conference at the Plaza Hotel, to unveil the model for the new Guggenheim Museum. Wright believed that the building represented "pure optimism." It would take another 15 years before the museum opened. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright In New York" 2007, p.96 and "The Guggenheim Correspondence", Pfeiffer, 1986, p.77. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.25.0714
1945
Guggenheim Museum Press Conference 1945. On September 20, 1945, Frank Lloyd Wright, Hilla Rebay and Solomon R Guggenheim held a new conference at the Plaza Hotel, to unveil the model for the new Guggenheim Museum. Wright believed that the building represented "pure optimism." It would take another 15 years before the museum opened. Wright is looking at the model. His arms are crossed holding his hat. his glasses are in his left hand, cane is draped over his left arm. He is grasping the model with his left hand. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.26.0714
1945
Guggenheim Museum Cross-section Model 1945. Model sitting on table. Description on verso: "Wide World Photo Please Credit. Spiral Art Gallery. New York - This cross-section shows the interior of the spiral-shaped building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Non-Objective Painting, it will be erected on upper Fifth Avenue. 9/21/45." Clipping on verso: "Sept 22, 1956. Below is Wright’s ‘architectural masterpiece’ ... or is it an ‘oversized hot cross bun’? New York made him redesign the structure..." Photographed at the same time as an image in "The Guggenheim Correspondence", Pfeiffer, 1986, page 77, and "The Guggenheim", 2009, page 157. Possibly photographed by Margaret Carson. Original silver gelatin 9 x 7 photo. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 0647.13.0310
1945
Imperial Hotel, 1945.  Photographed after the end of the war, while the Americans occupied the Imperial Hotel.  The Imperial Hotel resumed normal business on April 1, 1952. Caption: "Imperial Hotel for high ranking U.S. officers, Tokyo, Japan." (Two copies) 6 x 4.5. 0647.03.0307 0647.18.0413
1945
Imperial Hotel, Circa 1945. Pool, Entry and Lobby. Photographed after the end of the war, while the Americans occupied the Imperial Hotel. The Imperial Hotel resumed normal business on April 1, 1952. Possibly produced as a postcard, but it is not printed on the back. It is the same size other RPPCs produced during that time period.  It could have possibly been part of a Souvenir Pack.  0647.11.0109
1945
Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1944-45 for the "Ladies Home Journal", the Opus 497 "Glass House" Model and Plan was published in the June 1945 issue. At first glance this image looks like a detail of Broadacre City, but upon further study, it was discovered to be a detail of the model built for the Ladies Home Journal in 1945. In January 1944, the LHJ began publishing new house designs by the country’s outstanding architects, "houses that point the way to better, less expensive living after the war". This caught the attention of the Department of Architecture and Industrial Design at the Museum of Modern Art. Seven of the models created for the LHJ, were the focus for the exhibition "Tomorrow’s Small House: Models and Plans" held at MOMA from May 29 - September 30, 1945. Also included in the exhibition was a model of a row-house and a neighborhood development. Originally created to enable color photographs to be taken of the models for the magazine, the models were so complete and detailed they made excellent displays. Detail of the entrance to the Opus 497 Model. Hand written on verso: "June 1945". Stamped on verso: "Acme Newspictures Inc., New York City". Caption pasted to verso: "761381RO (3) Detail: Wright House. Overhang at the entrance...  Continue...    For more information see our Wright Study on Opus 497. 0647.17.0912
C 1945
George D. Sturges House, Circa 1945 (1939 - S.272). Viewed from the Southwest, the Living Room and fireplace are located on the Southern end of the home. The entrance is just to the right of the fireplace mass, and is sheltered by the carport on the left. The large fireplace mass adds a counterbalance to the cantilevered portion of the house and deck. Constructed of brick and redwood, the bottom portion of the cantilevered house and deck are enclosed in redwood. The cantilevered deck is covered with a trellis. Photographed by Wayne Andrews. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0647.29.0216
C 1945
Romeo and Juliet Windmill circa 1945-53, Taliesin Spring Green (1896, 1938 - S.037). Full view of the windmill tower. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the windmill tower for his aunts Jane and Nell Lloyd Jones in 1896. "...The reservoir finished, the Aunts intended to erect a windmill over it. This was decided upon by a family gathering which the clan usually held to make such decisions concerning the school or important affairs of their own. Said Aunt Nell, managerial mind of the school: "Why not a pretty windmill tower in keeping with our school building instead of an ugly steel tower or, for that matter, the timber ones I have seen? I am going to ask Frank for a design." "An Autobiography," Wright, 1932, page 130. The original windmill was covered in shingles, and in 1938 it was resurfaced in board and batten siding. In 1990, it was torn down and and completely rebuilt on its original stone base. Ezra Stoller photographed Taliesin in 1945 and again in the 1953. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.27.0514
C 1945
Romeo and Juliet Windmill circa 1945-53, Taliesin Spring Green  (1896, 1938 - S.037). View of the windmill tower from the base. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the windmill tower for his aunts Jane and Nell Lloyd Jones in 1896. "...The reservoir finished, the Aunts intended to erect a windmill over it. This was decided upon by a family gathering which the clan usually held to make such decisions concerning the school or important affairs of their own. Said Aunt Nell, managerial mind of the school: "Why not a pretty windmill tower in keeping with our school building instead of an ugly steel tower or, for that matter, the timber ones I have seen? I am going to ask Frank for a design." "An Autobiography," Wright, 1932, page 130. The original windmill was covered in shingles, and in 1938 it was resurfaced in board and batten siding. In 1990, it was torn down and and completely rebuilt on its original stone base. Ezra Stoller photographed Taliesin in 1945 and again in the 1953. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0647.28.0514
1945 Wright at 78. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright in 1945, crossing his arms. Photographed by Blackstone Studios at Taliesin on July 20, 1945. Courtesy Blackstone Studios, 4.5 x 5.75 print. High res digital image. 0647.12.0509
1945
Wright at 78. 1945. Frank Lloyd Wright speaks to women’s club. Wright looking to the left. He is wearing a three piece suit, his eyeglasses, hanging from a gold chain are setting in his breast pocket. Clipping taped to verso: "Main street is outmoded in American cities, said Frank Lloyd Wright, famed architect who spoke at Women’s Club Tuesday. He is shown telling Mrs. J. Frank Fraser that irrational, unexpressive, unimaginative examples of‘ 'tory minded architecture’ has resulted from lack of originality in American education." Stamped on clipping "Dec 5 1945." Note: it was reported on December 5, 1945 in the Racine Journal Times, that Wright spoke at the Women’s Club in Minneapolis on Tuesday (December 4, 1945), page 4. Stamped on verso "Nov 14." Original photograph is cut, overlapped, and glued. Restored by Douglas M. Steiner. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0647.23.0514
1946
1946
Wright at 79. 1946. Portrait of Wright glancing to the left, wearing a three-piece suit. His left hand is under his chin. We have seen a copy of this print inscribed "Taliesin, August 18, 1946. 4.75 x 6. High Res digital image. 0685.06.0609
1946
Jorgine Boomer, 1946 (1953 - S.361). Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Boomer Residence in 1953. Left to right: Jorgine Boomer, third from left. Caption pasted to verso: "Congenial Foursome. New York – Among those who attended the ball in the Waldorf Astoria May 9, for the United Nations Secretariat and Delegation, were, left to right, Mrs. Winthrop W. Aldrich, Chairman of the Hospitality Committee; Grover Whalen, Member of the Executive Committee; Mrs. Lucius Boomer and Trygve Lie, Secretary General of the Security Council of the United Nations. 5/9/46" Stamped on verso: "Ref. Dep, 5-17 ‘46, N. E. A." Original 9 x 7.25 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0685.13.1014
1946

Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). 5x8.  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.

1946.03.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). 8x10.  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.

1946.04.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). 8x10.  Photo by Fugitt, A.F.  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.

1946.05.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Inside Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's).  3.25x4.5.  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.

1946.06.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Inside Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). 3.25x4.5.  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938.

1946.07.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Esplanades, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). Built in 1946.  The Esplanades link all of Wright's buildings on the campus. 4.5x6.5.

1946.08.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Esplanades, Lakeland, Florida (circa late 40's). Built in 1946.  The Esplanades link all of Wright's buildings on the campus.  4.5x6.5 & 4x5.

1946.09.1104 1946.10.1104
1946
Florida Southern College, Administration Building, Lakeland, Florida, Photo by Harold Sanborn, 8x10, (circa late 40's)  Built in 1946. 1946.11.1104
1946
Florida Southern College, Administration Building, Lakeland, Florida, 4.5x6.5, (circa late 40's)  Built in 1946. 1946.12.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Library, Lakeland, Florida, 6x9, (circa late 40's)  Built in 1941.

1946.13.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Library, Lakeland, Florida, 8x10, (circa late 40's)  Built in 1941.

1946.14.1104
1946

Florida Southern College, Library, Lakeland, Florida, 8x10, (circa late 40's)  Built in 1941.

1946.15.1104
1946
Imperial Hotel circa 1946 (1915 - S.194). Detail of the Imperial Hotel vase and sculpture carved of Oya stone, setting atop the front porte-cochure. Oya stone, a soft lava rock Frank Lloyd Wright made famous at the Imperial Hotel. Loch Crane arrived in Arizona in March 1941, and Wright accepted him into the fellowship. After Pearl Harbor, he joined the Army and terminated his Taliesin fellowship in April 1942. After World War II, he stayed in Japan through 1946, spending his free time photographing, drawing and researching Japanese architecture. He returned to San Diego in late 1946 and established his first drafting office while preparing for architectural examinations. Photographed by Loch Crane. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.17.1216
1946
Imperial Hotel circa 1946 (1915 - S.194). Detail of the Imperial Hotel stone work. Rectangular blocks carved of Oya stone are in the foreground. Carved Oya stone and perforated terra-cotta blocks, embedded with glass create built-in light columns throughout the lobby. Oya stone and brick are woven together. Oya stone, a soft lava rock Frank Lloyd Wright made famous at the Imperial Hotel. Loch Crane arrived in Arizona in March 1941, and Wright accepted him into the fellowship. After Pearl Harbor, he joined the Army and terminated his Taliesin fellowship in April 1942. After World War II, he stayed in Japan through 1946, spending his free time photographing, drawing and researching Japanese architecture. He returned to San Diego in late 1946 and established his first drafting office while preparing for architectural examinations. Photographed by Loch Crane. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.18.1216
1946
Imperial Hotel circa 1946 (1915 - S.194). Detail of the Imperial Hotel stone work. Carved Oya stone and perforated terra-cotta blocks, embedded with glass create built-in light columns throughout the lobby. Oya stone and brick are woven together. Oya stone, a soft lava rock Frank Lloyd Wright made famous at the Imperial Hotel. Of particular interest is the use of the square, cared Oya stone imbedded in the design. It is very similar to the "Four-Square" furniture design Wright created in 1955 for Heritage Henredon. Loch Crane arrived in Arizona in March 1941, and Wright accepted him into the fellowship. After Pearl Harbor, he joined the Army and terminated his Taliesin fellowship in April 1942. After World War II, he stayed in Japan through 1946, spending his free time photographing, drawing and researching Japanese architecture. He returned to San Diego in late 1946 and established his first drafting office while preparing for architectural examinations. Photographed by Loch Crane. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.19.1216
1946
Imperial Hotel 1946 (1915 - S.194). View of the main entrance from across the street. Vegetation overgrown. Stone statue on right side of reflection pool totally overgrown with ivy. Sigh near entrance: "Off Limits." Hand written on verso: "Imperial Hotel 1946." Original 4.5 x 3.1 B&W photograph. 0685.08.1213
1946

Imperial Hotel.  Package of eight photographs one of which is the Imperial Hotel, including envelope.  Verify date through other photographs, Ernie Pyle Theater.  Photographed after the end of the war, while the Americans occupies the Imperial Hotel.  The Imperial Hotel resumed normal business on April 1, 1952.  4.75 x 3.2. 0685.03.0107
1946

Imperial Hotel.  Package of eight hand tinted photographs one of which is the Imperial Hotel, including envelope,  (Published by Fukuda Hobundo, Yokohama, Japan)  Verify date through other photographs,  Ernie Pyle Theater used by Allied Personnel.  Photographed after the end of the war, while the Americans occupies the Imperial Hotel.  The Imperial Hotel resumed normal business on April 1, 1952.  4.25 x 2.9. 0685.04.1007
1946

“Souvenir Views of Tokyo. Selected Photographs, Coloured By Hand.”  Package of eight hand tinted photographs one of which is the Imperial Hotel, including envelope, 1946. Verify date through other photographs, Ernie Pyle Theater used by Allied Personnel.  Photographed after the end of the war, while the Americans occupies the Imperial Hotel. The Imperial Hotel resumed normal business on April 1, 1952. 4.25 x 2.9. 0685.05.1007
1946
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946. Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Ezra Stoller first visited Taliesin West in May, 1946, then again in 1951. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. In this set of photographs, Wright and his apprentices were completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. Image #6, a portrait of Wright was published in the April 1946 Issue of Fortune Magazine, and also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West," Stoller, 1999, Frontispiece, but miss dated as 1951. Image #3 is published on page 8, and also miss dated as 1951. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built...  Continue... 0685.12.0514
1946 (#1)
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #1 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -1
1946 (#2) Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #2 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -2
1946 (#3)
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #3 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. Image #3, is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West," Stoller, 1999, page 8, and miss dated as 1951. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -3
1946 (#5)
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #5 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -5
1946 (#6)
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #6 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. Image #6, a portrait of Wright was published in the April 1946 Issue of Fortune Magazine, (flipped horizontally) dated May 1946, and also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West," Stoller, 1999, Frontispiece, but miss dated as 1951. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -6
1946 (#7)
Gerald M. Loeb Residence (Project 1944), 1946, #7 - Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing work on Loeb Residence model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gerald M. Loeb Residence in 1944 and was working on and completing the Loeb Residence model during Stoller’s 1946 visit. Wright and his apprentices are completing the model in preparation for Stoller’s extensive photo expose published in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the original Jester design and built the home on the grounds of Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona in 1974. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0685.12.0514 -7
Circa 1946
Suntop Homes Circa 1946 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the south, unit 307 is on the left, 156 on the right. In unit 156, the Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is to the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Landscaping next to the house on the right has matured. Photographed by Wayne Andrews. Acquired from and courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0685.09.0314
1946
Taliesin, Spring Green 1946. John de Koven Hill works on the Gerald M. Loeb model. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Ralph Jester Residence in 1938, but construction costs forced Jester to forgo building the home. Wright revived the design in 1944 for Gerald Loeb "Hilltop House." Wright and his apprentices worked on the model in 1946, and it was featured in the June 1946 issue of Architectural Forum. The model was then exhibited in New York at the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequently published in the September 1946 issue of Popular Mechanics. The design for the Loeb Residence was based on the Ralph Jester home. The home was never built, and the design was utilized for the Gerald Loeb Residence. The design was utilized again for the Dr. Paul V. Palmer Residence (project 1947) in Phoenix, Arizona, but again, remained unbuilt. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer and his father resurrected the...  Continue...
0685.20.0218 (1-3)
1947
1947
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, 1947. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. Viewed from the Southeast, looking Northwest. Three students are standing under the Roux Library esplanade, the entrance to the Library is just to the left. Page taped to verso: "Florida News & Photo Service, Inc. Jacksonville 2, Florida. For Immediate Release, Miami Herald. Comparing Notes. Lakeland, Florida - Students compare notes in front of the library at Florida Southern College whose individualistic buildings were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "Photography by Florida News & Photo Service, Jacksonville, Florida, ‘FNPS credit appreciated." "Nov 20, 1948." According to the Florida Library Archive, this photograph was taken on May 18, 1947. Original 8.5 x6.5 B&W photograph. 0720.10.0113
1947
George D Sturges House (1939 - S.272) 1947. Designed and built in 1939. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. A major portion of the home is cantilevered over the hillside. Although extremely visible, the design affords it an ample amount of privacy. It appears windowless from the street, but the east side of the home has six sets of floor to ceiling double doors that open outward. The living room covers about half the floor space. Two bedrooms are adjacent to the living room and share half of the floor to ceiling doors which open to the balcony. According to Guerrero, he photographed this image in 1947, for the House and Garden magazine. Constructed of brick and redwood. John Lautner, apprentice from 1933-38, handled the construction. Wright utilized this design again in the 1952, Frank S. Sander Residence (S.354) in Stamford, Connecticut. Published in "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, p.110. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 0720.11.0714
1947
George D. Sturges House, 1947 (1939 - S.272). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. View of the Living Room from the East. Built-in cabinets are on the left. The main entrance is just to the left of the fireplace. The dining area is on the far right. The beams overhead are not only structurally functional, but also adds to the interior design. The furniture was designed by Wright. In 1947, House and Garden asked Guerrero to photograph the Sturges house in preparation for an issue devoted to Wright’s work. "The plan did not succeed because there was not enough new or completed Wright houses in that postwar period to fill a whole issue. In preparation for it I did, however, photograph the Sturges house in Brentwood Heights..." Picturing Wright, 1994, Guerrero, p.96. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0720.14.0216
1947
George D. Sturges House, 1947 (1939 - S.272). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. View of the Dining area from the South. The Workspace is to the right. The chairs were designed by Wright. In 1947, House and Garden asked Guerrero to photograph the Sturges house in preparation for an issue devoted to Wright’s work. "The plan did not succeed because there was not enough new or completed Wright houses in that postwar period to fill a whole issue. In preparation for it I did, however, photograph the Sturges house in Brentwood Heights..." Picturing Wright, 1994, Guerrero, p.96. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0720.15.0216
1947
George D. Sturges House, 1947 (1939 - S.272). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. View of the Dining area from the South. The Workspace is in the center background. The chairs were designed by Wright. In 1947, House and Garden asked Guerrero to photograph the Sturges house in preparation for an issue devoted to Wright’s work. "The plan did not succeed because there was not enough new or completed Wright houses in that postwar period to fill a whole issue. In preparation for it I did, however, photograph the Sturges house in Brentwood Heights..." Picturing Wright, 1994, Guerrero, p.96. Published on page 111. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0720.16.0216
1947
George D. Sturges House, 1947 (1939 - S.272). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. View of the Dining area from the South. The Workspace is in the center background. A very good view of a Wright designed chair on the right. In 1947, House and Garden asked Guerrero to photograph the Sturges house in preparation for an issue devoted to Wright’s work. "The plan did not succeed because there was not enough new or completed Wright houses in that postwar period to fill a whole issue. In preparation for it I did, however, photograph the Sturges house in Brentwood Heights..." Picturing Wright, 1994, Guerrero, p.96. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0720.17.0216
1947
Picnic at Borglum Rock with apprentices, Summer 1947.  Borglum Rock was a lovely wooded terrace some miles away from Taliesin on a sheer escarpment overlooking a breathtaking ravine. "During one summer of late the 1930's while Gutzon Borglum was working on the Mount Rushmore heads, he visited Taliesin and attended one of the picnics. They later named the spot Borglum Rock". Mr. And Mrs. Wright seated. Apprentices include: Foreground (l-r) Alan Lape Davison, Davy (far left);  Ernst Wallfisch (in hat); Donald Brown (third); Ann Purcell (far right, violinist and part of the piano quartet from the Dallas Symphony that summer, which also included Ernst & Lorry Walfish, piano and viola respectively, and Signa Sandstrom, cello). It was a tradition of the Wrights when they were at Taliesin Spring Green, to have a picnic Sunday afternoons.  Apprentices cooked the food, packed it, the dishes and silverware, and hauled everything to a scenic spot at Taliesin or close by. "Working with Mr. Wright" Besinger (1937- 55) 1997, Pp 179 (Bob Brevick and Mansinh Rana also appear in a photo in Besinger).  Photographer possibly Wes Peters.  One original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph, and one original 5 x 4 B&W photograph. 5 x 4 acquired from the estate of Noverre Musson. Stamped on verso: "905F." I would...  Continue... 0720.03.0107 0720.19.0917
1947
Picnic at Borglum Rock, Summer 1947. Borglum Rock was a lovely wooded terrace some miles away from Taliesin on a sheer escarpment overlooking a breathtaking ravine. "During one summer of late the 1930's while Gutzon Borglum was working on the Mount Rushmore heads, he visited Taliesin and attended one of the picnics. They later named the spot Borglum Rock". Mr. Wright is on the left, gesturing with his hands, talking to the apprentices. Five apprentices are on the right. Acquired from the estate of Taliesin Apprentice Noverre Musson. Stamped on verso: "862F."  0720.20.0917
1947
Picnic at Borglum Rock with apprentices, Summer 1947.  Apprentices include (l-r):  Tore Bjornstadt (second from left with blond hair);  Paolo Solari (third from left, facing camera);  Next might be John Geiger, (but he does not remember the shirt);  Next is probably Ivovanna Wright (John vaguely remembers her in a halter that day);  Mansinh Rana (with bent head.  He was a friend of Indira Gandhi and became the state architect for India);  Ernst Wallfisch (in hat, behind and to the left of Mansinh Rana);  Next is Bob Brevic (looking to the left).  Photographer possibly Wes Peters.  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph.  I would like to thank John Geiger for his help in identifying those in this photo. 0720.04.0107
1947
Wright at 80. 1947. Portrait of Wright by Arnold Newman. Wright is seated at a table with architectural plans, drawing pencil and glasses in his right hand. A drawing of the Huntington Hartford Sports Club Project, Hollywood, CA (1947) is on the wall behind him. 7.5 x 6 print. High res digital image. 0720.07.0509
1948
1948
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings and Water Dome. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B), Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C); Edgar Wall Water Dome (1938, 1948 - S.255A) 1948. Viewed from the Northeast. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. The Water Dome, a 160 foot in diameter circular pool, was first filled in early 1948. The Water Dome is in the foreground. The Benjamin Fine Administration Building is on the water’s edge, the Emile E. Watson Administration Building is in the background on the right. Bernard Elmo Fulghum (1898-1972) was a Lakeland, Florida contractor. Text on face: "Sanborn Photo Service." Clipping taped to verso: "A Blending of Eras. A happy paradox will greet persons attending the 69th annual Founder’s week at Florida Southern College, Lakeland, next week... Three days later, on March 5 (1954), FSC students, alumni and guests will take part in ceremonies dedicating the college’s Frank Lloyd Wright campus. The great maestro of modern architecture is the designer of 18 buildings for Florida Southern to cost $10 million. Half of them are realities now, giving Florida an outstanding sample to Wright’s work. The buildings designed by Wright look newer than tomorrow,. They also look right at home in the landscape...  Continue... 0746.14.0113
1948
Florida Southern College, Seminar Buildings (1940 - S.253.1-3) 1948. Viewed from the Southwest. Originally called the Cora Carter, Isabel Walbridge and Charles W. Hawkins Seminar Buildings. Designed in 1940, these three Seminar buildings were completed in 1941. Sour students are gathered on the steps of the Water Dome. The Water Dome is on the left, the Walbridge Seminar building is on the right. Photographed by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. Four students can be seen in a similar photograph published in "The Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright at Florida Southern College", MacDonald, Galbraith, Rogers, 2007, p. 39. Similar photograph is also published in "Of Fact and Fancy", Thrift, 1979, p. 92. Stamped on verso: "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Department, Lakeland, Florida." "Please credit Atlantic Coast Line Railroad." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0746.15.0113
1948 Set of 10 original blueprints for the Huntington Hartford Cottage Group Center, Scheme II (Project). Huntington Hartford was born into one of the wealthiest families in the United States on April 18, 1911. His grandfather, founded the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (A&P) in 1859. At the age of 12, he inherited $90 million, the equivalent of nearly $1.25 billion in today's dollars. In 1942 Huntington Hartford purchased a 160 acres estate in the Hollywood Hills. In 1947 he commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a resort for the property which developed into five projects. 1. Cottage Group Center, Scheme I (4721); 2. Huntington Hartford House (4724); 3. Sports Club and Play Resort (4731); 4. The Stables (4737); and in January, 1948, 5. Cottage Group Hotel Scheme II (4837). Assisting Wright with the project as the landscape architect was Lloyd Wright, his son who had offices in Hollywood. Wright presented plans for the projects in October 1947. The hotel-resort was for members only, and designed to accommodate 130 guests. Wright placed the cottage units on the western slopes of the canyon and named it the Cottage Group Center, because of the nature of the cottage groupings rather than a single hotel building. Three months later, in January 1948, Wright... Continue... See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948)  
1948
Sheet 1) Huntington Hartford Resort Complex, Original Position (Project). Birds-eye view of the canyon toward the Southwest. Text bottom left: "Original Position." One of the two view points can be seen in the foreground on the left. A bridge can be seen on the top left. The Sports Club and Play Resort can be seen in the background on the right, on the Eastern ridge. The sports complex included swimming, tennis, saunas, dining, dancing, a cinema, balconies, terraces and an apartment for Hartford and his guests. 10 x 5 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -1A&B
1948
Sheet 2) Huntington Hartford Birds-Eye View Scheme II (Project). Viewed from the Southwest. Text: "Alternate. Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Box bottom right appears to be dated "Jan 30, 48." The Sports Club and Play Resort can be seen in the upper left corner on the Western ridge. The sports complex included swimming, tennis, saunas, dining, dancing, a cinema, balconies, terraces and an apartment for Hartford and his guests. The entrance to the Cottage Group Center can be seen on the bottom right. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, café, sun terraces, patios and gardens. 10 x 8 Color and B&W photographs. See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -2A&B
1948
Sheet 3) Huntington Hartford Entrance View Scheme II (Project). Viewed from the South. Text: "View From Entrance Drive. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Frank Lloyd Wright originally presented the plans for the Cottage Group Center Scheme I, in October, 1947. Three months later, in January 1948, Wright totally revised the plans with Scheme II. The major difference was moving the whole complex from the West side of the canyon to the East side. Wright reasoned that morning sun cast on the western slopes would give the guests a more agreeable view of the opposite side of the canyon in the morning. As you enter the property, you pass through a set of Wright designed gates. Wright also moved the Sports Club from the East ridge to the West ridge which can be seen on the top left corner. This design retained the cottage concept as in the first, thus The Cottage Group Center. These cottages were terraced on the canyon hillside and included cantilevered terraces and gardens, bedrooms, sitting rooms and kitchenettes. The main portion of the complex included the registration and lobby, offices, lounge, dining pavilion, café, sun terraces, patios and gardens. Wright transformed the eastern side of the canyon... Continue...  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -3A&B
1948
Sheet 4) Huntington Hartford Plan at 565, Scheme II (Project). Automobile entrance. Text: "Plan at 565. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Level 565 is the automobile entrance. As you enter the property, you cross a bridge over a pool that is on both sides of the road. As you pull forward, you drive under a large terrace that stretches over the road. The entrance leads to the lobby, clerk’s deck, vault and manager’s office. There are areas of plantings, that are open above. From the lobby, elevators and stairs lead to level 575. Driving forward leads to underground garage as well as addition outdoor parking. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. Plantings at this level includes: Palms, magnolia and acacia. The line for Cross Section "A - A" cut through the road and managers office at this level. "C - C" cuts through the entrance and lower lobby. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -4A&B
1948
Sheet 5) Huntington Hartford Plan at 575, Scheme II (Project). Main lounge. Text: "Plan at 575. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." The main lounge is on this level, and Wright labels it Living Room which includes built-in seating and two fireplaces. It opens to an outdoor lounge that covers the drive below. There are built-in planting boxes. Stairs on the east side lead to the open landscape. To the North of the living room are washrooms, storage and the upper garage, with ramps that lead to the lower garage below. From the Living Room, a walkway leads to the south wing which includes three cottages. Cottage Type (1), there are two, includes a sitting room with built-in seating and fireplace, an outdoor terrace, one bedroom, kitchen, a built-in dining table, and a bath. The larger Cottage Type (3) includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. Plantings at this level include: Palms, plum, avocado, walnut, acacia, bay, pine, broadleaf, grapefruit, laurel and bamboo. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -5A&B
1948
Sheet 6) Huntington Hartford Plan at 585, Scheme II (Project). Dining Pavilion. Text: "Plan at 585. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room (main lounge), is the "upper part of the Living Room" and has two fireplaces. Just to the north is the cocktail lounge and bar. Continuing north is a sun gallery and the kitchen. The ceiling is covered with triangular skylights. Next is the hexagonal-shaped dining pavilion. Taking a few steps up to a raised level is an area with a fireplace. The dining room looks out at a water cascade. To the South of the upper living room a passageway leads to terraced garden, then on to a larger Cottage Type (3) which includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs. See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -6A&B
1948
Sheet 7) Huntington Hartford Plan at 595, Scheme II (Project). Patio. Text: "Plan at 595. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room is a patio labeled "upper part of the Living Room." To the North is the glass and copper top over the dining pavilion, as well as employee rooms and a small sitting room. At the Southern end of this plan is another large three bedroom Cottage Type (3). The layout of this three bedroom cottage differs from the two on the lower levels, but still includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. It is reached by stairs from levels 585 and 605. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -7A&B
1948
Sheet 8) Huntington Hartford Plan at 605, Scheme II (Project). Open Patio and bedrooms. Text: "Plan at 605. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." Above the living room is an open patio labeled "upper part of the Living Room," and includes planned plantings on the roof. To the North is a single bedroom and bath, and a long terrace garden over the employee bedrooms below. To the South are eight guest rooms with fireplaces, and bathrooms. At the Southern end of this plan is another large three bedroom Cottage Type (3). The layout of this three bedroom cottage differs from the two on the lower levels, but still includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The plan is laid out utilizing an equilateral triangle grid pattern. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -8A&B
1948
Sheet 9) Huntington Hartford Plan at 615, Scheme II (Project). Upper Level. Text: "Plan at 615. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." The upper level provides additional cottages on the North and South, with Guest Bedrooms in the center. The roof above the lower "Living Room" is planted as a large Terrace Garden with a large irregular hexagon open to the patio below. To the North are three large three-bedroom Cottages Type (2). The layout of these three bedroom cottages differ from those on the lower levels. They includes a sitting room with a fireplace, an outdoor terrace, three bedrooms, each with their own bath, kitchen and a built-in dining table. The larger bedroom includes a fireplace. The five Guest Bedrooms located just next to the Living Room roof, are reached by stairs from the lower level. Each of the bedrooms include a bath and fireplace. This level of bedrooms are stepped back, so that the roof of the lower bedrooms provide a "Terrace Garden over Lower Bedrooms." Two the South are two one-bedroom cottages. Each has a sitting room and fireplace, kitchen, bedroom and bath. One has a built in dining table. Both are surrounded by lush plantings and terraces. The plan is laid out utilizing an... Continue...   See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -9A&B
1948
Sheet 10) Huntington Hartford Cross Sections, Scheme II (Project). Text: "Sections. Cottage Group Center. For Huntington Hartford. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Lloyd Wright Associate." This plan shows five cross sections, "A - A" through "E - E." A - A is on the top left, C - C is on the top right, E - E is in the center, D - D is on the bottom left, and B - B is on the bottom right. On the plans, the cross sections run from North to South: B - B; C - C; A - A in the center; E - E; D - D on the South. Of interest is B - B, the cross section of the of the Dining Room. Wright has added a spire rising from the roof made of glass and copper. There is also evidence of a water feature that cascades from the North to the South. It begins on the North by the Dining Pavilion and runs to the South, ending in the Pool at the Entrance. 8 x 8 Color and B&W photographs.  See Wright Study: Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 0746.21.0215 -10A&B
1948
Herbert & Katherine Jacobs Residence II, Middleton, Wisc (1944 - S.283). During construction in July 1948. Hand written on verso: "Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Jacobs in 1944. Construction began 2 years later. Solar hemicycle house, Middleton, Wisc." Label pasted on verso: "Reminiscent of a medieval fortress, this ‘solar hemicycle house’ in Middleton, Wis., was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Jacobs in 1944. Construction began two years later. The picture is from ‘Building with Frank Lloyd Wright’ by Herbert Jacobs with Katherine Jacobs (Chronick [Chronicle] Books). Photograph by Jack Steinberg. Published on the cover of "Building with Frank Lloyd Wright", Jacobs, 1978. Acquired from the archives of The Baltimore Sun. Original 10.25 x 3.75 B&W photograph. 0746.13.0612
1948
Wright at 81. 1948. Frank Lloyd Wright visits the University of Illinois, October 5, 1948. Wright is seated, studying a set of plans, ten students and faculty are standing around him looking on. Label pasted to verso: "Date: 10-5-48. Subject: Famed Architect. Location: University of Illinois, Navy Pier. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright, noted architect explains to students and part of the school faculty the high spots on architecture. Kenneth Shopen, Head of Art Dept., U. Of Ill." 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0746.16.0115
1948
Taliesin West 1948, (1937 - S.241). Olgivanna and Frank Lloyd Wright in their 1937 AC (Acedes) 16/80 March sports two-seater. Wright saw the car parked on the street, left a note to the owner and offered to purchase it. The owner agreed and was invited to dinner at Taliesin West in April 1948. "Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly," Winter 2010, p.15. The AC Sports Tourer was designed by the Earl of March, England. March had earlier worked at Bentley Motors with W.O. Bentley. Three cars were exported to the United States in 1937. Published in "A Way of Life" Gottlieb, 2001. Photographed by Lois Davidson Gottlieb. 10 x 6 color photograph. 0746.17.0215
1948
Taliesin West 1948, (1937 - S.241). Olgivanna and Frank Lloyd Wright in their 1937 AC (Acedes) 16/80 March sports two-seater. Wright saw the car parked on the street, left a note to the owner and offered to purchase it. The owner agreed and was invited to dinner at Taliesin West in April 1948. "Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly," Winter 2010, p.15. The AC Sports Tourer was designed by the Earl of March, England. March had earlier worked at Bentley Motors with W.O. Bentley. Three cars were exported to the United States in 1937. Published in "A Way of Life" Gottlieb, 2001. Photographed by Lois Davidson Gottlieb. 10 x 6 color photograph. 0746.18.0215
1948-49
Frank Lloyd Wright at Desk, Taliesin West, Scottsdale, 1948-49. 11 x 14 0746.03.0606
1948-49
Frank Lloyd Wright with five apprentices, Taliesin West, Scottsdale, 1948-49. 11 x 14 0746.04.0606
1949
C 1949
Oscar B. Balch Residence Circa 1949 (1911 - S.168). Oscar B. Balch moved to Oak Park in 1890, where he joined the firm of A. W. and S. E. Pebbles. Balch became a partner, and the name was changed to Pebbles and Balch. In 1907, Wright remodel their shop. The partnership did not last long. In 1908, a year after the shop was remodeled, Balch left to form the Balch-Linder Shop with Augustinus Linder, coincidentally just across the street. Shortly after Wright’s return from Europe, Balch called on Wright to design his home. Symmetrical in design, the Library in on the left, Living Room and Terrace in the center, Dining Room on the right. The entrance to the home is behind the Library on the left. Five bedrooms are upstairs. Photographed during the winter by John Gordon Replinger, most likely before he published his book on the Prairie School in 1951. 10 x 8 B&W photographs. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 0798.26.1016
1949
Meyer S. May Residence 1949 (1908 - S.148). Frank Lloyd Wright visits Meyer May house on May 24, 1949. Viewed from the Southwest. Wright points to details of the design with his cane. The Living Room is on the left, the Entrance is on the right. There are three large built in planters on the lower level. One is on the left behind Wright, on the end of the Living Room, the second is in the foreground on the end of the half-wall. The driveway runs alone the far side of the house, yet the front yard had been covered in concrete. On the second floor, a bedroom cantilevers out to the left. Courtesy of the Grand Rapids Public Library. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0798.27.1017
1949
New Theatre Model Circa 1949 (project). The design for this theater was first conceived for the New Theatre for Woodstock, New York (1931 Project). In 1938 Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Pfeiffer Chapel (S.251) at the Florida Southern College and utilized the original Woodstock floor plan. In 1949 the "New Theatre" was revived again in Hartford, Connecticut, but was never executed. The New Theater model appears to have been taken at Taliesin, Spring Green. Part of the photograph of Wright published in Parade, The Sunday Picture Magazine - April 2, 1950. 5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0798.20.0315
1949
Wright at 82, 1950. Frank Lloyd Wright points to a photograph of the New Theatre Model Circa 1949 (project). The design for this theater was first conceived for the New Theatre for Woodstock, New York (1931 Project). In 1938 Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Pfeiffer Chapel (S.251) at the Florida Southern College and utilized the original Woodstock floor plan. In 1949 the "New Theatre" was revived again in Hartford, Connecticut, but was never executed. The photograph of the New Theater model appears to have been taken at Taliesin, Spring Green. Copy photograph from the "Parade, The Sunday Picture Magazine" - April 2, 1950. 5 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 0798.21.0315
1949
S.C. Johnson Research Tower under construction June1949. (1944 - S.238). View of the Tower under construction. Scaffolding is in place. Windows have not been installed, enhancing the view of cantilevered floors. Once completed, square floors are exposed, round floors are somewhat visible through tubular glass. The Research Tower was designed in 1944, construction began in 1947 and the opening ceremony was held on November 17, 1950. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings" Lipman, 1986, page 144. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.19.0215
C 1949
Taliesin, Spring Green (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218) Circa 1949. Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1940 Lincoln Cabriolet parked outside at Taliesin West. Wright ordered it in 1939, and it was the 16th one built that year, completed on December 28, 1939 and shipped on January 5, 1940. As with all of Wright’s other automobiles, it was painted in his personal color, Cherokee Red. Shortly after it was delivered, Wright and Wesley Peters, Wright’s son-in-law had a heated argument. Peters stormed out of the residence, took the first car he say, sped down the road and rolled it, crushing the top. Wright took the opportunity to modify the top. He rounded the steel top, covering only the back seat, eliminated the back window and added two semi-circular side windows. Photographed by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0798.16.0115
1949
V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Exterior Entrance 1949 (1948 - S.310). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1948. At first glance the face of the building appears to be a flat solid brick wall, broken by the semi-circular entrance to the building. The details are subtle. But as you look closer, there is depth to the design. The face of the building protrudes about the thickness of one brick, and is bordered by the vertical perforated light column on the left, a concrete band near the top, and a second near the bottom, capping the row of inset square lights. The right side steps back and is nearly overlooked. As you step into the half glass, half brick semi-circular portal, each successive row of brick and glass reduces the size of the entrance, much the same as Wright’s hallways. The entrance feels restrictive and confined, but as you step through the doorway you feel a released. Published in the Architectural Forum, February, 1950, p.79; "An American Architect" Kaufmann/Wright 1955, Page 20; "The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright" De Long 1998 Page 55, 99. Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. The V. C. Morris Shop, Maiden Lane, San Francisco." Stamped on verso: "Oct 30 1953." Photographed by Maynard Parker. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.31.0218
V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Exterior.  Real Photo postcard.  Photo by Maynard Parker “San Francisco Store Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for V. C. Morris. Silver, Glass, China, Linens, Accessories, Gifts. 140 Maiden Lane Off Union Square.”  Built in 1948.  Published in ”An American Architect” Kaufmann/Wright 1955, Page 20;  “Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City” De Long 1998 Page 55, 99. 3.5 x 5.4. 0746.07.0207
1949
V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Interior 1949 (1948 - S.310). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1948. "As visitors (from the world over) enter through the arch they stand for a moment to gaze at the rhythmic spiral forms of the central ramp, on and up to the patterned fantasy of the hanging screen with its groups of luminesce opalescent bubbles appearing to ascend in clusters through the ceiling. It is for them a breathless moment..." V. C. Morris. Published in the Architectural Forum, February, 1950, p.83;  “Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City” De Long 1998 Page 99;  “The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright” Levine 1996 Page 369;  Built in USA, 1952, p.119. Stamped on Verso: "Built in USA: Postwar Architecture, Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York 19, N.Y. January 21 - March 15, 1953." Also: "Maynard Parker, Modern Photography, Los Angeles 26, Calif." Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, Store for V.C. Morris, San Francisco, Calif., 1949." Clipping pasted to verso: "The beautiful curving staircase of the Morris store in San Francisco, designed by Wright, actually is a ramp without steps. Curves are the main design theme." Stamped on clipping: "Feb 22 1953." Photographed by Maynard Parker. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.32.0218
1949
V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Interior.  Real Photo postcard.  Photo by Maynard Parker “San Francisco Store Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for V. C. Morris. Silver, Glass, China, Linens, Accessories, Gifts. 140 Maiden Lane Off Union Square.”  Built in 1948. Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City” De Long 1998 Page 99;  “The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright” Levine 1996 Page 369. 5.4 x 3.5. 0746.06.0405
1949
V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Interior 1949 (1948 - S.310). "Inside he finds release in the world of undreamed fantasy, all gold and gray and white, dominated by a ramp that spirals up like a Jacob’s ladder - or a wave checked in its break - toward light that filters through a translucent screen of plastic disks and half-bubbles, clustered in brass tubing and suspended beneath skylights. The circular spiral of the ramp is the pervading theme, developed in endless variation: reduced to disk or hole, elongated as cylinder or tube, blown into domes and spheres. Shapes of mass and void become complex, involute, as these basic forms cut through each other in space and light, yet it is all so vigorously organized that the total effect is one of singleness, breadth and peace. The visitor tends to extend his pleasure from the building to the wares displayed in the satiny black walnut cases and the circular wall niches. His transformation into a customer is accomplished with dignity and dispatch." Architectural Forum, February 1950, p.79-85. Published on page p.81. Photographed by Maynard Parker. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0746.19.0215
1949
Wright at 82. March 1949. Frank Lloyd Wright receives A.I.A. Gold Metal. The A.I.A.’s decision is a follow-up of its convention resolution in 1948 that the next Gold Medal should go to Wright. The resolution was prompted by a group of A.I.A.’s younger members. This was the first time the Institute had given its highest honor to a non-member. Wright presented Gold Metal by A.I.A. President Douglas William Orr, at A.I.A.’s annual convention held Houston, March, 1949. Published in L'Architecture D’Aujourd’Hui - No 24, June 1949, page V. Typed on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright (left) and Douglas Orr..." Stamped on verso: "International News Photo, New York. Mar 22, 1949". Original 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 0771.01.0911
1949
Wright at 82. 1949. Frank Lloyd Wright visits White House. May 26, 1949. Caption taped to verso: "Harris & Ewing Photos. Famous Architect Would Move Nation’s Capital to Western Plains. Washington, D.C., May 26. Frank Lloyd Wright, of Phoenix, Ariz., noted architect (shown left) and Robert Richman, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, today called on President today to propose the removal of the U.S. Capital from Washington. Wright said that President Truman agrees with him that the Capital should be moved ‘out on the rolling prairies’ west of the Mississippi. He further stated that ‘there is not a noble building in this city’. 5-26-49." Wright is facing to the left, looking to the right of the camera. Wearing a suit and tie, a cane and overcoat are draped over his left arm. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0798.25.0116
1949
Wright at 82. 1949. Frank Lloyd Wright visits Washington D. C. May 26, 1949. Caption on face: "5/26/49 - Washington, D.C... Frank Lloyd Wright, noted architect, and Robert Richman, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, are shown at the White House today as they called on Mr. Truman to urge that the U.S. Capital be moved west of the Mississippi, and a new city be built ‘out on the rolling prairie’." Wright is facing to the left, looking to the right of the camera. Wearing a suit and tie, a cane and overcoat are draped over his left arm. Stamped on verso: "International News Photo." 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0798.18.0115
1949
Wright at 82. 1949. Frank Lloyd Wright facing the camera, looking off to the right, pork-pie had under his arm. Possibly photographed at Taliesin, Spring Green, from one of the balconies. Caption pasted to verso: "The ‘Genius,’ Frank Lloyd Wright, and Pork-Pie Hat. ‘Farm boy’ gazes out over his beloved native Wisconsin valley." Stamped on verso: "Jun 12 1949." 6.25 x 8.25 B&W photograph. 0798.17.0115
1949
Wright at 82. 1949. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright facing camera by Valentino Sarra. Published in "Saturday Review" September 3, 1949, page 21 (flipped). Also published on the cover of "A Testament", Wright, 1957. (Note: Valentino Sarra also photographed the cover of "Time", January 17, 1938.) Original 8.1 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.09.1109
1949
Frank Lloyd Wright and Pedro E. Guerrero (September 5, 1917 - September 13, 2012), Pleasantville, New York, 1949. Guerrero was with Frank Lloyd Wright at the Usonian Cooperative in Pleasantville, NY, photographing the progress of three homes. He began photographing Wright’s work in 1939, and continues until Wright’s death. Photographed by Keneji Domoto, an architect and former apprentice. Published in "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, p.12 and "Pedro E. Guerrero", Guerrero, 2007, p.6. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.14.0714
1949
Frank Lloyd Wright at 82.  Photographed in New York City, Nov. 2, 1949.  Stamp on back also indicated that this photo was published Jun 3, 1951 and Dec 6, 1953.  Original 5 x 7 silver gelatin photo.  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright - A Visual Encyclopedia" 1999 Thomson, page 10 and 341. 0760.01.0706
1949
Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright (at 51).  Helen Morrison Photographer.  Hedrich-Blessing owned the rights to the negative, but were not the photographers.  Verso: “Reprinted by Hedrich-Blessing.  (Not a Hedrich-Blessing Photograph).  Negative Number 44206".  Published in “About Wright”  Tafel 1993, page 297;  "An Autobiography" Wright 1977, page 320 (see page 619, Photographers' Credits).  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph. 0798.06.0906
 
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