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Wright Studies

William L. Thaxton Residence (1954 - S.384)

  INTRODUCTION    FLOOR PLAN    PERSPECTIVE    1958    1991    2015 EXTERIOR    2015 INTERIOR  
 
Introduction
     

On a trip to Austin in August for our niece's wedding, we decided to take a side trip to Houston to visit the Thaxton Residence, The home was for sale, and Perry, from Sotheby's International Reality graciously gave us a tour of the gated property.
       In 1954, William L. Thaxton, an insurance executive, commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design the only home in Houston, Texas. The 1,800 square foot house, originally estimated to cost $25,000-35,000, ended up costing about $125,000 to build. "You didn't work with Mr. Wright," said Mr. Thaxton, "you presented Mr. Wright with a piece of property." The outdoor swimming pool adjacent to the master bedroom was originally designed to be partially inside the master bedroom, but Thaxton dissuaded by him.
       The Thaxtons sold the home in the late 1960s, and the  integrity of the Wright design was all but lost through a succession of owners. The custom furniture Wright designed to correspond with the homes' geometric shape, was torn out long ago.
       In 1983 Brian Nivins purchased the 1.2 acre property with the intent of demolishing the home and building another, But after finding a different piece of property to build on, he left the house to sit unoccupied.
       In 1991, after less than 40 years, and many additions that obliterated Wright's design, the house was put on the market again, and nearly demolished. The home was purchased by Drs. Betty Lee and Allen F. Gaw, architecture enthusiasts who restored the home to Wright's original plans and added a large addition. “It was dilapidated and the beautiful redwood paneling had been

 

painted over with many coats of paint,” said Dr. Gaw. (Houston House And Home, October 2014.)
 
      Gaw went to visit the Thaxtons in the 1990s. “Originally, Wright had not planned on air conditioning the house, and when Thaxton explained ‘this is Houston; this is swampland,’ Wright relented but would not let his original design be altered,” Gaw says. "Instead, all the AC ducts had to be inserted into the foundation, and the cool air comes out of the floor. Because of the change, the foundation was made about three feet deep, with the side benefit that, after 60 years, the foundation is still solid."
       Thaxton also told Gaw that the motivation behind having Wright design the house was that he hoped to develop a subdivision. It was in a densely wooded area – the Memorial area – then considered out in the sticks – and he believed if a famous architect built a home there, others would follow.
       The couple worked with Bob Inaba at Kirksey Architects to restore the house and to build the substantial annex that wraps around the back of the Wright house, touching it at either end but otherwise stepping back from it, Fox says. (Houston House And Home, October 2014.)
       The original Usonian home was designed utilizing a 120/60 degree parallelogram and constructed of concrete block. The concrete blocks step inward every two rows, as the walls rise upward from the foundation. The red cement floors is inscribed with the 120/60-degree diamond module, each side of the diamond being 4 feet long.
       August 26, 2015

 
 
 
Thaxton Residence Floor Plan
 
Floor Plan courtesy of William Storrer, adapted by Douglas M. Steiner.
 
 
 
William Thaxton Residence Perspective
 
William L. Thaxton Residence Perspective. Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.
 
 
 
Thaxton Residence - House & Home August 1958
 
Date: 1958

Title: House & Home - August 1958 (Published monthly by Time Inc., New York) (Note: Photograph on the cover is flipped horizontally.)

Author: Anonymous; Wright, Frank Lloyd

Description: "3 New Homes By Frank Lloyd Wright." 1: Harper House, St. Joseph; 2: Thaxton House, Bunker Hill (Houston); 3: Austin House, Greenvillle.
1 House in St. Joseph, Michigan.
2 House in Houston, Texas. Test on page 106: This house is a Frank Lloyd Wright solution for the large suburban lot. On the problem of designing for a one or two acre site Mr. Wright says: "We will have a good garden. The house is planned to wrap around two sides of this garden. We must have as big a living room with as much vista and garden coming in as we can afford, with a fireplace in it, and open bookshelves, a dining table in the alcove, benches, and living room tables built-in." A large screened porch virtually doubles the size of the living room, since it can be used all year round in temperate Houston. There is no roof over this porch – only screening. The Bedrooms turn off the living room at a 30o angle to enclose the garden. Street side of the house is almost entirely closed. See Thaxton Residence Study.
3 House in Greenville, South Carolina.
(Sweeney 1250)

Size: 9.25 x 12.5

Pages: Pp Cover 101-113

S#: 1
250.00.0517
   
1) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Maid's room is on the left, the Carport and Entrance left of center, the Living Room and Workspace (Kitchen) on the right. The fascia and Carport wood screen detailing appear to be diamond shaped. According to Storrer, the detailing in the wood fascia alone contained more than nine hundred pieces of trim. A light pole begins at the far end of the wood screen, extends through the roof, and continues skyward. Published on page 101, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
2) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The three Bedrooms are on the left, the Master Bedroom in the foreground. The Screened Terrace and Living Room is in the center, the Maid's room is on the right. Published on the cover of House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
3) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southwest. The three Bedrooms are on the far left, the Screened Terrace and Living Room is in the center, the Maid's room is on the right. Caption: "Screened porch and the living room behind it overlook the private rear garden. Swimming pool (far left) is feature of the garden." Published on page 106, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
4) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northeast. The Dining Room is on the far left, the Living Room is in the center, the Screened Terrace is on the right. Caption: "Screened porch is an extension of the living room. The two areas open to each other through glass doors. To give an uninterrupted sense of the flow of space, Mr. Wright kept the floors on the same level and used the same polished concrete, with low thresholds under doors." Published on page 107, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
5) Thaxton Residence viewed from the East. Master Bedroom. Caption: "Bedroom also opens to a view of the garden. All walls are of standard 8"x8"x16" concrete block, set back 1/2" every second course. The result is a slight batter to the walls, and distinctive horizontal lines." Published on page 107, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
 
 
Thaxton Residence (1991)
 
Thaxton Residence 1991. Caption on face of photograph: "Houston, April 22, 1991 - Wright - A battle has ensued over a house designed in 1954 by Frank Lloyd Wright which has been put up for sale in Houston. Several non-Wright addictions, including iconic columns, have encouraged offers from developers to tear down the house while Wright enthusiasts want it renovated. F. Carter Smith / New York Times Photo.
 
Detail of the Thaxton Residence 1991.
 
 
 
Thaxton Residence Exterior - By Douglas M. Steiner (2015)
 

The basic designed for the Thaxton Residence utilizes a 120/60 degree parallelogram, a diamond shape, The red cement floors and patio are inscribed with the same diamond module, each side of is 4 feet long. The shape of the pool follows the same angles. The open space between the Maid's room and the Living Room has been enclosed with a doorway. Each had it's own entrance, and what was stereotypically Wright, hidden from view as you approached the house.
       The only windows on the Southern wall of the Living room are the 8" x 8" holes that run horizontally under the roof. The windows and doors on the opposite side are floor to ceiling. The built-in lighting is triangular in shape. In addition to the missing wood details in the fascia, the original vertical slats that enclose the Carport, held five short horizontal pieces between each slat. Every other space was consistent, creating a pattern that some-what reflected the feel of the fascia. The chimney has been extended four courses upward.
       The walls are constructed of standard concrete block. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. As the walls rise from the ground, each two courses of block step inward. The Living Room walls are topped by small 8" x 8" windows and half-blocks that are turned 45 degrees, forming a diamond. Those blocks

 

are finished at the bottom with a diamond shape. The mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting the horizontal lines.
       The walls of the Workspace and Maid's Bedroom are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. There are built-in planters and mitered glass windows. The roof line over the Master Bedroom cantilevers out to a point. The pool is built right next to the house, the pool wall actually becoming part of the foundation. A thin 16" floor to ceiling doorway leads directly from the Master Bath to the pool. One step outward and William Thaxton was in the pool. The Terrace originally was screened in, as-well-as the trellis above, virtually doubling the size of the Living Room.
       The "U" shaped 1991 addition touches the home on either end. Passage is gained through the Maid's Bedroom on one end, and what was originally a bathroom on the other end.  Above the 16" doorway which leads to the original Maid's Room a 16" wide clerestory window aligns above.
       Although changes were made to the original design, most of the design details were retained, far better than the alternative, demolition.
       The following 36 exterior images were photographed on August 26, 2015.

     
1) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southeast as you enter the property from the street. The Entrance is on the left, the Living Room is in the center, the Workspace is on the right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-1)
 
2) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southeast. The Entrance is on the left, the Living Room is in the center, the Workspace is on the right. The upper roof in the center background is from the separate addition. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-2)
 
3) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Entrance is on the left, the Living Room, which is nearly closed off to the street view is in the center, the Workspace is on the right. The roof fascia detail has been eliminated and simplified. The fireplace chimney has also been extended upward. (See 1958 image.) 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-3)
 
3B) Thaxton Residence 1958. The detailing on the wood fascia and between the vertical slats of the Carport appear to be diamond shaped. According to Storrer, the detailing in the wood fascia alone contained more than nine hundred pieces of trim. Published in, and courtesy of House & Home, August 1958.
 
4) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southwest. The Entrance is in the foreground. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-4)
 
5) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southwest. The 1991 addition can be seen on the left. The Maid's Bedroom is in the center, the Carport is on the right. The walls of the Bedroom are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. The "U" shaped addition touches the home on either end. The passage from original to addition is attained through the original Maid's Bedroom. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-5)
 
6) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The 1991 addition can be seen on the far left. The Maid's Bedroom is on the left, the Entrance is in the center, the Carport and Living Room is to the right. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. The "U" shaped addition touches the home on either end. The passage from original to addition is attained through the original Maid's Bedroom. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-6)
 
7) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Entrance is on the left, the Carport and Living Room is to the right. This front door was originally an open space between the Maid's Bedroom on the left and Living Room on the right. Each had it's own entrance, and what was stereotypically Wright, hidden from view as you approached the house. The mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting the horizontal lines. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-7)
 
8) Thaxton Residence. This front door was originally an open space between the Maid's Bedroom on the left and Living Room on the right. Each had it's own entrance, and what was stereotypically Wright, hidden from view as you approached the house. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-8)
 
9) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Entrance is on the left, Living Room in the center, the Workspace is on the right. The only windows on the Southern wall of the Living room are the 8" x 8" holes that run horizontally under the roof. The windows and doors on the opposite side are floor to ceiling. The built-in lighting is triangular in shape. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-9)
 
10) Thaxton Residence. My brother-in-law enjoyed contemplating the genius of Wright. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-10)
 
11) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. In addition to the missing wood details in the fascia, the original vertical slats that enclose the Carport on the left, originally held five short horizontal pieces between each slat. Every other space was consistent, creating a pattern that some-what reflected the feel of the fascia. The chimney has also been extended upward four courses upward. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-11)
 
12) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Carport is on the far left, the Living Room is in the center, the Workspace (kitchen) is on the far right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-12)
 
13) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The Living Room is on the far left, the Workspace (kitchen) is on the right. The walls are constructed of standard concrete block. As the walls rise from the ground, each two courses of block step inward. They are topped by small 8" x 8" windows and half-blocks that are turned 45 degrees, forming a diamond. Those blocks are finished at the bottom with a diamond shape. The mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting the horizontal lines. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-13)
 
13B) Detail of the block wall. The walls are constructed of standard concrete block. As the walls rise from the ground, each two courses of block step inward. They are topped by small 8" x 8" windows and half-blocks that are turned 45 degrees, forming a diamond. Those blocks are finished at the bottom with a diamond shape.
 
14) Thaxton Residence viewed from the South. The exterior of the Workspace (kitchen). The walls of the Workspace, like the Maid's Bedroom are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-14)
 
15) Thaxton Residence viewed from the East. The exterior of the Workspace (kitchen). 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-15)
 
16) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. We continue counter-clockwise around the house. The 1991 addition can be seen on the left. The Bedroom's are on the right. The passage from original to addition is attained through the original Bath that was removed. The Workspace can be seen in the background. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-16)
 
17) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. We continue counter-clockwise around the house. The 1991 addition can be seen on the left. The Bedroom's are on the right. The passage from original to addition is attained through the original Bath that was removed. The Workspace can be seen in the background. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-17)
 
18) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The Master Bedroom is on the left, the 1991 addition in the background to the right. A built-in planter is in the center foreground. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-18)
 
19) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The two corner windows of the Master Bedroom are mitered glass. A built-in planter is in the foreground. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-19)
 
20) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. The 1991 addition is in the background on the left. the horizontal row of bedroom windows open outward. The corner window of the Master Bedroom is mitered glass, essentially removing from view the corner from the inside. A built-in planter is in the foreground. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-20)
 
21) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. The roof line over the Master Bedroom cantilevers out to a point. A built-in planter is in the foreground. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. The pool is built right next to the house, the pool wall actually becoming part of the foundation. The thin 16" floor to ceiling doorway to the right leads directly from the Master Bath to the pool. One step outward and William Thaxton was in the pool. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-21)
 
22) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. Of course you would want to shower off without having to go back inside the house. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-22)
 
23) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The Master Bedroom is on the left, the Living Room is on the right. A built-in planter is in the foreground. The pool is built right next to the house, the pool wall is part of the foundation. The walls are constructed of standard concrete block. As the walls rise from the ground, each two courses of block step inward.  The mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting the horizontal lines. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-23)
 
24) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The Master Bedroom is on the left, the Living Room is on the right. A built-in planter is in the foreground. The pool is built right next to the house, the pool wall is part of the foundation. The walls are constructed of standard concrete block. As the walls rise from the ground, each two courses of block step inward.  20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-24)
 
25) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. The was designed utilizing a 120/60 degree parallelogram, a diamond shape, The red cement floors and patio are inscribed with the 120/60-degree diamond module, each side of the diamond being 4 feet long. The shape of the pool follows the same angles. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-25)
 
Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The three Bedrooms are on the left, the Master Bedroom in the foreground. The Screened Terrace and Living Room is in the center, the Maid's room is on the right. Published on the cover of House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
26) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. The Master Bedroom and Bath are on the left, the Living Room is on the right. The thin 16" floor to ceiling doorway leads directly from the Master Bath to the pool. One step outward and William Thaxton was in the pool. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-26)
 
27) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The Living Room is towards the left, the original Maid's Bedroom is toward the right, the 1991 addition is on the right. The doors and windows of the Living Room run floor to ceiling, the doors open outward. The walls of the Maid's Bedroom, like the Workspace are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-27)
 
28) Thaxton Residence viewed from the West. The Master Bedroom is on the left, the Living Room is on the right. The Terrace originally was screened in, as-well-as the trellis above, virtually doubling the size of the Living Room. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-28)
 
Thaxton Residence viewed from the Southwest. The three Bedrooms are on the far left, the Screened Terrace and Living Room is in the center, the Maid's room is on the right. Caption: "Screened porch and the living room behind it overlook the private rear garden. Swimming pool (far left) is feature of the garden." Published on page 106, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
29) Thaxton Residence viewed from the North. The Living Room is on the left, the 1991 addition is on the right.  The "U" shaped addition joins the home on either end of the original home. The passage from original to addition is gained through the original Maid's Bedroom. The walls of the Maid's Bedroom, like the Workspace are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-29)
 
30) Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northwest. The Living Room is on the left, the Maid's Room is in the center, the 1991 addition is on the right.  The "U" shaped addition joins the home on either end of the original home. The passage from original to addition is gained through the original Maid's Bedroom. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-30)
 
31) Thaxton Residence viewed from the West. The Living Room is on the left, the Maid's Room is in the center, the 1991 addition is on the right. The walls of the Maid's Bedroom, like the Workspace are 20 courses, over 13 feet high. Above the 16" doorway which leads to the original Maid's Room a 16" wide clerestory window aligns above. My sister-in-law is enthralled with Wright's design. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-31)
 
32) Thaxton Residence viewed from the West. Detail of the Maid's clerestory window. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.25.0815-32)
 
33) Thaxton Residence. Detail of the trellis which were originally dotted with a row of diamonds. (ST#2015.25.0815-33)
 
34) Thaxton Residence. Detail of the trellis support. (ST#2015.25.0815-34)
 
35) Thaxton Residence. Detail of the trellis support. (ST#2015.25.0815-35)
 
Text photographs copyright Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
 
 
Thaxton Residence Interior - By Douglas M. Steiner (2015)
 

When the Thaxton Residence was first constructed the main house and the Maid's room were separate, but connected by the roof and the wood screen. Redwood was liberally used throughout the interior. Lighting inset into the ceiling was triangular in shape using 60 degree angles. Wright dropped ceiling above the entrance, so as you enter, the ceiling height in the Living Room seems to expand. As the walls rise from ground level, each two courses of block step inward. Mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting horizontal lines. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle.
       The Terrace was originally screened in at the trellis supports, doubling the size of the Living Room. The red cement floors is inscribed with the 120/60-degree diamond module, each side of the diamond being 4 feet long. The fireplace opening is 48" high by about 80" wide. Redwood was used for the built-in seating, cabinetry, paneling and trim. The concrete block walls in the Living Room are topped by small 8" x 8" windows and half-blocks that are turned 45 degrees, forming diamonds.

 

       The dropped ceiling in the Entrance, continues around the wall and ties into the built-in cabinetry. The dining room table utilizes 60 and 120 degree angles.
       The interior walls of the Workspace consist of 19 courses, 12 1/2 feet high, 20 courses on the exterior. Clerestory windows and skylights lighten in the interior of the Workspace. The Bath was removed to allow a passage from the original Wright home to the 1991 addition. Not only was the wall removed between the Bath and the first Bedroom, but the Southwest hallway wall was also removed enlarging the rooms square footage. The closet doors as-well-as the built-in cabinets along the windows have been removed. The wall between the second and third bedroom has been removed. The built-in cabinetry that exists was in the middle Bedroom. This thin 16" floor to ceiling exterior doorway in the Master Bath leads directly to the pool. One step outward and William Thaxton was in the pool.
       The following 30 interior images were photographed on August 26, 2015.

     
1) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the South. This entrance area was originally enclosed on the left with the wood screen, but open on the right. The front door was on the left side of the block wall. The Living Room is to the right. Redwood was liberally used throughout the interior. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-1)
 
2) Thaxton Residence interior. Inset lighting are triangular in shape using 60 degree angles. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-2)
 
3) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Southwest. This entrance area was originally enclosed on the left with the wood screen, but open on the right. The front door was originally between the end of the wood screen on the left and the center corner of the block wall. Wright dropped ceiling above the entrance, so as you enter through the dropped ceiling, the Living Room seems to expand as you enter. The Living Room is straight ahead, the Dining Room is in the background. Redwood was liberally used throughout the interior. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-3)
 
4) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Southwest. The original front door was on the concrete block wall corner in the foreground. The Living Room is straight ahead, the Dining Room is in the background. As the walls rise from ground level, each two courses of block step inward. Mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting horizontal lines. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-4)
 
5) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the South. The Terrace on the left was originally screened in at the trellis supports, doubling the size of the Living Room. The Dining Room and fireplace are to the right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-5)
 
6) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Southwest. The Dining Room is on the left, the fireplace is in the center, built-in seating to the right. Redwood trim and paneling was used throughout the house. The red cement floors is inscribed with the 120/60-degree diamond module, each side of the diamond being 4 feet long. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-6)
7) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the West. The built-in dining room table is on the left. The fireplace opening is 48" high by about 80" wide. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-7)
7B) Detail of the built-in dining room table and stools. (ST#2015.26.0815-7B)
 
8) Thaxton Residence interior. The built-in ties into the 120 degree corner. (ST#2015.26.0815-8)
 
9) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the North. Redwood was used for the built-in seating, cabinetry, paneling and trim. The concrete block walls in the Living Room are topped by small 8" x 8" windows and half-blocks that are turned 45 degrees, forming diamonds. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-9)
 
Thaxton Residence viewed from the Northeast. The Dining Room is on the far left, the Living Room is in the center, the Screened Terrace is on the right. Caption: "Screened porch is an extension of the living room. The two areas open to each other through glass doors. To give an uninterrupted sense of the flow of space, Mr. Wright kept the floors on the same level and used the same polished concrete, with low thresholds under doors." Published on page 107, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
10) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. The end of the built-in seating turns 120 degrees as it abuts to the built-in cabinetry. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-10)
 
11) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the North. The Entrance is to the right. The dropped ceiling in the Entrance, continues around the wall and ties into the built-in cabinetry. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-11)
 
12) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. The Entrance is to the right. The dropped ceiling in the Entrance, continues around the wall and ties into the built-in cabinetry. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-12)
 
13) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. Detail of the built-in cabinetry. Redwood was used throughout the interior. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-13)
 
14) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the built-in dining room table and stools. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-14)
 
15) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the built-in dining room table and stools. The table utilizes 60 and 120 degree angles. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-15)
 
16) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the built-in dining room table. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-16)
 
17) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the built-in dining room table. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-17)
 
18) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the built-in dining room table. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-18)
 
19) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the dining room stool. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-19)
 
20) Thaxton Residence interior Workspace (Kitchen). The ceiling in the hall to the right, is dropped down to the level of the Entrance, then opens up as you enter the Workspace. The interior walls of the Workspace consist of 19 courses, 12 1/2 feet high, 20 courses on the exterior. Clerestory windows and skylights lighten in the interior of the Workspace. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-20)
 
21) Thaxton Residence interior Workspace (Kitchen). View of the upper portion of the Workspace. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-21)
 
22) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the West. We are in the first Bedroom, the Workspace is to the right behind the wall. The Bath was removed to allow a passage from the original Wright home to the 1991 addition. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-22)
 
23) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. We are in the 1991 addition, the workspace is in the center behind the wall, the Dining Room can be seen down the hall. The blue picture is in the Dining Room. The Bedrooms are to the right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-23)
 
24) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. We are in the 1991 addition, the workspace is in the center behind the wall, the Dining Room can be seen at he end of the wall to the right. The door to the far left was added, the open doorway leads to the Workspace, and was an exterior door. The Bath was removed to allow a passage from the original Wright home to the 1991 addition. The blue picture is in the Dining Room. The Bedrooms are to the right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-24)
 
25) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the East. Just as you enter the original Wright house from the 1991 addition, as you look to the right you are into the first Bedroom. The Dining and Living Rooms can bee seen on the far left. Not only was the wall removed between the Bath and this Bedroom (to the left), but the Southwest hallway wall was also removed enlarging the rooms square footage. The closet doors to the right as-well-as the built-in cabinets along the windows on the far right have been removed. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-25)
 
26) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northeast. Passing through the first Bedroom. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-26)
 
27) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northwest. The wall between the second and third bedroom has been removed. The built-in cabinetry was in the middle Bedroom. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-27)
 
28) Thaxton Residence interior viewed from the Northwest. The wall between the second and third bedroom has been removed. The built-in cabinetry on the left was in the middle Bedroom. The Dining Room can be seen through the doorway on the right. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-28)
 
Thaxton Residence viewed from the East. Master Bedroom. Caption: "Bedroom also opens to a view of the garden. All walls are of standard 8"x8"x16" concrete block, set back 1/2" every second course. The result is a slight batter to the walls, and distinctive horizontal lines." Published on page 107, House & Home, August 1958. Courtesy of House & Home.
 
29) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the Master Bath. This thin 16" floor to ceiling doorway leads directly from the Master Bath to the pool. One step outward and William Thaxton was in the pool. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-29)
 
30) Thaxton Residence interior. View of the Master Bath. This triangle skylight allows daylight into the Master Bath. 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2015.26.0815-30)
 
Text photographs copyright Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2015.
 
 
 
WILLIAM L. THAXTON RESIDENCE (1954 - S.384)
   
Date: 1991

Title: William L. Thaxton Residence (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX.

Description: Caption on face: "Houston, April 22, 1991 - Wright - A battle has ensued over a house designed in 1954 by Frank Lloyd Wright which has been put up for sale in Houston. Several non-Wright addictions, including iconic columns, have encouraged offers from developers to tear down the house while Wright enthusiasts want it renovated. F. Carter Smith / New York Times Photo.

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1991.64.0212

   
Date: 2015

Title: William L. Thaxton Residence, 2015 (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX.

Description: Set of 36 exterior images of the Thaxton Residence photographed on August 26, 2015. The basic designed for the Thaxton Residence utilizes a 120/60 degree parallelogram, a diamond shape, The red cement floors and patio are inscribed with the same diamond module, each side of is 4 feet long. The shape of the pool follows the same angles. The open space between the Maid's room and the Living Room has been enclosed with a doorway. Each had it's own entrance, and what was stereotypically Wright, hidden from view as you approached the house. The only windows on the Southern wall of the Living room are the 8" x 8" holes that run horizontally under the roof. The windows and doors on the opposite side are...  Continue...

Size: 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph.

ST#:
2015.25.0617 (1-36)
   


 (See additional images.)
   
Date: 2015

Title: William L. Thaxton Residence, 2015 (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX.

Description: Set of 30 interior images of the Thaxton Residence photographed on August 26, 2015. When the Thaxton Residence was first constructed the main house and the Maid's room were separate, but connected by the roof and the wood screen. Redwood was liberally used throughout the interior. Lighting inset into the ceiling was triangular in shape using 60 degree angles. Wright dropped ceiling above the entrance, so as you enter, the ceiling height in the Living Room seems to expand. As the walls rise from ground level, each two courses of block step inward. Mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting horizontal lines. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle...  Continue...
Size: 20 x 13.5 high res digital color photograph.

ST#: 2015.26.0617 (1-30)
   


 (See additional images.)
   
   
 
Additional Wright Studies
SEE ADDITIONAL WRIGHT STUDIES
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 
 

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