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PHOTOS 1990 - 1999
 
  1990    1991    1992    1993    1994    1995    1996    1998    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1990
1990
Stork Column and Candlesticks 1990. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times/ Photographer: Nancy Stuenkel, Date: 3/2/90." Caption pasted to verso: "Oak candlesticks ($65 a pair) adapted from playroom balusters are available at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, as is the plaster reproduction of stork columns Wright designed for the entrance to his Oak Park Studio. Both from the Gingko Tree Bookshop." Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 1990.82.0411
1990
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church Exterior Circa 1990 (1956 - S.399). Viewed of the exterior. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in 1956. Label on sleeve: "Greek Orthodox Church by FLW, 1955-56, exterior." Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.149.0818 (1-2)
1990
Frederick C. Bogk Residence Exterior Circa 1990 (1916 - S.196). Bogk was a businessman and politician in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He commissioned and Wright designed his home in 1916, which was completed in 1917. View of the Northeast elevation. The house is constructed of tan brick with precast concrete trim. The horizontal joints are racked, while the vertical joints are flush. The Living Room doors on the first level lead to and enclosed Terrace. Bedrooms are on the second level. Label on sleeve: "Wright, Frank Lloyd (1867-1959). FC Bogk House, Milwaukie (sic), WI, 1916. View from Street. Am. Arch." Original glass 35mm color slide and 10 x 8 high res digital image. 1990.141.0618 (A)
1990
Frederick C. Bogk Residence Interior Circa 1990 (1916 - S.196). Bogk was a businessman and politician in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He commissioned and Wright designed his home in 1916, which was completed in 1917. View from the Living Room toward the Dining Room. Of note are the Heritage Henredon furniture in the Living Room. Two chairs and a triangle coffee table on the left, couch with large coffee table and smaller rectangular tables tucked under larger table. Label on sleeve: "Wright, Frank Lloyd (1867-1959). FC Bogk House, Milwaukie (sic), WI, 1916. View into dining room from Living Room. Am. Arch." Original glass 35mm color slide and 10 x 8 high res digital image. 1990.141.0618 (B)
1990
Coonley Print Cabinet. Birch Print Cabinet designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1908) for the Avery Coonley Residence (S.135 - 1907). Three-quarter view. Stamped on verso: "Apr 11 ‘90". Label on verso: "Curly Birch Print Cabinet, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, for the Coonely (sp) estate complex, Riverside, Illinois, 1908. $250,000 / 300,000." Caption pasted on verso: "A curly birch print cabinet, designed in 1908 by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Coonley estate complex in Riverside has a pre-sale estimate of $250,000 to 300,000." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 1990.80.1110
1990
Dana-Thomas Master Bedroom Sitting Room 1990 (1902 - S.072). Caption on face: "(Sept 2) Restoration completed – A sitting room is part of the master bedroom of the Dana-Thomas House in Springfield, Illinois. (AP - Seth Perlman) 1990. Slug: Restoring Wright." Clipping pasted to verso: "An award has been given for the restoration of the Dana-Thomas House in Springfield, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "Sept 5 90". Photographed by Seth Perlman. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.89.0811
1990
Dana-Thomas Residence (1902 - S.072) 1990. Double pedestal table lamp. Caption printed on face: "Designed for the house - This desk lamp was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Dana-Thomas House in Springfield, Illinois were it is on display. Illinois’ Gov. James R. Thomson bought the lamp at an auction for $704,000. (Seth Perlman) 1990." Stamped on verso: "Sep 5 90." Photographed by Seth Perlman. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1990.96.1012
1990
Dana-Thomas Residence (1902 - S.072) 1990. Double pedestal table lamp. Clipping pasted on verso: "Springfield - Would you spend $6 million for a house? What if it boasted one bowling lane, two barrel-vaulted ceilings, six-bedrooms, four bathrooms, 100 pieces of custom-designed oak furniture and 450 art-glass windows, doors and light fixtures, designed by one of the world’s greatest architects? If you’re an Illinois taxpayer, you just did. And believe it or not, you got a bargain. It is the Dana-Thomas House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Springfield socialite Susan Laurence Dana in 1904. Now, after a three year, $5 million restoration, the Prairie-styled mansion has reopened to the public. The restoration landmark is expected to attract 100,000 visitors in the next year, but none could be happier than Gov, James R. Thompson. In 1981 he urged the legislature to buy the house for $1 million from the heirs of its second owner, the Thomas Publishing Co." Caption pasted to verso: "Phone calls from Gov. James R. Thomson helped raise the $704,000 cost of returning this table lamp to the living room of the Dana-Thomas House." Stamped on verso: "Sep 16, 1990". Original 10 x 8 color Print. 1990.92.0512
1990
Dana-Thomas Residence (1902 - S.072) 1990. Double pedestal table lamp. Clipping pasted on verso: "Springfield - Would you spend $6 million for a house? What if it boasted one bowling lane, two barrel-vaulted ceilings, six-bedrooms, four bathrooms, 100 pieces of custom-designed oak furniture and 450 art-glass windows, doors and light fixtures, designed by one of the world’s greatest architects? If you’re an Illinois taxpayer, you just did. And believe it or not, you got a bargain. It is the Dana-Thomas House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Springfield socialite Susan Laurence Dana in 1904. Now, after a three year, $5 million restoration, the Prairie-styled mansion has reopened to the public. The restoration landmark is expected to attract 100,000 visitors in the next year, but none could be happier than Gov, James R. Thompson. In 1981 he urged the legislature to buy the house for $1 million from the heirs of its second owner, the Thomas Publishing Co." Caption pasted to verso: "A musicians’ gallery overlooks the dining room with its huge ceremonial dining set. The alternating tall and short chairs make serving easier." Stamped on verso: "Sep 16, 1990". Original 8 x 10 color Print. 1990.93.0512
C 1990

Frank Lloyd Wright Side Chair C 1990. This Wright Slant-back chair is in the collection of MOMA, and they date it 1904, a gift from Frank Lloyd Wright to MOMA, possibly in 1947, but they do not identify which home it was designed for. Frank Lloyd Wright designed a number of "slant-back" chairs.  A) William E. Martin House (1902 - S.061). William was the brother of Darwin D. Martin. The upright stile bracing the slant-back is approximately two-thirds the height of the seat. The stile is capped by a rectangular block, and the slant-back is twice the height of the stile above the seat. The slant-back is padded with leather, and held in place with tacks. (Providence Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery, April 22, 2018)  B) Larkin Administration Building Dining Room Chair. (1903 - S.093). The dining Room chairs in the Larkin Administration building were almost exactly like the chairs for the William E. Martin House, minus the padded leather on the slant-back. The upright stile bracing the slant-back is approximately two-thirds the height of the seat. The stile is capped by a rectangular block, and the slant-back is twice the height of the stile above the seat. Frank Lloyd Wright Interiors and Furniture, Heinz, 1994, p.80...  Continue...

1990.140.0618
C 1990
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence Circa 1990. (1923 - S.216). View of the perforated textile block in the entry-court. The Freeman Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s third textile block home in California: 1) Millard (La Miniatura), 2) Storer, 4) Ennis. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile...  Continue...
1990.138.0418 (1-5)
1990.139.0618
1990
Guggenheim Museum main Gallery 1990 (1956 - S.400). Possibly Alexander Calder’s Red Lily Pads (1956). Label pasted on verso: "APN Sunday Illustrations. AP Newsfeatures Photo. (For use Sun., Aug. 12, 1990 with Hugh Mulligan’s undated APN story slugged Wright’s Stuff.) Wright Museum. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum in New York City swirls skyward in this evening interior view." Label pasted to verso: "Houston Chronicle Library." Stamp on verso: "Sep 16 1991." Label pasted on verso of second copy: "The interior of the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright seems to swirls skyward." Stamp on verso of second copy: "Oct 7 1990." Two original 8 x 11 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Houston Chronicle. 1990.132.0617 1990.135.1217
1990
Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, Tokyo, Japan, 1990 (1921 - S.213). Label taped on verso: "APN Illustrations, New York. (For use Sun., Dec. 9, 1990 with Michael Hirsh’s Tokyo APN story slugged Japan-Land.) Building of Tomorrow. Yuko Hani stands in front of the ‘Building of Tomorrow,’ the Jiyu Gakuen school house Frank Lloyd Wright built 69 years ago near the northwestern section of metropolitan Tokyo. Ms. Hani heads a group of Jiyu Gakuan alumni, who are seeking to raise funds to save the building from its sagging foundation. 11/20/90. Stf/Katsumi Kasahara." Acquired from the archived of the Associated Press. Original 11 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.90.0911
1990
Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1990. A Victorian home was located one lot South of Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home from Frank S. Gray in 1900 and hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills (1900, 1906 - S.051). Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. On January 3, 1976 the home caught fire and destroyed the second floor. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Stamped on verso: "Date: 8/9/90. Photographer: Walter Kale." Clipping pasted to verso: "This is how the once-burned, Frank Lloyd Wright designed house looks today in its restored state." Stamped on clipping: "Aug 12 90". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.94.0512
1990
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building Entrance Circa 1990 (1936 - S.237). Set of 6 35mm slides. View of the entrance to the campus from the South. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Administration Building in 1936, and the Research Tower in 1944. The Research Tower can be seen in the background. Label on sleeve: "Johnson Wax, by FLW, 1936, entry to complex." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.147.0818 (1-6)
1990
Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414). Viewed from the Northwest. Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the North and West side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.97.1113
1990
Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414). Viewed from the Northwest. Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the North and West side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.98.1113
1990
Lindholm Service Station 1990 (1956 - S. 414). Viewed from the Northwest. Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. View of the front side. The roof is cantilevered over the pumps. The waiting room was in the glass enclosed second level and is reached via the stairs just to the right of the attendants office. It was constructed of concrete block with a copper metal roof. This was Wright’s only service station. Photographed by Jet Lowe in May 1990. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.99.1113
1990
Marin County Civic Center Circa 1990 (S.416-417 - 1957). Viewed from the West. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Marin County Civic Center in 1957. Label on sleeve: "Marin County Civic Center by FLW, general view." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image. 1990.148.0818
1990
Mrs. Alice Millard Residence (La Miniatura) Circa 1990 (1923 - S.214). View of the entrance from the South. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Millard Residence (La Miniatura) in 1923. Label on sleeve: "Millard House, LA, by FLW, 1920s, exterior." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image. 1990.150.0818
C 1990
Wilbur C. Pearce Residence Circa 1990 (1950 - S.320). Viewed from the Northeast. Designed in 1950, it was constructed of concrete block and Honduras mahogany. The first "hemicycle" home Frank Lloyd Wright designed was the Jacobs II (1944). He also designed the Meyer (1948), Laurent (1949), Pearce (1950), Lewis (1952), Marden (1952), Llewellyn Wright (1953), Cooke (1953), Rayward (1955) and the Spencer (1956). The Entrance is in the center. The Shop is on the left, Living and Dining to the right, with the bedrooms to the far right. Label on sleeve: "Wright, Frank Lloyd (1867-1959). Pearce House, CA, 1950. View from Northeast. Am. Arch." Copy of image published in "Details of Frank Lloyd Wright, The California Work 1909-1974" Zimmerman, Dunham, 1994, p.104. Original glass 35mm color slide and 10 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.137.0418 (1-4)
1990
Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1990. View of exterior of the Skylight. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Stamped on verso: "Sun Nov 4 1990, Tue May 4 1993". Clipping pasted to verso: "Revival of the Rookery. Workers remove tar and paint from the Rookery Building’s skylight as restoration of the landmark continues. For five years, the 1888 Rookery has sat vacant at 209 S. La Salle. But the sleeping beauty will awaken after the $80 million rehab project. Sun Times / Rich Hein." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 1990.95.0512
1990
Harvey P. Sutton Residence, Dining Room 1990 (1905 - S.106). After closing his practice in 1977, Dr. Donaldson was unable to find a buyer. Not wanting to see the home moved or demolished, Don and Mary Poore purchased the home in 1978. They began an extensive remodel, restoring the many of the changes back to its original state. The original sideboard was discovered in the basement. The Poores refinished it and returned it to it’s original location. Photographed by William Storrer. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 8.25 x 6 Color photograph. See our Wright Study on the Sutton Home. 1990.105.0414
C 1990
Taliesin III, Spring Green, Circa 1990 (1925- S.218). View from the drive below, looking North, up toward Taliesin. The Tower and Hill Apartments are on the left, the private living quarters and catwalk are visible on the right. Label on sleeve: "Taliesin E. Home." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.153.0818 (1-5)
1990
Frank Wright Thomas Residence 1990 (1901 - S.067). Viewed from the Northwest. In 1901, James Campbell Rogers hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house as a wedding present for his daughter, Susan Ann Rogers, and her husband, Frank Wright Thomas. The Thomas' were married on June 14, 1900. Label taped to verso: "APN Sunday Illustrations. AP Newsfeatures Photo. (For use Sunday., Aug. 1990 with Hugh Mulligan’s Undated APN story slugged Wright’s Stuff.) Wright Style. "Frank Lloyd Wright" (hand written). The Frank Thomas House in Oak Park, Illinois is viewed by tourists as they view the Wright Style. Sav-7/23/90. Stf/Mark Elias. Sil400." Stamped on verso: Plain Dealer. Sep 07 1990." Photographed by Mark Ellis on July 23, 1990. Acquired from the archives of The Plain Dealer. Original 11 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.133.1117
1990
Dr. H. and Dorothy H. Turkel Residence, Detroit, Michigan (S.388) (1955). Interior of the home viewed from North. Caption on back: "The 177 windows in the living room walls provide a unique view for Robert Blaszkowki, who house-sits the Monaghan property." Photographed by Detroit News Photographer Steve Haines. 1990. This photograph used and published in the Detroit News on April 10, 1990, 1E. Original B&W photograph, 10 x 8. (See our Wright Study that includes the Turkel Residence.) 1990.75.1109
C 1990
Unity Temple, Oak Park Circa 1990 (1904 - S.096). View of the interior of the interior of the Sanctuary. Label on sleeve: "Unity Temple, Oak Park, by FLW, interior, NW corner." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.152.0818 (1-2)
C 1990
Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park Circa 1990 (1895 - S.002-4). View of the entrance to Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park Studio. Label on sleeve: "Taliesin E. (sic) Home and Studio, Oak Park, by FLW, Studio entry." Photographed by Scot Gilchrist. Original 35mm Color slide and 5 x 8 high res digital image.
1990.151.0818 (1-2)
1990
Dr. Isadore and Lucille Zimmerman Residence 1990 (1950 - S.333). Viewed from the Southwest. The Garden/Living Room is on the left. Wright designed a window within a window. Five sets of floor to ceiling wood framed glass doors open outward from the Dining Loggia to the Terrace. A short brick wall adds privacy to the Master Bedroom. The Carport is on the right. When the Zimmerman’s past away in 1988, they left the home and everything in it, to the Currier Museum of Art. Hand written on verso: "10/12/90. P.S22. Manchester, NH, Museum." Label pasted to verso: " View of the Zimmerman House from the south garden. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1950)." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1990.145.1018
1990
Dr. Isadore and Lucille Zimmerman Residence Living/Garden Room 1990 (1950 - S.333). Viewed from the Southeast. The fireplace is on the far left. A Wright designed Music Stand is seen in the center. Built-in seating on the right. A Taliesin lamp is is in the foreground on the right. When the Zimmerman’s past away in 1988, they left the home and everything in it, to the Currier Museum of Art. Hand written on verso: "10/12/90. Garden Room, Zimmerman House. The Currier Gallery of Art, 192 Orange St., Manchester, NH 03104." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information on the Zimmerman Residence see our Wright Study. 1990.108.0414
1991
1991
Howard and Helen Anthony Residence (1949 - S.315), Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1991. View from the Southwest. The master bedroom is in the foreground on the left, two baths and another bedroom is in the center, the laboratory on the right. The Anthony Residence was designed on a 30-60 degree diamond shaped module and was constructed of Madison limestone and finished with cypress. It overlooks the St. Joseph River. Photographed on September 4, 1991. Original 35mm B&W negatives and 10 x 7 B&W photographs. Five similar views. 1991.67.1012
1991
Howard and Helen Anthony Residence (1949 - S.315), Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1991. View of the Living Room from the Southwest. Built-in seating is on the left. In the foreground on the far left is a tall vase very similar to the vase Wright designed in 1955 for Heritage Henredon. Just to the left of the fireplace is a reproduction of a lamp Wright designed for Taliesin in 1925. Just to the right of the fireplace, setting on the built-in cabinet, is Iannelli’s carving, "Wooden Nude in Grained Pine," 1931. The Workspace is in the background to the right. The Anthony Residence was designed on a 30-60 degree diamond shaped module and was constructed of Madison limestone and finished with cypress. It overlooks the St. Joseph River. Photographed on September 4, 1991. Original 35mm B&W negatives and 10 x 7 B&W photographs. Five similar views. 1991.68.0613
1991
Howard and Helen Anthony Residence (1949 - S.315), Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1991. View of the Dining Room table. Two Coonley Playhouse side chairs (1912 - S.174) are in the foreground around the built-in table. An Imperial Hotel side chair (1915 - S.194) is in the background. The Anthony Residence was designed on a 30-60 degree diamond shaped module and was constructed of Madison limestone and finished with cypress. It overlooks the St. Joseph River. Photographed on September 4, 1991. Original 35mm B&W negatives and 7 x 10 B&W photographs. Five similar views. 1991.69.1212
1991
Howard and Helen Anthony Residence (1949 - S.315), Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1991. Master Bedroom viewed from the South. The Living Room is beyond the bookshelf on the left, the Workspace is in the background to the right. The Anthony Residence was designed on a 30-60 degree diamond shaped module and was constructed of Madison limestone and finished with cypress. It overlooks the St. Joseph River. Photographed on September 4, 1991. Original 35mm B&W negatives and 10 x 7 B&W photographs. Five similar views. 1991.70.1212
1991 Howard and Helen Anthony Residence (1949 - S.315), Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1991. View of the Master Bedroom. The Anthony Residence was designed on a 30-60 degree diamond shaped module and was constructed of Madison limestone and finished with cypress. It overlooks the St. Joseph River. Just off the Living Room, the Master Bedroom is at the end of the "V" shaped home. Dresser and desk are built-in, and full length glass doors lead out to the terrace. Photographed on September 4, 1991. Original 35mm B&W negatives and 10 x 7 B&W photographs. Five similar views. 1991.66.0912
1991
Fallingwater (1935 - S.230) 1991. Set of 6 images from a trip to Fallingwater in March 1991. Designed in 1935 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Grounds at Fallingwater. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital...  Continue...
1991.74.1015 1-6
1991
Mrs. Thomas Gale Residence (1904 S.098) 1991. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Photographer: Rich Heid. Date 5-15-91. Location: 6 Elizabeth Ct. Oak Park. Reporter: Neil Steinberg. Caption: Thomas Gale House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Owner Peter & Meg Klinkow got a permit to put up aluminum siding to demonstrate the city’s need for a law protecting famous buildings." Clipping pasted to verso: "Mae and Peter Klinkow of Oak Park obtained a permit to put up aluminum siding on their home – the Thomas Gale House, 6 Elizabeth Ct., which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright – to demonstrate their position that the city needs an ordinance protecting historic buildings." Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 10 x 8 Print. 1991.59.0411
1991 
Original Midway Gardens Sprite, September 1991. Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright designed many an architectural masterpieces. One of his greatest blossomed, died of economic strangulation and was erased from the face of the earth in just 15 years on Chicago’s South Side. The brief but glorious life of the Midway Gardens - a landmark of architecture, jazz and haute culture - is being memorialized at Kelmscott Gallery, 4611 N. Lincoln, in the current exhibit: ‘Frank Lloyd Wright and Alfonso Iannelli - The story of the Midway Gardens’. The show runs through Oct. 26. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The first World War, the postwar recession and Prohibition quickly wrote finis to the indoor-outdoor pleasure ground that provided good music, good food and (originally) drink in Wright’s modern arts version of a German beer garden. The combination open-air café, band shell and large winter garden, decorated with tradition-shattering Cubist sculptures, opened in 1914 on South Cottage Grove and was torn down in 1929. Wright boasted in later years that it was so solidly built that the wrecking company went broke tearing it apart. Precious little remains of the place where Bix Beiderbecke made jazz hot, Benny Goodman cooled it on the clarinet, Russian ballerina Anna Pavlove danced and...  Continue... 1991.71.0513
1991
William L. Thaxton Residence, (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX. Caption on face: "Houston, April 22, 1991 - Wright - A battle has ensued over a house designed in 1954 by Frank Lloyd Wright which has been put up for sale in Houston. Several non-Wright addictions, including iconic columns, have encouraged offers from developers to tear down the house while Wright enthusiasts want it renovated. F. Carter Smith / New York Times Photo. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1991.64.0212
1991
Wright Home and Studio Dining Room, Oak Park (1895 - S.003) 1991. Dining table and six chairs. Clipping pasted on verso: "Dining room at the Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park. Tribune photo by Carl Wagner." Stamped on clipping: "Aug 16 91". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 Color Photograph. 1991.65.0212
1991
Wright Home and Studio Stork Panel 1898. Printed on verso: "Date: 12/11/91. Photographer: Brown. Location: 931 Chicago Ave. Oak Park. Description: Stork Panel designed by Wright at the entrance to his studio in 1898. The architect’s drafting board in background." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1991.63.0212
1992
1992
Henry J. Allen Residence 1992 (1916 - S.205). View of the Living Room. Setting in the center of the background is a writing desk and chair designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Allens. Stamped on face: "Randy Tobias. May 11, 1992." Caption glued to verso: "The living room of the Wright-designed Allen house has 40 ceiling lanterns covered with jigsaw-cut screens. Randy Tobias / The Wichita Eagle." Photographed by Randy Tobias. Acquired from the archives of the Wichita Eagle. Original 7.25 x 9.5 B&W photograph. 1992.122.0119
1992
American System-Built Houses. Photograph of Model E3. Text of face: "American Model E3. Patents Applied For. American System-Built Houses. Designed By Frank Lloyd Wright. The Richards Company Proprietors. Milwaukee." Date stamped on Verso: "Jan 19 1992". Caption pasted on verso: "A dozen previously unpublished designs for Frank Lloyd Wright pre-fabricated houses will be shown at the Kelmscott Gallery starting Friday." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1992.72.1110
1992
Peter A. Beachy Residence, Oak Park (1906 - S.117) 1992. Set of 3 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the James Fargo House to create the Prairie styled Beachy Residence. Little remains of the original structure. The Entrance is on the left just behind the two-story brick wall, but concealed behind it. The Living Room is on the right on the first level. The master Bedroom is directly above the Living Room. Built-in planters are to the left and right of the front. The home is constructed of brick, wood, stucco, and concrete, with strong horizontal lines. Viewed from the Northwest. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image...  Continue...
1992.99.1015 1-3
1992
Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104), Dining Room 1992. Printed on verso: "Date: 10/16/92. Photographer: Michael Budrys. Location: 520 N. East Ave., Oak Park. Caption: A restored 1903-4 Frank Lloyd Wright Prairie style house, owned by Atty. Dale Smirl. Mr. Smirl has made it available as a bed and breakfast place for those who like the master’s architecture and interior design, with lighting and furniture. The open dining room area." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 10.5 x 8.25 B&W print. 1992.73.0511
1992

William Copeland Residence Alterations (1909 - S.159) 1992. Although Frank Lloyd Wright recommended many exterior alterations to create a more prairie styled appearance, few exterior changes were made and it retained it much of its original style. Many of the interior changes were made and it does have the styled details. Changes were made to the garage, and it does have a prairie styled appearance. Viewed from the Southwest. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.

1992.100.1015
1992
Mrs. Thomas Gale Residence (1904 S.098) 1992. Set of 2 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Gale Residence in 1904, but construction did not take place until 1909. This design is dominated on the North elevation by the large walled terrace on the ground level, the cantilevered balcony on the second floor and cantilevered roof over the balcony. Viewed from the Northeast. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image...  Continue... 1992.98.1015 1-2
1992
Guggenheim Museum 1992 (1956 - S.400). View of the lines at the Entrance, during the reopening of the Guggenheim Museum. "Label pasted to verso" Guggenheim Reopens. Museum-goers lined up along Fifth Avenue outside the uptown Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York on a bright Sunday morning on June 28, 1992 to visit the reopened cultural institution after a two-year restoration and expansion project. A controversial building, housing additional galleries, rises in the background in contrast to the original Frank Lloyd Wright structure. June 28, 1992. For use Sunday, April 25, 1993 with Catherine Crocker’s New York APN story slugged Museum Money." Label pasted to verso: "Thu May 27 1993. Houston Chronicle Library." Acquired from the archives of the Houston Chronicle. Original 11 x 8 B&W photograph. 1992.121.0918
1992 
Guggenheim Museum(1956 - S.400) 1992. View of entrance and spiral walls. Caption pasted on verso: "New York: In Chicago, Frank Lloyd Wright is best known for his so-called Prairie Style houses, which he created during the early decades of his career. Echoing the long, low, horizontal planes of the regions topography, these structures reflect Wright’s attempts to find an American equivalent of the simple geometry, the fluid spaces and the resonance with nature that he so admired in Japanese architecture. By 1942, however, when Wright was commissioned to design a home for Solomon R. Guggenheim’s impressive collection of modern art, the architect’s delight in horizontal forms had given way to a fascination with spirals. The result was the Guggenheim Museum in New York, a building that continues to trigger awe, frustration and controversy more than 30 years after it first opened its doors." "The Guggenheim Museum has just emerged from a two-year, $60 million restoration and expansion project." Stamped on verso: "August 9 1992." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1992.81.0813
1992 
Guggenheim Museum(1956 - S.400) 1992. View of interior ramps and glass ceiling. The Guggenheim Museum has just completed a two-year, $60 million restoration and expansion project. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1992.82.0813
1992
Arthur Heurtley Residence, Oak park (1902 - S.074) 1992. Viewed from the Southwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1901. This was another home where Wright raised the living spaces, Living, Dining and Kitchen to the second floor. The Entry arch is reached by short stairs on either side of the front Terrace. As you move through the arch, you enter another space, where the front door is on the far right, not centered which would typical in most homes, but a typical to Wright’s designs where the entrances were hidden from the street. Through the front door, you enter a large hall and stairs that lead up to the main level. The face of the house is made of brick, but designed in such a way to create horizontal lines. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image. 1992.96.1015
1992
Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1992. Taken during a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. Viewed from the Northeast. A Victorian home was located one lot South of the Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home in 1900 and hired Frank Lloyd Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills. Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. During the move, Wright turned the home 90 degrees. Where the front door originally faced the street (East), it now faced North obscured from view. A signature of Wright’s. A total redesign created a prairie styled home. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image. 1992.94.1015
1992
Martin Residence (S.100 - 1904) Dining Room Chairs. Set of two Dining Room chairs designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Darwin D. Martin Residence Dining Room, one facing forward, one facing back. Date stamped on verso: "Sep 13 1992". Caption pasted on verso: "These are two of a set of five Frank Lloyd Wright oak dining chairs, which date from about 1904. The set and a matching copy brought $110,000 at an auction in San Francisco." Original 5 x 7 B&W print. For additional photograph see "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House", p148. 1992.71.1110
1992
Nathan G. Moore Residence (1923 - S.034) 1992. Set of 4 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. Viewed from the Southeast. This is the back of the home. Originally designed in 1895, a fire gutted the house 1922. Wright redesigned it the home in 1923. It is constructed of Roman brick. This was the only home Wright designed in a Tutor style. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image...  Continue...
1992.93.1015 1-4
1992
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, 1992. Aerial view of model. The carport is on the far left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Text on Verso: "Model of house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. PD/Scott Shaw. Slug: Wright. Drexler." Stamped on Verso: "Plain Dealer. Sept 10 1992." Photographed by Scott Shaw. Acquired from the archives of The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1992.118.0517
1992
Robie House (1906 S.127) 1992. Viewed from the Northwest. Hand written on verso: "Copies - J. Discher, 12/28/92". Stamped on verso: "Jan 2, 1993". Original 8 x 5.8 B&W photograph. 1992.75.0312
1992
Guy Smith Residence 1992 (1917 - S.204.1). Viewed from the Northeast. In 1911, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171) for Arthur L. Richards and John Williams, real estate developers from Milwaukee. In 1915, Richards worked with Wright again when he developed the American System Built Homes. Prefabricated homes, cut in a factory and sold as a finished package. Wright designed dozens of styles from smaller single story, two story, duplexes and larger homes. The first two-story home to be built was the Guy C. Smith Residence in Chicago. The basement housed the utilities, the Living and Dining Rooms and Kitchen were on the first floor. Four Bedrooms, Bath and a Sleeping Porch above the Porte-Cochere were on the second level. Printed on the verso: "Photographer: Neal. Location: 10410 S. Hoyne. Date 03/30/92." Clipping pasted to verso: "This Wright house features a porte-cochere, with an enclosed sunroom atop the drive-through. Tribune photo by Walter Neal. (Stamped Apr 3 - ‘92)." Photographed by Walter Neal. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1992.112.1116
1992
Melvyn Maxwell Smith Residence Living room, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. (S.288) (1946). North corner of Living Room. Possibly photographed by J. Discher. 1992. This photograph used and published in the Detroit Times on January 2, 1993, 3D. Original B&W photograph, 5 x 7. 1992.66.1109
1992
Richard and Berenice Smith House, Jefferson, Wisconsin, 1992 (1950 - S.337). Exterior view of the entrance. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950. Constructed of Limestone, cypress, plaster and cedar shingles. Caption pasted to verso: "Motifs of Frank Lloyd Wright appear in the soffit and front door of what is known as the Smith House in Jefferson, Wis. At right, light from these ceiling triangles creates the illusion of twinkling stars at night." Stamped on clipping: "Su Feb 16 1992." Original 6.25 x 9 B&W photograph. 1992.124.0719
1992
Richard and Berenice Smith House, Jefferson, Wisconsin, 1992 (1950 - S.337). Interior view of built-in lighting. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950. Constructed of Limestone, cypress, plaster and cedar shingles. Caption pasted to verso: "Motifs of Frank Lloyd Wright appear in the soffit and front door of what is known as the Smith House in Jefferson, Wis. At right, light from these ceiling triangles creates the illusion of twinkling stars at night." Stamped on clipping: "Su Feb 16 1992." Original 6.25 x 9 B&W photograph. 1992.123.0619
1992
Taliesin, Spring Green, Living Room, 1992. Verso: Published August 23, 1992, caption reads: "The living room at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin in Wisconsin holds his furniture designs as well. Photo by Don Greenwood / Special to the Tribune." Hand written: "Living room at Taliesin with its stone hearth, Wright designed furnishings and Oriental art." Additional information concerning the Living Room: According to "Quarterly" Fall 2007, page 11, "During Wright’s lifetime a large Chinese rug was in the living room... The rug seen in this photo (bottom right page 11) was designed by Wright in 1957 for the Max Hoffman residence... While never made for Hoffman, after Wright’s death (1959) it was manufactured for Mrs. Wright, and she placed it in the living room. After Mrs. Wright’s death (1985), the Chinese rug was returned to the living room, but when its condition began to deteriorate, the Hoffman rug was selected to replace it until a new Chinese rug is purchased or he original repaired."  "The living room with earlier rugs." (Top right page 11, is a very similar view by Guerrero.)  Addition images: A) Circa 1940-1953: "Picturing Wright" Guerrero 1994, page 78-79, Chinese rugs.  B) 1990: "Selected Houses 2" Pfeiffer/Futagawa, cover, pages 102-103, Hoffman design.  C) 2001: "Wright for Wright" Howard/Straus , page 64, photographed in the 1990s...  Continue... 1992.67.1209
1992
Frank Wright Thomas Residence (1901 - S.067) 1992. Set of 4 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. In 1901, James Campbell Rogers hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house as a wedding present for his daughter, Susan Ann Rogers, and her husband, Frank Wright Thomas. The Thomas' were married on June 14, 1900. The home is entered through the arch that is nearly hidden on the ground level. Once inside the arch, stairs lead up to the landing and Terrace on the second or main level. Like the Robie House, the main level, Living, Dining, Kitchen, etc., were placed on the second floor. Four bedrooms are on the third floor. This is considered Wright’s first Prairie styled house in Oak Park. Viewed from the Northwest. On the main level, the Living Room is on the left, a door leads out to the porch on the far left. The Dining Room is on the far right...  Continue...
1992.95.1015 1-4
1992
William and Elizabeth Tracy Residence 1992. William and Elizabeth Tracy relaxing on their back terrace. Caption on verso: "Ron Wurzer / Seattle Times. William and Elizabeth Tracy live in one of only three dwellings in the state that was designed by the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The house, with a sound view, was designed in 1954 and the Tracy’s have been the only inhabitants." Newspaper caption attached to verso and stamped Aug 20 1992. Photograph by Ron Wurzer. Published on August 20, 1992 in the Seattle Times. Acquired from the archives of the Seattle Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1992.74.1011
1992
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1992. Set of 5 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Unity Temple in 1904. Unity Temple, the Auditorium, is on the North end, Unity House, for Sunday School rooms and the Kitchen, is on the South end. View of the West side of Unity Temple. Constructed of concrete, six decorative columns adorn the upper portion of the West side. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.
1992.97.1015 1-5
1992
Wright Oak Park Studio Stork Panel (Tree of Life) reproductions, 1992. Two panels hung on the wall. Frank Lloyd Wright designed these panels for the columns at the entrance to his Oak Park studio in 1898. Panels covered all four sides of the column. The Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio Foundation began reproducing these panels in 1990. Like the originals, reproductions were made of plaster and painted to resemble bronze. Printed on verso: "1/3/92. Photographer: Brown. Description: Frank Lloyd Wright Home. Location: Oak Park." Clipping glued to background: "A stork panel from Wright’s Oak Park home." Stamped on clipping: "Feb 9 92." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. 1992.92.0815
1992
Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1889 - 1897 - S.002-004), 1992. Set of 9 images from a trip to Oak Park in March, 1992. While working for Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright designed his own home in Oak Park. It was a shingle styled home with a large brick walled veranda. After opening his own practice, he designed and added a studio which included a reception area, office, Library and two story drafting room. View of Wright’s home from the West. The Office Library can be seen on the far left. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image...  Continue...
1992.101.1015 1-9
1993
1993

Dana-Thomas House packet of 20 Slides 1977-1993 (1993.37). (Published by the Dana-Thomas House Foundation.) "The Dana-Thomas House. The Dana-Thomas House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, for Springfield socialite Susan Lawrence Dana, was completed in 1904. The Dana-Thomas House is administered by the Illinois his stork preservation agency and is listed on the national register. Packet of 20 slides."

1993.37.0305 (1-20)
1993
Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School, Tokyo, Japan, 1993 (1921 - S.213). Caption on face: "07 May 93 -- Tokyo: Front view of Myonichikan 07 May, a former women’s school was designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright before WWII. AFP Photo. Junji Kurokawa - 07/05/93." After completing the Imperial Hotel, Frank Lloyd Wright designed three residences and this school between 1917-1921. The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School was his final project in Japan. Photographed by Junji Kurokawa. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8.25 B&W photograph. 1993.69.0811
1993
Joseph & Helen Husser Residence Dining Room Table (1899 - S.046) 1993. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1899 for the Husser Residence in Chicago. Label pasted to verso: "Important Works by Frank Lloyd Wright and his Contemporaries from the Domino’s Center for Architecture and Design. Saturday, June 12, 1993. Frank Lloyd Wright, Oak Dining Table and Eight Chairs from the Joseph W. Husser House, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1899. Estimate: $500,000 - 800,000." Clipping pasted to verso: "Monaghan was selling a Wright oak dining table and eight chairs from the Joseph W. Husser House, Chicago, at a significant loss." Stamped on clipping: "Jun 13 93". Acquired from the archives of The Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 1993.70.0512
1993
Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling 1993 (1905 - S.113). View of lobby, staircase and balcony. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Frank Lloyd Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Clipping pasted to verso: "A staircase in the atrium of The Rookery Building is one of the features one sees on a tour of architecturally significant buildings in Chicago. Journal photo by Ned Vespa." Stamped on verso: "93 Sep 16." Photographed by Ned Vespa. Original 7.5 x 9.25 B&W photograph. 1993.91.1218
1993
Clarence W. Sondern Residence Armchair, 1993 (1939 - S.279). Clarence Sondern, a laboratory director of a chemical company in Kansas City. The Sondern house was designed by Wright as a Usonian home in 1939. Wright designed three chairs for the home, published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1937-1941 (6)," Pfeiffer, p.183. 1) "Lounge Chair." This chair (pictured) appears to be different than what Wright designed. "Revised chair details:" 2) Upholstered seats and 3) Dining Chair. This chair (pictured) appears to be a closer representation of #2, but with a few minor changes. #3, Dining Chair was also produced, but again with changes. In 1948, Arnold Adler (1948 - S.307) purchased the home and hired Wright to remodel and double the size of the home. This armchair was manufactured of cypress and cypress-faced plywood with upholstery, 30.5 x 24.75 x 26.25. A matching chair was sold at Christie's on May 12, 2005, for $24,000. A pair of Dining Chairs (#3) sold at Wright's Auction on December 11, 2014, for $19,000. They were originally in the Domino Pizza collection. "Frank Lloyd Wright: Preserving an Architectural Heritage," Hanks, pp.106-107, cypress plywood, upholstery. Label pasted to verso: " The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Kansas City, Missouri. 93-12/1. Furniture - American. Wright, Frank Lloyd...  Continue... 1993.80.0715
1993
Edward C. Waller Apartments (1895 S.031) (1993). Edward C. Waller was an important early Wright patron. He lived in River Forest near Wright's William Winslow house. Waller sold Winslow the property upon which his home was built. Waller commissioned several projects to be designed by Wright: the Francisco Terrace Apartments 1895 (S.030) (since demolished); the Waller Apartment 1895 (S.031); the remodeling of his home in River Forest 1899 (S.047); the Edward C. Waller Gates (S.065) and Stables (S.066) 1901; and the Edward C. Waller Bathing Pavilion 1909 (S.166). Waller's son Edward C. Jr. commissioned Midway Gardens 1913 (S.180). The Waller Apartments consisted of five units (numbered right to left). Unit #1 on the East end (right) and #5 to the West end (left). Unit #4 (second from left) was demolished in 1968 after a fire gutted the unit. Center entrance is possibly unit #2. The Francisco Terrace Apartments (S.030) were directly behind these units. Clipping pasted to verso: "The two abandoned properties at 2844 and 2848 W. Walnut were slated by the city to be torn down and would have been had a red light not gone off. The row housed in a small corner of East Garfield Park were designed by 1895 by Frank Lloyd Wright, then a 26-year-old, little known architect. Devereux Bowly Jr. wrote in his book The Poorhouse...  Continue... 1993.65.0311
1993
Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread 1993 (1937 - S.239). Sculpture at Wingspread. View of "Amanti" by Milton Hebald, one of many sculptures at Wingspread. Clipping pasted to verso: "Amanti," a bronze sculpture of two lovers by Milton Hebald, stands at the entrance to the Wingspread Conference Center at 33 E. 4 mile Road, Wind Point. The building was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright as a home for Herbert Fisk Johnson, who turned it into a conference center in 1959. Journal photo by Ronald M. Overdahl." Stamped on clipping: "Jun 8, 1993." Original 7.25 x 10 B&W photograph. 1993.89.0318
1994
1994
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House 1994 (1917 - S.208). Set of 28 exterior photographs during a trip to Los Angeles, September 1994. Designed in 1917 by Frank Lloyd Wright as an appropriate style for Southern California, the house was built in 1920-1921. Barnsdall’s plan for the 36 acre Olive Hill was to include her home, theater and an arts community. Of all the projects Wright designed, only Hollyhock House and two additional residences were built. Residence B was demolished. Barnsdall lived in the home until 1927, when she gave Hollyhock House and eleven surrounding acres to the city of Los Angeles for use as a public art park in memory of her father, Theodore Barnsdall. For the next fifteen years the house was home to the California Art Club. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.
1994.92.1015 1-28
1994
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House 1994 (1917 - S.208). Set of 18 interior photographs during a trip to Los Angeles, September 1994. View of the Living Room Fireplace looking South. The Fireplace is the focal point of the Living Room. "The bas-relief at the fireplace is composed in blocks of art-stone and ranks among the few and great mural abstractions that Wright deigned. Strictly geometric, monochromatic and austere in pattern, it is at the same time rich in references..." Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House, Hoffmann, p.61. Designed in 1917 by Frank Lloyd Wright as an appropriate style for Southern California, the house was built in 1920-1921. Barnsdall’s plan for the 36 acre Olive Hill was to include her home, theater...  Continue...
1994.93.1015 1-18
1994
Aline Barnsdall Residence A 1994 (1920 - S.210). Set of 7 photographs during a trip to Los Angeles, September 1994. View of Residence A from the Southwest. Stairs lead to the second floor. The Dining Room is on the far left, the Kitchen is in the center, Bedrooms on the right. Just to the left of the stairs, a second stairway leads down to the lower level and the entrance to the home, the Entrance Hall and a large two story Living Room. Stairs are not originals. Designed in 1920, Barnsdall’s plan for the 36 acre Olive Hill was to include her home, theater and an arts community. Of all the projects Wright designed, only Hollyhock House and two additional residences were built. Residence B was demolished. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image.
1994.94.1015 1-7
1994
Cassina Barrel Chair 1994. First designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1937 for the Darwin Martin Residence. Slight modifications were made to the design for the Herbert F. Johnson Residence, Wingspread (S.239 - 1937). Barrel chairs can also be found at Taliesin. The chair is facing towards the right. Label pasted to the verso: "Barrel Chair, designed 1937 Frank Lloyd Wright. Cassina USA." Clipping pasted to verso: "A Barrel Chair, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1937." Stamped on clipping: "Su May 15 1994." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1994.111.0619
1994
Charles Ennis Residence, Los Angeles(1923 - S.217), 1994. Set of 9 photographs from a trip to Los Angeles, 1994. Frank Lloyd Wright designed four textile block homes in Los Angeles. This was his last and largest of the four. When you include the chauffeur’s quarters, the home encompasses approximately 6,200 square feet. The home was constructed of more than 27,000 concrete blocks, all made by hand on site. The main house includes a large Living and Dining Room, Kitchen and three bedrooms. Viewed from the South, the back of the house (South elevation), the tall window in the Dining Room is visible on the left. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 35mm color slide and 12 x 8" high res color digital image...  Continue...
1994.90.1015 1-9
1994
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building Executive Office 1994 (1936 - S.237). View of the interior of Samuel C. Johnson’s office. Glass tubing can be seen behind and above Johnson. Hand written on verso: "(Samuel C. Johnson) S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc." and "Sentinel Photo By William Meyer, 10/10/94." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 11 x 8 Color photograph. 1994.108.1117
1994
Seth Peterson Cottage Exterior 1994, three views (1958 - S.430). Caption on face: "Lake Delton, Wis. – June 1, 1994 – Wright-Rent – The Seth Peterson Cottage, with a view of its spectacular stone and glass-walled living and dining area, and an interior and exterior view of the cocoon-like bedroom. From the outside, it is serene and energetic, a composition that at once seems to hug the earth and blast off from it. (Morry Gash/New York Times Photos)." Photographed by Morry Gash. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 7.6 x 10 B&W photograph. 1994.65.0811
1994
Seth Peterson Cottage Interior 1994 (1958 - S.430). Caption on face: "Lake Delton, Wis. – June 1, 1994 – Wright-Rent – Numerous Frank Lloyd Wright houses can be visited as museums or bought, usually at a substantial price. But only one Wright house can be rented on a nightly basis: the Seth Peterson Cottage in Wisconsin. The living room of the cottage is pictured. (Morry Gash/New York Times Photos)." Photographed by Morry Gash. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8.25 B&W photograph. 1994.66.0811
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 154 Suttone Road, the unit on the East corner S.248.2. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the East, the Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is on the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1994.75.0314
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 154 Suttone Road, the unit on the East corner S.248.2. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the East, the Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is on the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1994.76.0314
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 152 Suttone Road, the unit on the North corner S.248.1. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the North, the Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is on the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1994.77.0314
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 152 Suttone Road, the unit on the North corner S.248.1. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the North, the Carport is on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is on the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1994.78.0314
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 156 Suttone Road, the unit on the South corner S.248.3. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the Southeast, the Living Room is on the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1994.79.0314
1994
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1994 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." View of 156 Suttone Road, the unit on the South corner S.248.3. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the south, the Carport is to the left (out of the picture), Living Room on the lower level, with built-in seating and end table on the right.. The Dining Room and Kitchen in the balcony on the second level. Photographed on August 23, 1994 by Jack Boucher. Acquired from and courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 1994.80.0314
1995
1995
Sherman M. Booth Residence Library Table (1915 - S.187) 1995. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright 1916. Walnut, poplar, oak, and brass. 34 x 108 x 38 inches. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright and George Mann Niedecken", 1999, p. 55. Wright designed a similar table for the Bogk Residence (p. 54). Acquired from the Kelmscott Galleries. Stamped on verso: "Date Used Oct 8 1995." Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 1995.67.0214
1995
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence 1995. (1923 - S.216). The Freeman Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s third textile block home in California: 1) Millard (La Miniatura), 2) Storer, 4) Ennis. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcon and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light into the Living Room, creating patters of light on the interior. Deterioration of the textile block is very evident. Set of 24 photographs taken during a trip to California in 1995. 24 Original 6" x 4" Color Photographs and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Images.
1995.78.0216  (1-24)
Circa 1995 Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School (1921 - S.213). Undated set of seven photographs, descriptive sheet and envelop. The Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School began on April 15th, 1921 with thirty students. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Frank Lloyd Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. Arata Endo pasted way in 1951. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photographs by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. He was born in 1927. He attended the Jiyu Gakuen School after it became coed. He worked with his father, and at 30 years old, in 1957 became Wright’s last apprentice from Japan. After returning to Japan he became an architect. He past away in 2003. These photographs were most likely taken in the 1990s before renovations were competed in 2001. Photographs 6 x 4. Descriptive sheet 16.5 x 5.8 folded to 4.1 x 5.8. Envelope 6.4 x 4.5. 1995.57.1111
Photo 1
Photo 1: Birds-eye view of complex in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, and two classrooms on either side. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. Directly across the street, out of view on the left, is the Auditorium designed by Arata Endo. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 2 Photo 2: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 3 Photo 3: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 4 Photo 4: Front view in the spring. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Balcony roof overhang has been braced. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor, two classrooms on either side. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 5 Photo 5: Interior view of Class Room. Most likely taken in the 1990s. Wright’s design included two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 6 Photo 6: Side view in the spring of the additional classrooms on the left. Most likely taken in the 1990s. These additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen today. The Auditorium can be seen in the background across the street. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms, and also responsible for the design of the Auditorium which was designed in the late 1920s. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Photo 7 Photo 7: Auditorium designed in the late 1920s. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was responsible for the design of the Auditorium. Photograph by Raku Endo, son of Arata Endo. 6 x 4.  
Descriptive Description sheet and envelope. "This little school building was designed for the Jiyu-Gakuen - in the same spirit implied by the name of the school - a free spirit. It was intended to be simple happy place for happy children - unpretentious - genuine. It is built in no certified style. It has style all its own. Whether one likes or dislikes it, the style is harmoniously founded on right principles... The architects have felt this in working out this design with Mr. And Mrs. Hani, and are happy to see the building carrying its children as a tree carries its blossoms. The children seem to belong to the building in quite the same way as the flowers belong to the tree, and the building belongs to them as the tree belongs to its flowers... Frank Lloyd Wright, Arata Endo." Text reprinted from "Our Life in the Jiyu Gakuen" 1930. Text in English and Japanese. Descriptive sheet 16.5 x 5.8 folded to 4.1 x 5.8. White envelope 6.4 x 4.5.  
1995
John Storer Residence, 1995 (1923 - S.215). The Storer Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s second textile block home in California: 1) Millard (La Miniatura), 3) Freeman, 4) Ennis. The house was originally designed in 1922 for Charles P. Lowes, Eagle Rock, California, but was never built. Wright adapted the plan, made modifications and designed it for the Storer property. A two-story home, the Entrance, Dining Room, Kitchen, two Bedrooms and Terraces are on the main floor. The upper level includes the Living Room, directly above the Dining Room, two bedrooms as well as two Terraces. From the street, the Living and Dining rooms appear to be a single room, with unbroken windows running from ground to roof. Wright’s son Lloyd Wright supervise the construction of the home. There are four different textile blocks designs were used to construct the Storer House and are 16" x 16" square. Glass was added to the... Continue...
1995.83.1015  (1-24)
1995
George D Sturges House,1995 (1939 - S.272). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939, the deck and nearly half the house is cantilevered over the hillside. The Living Room in this nearly 1200 square foot house covers almost half the house and includes the Dining area and fireplace. The other half includes the kitchen, two bedrooms and bath. The east side of the home has six sets of floor to ceiling double doors that open outward to the cantilevered deck which adds 6 ½ feet in width. Stairs adjacent to the Workspace lead down to the Shop and Utilities below. A second set of stairs directly above, leads from the outside to the roof. Constructed of brick and redwood. John Lautner, apprentice from 1933-38, handled the construction. Wright designed an addition to the home in 1942, but it remained a project. Set of 10 photographs taken during a trip to California in 1995. Original 6" x 4" Color Photograph and 13" x 9" High Res Digital Image.
1995.79.0216  (1-10)
Circa 1995
Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1990s. Viewed from the South. Dining Room on the left, Living Room in the center, Sitting Room on the far right, first floor. Harry Van Pelt is sitting in his 1920 Westcott Automobile in front of the Westcott Residence during the 1990s. The Westcott House Foundation was established in September 2000 to manage the restoration. The house was fully restored and opened to the public on October 15, 2005. Acquired from the Harry Laybourne Collection of Springfield, Ohio, author of "Images of America, Springfield", 1998 and "Springfield, Ohio, Revisited", 2000. Stamped on verso: "Harry Laybourne, Springfield, Ohio". Original 5 x 3.5 Color Photograph. 1995.61.0712
1996
1996
Pope-Leighey Residence Restoration 1996 (S.268 - 1939). Caption on face: "March 31 1996 – Pam pierce and her husband, Kendall, from Pierce Cabinetry of South Carolina, are seen from the roof of the Original Pope-Leighey House checking blue prints for the soon-to-be-restored version of the house while Rick Wightman works on its roof March 27, 1996 in Mount Vernon, Va. More than 50 years after it was built, the Pope-Leighey house is falling apart through no fault of its architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. To save it, the home’s benefactors say they must dismantle, move and rebuild the structure, and forever alter Wright’s design in the process. (AP Photo/Rick Bethem)." Clipping pasted to verso: "People will go to great lengths to save a Frank Lloyd Wright house. In Mt. Vernon, Va., for example, benefactors are dismantling the Pope-Leighey House. The house, designed by Wright, fell into disrepair, so people like Pam and Kendal Pierce of South Carolina (checking blueprints) are helping to dismantle and rebuild it on a different lot. The move will change the design somewhat." Stamped on clipping: "Apr 13 96". Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 9.75 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1996.68.0811
1998
1998
Fallingwater. "Frank Lloyd Wright. A film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick." Photograph includes Fallingwater, Imperial Hotel, S.C. Johnson Wax Company Administration Building, Unity Temple. Label on verso: Frank Lloyd Wright. A film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings: (top left) Fallingwater in Bear Run, Pennsylvania; (top right) the Imperial Hotel in Japan which has since been demolished; (bottom left) the S.C. Johnson Wax Company Administration Building in Racine, Wisconsin; (bottom right) and the Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois, are examples of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work. The brilliant and controversial architect, who revolutionized American architect, is the subject of a new film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novack. ‘Frank Lloyd Wright’, which interweaves Wright’s extraordinary career with his equally tempestuous personal life, will be broadcast on PBS as a ‘General Motors Mark of Excellence Presentation, "Tuesday, Nov, 10 and Wednesday, Nov, 11, 1998. Photo credits: Fallingwater, Courtesy of James Reber and the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives. Imperial Hotel, S.C. Johnson and Unity Temple, Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives." Stamped on verso: "Nov 1998". Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Individual images 4.75 x 3. 1998.67.1011
1998
Guggenheim Museum (1956 - S.400) 1998. Ken Burns and Lynn Novick in front of the Guggenheim Museum. Press photograph for the documentary "Frank Lloyd Wright," which aired November 10-11, 1998. "The museum was one of Wright’s last projects before his death at the age of 91. Ken Burns and Lynn Novick co-direct and co-produce ‘Frank Lloyd Wright,’ a new film about the brilliant and controversial architect, who revolutionized American architecture, "Frank Lloyd Wright,’ which interweaves Wright’s extraordinary career with his equally tempestuous personal life will be broadcast on PBS as a ‘General Motors Mark of Excellence Presentation,’ " Stamped on verso: "Feb 2 1998." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1998.86.1216
1998
Ad for Ken Burns "Frank Lloyd Wright" documentary, 1998. New York Usonian Pavilion 1953 (1953 - S.370). The opening reception for the New York Usonian Exhibition occurred on October 22,1953. Frank Lloyd Wright in the Usonian Pavilion, holding a cup of tea, glancing at the camera. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero just before the exhibition opened. He wrote, "...he paused before a model of Wingspread. I had an assignment from the Ford Motor Company to shoot a portrait of him – but I did not have to pose him even for this one." Behind him to the right, is a model of the San Francisco Call Building model. " Picturing Wright, Guerrero, 1994, p.148. The show included sixteen models, 800 drawings and photographs, and a fully-finished four-room house. It was built on the site for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, in New York City. Text in ad: "Frank Lloyd Wright, a new film by Ken Burns and Linn Novick, interweaves the extraordinary career of the famous architect – shown here in 1953 at age 86 – with his equally controversial personal life. Photo: Pedro E Guerrero/General Motors. 1998 (11/10-11/11/98, 9:00 p.m. ET, 90-minute program)" Original 5.5 x 6 B&W photograph. 1998.96.0913
1998

S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building 1998 (1936 - S.237). Set of 16 35mm slides by an unknown photographer. Images are underexposed, but enhanced. 1) View of the Research Tower from the North. The Great Workroom is beyond the tower. 2) A series of circular pools lead from the parking area to the main Entrance. 3) Detail of the circular pool. 4) Main entrance to the Great Workroom from the Carport. 5) Detail of the glass tubing to the left and right of the entrance to the Great Workroom. 6) View of the Lobby from the Great Workroom. Monolithic dendriform columns have a diameter of 9 inches at the base and gradually widen to 2 feet 10 inches at the top, then spread out to a diameter of 18 feet 6 inches. The tallest columns are in the lobby at 31 feet tall, and the great room which are 21 feet 7.5 inches high. "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building", Lipman, 1986, p.50. 7) View of the glass tubing and dendriform columns in the Lobby. Monolithic dendriform columns have a metal base embedded in the floor. Golf tee in shape, the base has a diameter of 9 inches, gradually widen to 2 feet 10 inches at the top, then spread out to a diameter of 18 feet 6 inches. The tallest columns are in the lobby at 31 feet tall, and the great room which are 21 feet 7.5 inches high... Continue...

1998.94.1012 (1-16)
1998
Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread Cantilevered Master Bedroom 1998 (1937 - S.239). Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home of Herbert F. Johnson, Wingspread, in 1937. View of the cantilevered master bedroom. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wingspread, a Milwaukee Public Television Production, premieres Tuesday, Nov. 10, (1998) at 9:30 p.m., on WMVS-TV. Photo: Marshall Savick." Photographed by Marshall Savick. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Public Television. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1998.102.0619
1998
Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread Observation Staircase 1998 (1937 - S.239). Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home of Herbert F. Johnson, Wingspread, in 1937. View of the central staircase that leads up to the observation tower. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wingspread, a Milwaukee Public Television Production, premieres Tuesday, Nov. 10, (1998) at 9:30 p.m., on WMVS-TV. Photo: Marshall Savick." Photographed by Marshall Savick. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Public Television. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1998.103.0619
1998
Frank Lloyd Wright by Ken Burns and Kim Novick Commentators and Advisors 1998. Text from Press Release: "Some of the on-screen commentators and advisors who shared their thoughts and opinions on Frank Lloyd Wright. The brilliant and controversial architect, who revolutionized American architecture, is the subject of a new two-part documentary film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. "Frank Lloyd Wright," which interweaves Wright's extraordinary career with his equally tempestuous personal life, will be broadcast on PBS as a "General Motors Mark of Excellence Presentation" Top Row, left to right: 1) Paul Goldberger, architecture critic (on-screen commentator); 2) Meryle Secrest, biographer (on-screen commentator); 3) Tim Wright, grandson (on-screen commentator); 4) Robert A.M. Stern, architect (on-screen Commentator and advisor). Bottom Row, left to right: 1) Philip Johnson, architect (on-screen commentator); 2) Eric Lloyd Wright, grandson (on-screen commentator); 3) Neil Levine, architectural historian (on-screen commentator and advisor); 4) Maya Lin, artist (on screen commentator)." Stamped on verso: "Nov 17 1998." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1998.101.0119
 
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