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PHOTOS 1920 - 1929
 
  1920   1921   1922   1923   1924   1925   1926   1927   1928   1929    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1920
C 1920
Robert G. Emmond Residence, LaGrange, Illinois Circa 1920 (not dated) (1892 - S.015). Viewed from the Southeast. Designed and built in 1892 while Frank Lloyd Wright still worked for Louis Sullivan, it is considered one of Wright’s "bootlegged" houses. It is similar in design to the Thomas Gale Residence (1892 - S.016) and the Robert Parker Residence (1892 - S.017). It is also one of Wright’s earliest designs. According to the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, "1935 - the terraces were enlarged and enclosed." According to Storrer, "...the Emmond has been resurfaced with brick on the lower story; the terraces have been enlarged and enclosed (about 1935)." The Prairie Stained Glass Workshop dates this image circa 1917. The side terrace has been enlarged and covered, and a pitched roof added. Courtesy of the Prairie Stained Glass Workshop. 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 0142.18.0619
1920s

Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. (Circa 1920)  2.75 x 4.5. The American flags have been removed and there is a small sign just above the "Hotel Geneva" that says "Dancing".

1920.00.0105
C 1920
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1895/1923 - S.034) Circa 1920. Original 1895 structure. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. 333 Forest Avenue, Oak Park. Viewed from the East on Forest Avenue. Photographed by Henry Fuermann. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 7.75 x 9.25 B&W photograph. 0142.08.0112
1920s
Mrs. John Lloyd Wright.  Photograph of a portrait by Chicago artist Frank A. Werner, Born April 15, 1877 Akron, OH, Died July 6, 1953 Chicago, IL.  This photograph of the portrait was taken by Frederick O. Bemm, Art Institute Chicago Staff Photographer.  Verso: Mrs. John Lloyd Wright.  Not dated.  I have not been able to verify if this truly is “Mrs. Wright” or which of his wives it was.  I would estimate it had to be Jeanette or Hazel.  John Lloyd Wright: Born 12/12/1892, Oak Park, Illinois, died 12/20/1972, Del Mar, San Diego, California.  On returning to Chicago in late 1913, John was placed in charge of his father's office, now located in Orchestra Hall on Michigan Avenue, where he handled business matters when Frank Lloyd Wright was at Taliesin, the home he had built for himself and Mamah Cheney at Spring Green, Wisconsin.  In 1914 John Lloyd Wright married Jeanette Winters, a young woman he had met in Los Angeles, they were divorced in 1920.  The young couple moved into a tiny wooden building at 938 Lincoln Parkway. They dubbed their home "Bird Center," decorating it with jig sawed and painted birds.  In 1920, John moved back to Oak Park, to the apartment which his father had outfitted over the old studio in order to provide some income for John's mother, who still lived in the old family home...  Continue... 0142.03.0307
1920
Wright at 53. Portrait of Wright in 1920. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, William J Meuer Photoart House. Published in "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 48. Dated circa 1920-1930. 4.75 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 0142.06.0509
1921
1921
Apollo Theatre Architectural Illustration by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. Perspective view of the exterior, 31-45 W. Randolph St., Chicago, Illinois. Designed by Holabird & Roche, Architects. Charles L. Morgan (1890-1947) had a reputation as an excellent artist as well as being an architect. Frank Lloyd Wright was working on the National Life Insurance Company project in 1924-1925. Wright sought Morgan’s help in preparing a series of perspective drawings for the project. The Apollo Theatre was constructed in 1921 as a live theater venue, later used as a cinema and renamed the United Artists Theatre. It was demolished in 1989. Text on the face of the theatre: "The McCormick Theatre." Signed lower right: "Chas Morgan." Text bottom right: "Holabird & Roche, Archts." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0144.14.0219
1921
Mrs. Avery Coonley (1907 - S.135 ), October 14, 1921. Mrs. Avery Coonley and Miss Mary O. Wallace. This photograph taken one year after her husband, Avery Coonley past away. Queene Ferry Coonley, born Addie Elizabeth Ferry, (1874-1958), was born in Detroit to garden seed magnate Dexter Ferry and his wife Addie. Queene graduated from Vassar College in 1896, married Avery Coonley in 1901. They had one child, Elizabeth Ferry Coonley, born in 1902. Mrs. Avery (Queene Ferry) Coonley, a believer in the early childhood education, attempted to enroll her daughter in Kindergarten. She was denied entrance because her daughter was not yet five. In 1906, Mrs. Coonley formed the Cottage School in Riverside, Illinois, a private independent school. In 1912, Wright designed the Coonley Playhouse to accommodate the growth of the Cottage School. The school continued to grow, and In 1916, moved to a new facility. In addition to her duties at school she was treasurer of the National Women’s Party; a trustee of Vassar College and vice president of the Progressive Education Association. Original 7.25 x 10 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 0144.03.0112
C 1921
Hotel Geneva Circa 1921 (1911 - S.171). "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. A sign has been added to the exterior wall of the dining room. Brooks Photographs. 5 x 3 B&W photograph. 0144.06.0114
C 1921
Hotel Geneva Circa 1921 (1911 - S.171). "Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wis." One flag is visible on the top left corner of the Lobby. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals. Landscaping is flourishing. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. Light poles visible above base. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the corner. It is a photograph, but possible of postcard #0141.04. It is picking up a slight dot pattern. Photo in leather photo album and includes 16 small photographs of Lake Geneva. Album 4.8 x 2.6, Original B&W photographs 2.75 x 1.75. 0144.07.1115
1921
Frank L. Smith, 1921 (second from left). Frank L. Smith with hat and overcoat looking directly at the camera. Text on verso: "Left to right: Thomas F. Smith of New York, Frank L. Smith of Ill., Addison T. Smith of Idaho, John M. Smith of Mich." Caption pasted to verso: "January 30th 1921. For the first time in many sessions the sixty-seventh Congress number in its membership only one Smith. In the present Congress there are four of whom Addison T. Smith of Idaho is the only one re-elected. Left to right: Thomas F. Smith of New York, Frank L. Smith of Ill., Addison T. Smith of Idaho, John M. Smith of Mich." Stamped on verso: "Feb 2 1921. N. E. A." Original 8.25 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0144.04.0914
1921
Frank L. Smith, 1921 (second from left). Frank L. Smith with hat in hand and wearing overcoat, looking directly at the camera. Caption pasted to verso: "For the first time in many sessions the sixty-seventh Congress number in its membership only one Smith. In the present Congress there are four of whom Addison T. Smith of Idaho is the only one re-elected. Left to right: Thomas F. Smith of New York, Frank L. Smith of Ill., Addison T. Smith of Idaho, John M. Smith of Mich." Stamped on verso: "Feb 2 1921. N. E. A." Original 8.25 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0144.05.0914
C 1921
Frank Lloyd Wright visits the Great Budda in Kamakura, Japan, Circa 1921. Construction began on the Imperial Hotel in 1917 and on July 4, 1922 the first section of Imperial Hotel opened. In August 1923 the hotel was complete. Wright made several trips to Japan, including this one when he visited Kamakura, approximately 60 miles South of Tokyo and the Imperial Hotel. In the foreground, Frank Lloyd Wright (far left), Paul Mueller, (center, Wright's construction engineer) and the architect Antonin Raymond (far right). An unidentified man, possibly Endo Arata is in the background. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright in the Orient (left). Mag May 29 / 32." Published in the Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Spring 1995, p.3; Frank Lloyd Wright And the Art of Japan, Meech, 2001, p.158. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0144.13.0218
1922
C 1922
Jorgine Slettede Boomer, circa 1922 (possible 35 years old). She was born on August 18, 1887 in Norway. In 1903, at the age of 16, she and her older sister immigrated to the United States, finally arriving at their Uncles farm in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. She eventually became a student nurse and then was admitted to Columbia University of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. In 1915, she married Richard Sloane, one of the faculty members at Columbia. Six months later she was widowed. She married Lucius Boomer in September, 1920. She hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home in 1953, the Boomer Residence, and gave it to the Phoenix Art Museum in 1958. She passed away on May 7, 1971. 5 x 6.75 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0147.06.1014
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Adams Street and Art Institute. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of the Art Institute and Adams St. between Wabash Ave. and Michigan Ave. Published on the title page of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Text: "Catalog. The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition. American Institute of Architects, Illinois Chapter. The Chicago Architectural Club. The Illinois Society of Architects. With the Cooperation of the Art Institute of Chicago. The Galleries of the Art Institute of Chicago, March 11th to April 9, 1922." Text hand written in the illustration bottom center and right: "Adams Street and Art Institute. Chas Morgan 1921." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.15.0219
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Sketch of Public Library, Crerar Library Building and Wrigley Building. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of the Public Library, Crerar Library Building and Wrigley Building, Chicago. Published on page 5 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Page Title: "Medal of Honor." Text hand written in the illustration at the bottom: "Sketch of Public Library, Crerar Library Building and Wrigley Building." Signed in the illustration lower right: " Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.21.0219
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. The New Field Museum - Grant Park - Chicago. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of The New Field Museum - Grant Park - Chicago. Published on page 99 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Text hand written in the illustration bottom right: "The New Field Museum - Grant Park - Chicago. Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.17.0219
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Jackson Blvd. & La Salle St. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of Jackson Blvd. & La Salle St., Chicago. Published on page 121 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Text: "Jackson Blvd. & La Salle St., Chicago. Sketch by Chas L. Morgan." Text hand written in the illustration bottom right: "Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.16.0219
1922

Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Fourth Presbyterian Church. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of The Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago. Conte study for an etching (Conté, a drawing medium composed of powdered graphite or charcoal mixed with a wax or clay base). Published on page 167 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Title of the chapter: "Ecclesiastical and Educational." Text hand written in the illustration bottom center: "Fourth Presbyterian Church." Bottom Right: " Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph.
0147.18.0218
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Lincoln Park Way Drive. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of The Lincoln Park Way Drive, Chicago. Published on page 189 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Title of the chapter: "Sculpture and Carving." Text hand written in the illustration at the bottom: "Lincoln Park Way Drive, 1921." Signed in the illustration lower right: " Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.19.0219
1922
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Wrigley Building. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1921. View of The Wrigley Building from The Tribune Building, Chicago. Published on page 220 of The 35th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Page Title: "Index To Advertisements - Continued." Text hand written in the illustration at the bottom: "Wrigley Building from The Tribune Building." Signed in the illustration lower right: " Chas Morgan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0147.20.0219
C 1922
A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1922 (1915 - S.183). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1915 as a Brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Construction on the warehouse began in 1917, but was halted in 1921 when costs surpassed $125,000, on an estimated building cost of $30,000. The entrance and windows are boarded up. Although the building was never completed as Wright had fully designed it, and it is shown boarded up, he still chose to include it in the Wendingen Series, published in 1925. To the far right is German’s original, two-story warehouse. Text on face of building reads "Wholesale Floor and Sugar." Copy photograph of the image published in "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright," Wendingen, 1925. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0147.10.0117
1922
Milwaukee Public Buildings. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1922. "View of the Proposed Grouping of Public Buildings in Milwaukee Prepared for the Board of Public Land Commissioners, 1922." Landscape Architect: Frederick Law Olmsted. Signed lower right: "Chas Morgan 1922." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0147.22.0219
1922
Peter C. Stohr Arcade Building, Chicago 1922 (1909 - S.162). Designed in 1909, it was demolished in 1922, just 13 years after it was built. During the late teens or very early 1920s, an addition was added to the Southeast corner. It enclosed the mitered glass corner, the glass light fixtures and incorporated a new clock. Courtesy of the CTA Collection. 10 x 5 B&W photograph. For more information on the Stohr Arcade see our right study. 0147.08.0115
1923
C 1923
1) Aline Barnsdall Residence A Circa 1923 (1920 - S.210). View of the west elevation from the Northwest. The Living Room (first floor) and Dining Room (second floor) are on the far left. The Entrance and Kitchen (second floor) are in the center, the Bedrooms are to the right. The Master Plan included Hollyhock House, the main residence; The Theater; Residence A, (the Theater Director’s House); and Residence B. Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. These four photographs were published in the April, 1926 issue of Wendingen. This photograph was also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’, Hollyhock House and Olive Hill, Smith, 1992, p.158. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. 0156.52.1115 -1
C 1923
2) Aline Barnsdall Residence A Circa 1923 (1920 - S.210). View of the West elevation from the Southwest. The Living Room (first floor) and Dining Room (second floor) are on the far left. The Entrance and Kitchen (second floor) are on the right. Stairs, bottom right, lead past the wall topped with an urn, and leads to the Entrance Courtyard. The Master Plan included Hollyhock House, the main residence; The Theater; Residence A, (the Theater Director’s House); and Residence B. Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. These four photographs were published in the April, 1926 issue of Wendingen. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0156.52.1115 -2
C 1923
3) Aline Barnsdall Residence A Circa 1923 (1920 - S.210). View of the North (left) and West elevation (right) from the Northwest. The two-story Living Room covers the whole North end of the house. Five doors open outward onto a balcony. Patterned borders frame each two-story set of the windows and doors. The Dining Room, on the west end of the second floor, overlooks the two story Living Room. The Master Plan included Hollyhock House, the main residence; The Theater; Residence A, (the Theater Director’s House); and Residence B. Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. These four photographs were published in the April, 1926 issue of Wendingen. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0156.52.1115 -3
C 1923
4) Aline Barnsdall Residence A Circa 1923 (1920 - S.210). View of the Northwest corner of the two-story Living Room. Five doors open outward onto a balcony on the left. Patterned borders frame each two-story set of the windows and doors. The Dining Room, top right of the second floor, overlooks the two story Living Room. The Master Plan included Hollyhock House, the main residence; The Theater; Residence A, (the Theater Director’s House); and Residence B. Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. These four photographs were published in the April, 1926 issue of Wendingen. Also published in "In The Nature of Materials," 1942, Hitchcock, plate 242. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 7.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0156.52.1115 -4
1923
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority House. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1923. Etching of the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority House, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Published on page 33 of The 36th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Signed lower right: "Chas Morgan." Hand written text: "Kappa Kappa Gamma, University of Illinois." Text: "Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority House, University of Illinois. Etching by Chas. L. Morgan, Chicago. Ralph Milman, Architect, Chicago." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0156.72.0319
1923 
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Chicago Temple. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1923. Etching of the Chicago Temple (First Methodist Episcopal Church), Chicago. Published on page 121 of The 36th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Text: Etching of Etching of the Chicago Temple, By Chas L. Morgan, Chicago. Holabird and Roche, Architects, Chicago. By Courtesy Pratt and Lambert, Inc." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0156.71.0219
1923
Avery Coonley Residence (1907 - S.135 ) circa 1923. View of Pool and Terrace. Living room is in the center on the second level, the Children’s Playroom is on the ground floor. The two planters on either of the three sets of doors leading to the Playroom, originally connected as a single planter, with three sets of windows. Published in "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright" 1925, Page 22. Original 5 x 7 B&W photograph. 0156.25.0613
1923
Avery Coonley Residence Circa 1923 (1907 - S.135 ). View of Pool and Terrace. Living room is in the center on the second level, the Children’s Playroom is on the ground floor. The two planters on either of the three sets of doors leading to the Playroom, originally connected as a single planter, with three sets of windows. Similar view published in "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright" 1925, Page 22. This print was used by The University Prints. Cambridge, Mass., for publishing "A Special Study Set of Fine Art Reproductions" 1961, plate 81. Acquired from the archives of The University Prints. Cambridge, Mass. Original 10 x 3.25 B&W photograph. 0156.62.0118
C 1922-23 Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) Circa 1922-23. Main entrance and reflecting pool. Vintage hand-colored magic lantern slide from the YWCA World Tour of 1922-1923. T. J. Preston and his wife Frances participated in the world tour. She was on the Board of Directors of the YWCA. This slide was acquired from the T. J. Preston collection, President Pro Temp of Wells College and Professor at Princeton University. Frances (age 21) married Grover Cleveland (age 49) on June 2, 1886 and remains one of the youngest First Lady in U.S. history. He died in 1908. She married T. J. Preston on February 10, 1913, at the age of 49. Title reads "Imperial Hotel, Tokyo. Under construction." Image is of two women from the YWCA along with their courier. Original hand-colored magic lantern slide, 4 x 3.15, image measures 3 x 2. 0147.05.0813
1923
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1923. Photograph of the 1923 real photo postcard. View of entrance looking across the pool. This is one of just a few photographs that include the two taller "Sphere Sculptures" that are set higher and further back above the entry way (see Sphere Sculpture note). They are not visible in the 1922 postcard (not installed yet), and are not seen in later postcards or images. They were toppled during the September 1, 1923 earthquake. (See "The Imperial, The First 100 Years", 1990, p.135.) Caption pasted to verso: "Tokyo a Ruin After Flames and Earthquake Visatation (sp). The Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, Japan. One of the most modern buildings in the capital city which has been reported a victim of the flames and earthquake which caused a less of at least 125,000 lives in this and other Japanese cities. 9/3/23." Stamped on verso: "Sep 5 1923." Note: The value of this photograph is that it helps date the existing sets of color and B&W postcards. Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. 0156.45.0414
1923
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1923. Photograph of the 1923 real photo postcard. View of entrance looking across the pool. This is one of just a few photographs that include the two taller "Sphere Sculptures" that are set higher and further back above the entry way (see Sphere Sculpture note). They are not visible in the 1922 postcard (not installed yet), and are not seen in later postcards or images. They were toppled during the September 1, 1923 earthquake. (See "The Imperial, The First 100 Years", 1990, p.135.) Caption pasted to verso: "Tokyo a Ruin After Flames and Earthquake Visatation (sp). The Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, Japan. One of the most modern buildings in the capital city which has been reported a victim of the flames and earthquake which caused a less of at least 125,000 lives in this and other Japanese cities. 9/3/23." Stamped on verso: "Sep 6 1923." Note: The value of this photograph is that it helps date the existing sets of color and B&W postcards. Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. 0156.47.0814
1923
Imperial Hotel Circa 1923 (1915 - S.194). Emperor’s Entrance. The pool is in the foreground, the main entrance is to the right. Very similar photograph, taken at the same time was published in The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1925, p.119. This image published in An Autobiography, 1945, Faber & Faber, pl.17. Caption: "Emperors’ entrance. Brick wall sheets reinforced with steel, formed with concrete and cut lava members. Blue copper roof. Perforated cornices." Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 1913-19 Emperor’s Entrance, Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, Japan." Stamped on verso: "Oct 30 1953." Hand Written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright - Buildings Designed By." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0156.65.0218
1923
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1923. Photograph of the 1923 real photo postcard. View of the Main Lobby, from the North. The opening in the center leads into the Dining Room. Looking South. Frank Lloyd Wright designed most of the furniture and carpets for the Imperial Hotel. The chair and table in the foreground on the far left was designed by Wright, as was the armchair on the far right. The two matching armchairs in the center, match details of other Wright designed furniture for the Imperial hotel. Woven cane was added between some of the legs of the table, and the chair on the left. Cane was also added to the back of the chair, and possibly the seat, then fabric to the front side of the chair back. The pair of armchairs in the center are similar to armchairs seen in the bedrooms, but these do not appear to be upholstered with the "Imperial Triangle" fabric. The arm rests and legs are consistent with this style of bedroom furniture and match "stair step" design of floor lamps in the Imperial Hotel. The armchair on the far right is designed by Wright, and appears to be upholstered in leather. Additional "Peacock" side chairs are visible in the balcony above the dining room. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. 0156.49.0115
1923
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1923. Photograph of the 1923 real photo postcard. View of bedroom. Besides the single bed with the prairie styled headboard, there are three chair variations, a hassock and two tables. There is a writing desk and chair on the left. The edge of the desk and top have decoratively carved edges. Six drawers per side. The Chair, also seen on the far right, is similar in design to one of the chairs designed for Midway Gardens. The seat is square, the back is shaped as a hexagon. Two pads are held in place by ties that are fed through the frame to the back side and match the "Imperial Triangle" fabric used throughout the room. The two armchairs and hassock are upholstered with matching fabric, as is the bedspread and pillow cover. The long desk/table is intricate and complex. The light stand is attached to one side of the table, has a large bulb that lights the desk, and an upper light that illuminated the ceiling. The carpet was designed by Wright. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. 0156.50.0115
1923
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1923. View of possibly a bedroom suite sitting room. There are three side tables, two variations of arm chairs, one floor lamp and the carpet designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The armchairs are upholstered with "Imperial Triangle" fabric. The carpet matches the pattern in other bedrooms. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0156.51.0115
1923
Wright at 56. Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait.  November 27, 1923.  Photographer Arnold Genthe, AMICO Public Collection, Washington DC.  High-res 3 x 4 digital image. 0156.02.0706
1923 
Wright at 56. Circa 1923.Very similar to the portrait by Arnold Genthe. Wright is seated on the ground, facing left, his legs are crossed. His arms are resting on his knees. There is a slight smile on his face. 1923 was the period in Wright’s life he designed the four textile block homes in California. Original 4x 5 B&W photograph. Gift from Randolph C. Henning. 0156.43.0913
1923
Wright at 56. November 1923. Portrait of Wright, looking at the camera, but turned to the right. Published in "The Life Work of the American Architect:, Frank Lloyd Wright". The "Foto" (German) is dated November 1923. Also published in "An Autobiography, Frank Lloyd Wright" Wright, 1977, and indicates that this photograph was taken about the time he met Olgivanna (page 192e). 6.5 x 9.25 print, High res digital image. 0156.04.0609
1923
Wright at 56. November 1923. Heavily airbrushed portrait of Wright, looking at the camera, but turned to the right. See original above (0156.04). Dated November 1923. Partial printed news clipping pasted to verso shows this photograph to the left of a photograph of Miriam Noel Wright. Partial caption on verso reads "Miriam... Yesterday Miriam... suit for $100,000... beautiful Russian..." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 3 x 5.5 B&W Print. 0156.07.0910
1924
1924
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Chicago Union Station. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1924. Etching of the New Chicago Union Station. Published on page 93 of The 37th Annual Chicago Architectural Exhibition Catalog. Text: "Photographic Enlargement of Etching, New Chicago Union Station. By Charles L. Morgan, Chicago. Graham, Anderson, Probst, White, Architects, Chicago. Courtesy Pratt and Lambert, Inc." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0164.02.0219
1924
Imperial Hotel, view of the entrance from across the reflecting pool, circa 1924-25 (1915 - S.194). The two taller "Sphere Sculptures" that were set atop the second level above the entry way are missing (see Sphere Sculpture note). They were toppled during the September 1, 1923 earthquake. (See "The Imperial, The First 100 Years", 1990, p.135.) The geometric sculptures that adorn either side of the reflecting pool have been installed (left sculpture is out of view). Landscaping is consistent with images from this time period. A few lilies are growing in the pond. Hand tinted B&W photograph. 10 x 7 color photograph. 0157.13.1014
1924
John Storer Residence, Circa 1924 (1923 - S.215). Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, the home was completed in 1924. Most likely photographs shortly after the completion of construction. Wright's son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home as well as designing the landscape. The entrance of the home is reached by the stairs in the foreground. Possibly photographed by Kameki Tsuchiura. Published in Wright in Hollywood, Sweeney, p.63. 7 x 5 B&W Photograph. 0164.01.1016
1924
Louis H Sullivan. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1924. Portrait sketch of Louis H Sullivan. Charles L. Morgan (1890-1947) had a reputation as an excellent artist as well as being an architect. Frank Lloyd Wright was working on the National Life Insurance Company project in 1924-1925 and sought Morgan’s help in preparing a series of perspective drawings for the project. Signed lower right: "CM.". Text: "Louis H Sullivan. 1924." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0164.03.0319
  Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Set of eight images found to date, photographed at the same time at Taliesin. Some publications indicate that these are possible self-portraits. The Library of Congress notes that one of the images was a  photograph by Rudd.  
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Wright in his living room at Taliesin. Drafting pencil in his right hand. Possibly a self-portrait, photographed at the same time as 157.03.  Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. Dated circa 1924. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography" Secrest, 1992, page 261; "Frank Lloyd Wright, An Interpretive Biography", Twombly, 1973, page 149; "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 2. "Taliesin 1911-1914", Menocal, 1992, page ii. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 6 x 5.25 print, High res digital image. 0157.02.0509
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Wright in his living room at Taliesin. Seated at a table, a floral Japanese screen in the background. Pencil in his right hand, possibly a cigarette in his left. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 4 x 4.6 print, High res digital image. 0157.08.0509
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright working at his drafting table at Taliesin. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 5 x 4.9 Print, High res digital image. 0157.04.0609
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Close-up portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright working at his drafting table at Taliesin. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 3.5 x 4.1 Print, High res digital image. 0157.05.0609
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright facing slightly to the right, photographed at Taliesin. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. Courtesy Library of Congress. Library of Congress notes that photograph by Rudd. 6 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0157.06.0609
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright seated on a drafting table, holding a cane at Taliesin in front of a model of the Press Building Project (1912, San Francisco). Possibly a self-portrait, photographed at the same time as 157.02. Wright is holding the same cane as in 171.02. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. Dated 1924. Published in "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 86. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 4.2 x 6 print, High res digital image. 0157.03.0509
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright seated next to a drafting table, holding a cane at Taliesin in front of a model of the Press Building Project (1912, San Francisco). Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. 4 x 3 print, High res digital image. 0157.07.0609
1924
Wright at 57. Circa 1924. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright in the Living Room leaning against the fireplace at Taliesin. Cane is leaning against the fireplace on the right side, partly hidden behind the Japanese sculpture. This was photographed before the fire that struck Taliesin the second time in April 1925. 6.5 x 4.5 print. Part of a set of eight images to date photographed at the same time. High res digital image. 0157.09.0110
1924
Olga Milanoff, Circa 1924. Olga's first marriage was to a Russian architect, Vladimar Hinzenberg, in 1917. They divorced in 1925. Wright and Olga met at the Petrograd Ballet in Chicago in 1924 while she was separated from her husband. They were married on August 25, 1928 at midnight in Rancho Santa Fe near La Jolla. They honeymooned in Phoenix, Arizona at the Arizona Biltmore. Originally retouched by Walter A. Jones (embossed bottom right). Restored by Douglas M. Steiner. Original B&W photograph. 8 x 10. 0157.10.0210
1924
Olga (Olgivanna) Ivanovna Milanoff, Circa 1924. Turned to the her right, facing forward looking to her left. Partial news clipping pasted to the verso: "Accused Home Wrecker. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, noted American architect has fled (to Can)ada to the arms of his "most wonderful woman" (Olga) Milanoff, Russian danseuse (female ballerina) and the architect’s former (lover), and their infant son, according to Miriam Noel (the) architect’s wife. Mrs. Wright, who is a sculptress, (ends in h, m or n) this statement in answer to the charges of her hus-(band’s att)orney that his client was forced to leave the United (States to) recoup his fortune after she had financially ruined (- - -) bitter pen. According to Mrs. Wright, Mme. Milanoff’s (baby was) born in Chicago after she had spent three years in (- - his) household and her hasty departure was caused (by the) immigration authorities being on her trail. Mrs. Wright (said s)he is certain her husband has joined the young Russian (- - n) a new love nest in Canada." Hand written on verso: "Olga Milanoff, 1/16 or 7/16". Note: two corrections from account. 1) There is no record of Wright or Olgivanna fleeing to Canada, but in the beginning of September 1926, to throw Miriam off track in her heated pursuit to find Wright, he runs ad in Newspaper that he is going abroad. Attorneys publicly suggestion they go to Canada...  Continue... 0157.11.1110
1924
Olga Milanoff and daughter Svetlana Hinzenberg, 1924. Olga's first marriage in 1917 was to a Russian architect, Vladimar Hinzenberg. Svetlana was born on September 27, 1917. In January 1924, Olgivanna arrived in New York from Paris where she was reunited with her six and a half year old daughter. She was a dancer with Gurdjieff’s Russian Ballet. In March, 1924 she performed at Carnegie Hall. From there she preformed with the Ballet in Chicago. After returning to New York, funds were short, and when Gurdjieff headed back to Paris, Olgivanna was left behind. She found passage and returned to Paris with her daughter. When Gurdjieff closed his Ballet group, she sailed back to New York in October 1924 with her seven year old daughter. Svetlana and her son Daniel were killed in an automobile accident on September 30, 1946. (Note: Svetlana at twelve published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Monona Terrace" page 78.) 7 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 0198.02.0310
1925
C 1925-35
Francis Apartments (Circa 1925-35). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Photographed from the Northeast, attributed to Gilman Lane. Large sign in first floor corner window, "Hydrox Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars." 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0171.09.0711
C 1925-35
Francis Apartments (Circa 1925-35). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Photograph of the entrance courtyard, attributed to Gilman Lane. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0171.10.0711
C 1925
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence Circa 1925. (1923 - S.216). Viewed from the Northwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The garage is on the left, the entrance is behind the garage, the Living Room is to the right. A planter box sits to the left of the garage, a pool is to the right. Photographed by Edward Van Altena. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0171.26.0216
C 1925
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence Circa 1925. (1923 - S.216). Viewed from the South, of the Southwest corner. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. A built-in planter is in the foreground. The door to the right leads to the Bedroom, the Balcony is on the right. Photographed by Edward Van Altena. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0171.27.0216
C 1925
Hotel Geneva Circa 1925 (1911 - S.171). Photographed from a boat on the lake just to the left of the Wrigley Drive Bridge. Boat rental shack can be seen in the foreground. The Hotel Geneva can be seen in the background. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows. "Entrance Hotel Geneva" sign and five globe street light visible in the foreground on the left. Photographed by P. L. Huckins, Chicago. Image used in a postcard. Original 8 x 5 B&W photograph. 0171.12.0912
C 1925
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1895/1923 - S.034) Circa 1925. View after reconstruction. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. 333 Forest Avenue, Oak Park. Viewed from the Southeast on Forest Avenue. Possibly photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0171.11.0112
1925 
Wright Files for Dissolution of Marriage. Photograph of court document dated July 10, 1925. "State of Wisconsin, Sauk County. In Circuit Court. Frank Lloyd Wright, Plaintiff, -vs- Miriam Wright, Defendant. (Stamped on face: Clerk of Circuit Court. Filed Jul 10 1925. Sauk County.) –Complaint– Now comes Frank Lloyd Wright, by his attorney, James H. Hill... That the parties hereto were married in Wisconsin on the 12th day of November, 1923... That the plaintiff during all said time has faithfully kept and performed his marriage contract and at all times supported the defendant in a manner befitting his station in life. That notwithstanding this and without any cause or provocation on the part of this plaintiff, the defendant deserted this plaintiff and for more than one year since said deserted has continuously remained away. Wherefore, plaintiff prays judgment that the bonds of matrimony now subsisting between the parties be wholly dissolved and set aside and that he be freed therefore, and for such other and further relief as to the court seems just and equitable. James H. Hill (signature), Plaintiff’s attorney." Stamped on verso: "Dec 1 1925". Hand written on verso "26239". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0171.15.0713
1925 
Wright Responds to Press. Circa 1925. Photograph of hand written note. "I feel that this is no matter for the public. I have no wish to add more than this word to the mass of idle speculation already fabricated and published to gratify idle curiosity. Further than this I have absolutely no word to say. Frank Lloyd Wright." Hand written on verso "26239". (Not dated, but same number on verso as photograph dated Dec 1 1925.) Original 10 x 6 B&W photograph. 0171.16.0713
1925
Miriam Noel Wright. Photographed on November 28, 1925. International Newsreel photograph. Caption on verso reads "(Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright). 28 Nov 1925 - With the filing of a suit for divorce by Mrs. Miriam Noel Wright, famous sculptress against Frank Wright, world renowned architect, comes to the light the first knowledge of their legal marriage four years ago. Eleven years ago, Mrs. Noel threw conventions to the wind by taking up her abode with the eccentric architect in his $80,000 "love bungalow" at Spring Green, Wis., taking the place of Wright's murdered affinity, Mamah Borthwick Cheney, whose life was snuffed out by a demented colored caretaker. Mrs. Wright scoffs at the great herald chivalry of her architect husband, and charges cruelty against him, specially mentioning one occasion when he broke two of her ribs. She also speaks of a Mrs. Olga Milanoff, young dark haired Russian, who claims entered the famous "love nest" as a servant, but remained as a sweetheart. Wright is recognized as one of the foremost architects in the world." 3.5 x 4.75 B&W photograph. 0171.03.0609
Circa 1925
Miriam Noel Wright, Circa 1925 (Approximately 56 years old). On November 27, Miriam filed for a divorce, alleging desertion and cruelty. 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 0171.05.0310
Circa 1925
Miriam Noel Wright, Circa 1925 (Approximately 56 years old). Miriam sitting on a trunk with the initials F.LL.W. Facing slightly to the right. Caption on Verso: "Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright, whose husband deserted her for the love of Olga Milanoff, is shown when she was evicted from her hotel for failure to pay bill."  Published in "Uncensored" October 1955, page 42. Maude Miriam Noel: May 9, 1869 - January 3, 1930. Immediately after the tragic death of Mamah Cheney on August 15, 1914, Miriam Noel sent condolences to Wright. Within weeks Wright became involved with Miriam and she moved into Taliesin. Although Wright had not yet received a divorce from Kitty, they live together and travel to Tokyo, Japan in 1916. In 1922, Wright's first wife, Kitty, granted him a divorce. He was required to wait one year and on November 19, 1923, Miriam and Frank were married in Spring Green, Wisconsin. Their relationship was quite tumultuous. Wright explains in his Autobiography that he married her to rescue their relationship. "Marriage resulted in ruin for both. Instead of improving with marriage, as I had hoped, our relationship became worse." (An Autobiography, p 260). They quarreled a great deal, she was addicted to morphine, and in less than a year they were separated. In 1924, after the separation, but while still married, Wright...  Continue... 0171.04.1009
1925
Taliesin, Spring Green, December 1, 1925. Label pasted to verso: "Turmoil Now Reigns in ‘Love Nest’ of Frank Lloyd Wright. A view of the costly ‘love nest’ of Frank Lloyd Wright, famous architect, at Spring Green, Wisc., the scene of his many free love settings in alleged defiance to the code laid down by society, and wherein discord now reigns as a result of the proceedings of Mrs. Mariam (Miriam) Noel Wright, the sculptress, who he married four years ago after they had lived together seven years without the legal knot being tied. Mrs. Wright has withdrawn her divorce bill and instead seeks separate maintenance, thereby denying him his liberty to wed Olga Milanoff, his Russian servant, whom she declares is now the target for his affections. Mrs. Wright is also making every effort to have the middle-aged Russian deported, in which attempt she is being balked by her architect-husband. Wright came into great prominence as the builder of the Imperial Hotel in Tokio (sp) the only building to withstand the earthquake unimpaired. 12-1-25." View to the east from the Driveway. The Living Room is to the far left out of the picture. The bedrooms are through the passage in the center and to the left and right. The sitting room is on the other side of the large fireplace. The Porte Cochere is in the foreground on the right. Note the new construction...  Continue... 0171.14.0413
C 1925
Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002) C1925. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. There is a "Shield" on upper balcony. Very similar to the Grant Manson image that was taken during the winter after the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees). The "Shield" is missing in the Manson image. Dated Circa 1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49. Published in "Building a Legacy", Preservation Trust, 2001, page 49. 8 x 6 Print, high res image. 0171.06.0410
C1925
Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002) C1925. Photographed by Grant Manson. Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. Very similar to the Gilman Lane image that was taken during the spring or fall before the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees, only four of the five thin small trees remain just in front of the porch). The "Shield" is missing in this image. The Gilman Lane image is dated Circa1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49. 8 x 6 Print, high res image. 0171.07.0410
1926
1926
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House Circa 1926 (1917 - S.208). View of the exterior of the Living Room from the South. A terrace is on the far right. A stylized hollyhock is designed into the roof of the Living Room. Designed in 1917 by Frank Lloyd Wright as an appropriate style for Southern California, the house was built in 1920-1921. This photograph was published in publication Wendingen, Volume VII, No. 8 1926, page 135. The sixth issue of seven part series. Then bound into "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright" which combined all seven issue. January 1928 issue of Architectural Record, and "Frank Lloyd Wright." Hitchcock, 1928. Mounted in a small folder with label hand written: "12467 Applied Str. Holly..." Purchased from Toulouse, France. Original 5 x 4 B&W photograph. 0172.43.0318
1926
Nakoma and Nakomis models for the Memorial Gateway project, 1924. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. These models created by Wright were photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. But the project was rejected due to the cost. Wright refused to scale down the plans, and the Gateway project was abandoned. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society, WHS-101791. 5.75 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0172.17.0613
1926
Nakoma model for the Memorial Gateway project, 1924. Enlargement of Nakoma model from original 1926 image. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. These models created by Wright were photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. But the project was rejected due to the cost. Wright refused to scale down the plans, and the Gateway project was abandoned. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society, WHS-101791. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0172.18.0314
1926
Nakomis model for the Memorial Gateway project, 1924. Enlargement of Nakomis model from original 1926 image. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. These models created by Wright were photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. But the project was rejected due to the cost. Wright refused to scale down the plans, and the Gateway project was abandoned. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society, WHS-101791. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0172.19.0314
1926
Oak Park Play House No 0, Perspective, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." FLW A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained unrealized for 30 years, Wright resurrected...  Continue... 0172.33.0317
1926
Oak Park Play House No 1, Elevation, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained unrealized for 30 years, Wright...  Continue... 0172.34.0317
1926
Oak Park Play House No 3, Perspective, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained unrealized for 30 years, Wright...  Continue... 0172.35.0317
1926
Oak Park Play House No 3, Elevation and Floor Plan, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained unrealized...  Continue... 0172.36.0317
1926
Oak Park Play House No 4, Elevation (left) and No O, Elevation, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained...  Continue... 0172.37.0317
1926
Oak Park Play House Floor Plan, 1926 - Project 2601. In 1926 Frank Lloyd Wright designed six Children's play houses for the Oak Park Playground association. All six, variations on the same design. The basic design was square, with a fireplace in the center, and two terraces off of either side. He named the series "Kindersymphonies" (1926 - project 2601). Fanciful in design, Wright added balloons, light poles, pendants with colored globes, perforated light globes, circular lights, large circular urns. The windows appear to be elaborate stained glass geometric designs dominated by circles. Although square in design, circles decorate the design. Like the Coonley Playhouse and Midway Gardens, circles became decorative elements in both designs. In 1959 during Wright's last interview he said, "A creative teacher is one of the finest examples of humanity." Then he said that a child should begin to learn what is called art at the earliest possible age. "Put blocks in the child's hands," he said. "Let the child hold a sphere, a ball—and get a sense of the universe, a sense of God." Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, Farr, 1961, p.278. Of the blocks, he was referring to Froebel blocks, but of the spheres, could he be reminiscing about the Oak Park Play House buildings? Although they remained unrealized for 30 years, Wright resurrected...  Continue... 0172.38.0317
1926
Robie House (1906 S.127) 1926. Stamped on Verso: "June 11 1926". Typed on verso: "The Chicago Theological Seminary Purchases Beautiful Home of Marshall D. Wilber, 5757 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, as administrative offices. Erected by H B Bernard, Chicago. Lot 60 x 180. One of the most remarkable designs of Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright. Long beams of steel built in like a bridge make possible the over-hanging roofs, ledges and unusual flower beds. There are more than 2000 pieces of glass in its windows. Purchased June 1, 1926 by The Chicago Theological Seminary as an Administration Building to be used during the completion of its building program including an assembly hall, library and a Gothic tower 160 feet in height and of exquisite beauty at a cost of approximately $500,000." 10.5 x 8 Print, High Res image. (Note: Mail box on left, street lamp on far right.) 0172.07.0410
1926
Frank L. Smith, 1926 (1905 - S.111). Smith (left) and Wright before investigation committee. Caption pasted to verso: "Illinois Inquiry Shows $534,388 Primary Outlay. The Senate investigation of the Illinois primary election of April 13 got underway at Chicago in order to probe the charges that an enormous slush fund was used by both men in their efforts to win the senatorial nomination of the Republican party. The photo shows Col. Frank L. Smith, the winner of the primary contest (left) and Edward H. Wright, Negro politician who were summoned as witnesses before the investigation committee." Stamped on verso: "Acme Newspictures, New York City." "Aug 4 1926. N. E. A." Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0172.22.1114
1926
Frank L. Smith, 1926 (1905 - S.111). Smith is seated, looking to the let, straw hat in his lap. In August, 1926, the Senate investigated the Illinois primary election of April 13, to probe the charges that an enormous slush fund was used by Smith and Wright in their efforts to win the senatorial nomination of the Republican party. Col. Frank L. Smith won the primary contest. Stamped on verso: "Aug 14 1926. N. E. A." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0172.23.1114
Circa 1926
Frank L. Smith Portrait. Circa 1926. Looking straight into the camera, lighting from the right, wearing a suit and stripped tie. Published by the Bain News Service. Reproduced from glass negative. Possibly photographed after his senatorial election in 1926. 7.75 x 9.5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0172.15.0213
1926
Wright at 58.  Portrait of Wright holding his baby daughter Iovanna at Taliesin. Iovanna Lazovich Lloyd Wright was born on December 2, 1925.  No other copy of this print is known to exist.  This photograph was loaned to Ken Burns for his 2004 Wright documentary.  Inscribed on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright and baby daughter Iovanna at Taliesin".  Kelmscott Gallery, Chicago, acquired this photograph from Wright's granddaughter Nora Natof in 1980. Wright is holding the same cane as in 157.03.  Original vintage 2.5 x 4.25 silver gelatin photograph. 0171.02.1206
1926
Wright at 59. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, Photographed by DeLonge Studio on March 1, 1926. Wright is facing to the right of the camera, but looking to the left. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography", Secrest, 1992, page 157, but dated 1905. (Note: Cropped out of the bottom right hand corner of the photograph is the hat he is holding in photograph #0249.17 below.) Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 5 x 6 Print. High-res digital image. 0249.09.0706
1926
Wright at 59. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, Photographed by DeLonge Studio on March 1, 1926. Wright is facing to the right of the camera, but looking to the left. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography", Secrest, 1992, page 157, but dated 1905. (Note: Cropped out of the bottom right hand corner of the photograph is the hat he is holding in photograph #0249.17 below.) Printed on sleeve: "The American History Slide Collection. 1977 Instructional Resources Corporation." Original 35mm Slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image. 0172.45.1218
1926
Wright at 59. Portrait of Wright by DeLonge Studio, March 1, 1926. Photographed at the same time as 249.09. He is wearing a long black coat, with a second draped over his left arm which is holding a hat. A pair of glassed are in his right hand. Published in "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 32. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 4.75 x 6 Print. High res digital image. 0249.17.0509
1926
Frank Lloyd Wright at 59. Portrait of Wright in 1926 by DeLonge Studio. Photographed at the same time as 249.09 and 249.17. He is wearing a long black coat, with a second draped over his left arm. The hat that was in the other portraits is now on his head. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Noted architect & many of many romances. 2/26/26." Also: "This photograph is copy righted therefore credit lines must appear in every publication. Copyrighted photograph by O. F. DeLonge Studio, Madison Wis." (Note: decorations added by hand.) Original 7.5 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0172.41.0219
1926
Miriam Noel Wright, May 20, 1926 (Approximately 56 years old). Miriam Noel Wright walking on sidewalk on her way to the court room in Madison Wisconsin, holding flowers, looking down at the sidewalk. Caption on verso: "Efforts to settle outside of court the differences between Frank Lloyd Wright, internationally known high art architect and adventurer in love, and is wife, Maude Miriam Noel Wright, failed today and their divorce suit before Judge A. C. Hoppman was started shortly after noon at Madison, Wisconsin. Wright, in his bill, charges desertion and in a counter-charge, Mrs. Wright charges him with an affair with Mme. Olda Milanoff, pretty Montonigren dancer, in his "love citadel" at Green Spring, Wisc. The couple, through their attorneys were prepared to settle, but when the differences in opinion as to the amount of alimony Wright should pay was brought up, a hitch developed and the fight is just as spirited as ever. 5-20-26. ‘P and A Photo’ Chicago Bureau. ...on her way to..." 2.5 x 5.6 B&W photograph. 0172.09.1210
1926
Miriam Noel Wright, (Circa) May 20, 1926 (Approximately 56 years old). Miriam Noel Wright smiling, looking to the left of the camera. This appears to be taken May 20, 1926, the day she appeared in Madison court room in an efforts to settle divorce, effort failed (See 172.09). She is wearing the same hat, mink, dress, necklace and purse. "The couple, through their attorneys were prepared to settle, but when the differences in opinion as to the amount of alimony Wright should pay was brought up, a hitch developed and the fight is just as spirited as ever." Hand written on verso: "Miriam Noel Wright, divorced at Madison, Wis." Stamped on verso: "Reference Dept. May 24 1926, N. E. A." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0172.26.0116
1926
Portrait of Miriam Noel Wright, second wife of Frank Lloyd Wright. Circa 1926. Standing behind a car. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography" Secrest, 1992, page 279; "Frank Lloyd Wright, An Interpretive Biography", Twombly, 1973, page 144. Courtesy Wisconsin Historical Society. 3.5 x 6 B&W photograph. 0156.03.0509
1926
Miriam Noel Wright sitting in a chair, tuned to the right, facing forward. (Circa June 1926) Caption reads "Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright at the Southmoor hotel after her unsuccessful invasion of husband’s estate at Spring Green, Wis. She says she is confident her husband and Olga Milanoff are living there, but are dodging officers." (See time line.) 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0172.04.0110
1926
Miriam Noel Wright leaning against stack of pillows, handkerchief in her right hand, looking down. Same dress, head bands and handkerchief as image #172.04. Possibly June 1926 at the Southmoor Hotel after her unsuccessful invasion of husband’s estate at Spring Green, Wis. Stamped on verso: "From Chicago Bureau, 7 South Dearborn St.. Photo By Pacific & Atlantic Photos, Inc. New York City." 4 x 6 B&W photograph. 0172.10.1210
C 1926
Miriam Noel Wright, Circa 1926 (Approximately 56 years old). Miriam Noel Wright posing for camera, facing left, looking to the right. She is wearing a coat with a fur collar and a hat. Plain background, dark on left, lightens to the right. Hand written on verso: "Tony Berardi, Chicago-American." Tony Berardi was a photographer in Chicago. By 1923, at the age of 17, he became one of the youngest newspaper photographers in the country. He took the first portrait Al Capone agreed to pose for. He began his carrier as a photographer for the Chicago American newspaper. He continued as it changed to the Chicago Today and finally the Chicago Tribune. This portrait was taken during the time she refused to grant Wright a divorce, harassing and following he and Olgivanna. Hand written on verso: "Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright. (Miriam Noel Wright)." Stamped on verso: "May 25, 1961" (date of print). Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 0172.13.0512
C 1926
Miriam Noel Wright, Circa 1926 (Approximately 56 years old). Miriam Noel Wright posing for camera, facing forward, looking to the right. She is wearing a coat with a fur collar. Plain background, dark on left, lightens to the right. Hand written on verso: "Tony Berardi, Chicago-American." Tony Berardi was a photographer in Chicago. By 1923, at the age of 17, he became one of the youngest newspaper photographers in the country. He took the first portrait Al Capone agreed to pose for. He began his carrier as a photographer for the Chicago American newspaper. He continued as it changed to the Chicago Today and finally the Chicago Tribune. This portrait was taken during the time she refused to grant Wright a divorce, harassing and following he and Olgivanna. Hand written on verso: "Mrs. Frank Lloyd . (Miriam Noel Wright)." Stamped on verso: "Jul 15, 1961" (date of print). Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 0172.14.0719
1926
Olgivanna Lloyd Wright 1924, but used with an article dated February 22, 1926. Portrait of Olgivanna, facing to the right, looking to the left of the camera. Clipping pasted to verso: "Russian Danseuse said to be in Hiding With Famous Architect. Frank Lloyd Wright, noted American architect, has fled to Canada to the arms of his ‘most wonderful woman,’ Olga Milanoff, Russian danseuse and the architect’s former housekeeper, and their infant son (sic), according to Miriam Noel Wright. The architect’s wife. Mrs. Wright, who is a sculptress, gave forth this statement in answer to the charges of her husband’s attorney that his client was forced to leave the United States to recoup his fortune after she has financially ruined him with her bitter pen. According to Mrs. Wright, Mme. Milanoff;s son was born in Chicago after she had spent three years in Wright’s household, and that her hasty departure was caused by the immigrations authorities being on her trail. Mrs. Wright asserts she is certain her husband has joined the young Russian woman in a new love nest in Canada. (BFM) 2-22-26." 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0172.24.0115
1926
Olgivanna and daughter Iovanna, 1926. Olga (Olgivanna) Ivanovna Milanoff met Frank Lloyd Wright at the Petrograd Ballet in Chicago in 1924 while she was separated from her husband. Iovanna Lazovich Lloyd Wright was born on December 2, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. During the Spring and summer they were living at Taliesin in Spring Green Wisconsin. In September, after the bank foreclosed on Taliesn, they move to Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, where on the evening of October 20, 1926, Wright is arrested for violation of the Mann act and spends an evening in jail. Wright and Olgivanna were married on August 25, 1928 at midnight in Rancho Santa Fe near La Jolla. Stamped on verso: "From Chicago Bureau. 7 South Dearborn St." Published in “Many Masks” Gill, 1987, page 293. Caption reads "Olgivanna and Iovanna at Lake Minnetonka. Milwaukee Journal". Also published in "Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography" Secrest, 1992, page 321. Original B&W photograph, 6.3 x 4.8, Digitally restored high res image. 0172.08.1110
C1926
Dining Room (left) and Living Room, Taliesin III, Circa 1926. In April 1925, fire struck Taliesin for the second time and destroyed the living quarters. Wright rebuilt again, expanding and enlarging the Dining and Living Room. (Notice the ball and baby rattle under the chair in the foreground, for their daughter Iovanna.) Taken at the same time as S#172.03. Photographed by Henry Fuermann, W-49. 10 x 8 Print, High res digital image. (For further information see our Wright study.) 0172.02.1209
C1926
Dining Room (left) and Living Room, Taliesin III, Circa 1926. In April 1925, fire struck Taliesin for the second time and destroyed the living quarters. Wright rebuilt again, expanding and enlarging the Dining and Living Room. Taken at the same time as S#172.02. Photographed by Henry Fuermann, W-42. 10 x 8 Print, High res digital image. (For further information see our Wright study.) 0172.03.1209
C1926
Studio, Private Office, Taliesin III, Circa 1926. In August 1925, fire struck Taliesin for the second time and destroyed the living quarters. Wright rebuilt again, expanding and enlarging the Dining and Living Room. Three armchairs, two variations. The back in the center chair varies from the back on the two outside chairs. A variation of the arm chair is visible in the 1915 Dining Room photograph, but the horizontal back is longer. The example on the left and right is also seen in the 1926 Dining Room. Possibly taken at the same time as S#172.02 and 172.03. Photographed by Henry Fuermann, W-21. 6.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 0172.16.1213
1926
Wright at 59. 1926. Wright arrested in Minnesota. On Wednesday evening, October 20, 1926, Hennepin county deputy sheriffs arrested Wright at a Wildhurst, Lake Minnetonka cottage. When the deputies came to the kitchen door of the cottage Wednesday night they were met by the cook and maid, Miss Viola Meyerhaus. He was brought to the Hennepin county jail, where he was held without charge for Baraboo, Wis., authorities. After arresting Wright, deputies returned to Minnetonka and brought Olga Milanoff and two children to the county jail. (L to R) Miss Viola Meyerhaus, Frank Lloyd Wright and Hennepin county deputy. Possibly seen on the far left behind screen door is Olga Milanoff.   5.5 x 3.75 Print, High res digital image. (See 1926 article.) 0172.05.0310
1926
Wright at 59. 1926. Wright and Olga leave court , October 21, 1926. Published caption on verso: "F. Lloyd Wright and Olga Released on $12,000 bond. Frank Lloyd Wright, world famed architect, and his companion, Mrs. Olga Milanoff, former Russian dancer, pleaded ‘not guilty’ in Minneapolis court today to Mann act charge lodged against them. After spending a night in jail, the two were released on bonds totalling (miss spelled) $12,500, and the case set for hearing Oct. 30th. The charges against the couple were filed with their discovery in a love nest at Lake Minnetonka, Minn., where they had been living since Sept. 7th while a country wide search was being made for them. CC 65743 Chicago Bureau. (Photo shows L. to R. - A Deputy U.S. Marshal; Olga Milanoff; a police matron; and Frank Lloyd Wright)" Stamped on verso: "From Chicago Bureau. 7 South Dearborn St. Oct 23, 1926." 5.75 x 4.5 and 8.25 x 6 B&W photographs. (See 1926 article.) 0172.06.0310 0172.20.0314
1926
Frank Lloyd Wright at 59. 1926. Vladimir Hinzenberg, Olga Milanov and Frank Lloyd Wright waiting in Court. A Picture Tells a Thousand Words. Vladimir Hinzenberg (left) glaring at Milanov, is leaning slightly away from her, looking slightly intimidated as she looks right through him. His legs are crossed, and he nervously moved his foot back and forth. Olga Milanov (Olgavanna) leans away from him, up against Wright. She is tense, her lips are pursed, is glowering at him, a slight pained look on her face. Frank Lloyd Wright’s legs are crossed, an overcoat sets over his lap, cane hooked on his left arm, his hands are crossed, very relaxed. He is facing away from both, staring off in space, deep in thought. Hand written on verso: "3 of principals in Frank Lloyd Wright love triangle. Left to right - Vladimir Hinzenberg (divorced husband of Mme Milanov). Mme Olga Milanov (Companion of F L Wright). Frank Lloyd Wright. 10/23/26." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph (background airbrushed). 0172.42.0218
Circa 1926
Frank Lloyd Wright at 59. Circa 1926. Frank Lloyd Wright and unidentified male. Possibly Wright’s attorney. Possibly courthouse in background. Hand written on verso: "Wright being taken to jail." Wright’s second wife, Miriam Noel, harassed him publicly for years. On November 19, 1923, Miriam and Mr. Wright were married in Spring Green, Wisconsin. In May 1924 Miriam walked out of Taliesin. On November 30, 1924 Mr. Wright and Olga met at the Petrograd Ballet in Chicago. She was separated from her husband. In February, 1925. Mr. Wright moved Olgivanna into Taliesin. On November 27, 1925, Miriam filed for a divorce, alleging desertion and cruelty. On December 2, 1925,Olgivanna gives birth to Iovanna Lazovich Lloyd Wright in Chicago. On May 20, 1926, Miriam appears in Madison court room in an efforts to settle divorce, effort failed. On June 3 Miriam attempted to take Taliesin, by storm but failed to get beyond the front gate. In August, Miriam refused to grant divorce and demanded the right to live at Taliesin. She sues Olgivanna. In September the bank foreclosed on Taliesin Mortgage. Wright was arrested at the kitchen door of a Lake Minnetonka cottage on October 21, where he had lived since September 7. Miriam and Frank were finally divorced on August 26, 1927. Wright travels with Olgivanna to...  Continue... 0172.21.0714
1927
1927

Isabel & Darwin Martin Residence Graycliff and Garage Construction Scrapbook June 5, 1927 - May 1930 (1927 - S.225-226). The Graycliff estate was the summer residence of Isabelle and Darwin Martin, Derby, New York. Graycliff was the second completed complex designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Martin’s. The first being the Martin House Complex in Buffalo. This collection of photographs of the construction, begins with construction in 1927, to the completion in 1928, and a page of follow-up photos in 1930. These copies of the scrapbook were made in the 1980s by Kelmscott Gallery. Provenance: Kelmscott Gallery, Chicago; D. D. Martin estate. The greatest value of this set is documenting the dates and progress of the construction of Graycliff. This set consist of twenty 11 x 17" pages and seven 8-1/2 x 11" pages creating twenty-one 13.75 x 11" pages of the scrapbook. Plus two pages of the Buffalo Complex.

0198.26.0518 (1-23)
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Charles S. Deneen and Frank L. Smith, January 20, 1927. Stamped on verso: "Jan 20, 1927." Hand written on verso: "Frank L Smith (right) and Chas S. Deneen." After the death of incumbent Illinois Senator William McKinley, Smith was appointed to the seat in December 1926 by Illinois Governor Len Small. On Jan. 19, 1927, Smith's credentials were submitted to the senate by Senator Charles S. Deneen of Illinois. Charles Samuel Deneen (May 4, 1863 – February 5, 1940) served as Governor of Illinois from 1905 to 1913. He served as a U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1925–1931. On January 20 the senate refused to allow Smith to take his senate seat. Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0198.16.0414
1927
Frank L. Smith, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith standing on train stairs, holds his hat up in his right hand, January 20, 1927. Hand written on verso: "Col. Frank L. Smith." Stamped on verso: "Jan 20, 1927. N. E. A." "Photo From Jun Fujita, 12 S. Market St., % The Post, Chicago." After the death of incumbent Illinois Senator William McKinley, Smith was appointed to the seat in December 1926 by Illinois Governor Len Small. On Jan. 19, 1927, Smith's credentials were submitted to the senate by Senator Charles S. Deneen of Illinois. Charles Samuel Deneen served as Governor of Illinois from 1905 to 1913. He served as a U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1925–1931. On January 20 the senate refused to allow Smith to take his senate seat. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0198.17.1114
1927
Frank L. Smith, 1927 (1905 - S.111). (Second copy of Photograph.) Frank L. Smith standing on train stairs, holds his hat up in his right hand, January 20, 1927. Stamped on verso: "Jan 20, 1927. N. E. A." "This photo is supplied by Acme Newspapers. 461 Eighth Ave., New York City." Label pasted to verso: "Leaves to Appear Before Senate Investigation. Col. Frank L. Smith, senator-elect from Illinois, shown leaving Chicago, Ill., for Washington, D.C., to appear before the Senate committee who have been investigating his credentials and have refused to allow him to be seated in the Senate." Original 6.5 x 8.5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0198.22.1216
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). "Frank L. Smith returns to his hometown of Dwight, Ill. on Jan. 24, 1927, after being refused a seat in the U.S. Senate. Smith, a former congressman and chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission, was appointed to the seat in December 1926 by then - Illinois Gov. Len Small, after the death of incumbent Sen. William McKinley. But Smith had been accused by Senate officials of accepting $125,000 in campaign money from Samuel Insull, the powerful owner several public utilities, while Smith was the chair of the ICC. Accepting such a contribution while acting as the ICC chair was a violation of Illinois law. Although he was never officially charged with a crime, the U.S. Senate voted 61-23 that Smith was not entitled to his Senate seat." Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. 5 x 7 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0198.13.1213
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith (left) and Senator Charles S. Deneen (Right). Caption pasted to verso: "Defends Smith Trying For Senate Seat – Photo Shows Senator-Elect Frank L. Smith of Illinois, (Left) with Senator Charles S. Deneen of Illinois, who is defending Smith in his fight to obtain a seat in the U.S. Senate." Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Frank L. Smith Bank in 1905. Stamped on Verso: "Dec 9 1927." Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0198.19.0816
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith (left) and Senator Charles S. Deneen (Right). Caption pasted to verso: "Defends Illinois Senator Elect Who is Fighting for Seat. Washington D.C. Photo Shows - Senator-elect Frank L. Smith of Illinois, left, with senator Charles S. Deneen of Illinois, who is defending Smith in his fight to obtain a seat in the U.S. Senate." Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Frank L. Smith Bank in 1905. Stamped on Verso: "Reference Dept. Oct 17 1930." "This photo is supplied by Acme Newspictures, 461 Eighth Ave. New York." Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0198.20.0816
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith (left) and Senator Charles S. Deneen (Right). Caption pasted to verso: "Defends Illinois Senator Elect Who is Fighting for Seat. Washington D.C. Photo Shows - Senator-elect Frank L. Smith of Illinois, left, with senator Charles S. Deneen of Illinois, who is defending Smith in his fight to obtain a seat in the U.S. Senate." Stamped on Verso: "Reference Dept. Dec 10 1927." "This photo is supplied by Acme Newspictures, 461 Eighth Ave. New York." Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0198.18.1215
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith standing in front of steps, facing the camera, holding his hat in his right hand. Caption pasted to verso: "Senator-elect Frank L. Smith, Illinois, photographed at the Senate office building, Washington, where he is fighting to obtain a seat in the Senate." Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Frank L. Smith Bank in 1905. Stamped on Verso: "Reference Dept. Dec 9 1927 N. E. A." Original 8.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0198.21.0816
1927
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1927 (1905 - S.111). "Some of the most powerful men in Illinois during the Roaring 20's meet at the Hotel Sherman on Dec. 31, 1927. Left to right: Eugene Pike, the new president of the Lincoln Park board; Sen. Elect Frank L. Smith; Chicago Mayor William "Big Bill" Thompson; and Illinois Gov. Len Small. Both Small and Smith had legal issues during their careers as public servants in Illinois. Small was indicted in 1921 on charges of embezzling up to $700,000 in public funds and conspiracy to defraud the state during Small's second term as Illinois state treasurer. But he was never convicted. Smith, a former congressman and chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission, was appointed to the seat in December 1926 by then-Illinois Gov. Len Small, after the death of incumbent Sen. William McKinley. But Smith had been accused by Senate officials of accepting $125,000 in campaign money from Samuel Insull, the powerful owner several public utilities, while Smith was the chair of the ICC. Accepting such a contribution while acting as the ICC chair was a violation of Illinois law. Although he was never officially charged with a crime, the U.S. Senate voted 61-23 that Smith was not entitled to his Senate seat." Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. 7 x 5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0198.14.1213
1927
Miriam Noel Wright (February 1, 1927 - San Francisco).  International Newsreel photograph.  Caption on verso reads "Slug (Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright).  Love's Eternal Triangle-Missing Mate Found in San Francisco.  Present wife but not the mate of Frank Lloyd Wright, noted architect, Miriam Noel Wright has been  found here, the first trace of her since her disappearance from Chicago last December.  She is firm in her determination not to permit Wright to obtain a divorce. See San Francisco Examiner Feb. 1st for Story. All Bureaus (list A) Ex.....2/2/27." Courtesy International Newsreel.  (San Francisco Examiner, Feb. 1, 1927: Maud Miriam Noel Wright, the wife of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, has been living in the Claremont Apartments on Sutter Street in San Francisco since December 1926. She is recuperating in California while her suit for separate maintenance is pending and while her husband's lawyers vainly urge her to divorce him.) 4.5 x 6 B&W Photograph. 0198.01.0609
1927
Miriam Noel Wright. (March 7, 1927) Caption on verso: "Fighting Mad. Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright, wife of noted architect, whose marital affairs have been in the public eye for some years, says she’s going to battle for her rights, which she claims have been usurped by a pretty Russian dancer friend of Wright." Stamped on verso: "Mar 7 1927. San Francisco Bureau. Photo By Pacific & Atlantic Photos, Inc. New York City." 4 x 6 B&W Photograph. 0198.03.1210
1927
Miriam Noel Wright. (September 21, 1927) Clipping pasted to verso: "Good-bye trouble; Hello Art. Admitting cinema ambitions and hinting at movie offers, Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright quietly left San Francisco for Hollywood, Chicago, Paris and points East. The divorced wife of the famous Chicago architect who has filled columns of newspaper space in her legal tilt with her noted husband, has been in San Francisco more than six months. For a time she was penniless, hungry sometimes, and unable to pay her rent, she said. But a few weeks ago she was given more than $30,000 and a substantial allowance in granting her husband a divorce. 9/21/27. International Newsreel photo, San Francisco Bureau." Note: Her divorce to Wright was finalized on August 26, 1927. 4 x 6 B&W Photograph. 0198.04.1210
1927
Miriam Noel Wright (Circa 1927). Seated in a chair, facing slightly to the right, looking to the right. Her face is slightly filling out, but still looks strained. She is wearing the same bracelet on her right wrist as she wore in the September 1, 1927 photograph. She is wearing the same ring and watch on her wrist and hand as she wore in the Circa 1928 photograph. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. 0198.06.0512
1928
1928
"Architect’s Home. LaJolla, Calif. — Photo shows the home of Architect Wright, smashed by his irate wife. It is on the seashore of an exclusive district of La Jolla, Calif. HA 7/17/28." On November 30, 1924 Frank Lloyd Wright met Olga in Chicago. On November 27, 1925, Miriam, Wright’s third wife files for a divorce, but subsequently reverses her decision and begins hounding him. Meryle Secrest writes "... she took a taxi there and discovered that the back door was unlocked. ‘I went in... and found my own belongings all over the place. I decided to get on the front page of the newspaper and see what effect publicity would have upon the situation. I thought the happy home belong to Frank, so I wrecked the place inside, and as a wreck it was a perfect success.’" Frank Lloyd Wright A Biography, p 340. International Newsreel Photo, Los Angeles Bureau. Original 7.4 x 4.6 B&W photograph. 0215.06.0510
1928
Chicago Architectural Exhibition. Alcantara Bridge, Toledo, Spain. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1928. One of the illustrations from "Color Sketches: Spain, France, England. A Series of Thirty Sketches Made by Mr. Morgan in a Trip to Europe. 1926." Published on the title page of the "Year Book of The Chicago Architectural Exhibition League and Catalogue of The Forty-First Annual Exhibition 1928. East Galleries, The Art Institute of Chicago. May Nineteenth to June Seventh. Text: "Alcantara Bridge, Toledo, Spain. By Charles L. Morgan, Chicago." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0215.23.0219
C 1928
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence Circa 1928. (1923 - S.216). Viewed from the South, of the Southeast corner. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The Living Room balcony is on the left, bedroom closets below it. Stairs on the right lead to the bedroom. The kitchen and stairway are on the far right. Published in the August 1928 issue of Architectural Record, p.100. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0215.15.0216
1928
The Powhatan Building. Illustrated by Charles L. Morgan, 1928. The Powhatan or Powhatan Apartments is a 22-story apartment building overlooking Lake Michigan. The building was designed by architects Robert De Golyer and Charles L. Morgan. Morgan was responsible for the colorful mosaics in the lobbies and ballroom, as well as the colorful exterior terra-cotta panels featuring scenes with Native American references. Other American Indian motifs can be found throughout the building. Signed bottom right: "C. Morgan." Text: "The Powhatan." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 6.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0215.24.0319
1928
Miriam Noel Wright. (Circa 1928). Her divorce to Wright was finalized on August 26, 1927. After announcing cinema ambitions in September 1927, Miriam continues to dog Olgivanna and Wright. In July 1928, she tracks them down in La Jolla, California and is arrested after trashes their home. 4 x 6 B&W Photograph. 0215.09.1210
1928
Wright’s Oak Park Home (1889 S.002) C1928-30. Viewed from the west. Circular Garden wall is on the far left. Directly beyond that is the Library. The Veranda and porch have been enclosed incorporating the porch wall, also creating an open balcony upstairs. The original Entry on the right has been sealed off. Very similar to the Gilman Lane photograph dated 1925 in "Building a Legacy" page 49. The Grant Manson image was taken during the winter after the Lane photograph (judging by the landscaping and trees). The "Shield" is missing in the Manson image. This image was taken within 2-4 years after the Manson and Lane images, judging the growth of the landscaping and trees. Hand written on verso: "Old Illinois Houses, Frank Lloyd Wright House, Oak Park, Ill." Similar to photograph published in "Building a Legacy", Preservation Trust, 2001, page 49. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 0215.04.0410
Circa 1928
Frank Lloyd Wright at 61. 1928. Frank Lloyd Wright wearing a calf skin coat. While separated from Miriam Noel, Wright met Olgivanna at the Petrograd Ballet in Chicago on Nov 30, 1924. In February 1925 Wright and Olgivanna moved into Taliesin. Miriam filed for divorce on November 27. On December 2, 1925 Iovanna Wright was born. For the next few year Miriam would torment Wright. Divorce was finally finalized on August 26, 1927. In January, 1928, the bank orders Wright out of Taliesin. Wright heads to Arizona and consults on Arizona Biltmore. In March, Frank and Olgivanna move to La Jolla, CA. In July, Miriam trashes Wrights cottage in La Jolla. Taliesin is sold at a sheriff's sale in July. Wrights are finally married on August 25, 1928 at midnight in Rancho Santa Fe near La Jolla. In October, Wright, Olgivanna and children mover back into Taliesin. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0215.13.0714
1929
1929
Richard Lloyd Jones Residence "Westhope,", Tulsa, OK.  Original vintage photograph taken by Frank Lloyd Wright associate, John Lloyd Wright, Wright’s son, of the Richard Lloyd Jones residence under construction in 1929.  Title on verso reads "Billiard room conservatory, owner's room above" and initialed "JLW".  Purchased from the Estate of Alfonso Iannelli. Original vintage silver gelatin photograph.  3.5 x 5. 0228.08.0507
1929
Nakoma Model at Taliesin West, circa 1929. View 1, facing toward the left. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Models were created by Wright and photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930 by Charles L. Morgan. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. According to Oskar Munuz and Doug Volker, Taliesin West, this white plaster figure was most likely created for used in creating the 1929 terra cotta sets, not the original figure photographed in 1926. Note the left arm of father (right side) where it intersects with the son’s head. The arm in this model closer to the base of the neck then the back of the head, as in the 1926 photograph. Photographed in June, 2013 by Oskar Munuz, Taliesin West. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.12.0314
1929
Nakoma Model at Taliesin West, circa 1929. View 2, facing slightly toward the left. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Models were created by Wright and photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930 by Charles L. Morgan. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. According to Oskar Munuz and Doug Volker, Taliesin West, this white plaster figure was most likely created for used in creating the 1929 terra cotta sets, not the original figure photographed in 1926. Note the left arm of father (right side) where it intersects with the son’s head. The arm in this model closer to the base of the neck then the back of the head, as in the 1926 photograph. Photographed in June, 2013 by Oskar Munuz, Taliesin West. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.13.0314
1929
Nakoma Model at Taliesin West, circa 1929. View 3, facing forward. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Models were created by Wright and photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930 by Charles L. Morgan. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. According to Oskar Munuz and Doug Volker, Taliesin West, this white plaster figure was most likely created for used in creating the 1929 terra cotta sets, not the original figure photographed in 1926. Note the left arm of father (right side) where it intersects with the son’s head. The arm in this model closer to the base of the neck then the back of the head, as in the 1926 photograph. Photographed in June, 2013 by Oskar Munuz, Taliesin West. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.14.0314
1929
Nakoma Model at Taliesin West, circa 1929. View 4, facing right. In 1923 Wright was commissioned to design a clubhouse for the Nakoma Golf Club, Madison, Wisc. In 1924 he was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Models were created by Wright and photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin for Franz A. Aust, by Melvin E. Diemer. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930 by Charles L. Morgan. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. According to Oskar Munuz and Doug Volker, Taliesin West, this white plaster figure was most likely created for used in creating the 1929 terra cotta sets, not the original figure photographed in 1926. Note the left arm of father (right side) where it intersects with the son’s head. The arm in this model closer to the base of the neck then the back of the head, as in the 1926 photograph. Photographed in June, 2013 by Oskar Munuz, Taliesin West. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.15.0314
1929

Nakoma gilded Terra-cotta Sculpture 1929. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. Of interest is Charles L. Morgan’s involvement to create "a few black sets" of the Nakoma and Nakomis in 1930. (Frank Lloyd Wright and Madison, 1990, page 88). On March 3, 2008, this Nakoma Sculpture was sold at Treadway Gallery, Chicago. Unglazed terra-cotta, painted gold, impressed "Frank Lloyd Wright" inscription to base. It was given as a gift to the seller in August 1942. Height is 12.25". Price realized $2,800 plus 22% buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Treadway Gallery. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures.

0228.16.0314
1929
Nakoma and Nakomis Terra-cotta Figures 1929. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. Of interest is Charles L. Morgan’s involvement to create "a few black sets" of the Nakoma and Nakomis in 1930. (Frank Lloyd Wright and Madison, 1990, page 88). On June 13, 2002, these sculpture were sold at Christie's Auction, "Important 20th Century Decorative arts Including Tiffany". Nakoma (left) 12.25 in. high, Nakomis (right) 18in. high, each impressed with Frank Lloyd Wright monogram. Price realized $5,975 plus buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Christie's, New York. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.17.0314
1929
Nakoma and Nakomis plaster sculptures circa 1929. "Nakoma and Nakomis, depicting the curvilinear Nakoma with children, holding a vessel, and Nakomis standing, wearing a headdress and teaching his son to take the bow to the Sun God. Impressed box signature. Nakoma (left) 12" high, Nakomis (right) 16" high. Break bow and arrow." On December 7, 2013, this set sold at the Treadway Toomey auction. Price realized $2,750 plus 22% buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Treadway Toomey Gallery. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0228.18.0314
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona (1928 - S.224). Exterior view of Ocatilla from a distance, 1929. As a result of his work on the Arizona Biltmore, in April, 1928, Alexander J. Chandler (1859-1950), one of the Phoenix area's successful developers, commissioned Wright to design ‘San Marcos in the Desert". By May he had a design for the resort in mind. The site for the resort consisted of 1,400 acres, located south of Phoenix at the base of the Salt River Mountains. Chandler approved of Wright's proposal, and in January 1929, Wright built a temporary camp on a low mound south of the site for San Marcos. Built near Chandler, Arizona, he called the camp "Ocatilla" after the giant desert shrub that grew in the area. He designed his temporary encampment with low board walls and angled enclosures. He went as far as constructing a full-scale sample of the textile blocks he envisioned for the resort. He completed the working drawings for the resort by late May, and left for Taliesin. In June, much of the camp was destroyed by fire. The stock market crash in October, and whatever hope of completion vanished. What remained of the camp gradually fell into ruin, slowly consumed by the desert and vanished with the project. Photograph taken between March and May, 1929. 8 x 3.25 B&W photograph. 0228.28.0215
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona (1928 - S.224). Exterior view of Ocatilla 1929. As a result of his work on the Arizona Biltmore, in April, 1928, Alexander J. Chandler (1859-1950), one of the Phoenix area's successful developers, commissioned Wright to design ‘San Marcos in the Desert". By May he had a design for the resort in mind. The site for the resort consisted of 1,400 acres, located south of Phoenix at the base of the Salt River Mountains. Chandler approved of Wright's proposal, and in January 1929, Wright built a temporary camp on a low mound south of the site for San Marcos. Built near Chandler, Arizona, he called the camp "Ocatilla" after the giant desert shrub that grew in the area. He designed his temporary encampment with low board walls and angled enclosures. He went as far as constructing a full-scale sample of the textile blocks he envisioned for the resort. He completed the working drawings for the resort by late May, and left for Taliesin. In June, much of the camp was destroyed by fire. The stock market crash in October, and whatever hope of completion vanished. What remained of the camp gradually fell into ruin, slowly consumed by the desert and vanished with the project. Photograph taken between March and May, 1929. 9.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 0228.29.0215
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona (1928 - S.224). Exterior view of Ocatilla, 1929. As a result of his work on the Arizona Biltmore, in April, 1928, Alexander J. Chandler (1859-1950), one of the Phoenix area's successful developers, commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design ‘San Marcos in the Desert". By May he had a design for the resort in mind. The site for the resort consisted of 1,400 acres, located south of Phoenix at the base of the Salt River Mountains. Chandler approved of Wright's proposal, and in January 1929, Wright built a temporary camp on a low mound south of the site for San Marcos. Built near Chandler, Arizona, he called the camp "Ocatilla" after the giant desert shrub that grew in the area. He designed his temporary encampment with low board walls and angled enclosures. He went as far as constructing a full-scale sample of the textile blocks he envisioned for the resort. He completed the working drawings for the resort by late May, and left for Taliesin. In June, much of the camp was destroyed by fire. The stock market crash in October, and whatever hope of completion vanished. What remained of the camp gradually fell into ruin, slowly consumed by the desert and vanished with the project. Photograph taken between March and May, 1929. Original 12 x 8 B&W photograph.. Courtesy of the Donald D. Walker Collection, Library of Congress. 0228.11.0512
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona (1928 - S.224). Draftsmen working at Ocatilla, 1929. As a result of his work on the Arizona Biltmore, in April, 1928, Alexander J. Chandler (1859-1950), one of the Phoenix area's successful developers, commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design ‘San Marcos in the Desert". By May he had a design for the resort in mind. The site for the resort consisted of 1,400 acres, located south of Phoenix at the base of the Salt River Mountains. Chandler approved of Wright's proposal, and in January 1929, Wright built a temporary camp on a low mound south of the site for San Marcos. Built near Chandler, Arizona, he called the camp "Ocatilla" after the giant desert shrub that grew in the area. He designed his temporary encampment with low board walls and angled enclosures. He went as far as constructing a full-scale sample of the textile blocks he envisioned for the resort. In the background on the left is the drawing of the National Life Insurance Company project. He completed the working drawings for the resort by late May, and left for Taliesin. In June, much of the camp was destroyed by fire. Note the "No Smoking" sign. The stock market crash in October, and whatever hope of completion vanished. What remained of the camp gradually fell into ruin, slowly consumed by the desert and vanished with the project...  Continue... 0228.10.1211
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona 1929 (1928 - S.224). Frank Lloyd Wright Ocatilla Desert Camp, 1929. View of cabins, center and right, and a full scale model on the left, of the concrete block system being proposed for the San Marcos in the Desert hotel. As a result of his work on the Arizona Biltmore, in April, 1928, Alexander J. Chandler (1859-1950), one of the Phoenix area's successful developers, commissioned Wright to design ‘San Marcos in the Desert". By May he had a design for the resort in mind. The site for the resort consisted of 1,400 acres, located south of Phoenix at the base of the Salt River Mountains. Chandler approved of Wright's proposal, and in January 1929, Wright built a temporary camp on a low mound south of the site for San Marcos. Built near Chandler, Arizona, he called the camp "Ocatilla" after the giant desert shrub that grew in the area. He designed his temporary encampment with low board walls and angled enclosures. He went as far as constructing a full-scale sample of the textile blocks he envisioned for the resort. In the background on the left is the drawing of the National Life Insurance Company project. He completed the working drawings for the resort by late May, and left for Taliesin. In June, much of the camp was destroyed by fire. The stock market crash in October, and whatever hope of completion...  Continue... 0228.31.0117
1929
Ocatilla, Chandler Arizona, Wright’s in their Packard, 1929 (1928 - S.224). Frank Lloyd Wright, Olgivanna and their two daughters, Svetlana and Iovanna, in their newly purchased Packard. In the background is Wright’s desert camp Ocatilla, in Chandler Arizona. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 0228.27.0215
C 1929
Ravine Bluffs : Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Station Circa 1929 (1911 - FLLW.1123). Viewed from the East. One of two designs Frank Lloyd Wright created for Sherman Booth. This one had a flat roof, the second had a pitched roof. Located at the corner of Old Green Bay Road and Maple Hill in Glencoe, Illinois. Of interest is the barren landscaping. It featured a flat roof, a heated room in the winter, and a covered area when it rained. From 1911 - 1915, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Sherman Booth to design homes and a suburban development in Glencoe, Illinois, the Ravine Bluffs Development. The project included both public and private buildings. Sherman Booth House, Municipal Art Gallery, Sherman Booth Summer Cottage, Architectural Features for Parker Way, Glencoe Town Hall, Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Stations, Sherman Booth Stable and Garage, Ravine Bluffs Bridge and Concrete Street Lamp, Sherman Booth House Scheme, Ravine Bluffs Development and Five Rental House. The electric trains ran until July 1955, and the stations that served the line were eventually demolished. Text etched in negative "Green Bay Rd, Glencoe. No 19." Courtesy of the Village of Glencoe, Illinois. 6 x 4.5 B&W photograph. (S#228.32) 0228.32.1217
C 1929
Ravine Bluffs : Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Station Circa 1929 (1911 - FLLW.1123). Viewed from the South. One of two designs Frank Lloyd Wright created for Sherman Booth. This one had a flat roof, the second had a pitched roof. Located at the corner of Old Green Bay Road and Maple Hill in Glencoe, Illinois. It featured a flat roof, a heated room in the winter, and a covered area when it rained. From 1911 - 1915, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Sherman Booth to design homes and a suburban development in Glencoe, Illinois, the Ravine Bluffs Development. The project included both public and private buildings. Sherman Booth House, Municipal Art Gallery, Sherman Booth Summer Cottage, Architectural Features for Parker Way, Glencoe Town Hall, Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Stations, Sherman Booth Stable and Garage, Ravine Bluffs Bridge and Concrete Street Lamp, Sherman Booth House Scheme, Ravine Bluffs Development and Five Rental House. The electric trains ran until July 1955, and the stations that served the line were eventually demolished. The sign to the right of the sidewalk reads "Do Not Cross In Front of Trains." Text etched in negative "Green Bay Rd, Glencoe. No 20." Courtesy of the Village of Glencoe, Illinois. 6 x 4.5 B&W photograph. 0228.33.1217
1929
St. Mark’s Tower in the Bouwerie, circa 1929 (Project 1929). Perspective for apartment complex, designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright for his long time friend William Norman Guthrie, pastor of St. Mark’s in the Bouwerie, New York. This was Wright’s first use of his Taproot foundation design. A second tower in the complex can be seen to the right. It became the Broadacre model and later resurrected for the Price Tower. Illustration published in The New York Times Magazine, March 20, 1932, p.9. 5.75 x 10 B&W photograph. 0228.26.0115
1929
St. Mark’s Tower in the Bouwerie (Project 1929). Side view and floor plan. Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned in 1929 to design an apartment complex by his long term friend William Norman Guthrie, pastor of St. Mark’s in the Bouwerie. This was Wright’s first use of his Taproot foundation design. It became the Broadacre model and later resurrected for the Price Tower. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0228.22.0514
C 1929 A&B
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park circa 1929. Viewed from the Southwest, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, and the Entrance is in the center behind the large urn. Lake Street is on the left, North Kenilworth Avenue in the foreground. Photographed by Gilman Lane before it was published in "The New World Architecture," Cheney, 1930, page 341. 10 x 8 B&W photograph and original 4.5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0228.23.0514
1929
Unity Temple Oak Park Circa 1929 (1904 - S.096). Viewed from the Southwest, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, and the Entrance is in the center behind the large urn. Lake Street is on the left, North Kenilworth Avenue in the foreground. Photographed by Gilman Lane before it was published in "The New World Architecture," Cheney, 1930, page 341. Photographed at the same time as the photograph in "In The Nature of Materials," Hitchcock, 1942, pl.118. Mounted in a small folder with label hand written: "12937 Unity Temple, Chicago." Purchased from Toulouse, France. Original 5 x 4 B&W photograph. 0228.34.0318
C 1929
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park circa 1929. Viewed from the West, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, and the Entrance is in the center behind the large urn. Lake Street is in the foreground. Photographed by Gilman Lane before it was published in "The New World Architecture," Cheney, 1930, page 33. Also published in "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, plate 118, and published in "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910", Manson, 1958, page 160. Original 4.5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0228.24.0514
 
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