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PHOTOS 2010 - 2018
 
  2010    2012    2013    2014    2015    2016    2017    2018    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
2010
2010
American System-Built Homes, Arthur L. Richards Duplex Apartments, 2010 (1916 - S.201). Exterior view of the South elevation from Burnham Street. When facing the four duplexes, this is the duplex on the right (East), 2720-22 W. Burnham Street. Arthur Richards built four duplex in a row on this block. 2720-2734 W. Burnham Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photographed in June 2010, by James W. Rosenthal. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 2010.39.0519
2010
American System-Built Homes, Arthur L. Richards Duplex Apartments, 2010 (1916 - S.201). Interior view of the Living Room, looking North. When facing the four duplexes, this is the duplex on the right (East), 2720-22 W. Burnham Street. Arthur Richards built four duplex in a row on this block. 2720-2734 W. Burnham Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photographed in June 2010, by James W. Rosenthal. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 2010.40.0519
2010
Fallingwater HABS Sheet 11 of 11, 2010 (1935 - S.230). Historic American Buildings Survey PA-5346 Details. Includes drawings of the Desk, Master Bedroom and Dressing Room Lamps. 2010 Charles E. Peterson Prize Competition Entry. Drawn by: John Fritsch, Andrew Lallithin, Brent Schriefer, Sara Vandenbark, & Nicole Zuber. Kent State University Caed. Fallingwater was designed in 1935. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 2010.17.0114
2010
Guggenheim Museum, Set of 29 photographs. No Beginning, No End. Frank Lloyd Wright was first approached in June 1943 to design the Guggenheim Museum. He immediately began conceptual drawings, but it would take over two years to approve the final drawings. On September 20, 1945 the model of the Guggenheim Museum was unveiled. From October 22 - December 13, 1953, the Guggenheim hosted the exhibit "Sixty Years of Living Architecture." Wright designed, and Guggenheim built the Usonian Exhibition House on the site of the Guggenheim Museum. On May 4, 1956 Harry Guggenheim announced the beginning of construction, and Ground was finally broken on August 14, 1956. The Guggenheim Museum opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after Wright’s death. This set of 29 images were taken in March 2010, on a trip to New York City. We approached the Guggenheim from across the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reserve in Central Park. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner. 2010.21.1114 (1-29)
2012
2012  Taliesin West (1937 - S.241) 2012. Original press photograph for Drama in the Desert. Text on face: "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright planned his winter home near Phoenix to become a part of the desert landscape which he accomplished with broad steps joining various mesa-like levels and landscaping in native desert plants. This exterior view looks toward the entrance to the late architect's home which adjoins the school he operated for many years." Original 8 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 2012.11.0613
2013
2013
Taliesin III, Spring Green entrance, 2013 (1925 - S.218). The "Entrance Wall" still exists, but the road does not. Viewed from the Northeast, looking Southwest. The mailbox is gone, but the lower wall that formed the base for the mailbox still exists. The matching lower wall on the right side, that was in front of the stone with the letters "Taliesin" carved in it, is gone. Photographed in September 2013. Courtesy of Google. Original 10 x 6 color photograph. 2013.11.0514
2014
2014
Benjamin Adelman Residence, 2014 (1953 - S.344). Set of 50 images of the Exterior of the Adelman Residence, photographed in April 17, 2014 by Douglas M. Steiner. We had that opportunity at the Adelman Residence. The owners were very gracious and allowed us not only to closely view the exterior, but also the interior. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home in 1951 as a summer cottage. In 1957, Wright enlarged the Living and Master Bedroom of the main house. In 1988, the main home was extensively renovation and enlarged to the North by Fred Bloch, an architect who had worked under Edgar Tafel. The main house and guest wing were also joining by enclosing the walkway. Although the 1988 renovation was extensive, it maintained the 1' x 2' block dimensions, and 1' increments in the roof fascia. There are also extensive sections from the original 1951 Wright design and Wright's 1957 remodel that remain intact. Original 10 x 7.5 color image. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright Study. (ST#2014.20.0414) (1-50) 2014.20.0414
(1-50)
2014
Benjamin Adelman Residence, 2014 (1953 - S.344). Set of 9 images of the Interior of the Adelman Residence, photographed in April 17, 2014 by Douglas M. Steiner. We had that opportunity at the Adelman Residence. The owners were very gracious and allowed us not only to closely view the exterior, but also the interior. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home in 1951 as a summer cottage. In 1957, Wright enlarged the Living and Master Bedroom of the main house. In 1988, the main home was extensively renovation and enlarged to the North by Fred Bloch, an architect who had worked under Edgar Tafel. Although the 1988 renovation was extensive, it maintained the 1' x 2' block dimensions, and 1' increments in the roof fascia. There are also extensive sections from the original 1951 Wright design and Wright's 1957 remodel that remain intact. Original 10 x 7.5 color image. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright Study. (ST#2014.21.0414) (1-9) 2014.21.0414
(1-9)
2014
Benjamin Adelman Residence, 2014 (1953 - S.344). Set of 14 images of the Adelman Residence Guest House, photographed in April 17, 2014 by Douglas M. Steiner. We had that opportunity at the Adelman Residence. The owners were very gracious and allowed us not only to closely view the exterior, but also the interior. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the home in 1951 as a summer cottage. In 1957, Wright enlarged the Living and Master Bedroom of the main house. The original Carport is now enclosed. In 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed an addition to the back of the Carport, to be used the "Servant's Room." It appears that the Carport was enclosed instead. Windows were added to the two front corners. Original 10 x 7.5 color image. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright Study. (ST#2014.22.0414) (1-14) 2014.22.0414
(1-14)
2014
Jorgine Boomer Residence, 2014 (1953 - S.361). Set of 24 images of the exterior of the Boomer Residence, photographed on April 15, 2014 by Douglas M. Steiner. As we approached the home from the east, the first thing that became apparent was the extreme measures that had been taken to reduce the desert growth which had engulfed the property and the home ten years earlier. Fifty years of growth had created a dense forest. The home is anchored to the desert with walls that are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete, in the nature of Taliesin West. The concrete walls of the Sitting Room and Work Space slant inward, while the Balcony walls slant outward. Perforated light screens top the walls of the Dining and Work Space, adding a measure of privacy. The home is dominated by the large roof that begins in the rear of the home, a few feet off the ground and rises, enhancing the two story home in front, then cantilevers out over the cantilevered balcony. There are three mitered glass corners on the upper level, two on the lower. Floor to ceiling windows and doors on the first and second level enhances the natural light. Original 10 x 7.5 color image. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study.

2014.07.1014 (1-24)

 

2014
Jorgine Boomer Residence, 2014 (1953 - S.361). Set of 24 images of the interior of the Boomer Residence, photographed on April 15, 2014 by Douglas M. Steiner. The concrete masonry core is constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete and house the bathrooms and fireplaces on the first and second floors. There originally was a wall that created a bedroom on the west end of the Sitting Room. The built in seating occupied the removed wall between the Sitting room and Bedroom. Half height windows look out on the desert. Floor to ceiling windows and doors, leads to the Lanai. The redwood ceiling has open beams. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Boomer Residence on an equilateral parallelogram diamond grid. The grid is engraved in the "Cherokee Red" concrete floor. Original 10 x 7.5 color image. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 2014.08.1014 (1-24)
2014
Aime and Norman Lykes Residence, 2014 (1959 - S.433). Set of eighteen images of the exterior Lykes Residence photographed on April 17, 2014. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959, it was to be his last residential work. Working drawings were completed in 1966 by Taliesin Fellow, John Rattenbury, who had worked closely with Mr. Wright on the initial plans. Rattenbury also supervised the construction of the home. Based on intersecting and overlapping circles, the home is over 2800 square feet. The circular design is constructed of desert-rose tinted concrete blocks. The home is dramatically built into the hillside, overlooking Phoenix and the valley. As we approach the home it is viewed from below and reached by a steep hill on the East side of the property. During this trip to Scottsdale, we had more time to photograph the exterior this home than ten years earlier. The Master Bedroom Balcony is cantilevered, and formed by two intersecting circles. The built-in planter, although separated from the bedroom wing by the living room, still follows the curvature of the bedroom wing. Wright adapted his designs to the landscape. Colors blend. He formed the home around a major rock outcropping he wanted to preserve...  For more information on the Lykes Residence see our Wright Study.  Continue...

2014.25.0715 (1-18)

2014
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, Circa 2014. Aerial view of model. The carport is on the far left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Photographed by Steven Litt. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2014.30.0617
2014
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, Circa 2014. View of the South Elevation (left) and East elevation (right). The carport is on the far left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Photographed by Steven Litt. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2014.31.0617
2014
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, Circa 2014. View of the South Elevation. The carport is on the left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Photographed by Steven Litt. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2014.32.0617
2014
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, Circa 2014. View of the South Elevation. The carport is on the left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Photographed by Steven Litt. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2014.33.0617
2014
Louis Penfield House Scheme II Model, Circa 2014. Overall view of model. The carport is on the left, Bedrooms in the center, Living and Dining Room and Workspace are on the right. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commission. In 1953, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the first home for Louis Penfield in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, (1953 - S.365.) In 1957, Penfield was devastated when he learned that I-90 would be built through his property. He contacted Wright for the second time and Wright designed Scheme II. Upon his death, Wes Peters completed the plans. Penfield planned to build the home himself, but came to realize it "was more than one human being could do." Wright’s last home to be built was the Lykes Residence (Job #5908), the Penfield Scheme II was #5909, the last residential home to be designed by Wright. Text on the left side: "House For Mr. And Mrs. Louis Penfield. River Road, Willoughby Hills. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect. David B. Jatich, AIA Architect. David W. Smith, Architect. Peter Jatich and Gregory R. Seifert, Stow Ohio." This model was built by David Jatich, David Smith, Peter Jatich and Gregory Seifert, Stow Ohio. Photographed by Steven Litt. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2014.34.0617
2014
Powhatan Building completed in 1929. The Powhatan or Powhatan Apartments is a 22-story apartment building overlooking Lake Michigan. The building was designed by architects Robert De Golyer and Charles L. Morgan. Morgan was responsible for the colorful mosaics in the lobbies and ballroom, as well as the colorful exterior terra-cotta panels featuring scenes with Native American references. Other American Indian motifs can be found throughout the building. Of particular interest are the mosaic panels in the anteroom between the lobby and the pool. They bear a striking resemblance to the murals in the Tavern of Midway Gardens, designed by Wright in 1913. It’s possible Morgan wished to honor Wright’s work at the Midway Gardens, which was demolished at the same time the Powhattan Building was receiving its final touches. During the destruction of Midway Gardens, Wright asked Morgan to assist him with an illustrated essay on Midway Gardens that was planned but never published in the Chicago Daily News. With the completion of the Powhatan Building in 1929, Wright’s association in December, and American Indian motifs and terra-cotta molds freshly on Morgan’s mind, his involvement in the Nakoma and Nakomis sets was a natural fit. In a letter to Wright dated December 23, 1930...  Continue... 2014.39.1117 (1-11)
2014
Harvey P. Sutton Residence, January 12, 2014 (1905 - S.106). Set of 35 photographs of the exterior of the Sutton Home. Designed in 1905, the Sutton home is the only Wright home in Nebraska. Symmetrical in shape, it s a basic cruciform layout. When the home became available, Jan and Van Korell purchased the home with the intent to restore the home to its original 1908 condition. That began the process which would last until 2001. Today, thanks to the Korell's extensive effort, we are able to once again, glimpse the Sutton home as Wright's intended in 1908. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on January 12, 2014. 35 - 10 x 6.75 Color Photographs, High Res 600 DPI digital images. See our Wright Study of the Sutton House. 2014.03.0114 (1-35)
2014
Taliesin West 2014 (1937 - S.241). Set of 87 - Color 13 x 20 High Res Digital images photographed on April 16, 2014 during a trip to Scottsdale, Arizona. Ten years after our first visit to Taliesin West, and armed with a newer camera, we had the opportunity to visit Taliesin West again, tour the complex and thank Arnold Roy, Margo Stipe and Oskar Muńoz, for there assistance in our endeavor publishing "Frank Lloyd Wright, Nakoma Clubhouse and Sculptures." It was my pleasure! Frank Lloyd Wright’s first trip to the Phoenix area was in January 1927, for the purpose of working on the Arizona Biltmore. In 1928, they were back in the Phoenix area. The set up a temporary camp they named ‘Ocotillo,’ built on the site near the project San Marcos-in-the-Desert. When the stock market crashed, Ocotillo was abandoned, but not the warm winters of Arizona. They purchased land Northwest of Phoenix in 1937 and began building Taliesin West, the winter home of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship. At the time, like the Arizona Biltmore, they were in the middle of the "wilderness," surrounded only by open and vast vegetation desert rocks and wilderness as far as the eye could see. Today, Taliesin West is bordered on three sides by development and the fourth by the McDowell Mountains...  Continue... 2014.38.0917 (1-87)
2015
2015
Andrew and Maude Cooke Residence Exterior (1953 - S.360) photographed on April 9, 2015. Set of 41 exterior photographs of the Andrew and Maude Cooke Residence, April 9, 2015. The walls are constructed of a buff colored bricks. The copper roof has turned a beautiful patina color. The Living and Dining Rooms are "hemicycle" in design and also includes the Workspace (Kitchen). The South wing is comprised of three Bedrooms, the Carport and the Servant's (Maid's) room. Perforated light screens run the length of the bedroom wing, adding soft light to the interior and a measure of privacy. Many of Frank Lloyd Wright's roof trestles were square or rectangular in shape. Here, they are diamond in shape, with the Northeast...  (Continue...)   For more information see our Wright Study on the Cooke Residence
2015.18.0916 (1-41)
2015
John & Syd Dobkins Residence 2015 (1953 - S.362). Set of 17 photographs of the exterior of the Dobkins Residence in Canton, Ohio. As you approach the Dopkins Residence from the drive, the design of the exterior is very private. The interior is obscured by a brick wall broken only by vertical windows and the front door, unlike the opposite side of the house that has floor-to-ceiling glass and looks out on an expansive yard. The footprint uses a module based on an equilateral triangle, with the living room and terrace forming a very large triangle, the workspace forming a smaller triangle. On a trip from Cincinnati to Seattle with my daughter and grandsons, we decided to surprise them with a trip to the Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. Waiting for it to open gave me the opportunity to view the Dobkins Residence.  1) John & Syd Dobkins Residence 2015 (1953 - S.362). A red brick equilateral triangle marks the entrance to the drive. Original 20 x 13.5 Color photograph. Copyright 2015, Douglas M. Steiner.
2015.29.0217 (1-17)
2015
Ellis & Alice Feiman Residence 2015, Canton, Ohio (1954 - S.371) set of 58 photographed on May 20, 2015. The Feiman Residence is considered the first Usonian house built, based on Frank Lloyd Wright's design for the New York exhibition house. The second being the Trier Residence (1956 - S.398). While the New York exhibition house was based on the three foot square module, and utilized brick and oak plywood, the Feiman house is based on the four foot module and constructed of brick and Philippine mahogany. The openings in the brickwork, creating a decorative pattern, matches the exhibit house. Like the exhibition house, the ceiling is composed of halved sheets of plywood, with every other sheet rotated 90 degrees, creating a rich wood pattern. Like the Trier Residence, this home also includes a third bedroom. Wright also added a carport which is set at a 90 degree angle to the front of the house, and covers the entrance. Taliesin apprentice Allan J. Gelbin oversaw the construction of the house. For more information see our Wright Study on the Feiman Residence 2015.12.0216 (1-58)
2015
Luis & Ethel Marden Residence Exterior (1952 - S.357) photographed on April 6, 2015. Set of 47 images of the exterior of the Marden Residence photographed on April 6, 2015. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1952, construction began 1956, and was completed on May 30, 1959. Although Luis Marden was a professional photographer, early photographs of the home could not be found, and their desire for privacy kept this Wright home a hidden gem. The first "hemicycle" home Frank Lloyd Wright designed was the Jacobs II (1944). He also designed the Meyer (1948), Laurent (1949), Pearce (1950), Marden... 20 x 14 high res digital color photographs.  (Continue...) 2015.08.1115 (1-47)
2015 

Luis & Ethel Marden Residence Exterior (1952 - S.357) photographed on April 6, 2015. Set of 51 images of the exterior of the Marden Residence photographed on April 6, 2015. As you step through the front door, the view is breathtaking. The house almost appears to float over the Potomac River. A built-in planter-box borders the stairs that lead out to the Promenade. The tinted concrete floor is Cherokee Red. Heating elements embedded in the concrete heated the home. The house is set up on a 4' grid system. The 4 x 4' wood ceiling sections line up with the concrete squares below. Original drawings specify the ceiling height of the lower section of the house at 7' 4"...  (Continue...)

2015.09.1115 (1-51)
2015
Pope-Leighey House 2006. Set of 63 photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, by Douglas M. Steiner, April 7, 2015. Like many of Wright's Usonian homes, it was an "L" shaped design based on a 2x4 foot rectangular module. It was constructed of brick, natural unfinished cypress and glass. The home slowly rises above the ground as the ground slopes away from the home. Like many of Wright's designs, the entrance is hidden, and is not revealed until you reach the... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House. 2015.03.0815 (1-63)
2015
Pilgrim Congregational Church, Redding, California (1958 - S.431). Set of 6 photographs of the Pilgrim Congregational Church model, June, 2015. In the lower level of the Pilgrim Congregational Church Fellowship Hall is a model of the Church as Frank Lloyd Wright originally designed it. "Designed in 1958 By Frank Lloyd Wright. Model by The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. August, 2001." Triangles are integrated throughout the whole church's design, and can be seen everywhere you look. Like Taliesin West's Drafting Room, the exposed exterior supporting beams are an integral part of the buildings design. The poles on the west side of the Fellowship Hall begin outside the building, cut inside the fellowship hall and continue through the roof. The design of the building is based on an equilateral triangle, the triangle being the symbol of the spiritual... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pilgrim Congregational Church.
 
2015.17.0615 (1-6)
2015
Pilgrim Congregational Church, Redding, California (1958 - S.431). Set of 68 exterior photographs of the Pilgrim Congregational Church, June, 2015. The Fellowship Hall is set on a hillside, so as you approach the church from the parking lot, the church is below you. The roof is suspended below the beams, a unique feature of this Wright design, and the only completed building to utilize this feature. The precast concrete poles at the entry are on the exterior of the building, those to the South begin on the interior of the fellowship Hall and continue up and out through the roof. The rubble masonry walls are constructed of natural stone set in concrete. Walls contain 91 tons of rock gathered by church members. Concrete sidewalks and interior floors are Cherokee Red. Visitors and church members pass through three concrete beams as they enter the Fellowship Hall... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pilgrim Congregational Church.
2015.15.0615 (1-68)
2015
Pilgrim Congregational Church, Redding, California (1958 - S.431). Set of 23 interior photographs of the Pilgrim Congregational Church, June, 2015. The Concrete beams on the East side of the Fellowship Hall begin on the interior of the building. Concrete beams on the West side begin outside, cut through the wall, then continue though the roof. The floor is tinted Cherokee red. Low stairs lead up to the Sanctuary. A fireplace is set into the two-story rubble stone mass. The hexagon ceiling lights are created with six equilateral triangles then set within triangles. Clerestory stained glass windows, created with "Slag" or chunks of glass, are set on the East side of the Fellowship Hall. Seven windows were added in 1976. Like in many of Wright's homes and buildings, the ceiling on the East side is lowered, so as you move toward the center of the room, the contrast... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pilgrim Congregational Church.
 
2015.16.0615 (1-23)
2015
Nathan Rubin Residence Exterior 2015 (1951 - S.343). Set of 24 photographs of the exterior of the Rubin Residence in Canton, Ohio. There are three Frank Lloyd Wright homes in Canton, Ohio. The Nathan and Jeanne Rubin Residence (1951 - S.343), the John and Syd Dobkins Residence (1953 - S.362), and the Ellis and Alice Feiman Residence (1954 - S.371.) Jeanne Rubins and Alice Feiman were sisters. "My mom and dad met Frank Lloyd Wright," recalled Robert Rubin, who lives in the home that his parents, Nathan and Jeanne Rubin, commissioned the noted architect to design early in the 1950s. "They went to see Wright several times... The (Rubin) house was finished, and Nate and Jeanne moved in and invited Alice over and she loved it and wanted one herself," said Dave Lewis, who lives beside the Feiman house and knew both families. The home is laid out with a 2' x 4' grid... Continue... 
2015.30.0218 (1-24)
2015
William L. Thaxton Residence, 2015 (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX. Set of 36 exterior images of the Thaxton Residence photographed on August 26, 2015. The basic designed for the Thaxton Residence utilizes a 120/60 degree parallelogram, a diamond shape, The red cement floors and patio are inscribed with the same diamond module, each side of is 4 feet long. The shape of the pool follows the same angles. The open space between the Maid's room and the Living Room has been enclosed with a doorway. Each had it's own entrance, and what was stereotypically Wright, hidden from view as you approached the house. The only windows on the Southern wall of the Living room are the 8" x 8" holes that run horizontally under the roof. The windows and doors on the opposite side are floor to ceiling. The built-in lighting is triangular in shape. In addition to the missing... Continue...   For more information see our Wright Study on the Thaxton Residence.
2015.25.0617 (1-36)
2015
William L. Thaxton Residence, 2015 (1954 - S.384) Bunker Hill, TX. Set of 30 interior images of the Thaxton Residence photographed on August 26, 2015. When the Thaxton Residence was first constructed the main house and the Maid's room were separate, but connected by the roof and the wood screen. Redwood was liberally used throughout the interior. Lighting inset into the ceiling was triangular in shape using 60 degree angles. Wright dropped ceiling above the entrance, so as you enter, the ceiling height in the Living Room seems to expand. As the walls rise from ground level, each two courses of block step inward. Mortar is raked on the horizontal joints, while flush on the vertical joints, accenting horizontal lines. Corner blocks had either a 60 or 120 degree angle. The Terrace was originally screened in at the trellis supports, doubling the size of the Living Room... Continue...   For more information see our Wright Study on the Thaxton Residence.
2015.26.0617 (1-30)
2016
2016
American System-Built Houses. Lewis E. Burleigh Residence, American System-Built Home 2016 (1915 - S.203.2). Located at 330 Gregory St., Wilmette, Illinois. According to Storrer, the home was built by Thomas E. Sullivan & Co., and sold to Burleigh in 1919. Some records indicated that the house was sold to J. J. O’Connor in 1916. Considered a "Cottage," it appears to match Model C3. Courtesy of Google Earth. 10 x 6.5 Color photograph. 2016.11.0317
2016
American System-Built Houses. Thomas E. Sullivan Residence, Possibly American System-Built Home 2016 (1915 - S.203). Located at 336 Gregory St., Wilmette, Illinois. Next door to the Lewis E. Burleigh Residence, a home built by Thomas E. Sullivan, is the home that Sullivan lived in. There is some dispute as the whether this is an American System-Built home, but it is very similar in layout to the Model D-101, but with alterations. Courtesy of Google Earth. 10 x 7 Color photograph. 2016.12.0317
2016
A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Frank Lloyd Wright was born 26 miles from Taliesin, Spring Green, in Richland Center, Wisconsin, the location of the A. D. German Warehouse. Designed by Wright in 1915 as a Brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. In June, 2016, on a road trip from Philadelphia to Seattle with my son-in-law, We stopped in Oak Park to tour Wright’s Home and Studio. We took an hour to photograph the outside, and unable to obtain tickets to tour the inside, we called Taliesin and reserved tickets to tour Wright’s personal residence. We headed to Taliesin, Spring Green, arriving with 10 minutes to spare before the tour began. My excitement mounted. It had been 43 years since I had last visited Taliesin. After spending a few hours, immersing ourselves in every detail, overwhelmed at Wright’s genius, we hit the road. Low and behold we found... Continue...

2016.06.1206 (1-24)

2016
Ravine Bluffs: Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Station Site 2016 (1911 - FLLW.1123). Viewed from the Southeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Sherman Booth in 1911. It was located at the corner of Old Green Bay Road and Maple Hill in Glencoe, Illinois. It featured a flat roof, a heated room in the winter, and a covered area when it rained. From 1911 - 1915, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Sherman Booth to design homes and a suburban development in Glencoe, Illinois, the Ravine Bluffs Development. The project included both public and private buildings. Sherman Booth House, Municipal Art Gallery, Sherman Booth Summer Cottage, Architectural Features for Parker Way, Glencoe Town Hall, Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railway Stations, Sherman Booth Stable and Garage, Ravine Bluffs Bridge and Concrete Street Lamp, Sherman Booth House Scheme, Ravine Bluffs Development and Five Rental House. The electric trains ran until July 1955, and the stations that served the line were eventually demolished. Photographed May, 2016. Courtesy of Google. 10.5 x 7 Color photograph. 2016.24.1217
2016
Riverside Terrace Restaurant 2016 (1953 - S.367). Set of 35 exterior and 11 interior photographs, photographed on June 10, 2016. Originally designed in 1943, modified in 1953, construction began in 1957, but was halted upon Mr. Wright’s death. It was resurrected again in 1967 as part of The Spring Green Resort complex, Modified and completed by the Taliesin Associated Architects, headed by William Wesley Peters. To support the restaurant’s 300 foot length, steel trusses were salvaged from the flight deck of the Ranger aircraft carrier training ship which was used on the Great Lakes during WWII. The restaurant opened in October 1967. Located just a stones throw from Taliesin, it became the Visitors Center in 1993. On a trip from Chicago to Seattle with my son-in-law, we stopped to tour Taliesin. The tour began at the Riverside Terrace Restaurant.
2016.25.0218 (1-46)
2016

Taliesin III, Spring Green, 2016 (1925- S.218). Tour of Taliesin III, Frank Lloyd Wright's Personal Residence at the Taliesin, Spring Green Complex. The Taliesin Complex cover 600 acres. Wright built Taliesin I in 1911 and it continually evolved until his death in 1959. After a fire destroyed the residential wing in 1914, he rebuilt, Taliesin II. After fire struck again in 1925, he built again, Taliesin III. Taliesin is a treasure trove, a gem, a Petri dish of Wright ideas, a museum. Details is what we attempted to record. Details that are easy to overlook in the expansive picture of Taliesin. Hidden in plain view, tucked in the back of a shelf is an original 1894 weed holder. There are examples of the many chairs he designed. Chinese artwork. Japanese prints. Flowers in the Crannied Wall, Priceless artifacts. Minic prototype accessories. Nakoma and Nakomis. Dana wall sconce. Heath art glass... To many to take in in just a few short hours. Set of 174 high res 20 X 13.5 digital images. Photographed June 10, 2016. Copyright 2016, Douglas M. Steiner.

2016.26.0218 (1-174)
2016
Taliesin Fellowship Complex, Spring Green, 2016 (1932 - S.228). Set of 35 original photographs. On a trip from Chicago to Seattle with my son-in-law, we stopped to tour Taliesin. After touring Taliesin, we headed to the Taliesin Fellowship Complex. Frank Lloyd Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902 for his two Aunts. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. When the Hillside Home School closed in 1915, it fell into disrepair. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, it became part of the Taliesin Fellowship Complex. Wright converted the original gymnasium into a theater in 1933. In the Spring of 1952, a fire devastated the Theater on the west end of the facility and the two story section in the center of the complex. Wright took the opportunity to make changes. He completely changed the Theatre that was destroyed, retaining the masonry walls...
2016.31.0818 (1-35)
2016
Taliesin Fellowship Dam, Spring Green, 2016 (1920 - S.219). Two original photographs. On the Northern end of Lower Taliesin Lake, Frank Lloyd Wright built a Dam and Hydroelectric Plant. "Wright’s desire for self-sufficiency brought about the installation of a turbine generator at the lower dam..." Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin, Henning, 2011, p.70-73. Wright designed a beautiful enclosure, but by the mid-1940's, water damage and lack of maintenance had taken its toll, and it was demolished. What remains today are some of the masonry stone and the dam itself. Two original high res 20 x 13.5 x 20 digital images photographed June 10, 2016. Copyright 2016, Douglas M. Steiner.
2016.32.0818 (1-2)
2016
Unitarian Meeting House Exterior 2016 (1947 - S.291). Set of 61 exterior photographs. Designed in 1947, construction began in 1949. On August 21, 1951, the church opened with a lecture by Frank Lloyd Wright and a performance by the Taliesin Fellowship musicians. In 1960, the American Institute of Architects designated it as one of 17 examples of Wright's contribution to American culture. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. "...I tried to build a building here that expressed that over-all sense of unity. The plan you see is triangular. The roof is triangular and out of this – triangulation – (aspiration) you get this expression of reverence without recourse to the steeple. The building itself, covering all, all in all each in all, sets forth – says what the steeple used to say, but says it with greater reverence, I think, in both form and structure." Frank Lloyd Wright, 1953. The design is based...

2016.18.0717
(1-61)

2016
Unitarian Meeting House Interior 2016 (1947 - S.291). Set of 5 exterior images photographed November 18, 2016. On a quick road trip from Philadelphia to Seattle with my son-in-law and two grand children, we arrived in Madison just as the church was closing. The staff was gracious and allowed up to take a quick peak at the auditorium. "In this design, the social activities of the members of the congregation are served by the Church Auditorium itself. In front of the Auditorium, beautiful views of distant Lake Mendota frame the pulpit on either side. The preacher and the choir are at this apex of the main triangle. The whole triangle is the center of the plan, and the apex of the triangle is a stone mass of perforated pattern... It is the mass of the structure that is depended upon to give the impression of aspiration usually left to the steeple. The walls are to be made of native stone, the interior framing wood, and...

2016.19.0717
(1-5)

2017
2017
Beth Sholom Synagogue, Elkins Park, PA, 2017 (1954 - S.373). Founded in 1919 the new Synagogue was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954, dedicated on September 20, 1959. With the help of Rabbi Mortimer J. Cohen, Wright incorporated Jewish symbolism in the design of the Synagogue. The Synagogue was dedicated on September 20, 1959, a little more than five months after Wright’s death. Designed as a hexagon, the main glass walls of the sanctuary are suspended from a steel tripod and are composed of 21,000 corrugated wire-glass sheets, giving the whole sanctuary a translucent appearance. There are two levels. As you enter the Synagogue on the lower level, you step into the Vestibule. Ramps on the left and right ascend to the Temple on the main (upper) level. Straight ahead stairs descend to the chapel on the lower level. Steel, copper, concrete and glass enclose...  Continue...
2017.31.0519 (1 - 124)
2017
E. Clark Arnold Residence 2017 (1954 - S.374). On a trip cross-country from New York to Seattle, we made a stop in Cedarburg, Wisconsin, then headed west. As we drove through Columbus, my son-in-law suggested we stop and look at the Arnold Residence. Our timing couldn’t have been better. Mr. St. Maurice needed a break from yard work. About 20 miles Northwest of Madison Wisconsin, the Arnold Residence is constructed of native Wisconsin limestone, redwood board and batten, and glass. Designed using a diamond shaped equilateral parallelogram module, it is formed with 60-120 degree angles. The four sides of the diamond module are four feet long. The original design had two wings, the bedroom wing and the living/dining wing, set at 120 degrees. In 1959, John Howe (TAA) designed an additional wing, creating a footprint forming a "Y". A small bonus is Louis Sullivan’s Farmers...  Continue...
2017.22.1018 (1-79)
2017
Darwin D. Martin Residence Fireplace 2017(S.100 - 1904). Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Martin Residence in 1904. Photographed in 2017 after the extensive restoration of the Darwin Martin House. Two 10 x 8 photographs, one Color and one B&W.
2017.25.1118 (A&B)
2017
Mrs. Alice Millard Residence (La Miniatura) 2017 (1923 - S.214). Set of 96 photographs of the Millard Residence. The Millard Residence was Frank Lloyd Wright’s first textile block home in California: 2) Storer, 3) Freeman, 4) Ennis. Wright wrote extensively about La Miniatura in An Autobiography. "I had used the block in some such textured way in the Midway Gardens upper walls. If I could eliminate the mortar joint I could make the whole fabric mechanical. I could do away with skilled labour. I believed I could and began the experiment on La Miniatura. A home and bookshop for Mrs. Alice Millard. Lightness and strength! Steel the spider spinning a web within the cheap plastic material wedded to it by pouring an inner core of cement after the blocks were set up..." p.235. "La Miniatura happened as the cactus grows, in that region still showing what folk from the Middle-Western prairies did when, inclined..."  Continue...
2017.24.1018 (1-96)
2017
Wilbur C. Pearce Residence 2017 (1950 - S.320). Northeast of Los Angeles, the Angeles National Forest and Mt. San Antonio reaches a height of 10,064 feet. Nestled on a ridge in the southern foothills is the Wilbur C. Pearce Residence, with a spectacular view of the San Gabriel Valley. It was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950. Very similar to the Laurent Residence (S.319) designed one year earlier. Wright designed a number of semi-circular and circular buildings. Jacobs II (Hemicycle 1944 - 283); Meyer (Hemicycle 1948 - S.297); Friedman (Circular 1948 - S.316); Laurent (Semi-circular 1949 - S.319); Pearce (Semi-circular 1950 - S.320); David Wright (Circular 1950 - S.322); Marden (Semi-circular 1952 - S.357) (Not a hemicycle! Correct.); Llewellyn Wright (Hemicycle 1953 - S.358); Lewis (Hemicycle 1952 - S.359); Cooke (Hemicycle 1953 - S.360); Rayward (Partial... Continue...
2017.27.0319
2017
Seth Peterson Cottage 2017 (1958 - S.430). After visiting the Arnold Residence on a cross-country trip from New York to Seattle, we headed west to hook up with Interstate 90. It occurred to us that the Seth Peterson Cottage was in the general direction of our trajectory, and decided to give it a visit. We were feeling lucky, even though daylight was fading. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the cottage in 1958, his smallest residential gems, 880 square feet. It was constructed of native sandstone, Philippine mahogany and glass. Although almost 70 years younger than Wright, Peterson shared his birthday. He was drawn to architecture at a young age, and the designs of Wright. Mostly the designs of Wright. After graduating from high school in 1954, he applied to the Taliesin Fellowship but was turn down a number of times. Peterson persisted from a different angle. He commissioned Wright to design a small... Continue...
2017.23.1018 (1-57)
2018
2018
Frederick Bagley Residence, Hinsdale, Illinois 2018 (1894 - S.028). After arriving in Chicago, Frank Lloyd Wright was hired as a draftsman with Joseph Lyman Silsbee who he had collaborated with on Unity Chapel (1886 - S.000) in Spring Green. His employment with Silsbee was short lived after accepting employment in 1887 as a draftsman for Adler and Sullivan, working closely with Sullivan for six years. After leaving Sullivan's firm 1893, Wright established his own practice. One of the first homes Wright designed after leaving Sullivan was the Walter Gale Residence (1993 - S.020). The Bagley was designed one year later, 1894. "Dutch Colonial" in design, it was included in an article on Wright’s early work in Architectural Review, June 1900. "The polygonal libraries of the Bagley, Devin and McAfee houses and of Mr. Wright’s own studio, with their above-head or direct top light and air of quiet seclusion for... Continue...
2018.16.0719 (1-32)
2018
Robert G. Emmond Residence, LaGrange, Illinois 2018 (1892 - S.015). Designed and built in 1892 while Frank Lloyd Wright still worked for Louis Sullivan, it is considered one of Wright’s "bootlegged" houses. It is similar in design to the Thomas Gale Residence (1892 - S.016) and the Robert Parker Residence (1892 - S.017). It is also one of Wright’s earliest designs. Like the Gale and Parker designs, there are two octagonal bays on the outside corners, with a "library" (living room) with fireplace in the center. There are different elements to each, but this design was the most elaborate of the three. The house was originally... Continue...
2018.14.0619 (1-53)
2018
E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Set of 38 photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory. The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. Little remains of Frank Lloyd Wright’s original design for the E-Z Polish Factory, designed in 1905 for William and Darwin Martin. And what does remain appears to be what Wright designed for the back of the factory not the front. There do not appear to be any photographic records of the original building as Wright designed it, that have been discovered at this time. Original plans were published in Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer, p.187. What Wright designed was a two story building with a daylight basement facing Fillmore Street. The building was constructed of reinforced concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out... Continue...
2018.11.0219 (1-38)
2018
Francisco Terrace Apartments Site 2018 (1895 - S.030). Set of 11 images of the original site of the Francisco Terrace Apartments before they were demolished in March of 1974. The site has been vacant ever since. The existing building on the right is the original Waller Apartments (1895 - S.031). One of Frank Lloyd Wright's early clients was real estate attorney and developer Edward Waller. After completing the Waller and Francisco Terrace Apartments in 1895, Wright remodeled Waller's home (S.047) in River Forest in 1899. Two years later, Wright designed the Waller Gates (S.065) and Stables (S.066). The Gates still stand, but the house and stable were demolished. Waller also managed the Rookery Building in Chicago, and in 1905, he commissioned Wright to remodel the entrance and extensive interior lobby. Waller owned 2,000 acres between the northern end of Lake Michigan in Lake... Continue...
2018.08.0119 (1-11)
2018
Reconstructed Francisco Terrace Apartments 2018 (1895 - S.030). Set of 80 images of the reconstructed Francisco Terrace Apartments built in Oak Park in 1978. According to Devereux Bowly, The Poorhouse: Subsidized Housing in Chicago, after Waller past away in 1931, the Francisco Terrace Apartments were subdivided and sold off as twenty-two separate parcels. As the west side of Chicago deteriorated, so did the Francisco Terrace Apartments. In an article that was published in the Chicago Sun-Times, February 20, 1972: "Hoping to save their historic building from a demolition order, residents of Frank Lloyd Wright Francisco Terrace Apartments began boarding up vacant flats Saturday. Wright designed the building in 1895 as one of the first ‘projects’ for low-income families, and the complex at 237 N. Francisco was converted to a co-operative in 1930. It is believed Wright’s last apartment... Continue...
2018.09.0119 (1-80)
2018
Harold Price Sr. Residence, Paradise Valley, Arizona, 2018 (1954 - S.378). Set of 262 images of the interior and exterior photographed in 2018. Designed in 1954 as a winter home, and given the name "Grandma’s House." Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Price's home, built in the Arizona desert, with two wings, the living and bedroom wings, connected with a central atrium. The roof of the atrium is raised, with a centered open skylight. Centered in the room below is a fountain with a circular bowl. Constructed of concrete blocks, a prominent feature are the inverted concrete block columns that increase in size as the rise from the desert floor. Atop each column is a light, illuminating the ceiling, giving the appearance that it floats above the house. Windows in the living and dining room frame the picturesque Arizona desert. The fascia is a stamped copper, which was repeated on one of the outdoor... Continue...
2018.15.0719 (1-262)
2018 V.C. Morris Gift Shop, Exterior 2018 (1948 - S.310). Set of 20 exterior and 66 interior photographs of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop, January 4, 2018. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1948. At first glance the face of the building appears to be a flat solid brick wall, broken by the semi-circular entrance to the building. The details are subtle. But as you look closer, there is depth to the design. The face of the building projects out about the thickness of one brick, and is bordered by the vertical perforated light column on the left, a concrete band near the top, and a second near the bottom, capping the row of square inset lights. The right side steps back and is nearly overlooked. As you step into the half glass, half brick semi-circular portal, each successive row of brick and glass reduces the size of the entrance, much the same as Wright’s hallways. The entrance feels restrictive and confined, but as you... Continue...
2018.01.0418 (1-20)
2018.02.0418 (1-66)
2018
Edward C. Waller Apartments 2018 (1895 - S.031). Set of 145 images of the Waller Apartments. Edward C. Waller was an important early Wright patron. He lived in River Forest near Wright's William Winslow house. Waller commissioned several projects to be designed by Wright including the Francisco Terrace Apartments (1895 - S.030) (demolished) and the Waller Apartment (1895 - S.031). The Waller Apartments consisted of five connected buildings, numbered right to left (East to West). Unit #1 on the East end (right) and #5 to the West end (left). Unit #1: 2840 A&B (right) and 2842 A&B (left), Unit #2: 2844 and 2846, Unit #3: 2848 and 2850, Unit #4: 2852 and 2854, Unit #5: 2846 and 2858. The of the five attached apartment buildings each containing four approximately 600-square-foot units. Original plans published in Monograph... indicated that each of the 20 units had a dining room, kitchen... Continue...
2018.10.0219 (1-145)
 
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