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PHOTOS 1970 - 1979
 

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YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1970
1970 Iovanna Lloyd Wright (left) and Olgivanna Lloyd Wright (June 23, 1970). Caption on verso "At left, Iovanna Lloyd Wright... her correspondence with Svetlana led to invitation; there was an instant kinship between the two. Olgivanna Lloyd Wright... ‘the gestures, spirit: She (Svetlana) fills the image of my late daughter to perfection.’ (Please credit: Photos by Mary Frampton, Los Angeles Times) Los Angeles Times/Washington Post News Service." 8 x 6.5 Print, High res digital image. 1846.13.1210
Circa 1970 Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West.  Circa 1970.  Photograph by Joseph F. Rorke, Resident in 1954.  Original 6 x 5.75 silver gelatin photo. 1846.01.1006
1970 Nathan G. Moore Residence (1923 - S.034) 1970. Label on verso: "Sun Times Photog: Dykinga. Date: July 31, 70. Location: Oak Park. Subject: Frank L. Wright Houses. Nathan G. Moore house and Stable, 333 Forest Ave." Clipping on verso: "Amid a cluster of Wright housed on Forest Av. In Oak Park stands the Nathan G. Moore house, resembling an Alpine chalet." Stamped "Sun-Times Nov 9, 1970." Original 11 x 8.5 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 1846.10.0310
1970 Svetlana and William Peters, 1970. Caption pasted to verso: "4/8/70 - Phoenix, Ariz. William Wesley Peters, vice president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, slips wedding band on finger of Svetlana Alliluyeva, youngest daughter of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, during wedding ceremony here 4/7. UPI." Original 7 x 9.5 B&W photograph. 1846.17.1012
1970

William and Svetlana Peters cutting wedding cake at Taliesin West reception on April 8, 1970. Clipping pasted to verso: Svetlana Alliluyeva and William Wesley Peters. Newlyweds cut their wedding cake. Stalin’s Daughter Married to Architect in Phoenix. Svetlana Alliluyeva youngest daughter of the Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin, and William Wesley Peters, architect, were married yesterday in a secret ceremony in Phoenix. The wedding, attended only by a few friends and associates was conducted at Taliesin West, the residence of Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright, widow of the famous architect, and headquarters of the Wright Foundation. Peters, chief architect for the organization, was formerly married to Svetlana Lloyd Wright, daughter of the famed architect. Mrs. Peters was killed in an auto accident in Wisconsin in 1946. Miss Alliluyeva, 44, who fled from the Iron Curtain to the United States in 1967, met Peters at the Desert Architectural School northeast of here last month. It was her fifth marriage. When she came to visit Iovanna Lloyd Wright, another daughter of the Wrights, Miss Alliluyeva said the "unique quality" of coincidence of the name Svetlana convinced her she should accept an invitation to go from her home in Princeton, N. J. Word of the marriage leaked out after it was learned the couple had quietly obtained a marriage license Monday and had received special court permission to waive the state’s three-day waiting period. Peters, 58, who also is vice president of the foundation, had worked with Wright since 1932. His designs include numerous churches, community developments and university buildings. In Moscow, Joseph Morozov, son of Mrs. Peters, said news of his mother’s marriage is "not very exciting" for him or his sister Katya. "We have got used to the idea after five or six of her marriages. It told her myself that she had been married often enough and shouldn’t marry again," he said. Stamped on verso: "Apr 8 1970." Original 8 x 8.5 B&W photograph.

1846.22.0114
1970
William and Svetlana Peters wedding reception at Taliesin West on April 8, 1970. Caption on face: "(NY9-Dec. 18) Reported expecting a child – Svetlana Stalin Peters, daughter of the late Soviet premier, is reportedly expecting a baby, according to Washington Post columnist Maxine Cheshire. She is pictured at her wedding reception in Tucson, Ariz., earlier this year with her husband, architect William Wesley Peters. Mrs. Peters, now 44, has two grown children." (Note: Wedding and reception held at Taliesin West.) Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1846.21.0114
1970 Svetlana and William Peters. Caption: "(PN3) Phoenix, Ariz. April 7 - Svetlana and William Peters - The former Svetlana Alliluyeva and architect William Wesley Peters announced their marriage Tuesday at Taliesin West, the architecture school of the late Frank Lloyd Wright, near here. The daughter of Russian Premier Joseph Stalin and Peters, Wright’s former chief assistant, were married in a simple Quaker ceremony. (AP Wirephoto) 1970 Phoenix. Original 8 x 10.3 B&W photograph. 1846.11.0710
1970
William and Svetlana Peters at Taliesin West, 1970. Caption taped to verso: "At home in Taliesin West – Fingers crossed (for luck?). Mrs. William Wesley Peters (the former Svetlana Alliluyeva, daughter of Josef Stalin) stands beside her new husband at reception given them by Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright Peters, vice president of the foundation, and his wife will make their home in the winters at Taliesin West, Ariz., and summers at Taliesin East in Spring Green, Wis." Hand written on verso: "Aug. 17, 1970" and "Mrs. Wm. Wesley (Lana) Peters." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1846.19.1213
1970
William and Svetlana Peters at Taliesin West on April 8, 1970. Caption pasted on verso: "Phoenix, Ariz., April 8 – Svetlana Alliluyeva, daughter of Josef Stalin, talks with newsmen Wednesday with her new husband, architect William Wesley Peters. The couple held a news conference in the living room of their desert home at Taliesin West near Phoenix. Taliesin West is an architectural school of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 1970." Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 8 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1846.24.0114
1970
William Wesley Peters plans to marry, 1970. Caption on face: "4/7/70 – Phoenix, Arizona - Architect William Wesley Peters of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation plans to marry Svetlana Alliluyeva, daughter of late Soviet dictator Josef Stalin. The couple obtained a marriage license in Phoenix 4/7." Stamped on verso: "Cleveland Press. Apr 10 1970." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1846.23.0114
1970
William and Svetlana Peters, 1970. Caption on face: "12/18/70 - Washington: Svetlana Stalin, daughter of the late Russian premier, reportedly is expecting a baby, Washington Post columnist Maxine Cheshire said 12/18. Miss Stalin, 44, married American architect William Wesley Peters, 58, last April. The couple is shown in a 1970 filer. It was her third marriage, his second. UPI." Original 8.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 1846.20.0114
1970
Taliesin West Office (1937 - S.241) 1970. Taliesin West office seen from the east. Fountain in the foreground was added in 1956. Door to the Cabaret Theater out of right frame. Stamped on verso: "Aug 17 1970." Original10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1846.25.0114
1971
1971 Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright.  Stamped on back “Published August 8, 1971".  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photo. 1867.02.1006
1971
William and Svetlana Peters 1971. Caption on face: "San Rafael, Calif., Jan. 5 – Favors Russian Observers – Svetlana Peters, Dictator Joseph Stalin’s daughter, with her husband, William Wesley Peters, Arizona architect, at a news conference in San Rafael Monday, during which she said she agrees with the idea of having Soviet observers at the Angela Davis trial. 1971." Stamped on verso: "Jan 14 1971." Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1867.13.0114
1971 William Wesley Peters, 1971. Caption: "San Rafael, Calif., May 21 - Proud Father - Mrs. William Wesley Peters, only daughter of the late Russian dictator, Joseph Stalin, gave birth to a 7-pound baby girl in Marin General Hospital Friday morning. Here the father, 58, president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation at Taliesi (Taliesin), Ariz., enters the hospital to see his baby. (APWirePhoto) 1971. Their daughter's name was Olga Peters. Original 8 x 11 B&W photograph. 1867.05.0710
1971
William Wesley Peters, 1971. William and Svetlana Peters in hospital with newborn baby daughter. Clipping pasted to verso: "Stalin’s daughter and baby. Mrs. Svetlana Peters, 45, daughter of Joseph Stalin, former Russian dictator, introduced her daughter Olga to her husband, William Wesley Peters, 58, president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. The baby, born yesterday in San Rafael, Calif., weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces. Mrs. Peters, who has a grown son and daughter in Russia, defected to the United states in 1967. She was married to Peters, her third husband, in April, 1970. – A.P. wirephoto." Stamped on verso: "May 22 1971." Hand written on verso: "Mrs. Wm. Wesley Lana Peters." Original 8 x 9 B&W photograph. 1867.11.1113
1971
William Wesley Peters, 1971. Caption on face: "Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 12 – No comment on Khrushchev’s death – The daughter of Joseph Stalin, Svetlana, and her husband, William Wesley Peters, stand with their four-month-old daughter, Olga, today at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church today in Milwaukee. Svetlana refused to comment on the death of former Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev when questioned yesterday. Peters, president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, was on hand for consecration ceremonies at the Wright designed church. (AP Wirephoto) 1971." Stamped on verso: "Sep 15 1971." Hand written on verso: "Mrs. William Wesley Peters (Lana)." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1867.12.1113
1971
Svetlana Peters and her daughter Olga, Sept 12, 1971. Caption pasted on verso: "Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 13 – Svetlana and daughter – Daughter of Josef Stalin, Svetlana, kisses her baby, Olga, yesterday as she was attending church services in Milwaukee. The four-month-old child was baptized at the Greek Orthodox church following the formal services. Svetlana is married to William Wesley Peters. 1971." Stamped on verso: "Sep 13 1971. Peters Svetlana." Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 8 x 9 B&W photograph. 1867.14.0114
1971 Francisco Terrace Apartments Courtyard (1895 - S.030) 1971. Clipping on verso: "(Caption) The two-story building at 237 N. Francisco was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895 for low-income families. The building now faces demolition. Photo by Steve Perraud. W. Siders out to save rare Wright Building. By Dennis Byrne. Tenants and owners of a West Side co-operative are fighting to save their home - a rare Frank Lloyd Wright apartment building - from the wrecking ball... ¶ Each of the 46 units has its own exterior entrance facing a once handsomely landscaped interior courtyard. There are no hallways to heat or to provide hiding places for thugs. ¶ The typical Chicago flat in 1895 when Wright designed the building was cramped, and often light and fresh air failed to reach many of the units. ¶ Wright meant his building to be a prototype for better living condition for the poor... ¶ In 1930, the building was converted into a co-operative project... ¶ Almost half of the units are vacant, and about six have been gutted by fires... ¶ Faced with possible court action condemning the building, the residences sought help from Michael Brown, an attorney... ¶ Architects estimate renovation costs would be from $11,000 to $15,000 for each dwelling unit..." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Daily News. Dec 9, 1971." Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1867.04.0310
1971 Unity Temple (S.096 1904) 1971. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times, Mar 1 1971." Label on verso: "Photographer: Jack Dykinga. Date: Feb 27/71. Location: Oak Park. Subject: Unity Temple. Caption: Exterior of the Frank Lloyd Wright Unity Temple." Clipping pasted to verso: "Historic landmarks here. Exterior of the Avery Coonley home, 300 Scottswood, Riverside, which has been designed by Interior Sec. Rogers C. B. Morton, in Washington as a national historic landmark, along with Unity Temple at Lake and Kenilworth in Oak Park. Frank Lloyd Wright designed both." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original B&W photograph, 10.5 x 8.25. 1867.07.0711
1971 Unity Temple (S.096 1904)1971.  Published March 21, 1971, "Cracks in the exterior of the Unity Temple, 875 Lake St., Oak park, are among the signs of deterioration which a restoration committee wants to remedy. The temple has been named a national landmark." Photographed by Quentin C. Dodt, March 13, 1971. Original B&W photograph, 10 x 7. 1867.03.0210
1971 Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park, 1971. Interior ceiling. Label pasted to verso: "Date: March 13, 1971. Location: 875 Lake St., Oak Park. Photographer: Quentin C. Dodt. Caption: Unity Temple. Fund raising to restore Frank Lloyd Wright building. View of ceiling in main room. Architect said windows need to be taken out and releaded." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original B&W photograph, 6.75 x 10. 1867.10.0212
1972
1972 James Charnley Residence (1891 - S.009) 1972. Clipping on verso: "Charnley House: a landmark? At open hearing at City Hall before Chicago Commission on Historic and Architectural landmarks, architectural expert Robert Selby of the American Institute of Architects testified that Charnley House (above) at 1365 N. Astor should be designated a city landmark. The single-family residence was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1891 for a close friend of Louis Sullivan, Lumber magnate James Charnley." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times, May 26, 1972." "Chicago Daily News, Jun 7, 1972." "Photo by Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks, 320 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois, 60610." Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Daily News. 1909.07.0310
  Mamah Borthwick and Edwin H. Cheney Residence, Oak Park Illinois (1903 - S.104). Set of twenty B&W images photographed on February 11, 1972.  
1972 (#1) Cheney Residence, viewed from the street, looking Northeast in 1972, (1903 - S.104). Terrace is seen in the forefront of the home, entrance is on the right side of the home. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #1 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.13.0911
1972 (#2) Cheney Residence, viewed from the street, looking Northeast in 1972, (1903 - S.104). Terrace is seen on the left, stairs on the right lead to the entrance of the home. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #2 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.14.0911
1972 (#3) Cheney Residence Entrance, viewed from the South in 1972, (1903 - S.104). Study is seen on the left, like many of Wright’s designs, the Entrance is hidden in he center. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #3 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.15.0911
1972 (#4) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Study in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room is seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #4 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 35mm B&W negative and 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.16.0911
1972 (#5) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Study in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room is seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #5 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.17.0911
1972 (#6) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room can be seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #6 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.18.0911
1972 (#7) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room can be seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #7 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.19.0911
1972 (#8) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room can be seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Fireplace is on the far right. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #8 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.20.0911
1972 (#9) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room can be seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Fireplace is on the right. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #9 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.21.0911
1972 (#10) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room can be seen in the background on the left, the Living Room is seen in the foreground. The Fireplace is on the far right. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #10 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.22.0911
1972 (#11) Cheney Residence Study, viewed from the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Study can be seen in the background on the right, the Living Room book shelves are on the left. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #11 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 6.1 x 10 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.23.0911
1972 (#12) Cheney Residence Study, viewed from the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Study can be seen in the background on the right, the Living Room book shelves are on the left. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #12 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 6.1 x 10 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.24.0911
1972 (#13) Cheney Residence Study, viewed from the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Study can be seen in the background on the right, the Living Room book shelves are on the left. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #13 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 6.1 x 10 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.25.0911
1972 (#14) Cheney Residence Dining Room, viewed from the Northwest corner of the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Kitchen is behind the wall on the far right. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #14 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.26.0911
1972 (#15) Cheney Residence Dining Room, viewed from the Northwest corner of the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Kitchen is behind the wall on the far right. Built-in Dining Room Cabinets on the far right. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #15 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.27.0911
1972 (#16) Cheney Residence Dining Room, viewed from the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Dining Room ceiling pattern is prominent in the top half. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #16 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 6.1 x 10 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative.  Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.28.0911
1972 (#17) Cheney Residence Dining Room, viewed from the Living Room in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Living Room ceiling pattern is uninterrupted from the Study (behind camera), across the Living Room ceiling, to the Dining Room. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #17 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.29.0911
1972 (#18) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. The Dining Room can be seen in the background. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #18 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.30.0911
1972 (#19) Cheney Residence Living Room, viewed from the Southeast corner in 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. The Dining Room can be seen in the background. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #19 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 10 x 6.1 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.31.0911
1972 (#20) Cheney Residence 1972, (1903 - S.104). The Living Room can be seen straight ahead. The Dining Room is on the right. Caption: "Frank Lloyd Wright house owned by Stew Roberts, 520 N. East Avenue, Oak Park." Image #20 of 20, from a roll of 35mm B&W negatives. Photographed by Krejcsi, February 11, 1972. 6.1 x 10 B&W photograph and 35mm B&W negative. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun -Times. 1909.32.0911
1972 Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104) 1972. Viewed from the sidewalk, looking Southeast. Terrace is seen on the right, stairs on the left lead to the back entrance into the kitchen. Label on verso: "Date: May 2, 1972. Photographer: Walter Kale. Caption: Edwin Cheney house, 520 N. East Ave. Oak Park." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. 1909.40.0512
1972 Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104) 1972. Viewed from the sidewalk, looking Northeast. Terrace is seen on the left, stairs on the right lead to the entrance of the home. Label on verso: "Date: May 2, 1972. Photographer: Walter Kale. Caption: Edwin Cheney house, 520 N. East Ave. Oak Park." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 1909.34.0112
1972 Francisco Terrace Apartments Courtyard, Chicago (1895 - S.030) 1972. Clipping on verso: "Hoping to save their historic building from a demolition order, residents of Frank Lloyd Wright Francisco Terrace Apartments began boarding up vacant flats Saturday. Wright designed the building in 1895 as one of the first ‘projects’ for low-income families, and the complex at 237 N. Francisco was converted to a co-operative in 1930. It is believed Wright’s last apartment building in Chicago. It faces condemnation unless boarding-up is completed and a renovation plan is approved in Housing Court. (Sun-Times Photo by Larry Graff). (Caption) Each of the building’s 46 apartments opens on the central courtyard, a startling innovation in 1895. Tenants hope the building can be cleaned up and renovated." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Feb 20, 1972." 8 x 6 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1909.08.0410
1972 Francisco Terrace Apartments Window Detail, Chicago (1895 - S.030) 1972. Clipping on verso: "Tenants Help battle to save Francisco ‘project’. Hoping to save their historic building from a demolition order, residents of Frank Lloyd Wright Francisco Terrace Apartments began boarding up vacant flats Saturday. Wright designed the building in 1895 as one of the first ‘projects’ for low-income families, and the complex at 237 N. Francisco was converted to a co-operative in 1930. It is believed Wright’s last apartment building in Chicago. It faces condemnation unless boarding-up is completed and a renovation plan is approved in Housing Court. (Sun-Times Photo by Larry Graff)." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Feb 20, 1972." 8 x 6 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1909.09.0410
1972
Francis W. Little House (1912 - S.173, Residence II - Northome) circa 1972, Wayzata, Minn. This was Little’s second home designed by Wright in 1912. Mr. Little past away in 1923. Mrs. Little gave the summer home to their daughter Eleanor and her husband, Raymond Stevenson. By the late 1960s, the Stevensons could not keep up with the challenges of the home. The Metropolitan bought the house in March, 1972, installing the Living Room, selling other portions of the home to other museums. The home was demolished in the summer of 1972. Photograph by Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo and Associates, New York, before demolition of the home. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1909.42.1113
1972 Nathan G. Moore Residence (1923 - S.034) 1972. Label on verso: "Date: Jan 7 72. Location: Oak Park. Photographer: Loewe. Caption: Oak Park Village board adopted a resolution calling for an historic district to preserve examples of the so-called Prairie school of Architecture developed by Frank Lloyd Wright. 333 Forest Ave. Oak Park. Tribune photo by William Loewe." Clipping pasted to verso: "This Frank Lloyd Wright home at 333 Forest Av., Oak Park is one of 55 examples of the ‘Prairie School’ of architecture that would be preserved by the Historic Commission proposed by the Oak Park village board." Stamped on clipping: "Jan 13 1972". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 1909.33.0112
1972
William Wesley Peters at Taliesin West, 1972. Peters stands in courtyard, the Dining Room is on the left. The bell tower is beyond it, and the drafting room is seen in the background on the right. Stamped on verso: "Mar 28 1972." Hand written on verso: "William Wesley Peters at Taliesin West - near Phoenix, Ariz." Original 8 x 11 B&W photograph. 1909.43.1113
1972 Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1972. View of the Lobby looking toward the stairs, from the balcony. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Photographed in 1972 by Richard Nickel. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1909.38.0512
1972 Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1972. View of the Balcony. Photographed in 1972 by Richard Nickel. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1909.39.0512
1972 Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1972. View of Balcony. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, Francisco Terrace Apartments (1895 - S.030), Edward C. Waller Apartments (1895 - S.031), Edward C. Waller Residence Remodeling (1899 - S.047), Edward C. Waller Gates (1901 - S.065), Edward C. Waller Stables (1901 - S.066), Edward C. Waller Bathing Pavilion (1909 - S.166), managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. His son, Edward C. Waller Jr. hired Wright in 1913 to design the Midway Gardens (S.180). Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. William Winslow’s headquarters was there alone with the American Luxfer Prism Company. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times, May 14, 1972." Clipping pasted to verso: "The richly ornamented central lobby space of the Rookery Building at 209 S. LaSalle. The building was designed by architects Burnham & Root in 1886, and Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the interior in 1905." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10.25 x 10 B&W photograph. 1909.37.0512
1972 Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1972. Rookery Building stairway. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Stamped on verso: "July, 1972." Clipping pasted to verso: "Photographer: Gene Pesek. Date: 7-5-72. Location: Rookery Building, 209 So LaSalle. Subject: Named city landmark. Caption: Wrought iron and marble make up the lobby of the famous Rookery Building." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8.2 x 12 B&W photograph. 1909.41.0512
1972 Frank Wright Thomas Residence (1901 - S.067) 1972. In 1901, James Campbell Rogers hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house as a wedding present for his daughter, Susan Ann Rogers, and her husband, Frank Wright Thomas. The Thomas' were married on June 14, 1900. Label pasted on verso: "Date: May 31, 1972. Photographer: Yates. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright designed home at 210 Forest up for sale for 100 grand." Clipping pasted to verso: "The Thomas House, 210 N. Forest Av., Oak Park, one of the early examples of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie School of Architecture." Stamped on clipping: "June 8 1972". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 9.6 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 1909.36.0212
1972 Frank Wright Thomas Residence (1901 - S.067) 1972. In 1901, James Campbell Rogers hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house as a wedding present for his daughter, Susan Ann Rogers, and her husband, Frank Wright Thomas. The Thomas' were married on June 14, 1900. Label pasted on verso: "Date: May 31, 1972. Photographer: Yates. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright designed home at 210 Forest up for sale for 100 grand." Clipping pasted to verso: "Stain-glass enclosed breezeway which leads to a long and narrow foyer can be yours for $100,000." Stamped on clipping: "June 8 1972". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1909.35.0112
1974
1974 Mamah Borthwick and Edwin H. Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104) 1974. Caption pasted on verso: "Stewart and Betty Roberts are looking for someone to live n - and love - their home, without making any changes." Article pasted to verso: "Stewart and Betty Roberts of Oak park have a painstakingly restored 11-room Frank Lloyd Wright house for sale, and almost anyone with $99,000 can have it. But only if the buyer promises not to make any changes. Certainly everyone knows of Wright and of the elegant beauty f the prairie homes he designed. Anyone can view the outside of a dozen of these homes - including this one, the Cheney house built in 1904 - on the regularly scheduled walking tours of Oak Park every Sunday afternoon. It’s surprising then to the Robertses that many potential buyers not only don’t appreciate a Wright house but also would want o rip out rooms, paint the natural wood trim and beams and make other changes that would undermine the warm and comfortable character of this classic house. The Robertses are looking for someone who would love and live in this architectural artwork without making any changes... By Jerry De Muth." Stamped on verso: "Jun 23 1974". Acquired from the archives of the Sun-Times. Original 10.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 1963.05.0311
1974 Coonley Residence Main Entrance. (1907 - S.135 ) 1974. Clipping pasted o verso: "Avery Coonley House. Evanston - Riverside is a lovely place. We’ve been thru it several times and thoroly (sp) enjoyed Sheldon Mix’s story about it ("Perfection, Your Name is Riverside," May 19). But was that the Avery Coonley House you pictured, or was it the playhouse? Mrs. Joseph Standard. Indeed it was the playhouse. Here is a photo of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Avery Coonley House, a national landmark. Sorry for he mix-up -- Ed." Stamped on clipping: "Jun 16 1974". Stamped on verso: "Apr 24 1974, J. Austad." Note: Ed still seems to be mixed-up. This is the main approach to the Coonley Residence, not the Playhouse. The Bedroom Wing in on the left, the Guest Room Wing on the right. See Select Houses 1, p170-173. Photographed by J. Austad. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 1963.04.0311
1974 Francis W. Little House, Hallway windows.  Northrome, Minnesota, 1912-14.  Dismantled in 1972.  These windows are part of the collection of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts.  Photographed by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts.  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photo, 1974. 1963.02.0207
1974
Nakomis Sculpture, Bronze 1974. Thomas Hubbard contacted the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and was granted a license to produce bronze sculptures in December 1973. The first bronze sets were produced in 1974 by the Shidoni Foundry in Tesuque, New Mexico. The original list price was $1,650 per set. On September 29, 2007, this sculpture were sold at Altermann Galleries, Sante Fe, NM. 18 in. high. Provenance: The Estate of the native American artist RC Gorman. Price realized $2,180 plus buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Altermann Galleries, Sante Fe, NM. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 1963.14.0314
1974
Nakoma Sculpture, Bronze 1974. Thomas Hubbard contacted the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and was granted a license to produce bronze sculptures in December 1973. The first bronze sets were produced in 1974 by the Shidoni Foundry in Tesuque, New Mexico. The original list price was $1,650 per set. On September 29, 2007, this sculpture were sold at Altermann Galleries, Sante Fe, NM. 12 in. high. Provenance: The Estate of the native American artist RC Gorman. Price realized $2,160 plus buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Altermann Galleries, Sante Fe, NM. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 1963.15.0314
1974 Robie House Dining Room Table and Chairs, 1974. Label on verso: "The University of Chicago, Office of Public Information, Chicago, Illinois 60637. Lobby of the David and Alfred Smart Gallery in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center at The University of Chicago. Currently on display is dining room furniture from the Frederick C. Robie House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1908." Stamped on verso: "Daily News, Dec 21 1974. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1963.03.0610
1974
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1974 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. View of 156 Sutton Road, the unit on the South corner S.248.2. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the south, the Carport in on the lower left, Master Bedroom balcony above it, the Living Room is to the right. The Sun Terrace is above. Stamped on verso: "Date Used, Nov 17 1974." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1963.10.0214
1974
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1974 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. View of 156 Sutton Road, the unit on the South corner S.248.2. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the North, from the fireplace toward the South corner of the Living Room. Sheet music for Billie Joel’s "Piano Man" setting on the piano. Stamped on verso: "Date Used, Nov 17 1974." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1963.11.0214
1974
Suntop Homes, Ardmore, PA 1974 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. View of 156 Sutton Road, the unit on the South corner S.248.2. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Viewed from the south, the Carport is to the left, Living Room on the lower level. The Dining Room and Kitchen in the balcony on the second level. Stamped on verso: "Date Used, Nov 17 1974." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1963.12.0214
1974 Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 - S.004) 1974. Label on verso: "Photographer: Gene Pesek. Date: 7-20-74. Location: 951 Chicago Ave - Oak Park. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright home open. Caption: The historic house and studio where Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked for two decades was opened to the public this afternoon. Visitors sign in or conducted tours in the hall area of the studio. A famous Wright design is the leaded glass sky-light. Guide Ellen Jacobsen tells the tour about the famous play-room where the six Wright children spent their childhood. Again we see the sky-light and another Wright design is the fire-place and the built in furniture. Exterior view of the studio on the left and the house on he right. Courtyard was off the study where Wright worked." Clipping pasted to verso: "The Oak Park studio-house where architect Frank Lloyd Wright lived and worked for two decades was opened to the public Saturday. For $2 admission, the setting for his genius was made public by the Wright nonprofit citizens group at 951 Chicago, Oak Park. Studio is on the left, next to the home... Wright died in 1959." Original 10.5 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 1963.07.0711
1974
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland, 1974 (1953 - S.358). Robert Llewellyn Wright on the balcony of his home designed by his father, Frank Lloyd Wright. Text on face: "Robert Llewellyn Wright stands on balcony of house designed by his father, Frank Lloyd Wright, in Maryland suburb of Washington. (Photo Credit: Larry Norris, The Washington Post.) Illustrates story slugged Wright, by Sarah Booth Conroy (Post) to move over wire Monday, July 8, 1974. Los Angeles Times / Washington Post news Service." Stamped on Verso: "Date Used, July 21, 1974." Viewed the from the Master Bedroom balcony, looking east. The lower level terrace can be seen to the right. Photographed by Larry Norris. Robert Llewellyn was Wright’s sixth child. Acquired from the archives of the Washington Post. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1963.13.0214
1975
1975 Harry S. Adams Residence (1913 - S.179) 1975. Wright’s first proposal was more extensive than the finished project, and was dated September 4, 1912. Wright’s second proposal was dated May 31, 1913. Both were rejected as too elaborate, and the third scaled down proposal was one of Wright’s last prairie homes to be completed. Stamped on verso: "Apr 14, 1975. Chicago Tribune. Photo by Hardy Wieting." Clipping pasted to verso: "Distinctive Frank Lloyd Wright homes in Oak Park slated for restoration include the Gale house and Adams house. Tribune Photos by Hardy Wieting." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 1996.12.0112
1975 Harry S. Adams Residence (1913 - S.179) 1975. Wright’s first proposal was more extensive than the finished project, and was dated September 4, 1912. Wright’s second proposal was dated May 31, 1913. Both were rejected as too elaborate, and the third scaled down proposal was one of Wright’s last prairie homes to be completed. Stamped on verso: "Daily News. Sep 13, 1975." Clipping pasted to verso: "Mrs. Harold Blumenthal stands in front of the original buffet designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for her home, the Adams House, 710 Augusta, Oak Park. Daily News Photo / Donald Bierman." Photographed by Donald Bierman. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 9.2 x 6.4 B&W photograph. 1996.16.0312
Circa 1975 Anderton Court Shops (1952 - S.356) Exterior Circa 1975. In 1952, Nina Anderson, a wealthy widow, commissioned Wright to design retail space on Beverly Hills’ exclusive Rodeo Drive. Consisting of four shops on the first two levels, two on either side of a centrally located light well connected by an angular ramp that winds upward in a diamond shaped parallelogram. The upper level was originally designed as an apartment, later divided into two additional shops. Construction was supervised by apprentice Joseph Fabris, who stayed in Anderton’s Bel-Air home during construction. The first tenants included Heftler Construction Company, Paulette Girard Dresses and a coiffeur. By 1969, Kazanjian Jewelers and the Klein Art gallery were located there. Original 35mm B&W slide, 7 x 10.25 B&W photograph. 1996.15.0212
1975 Emil Bach Residence, Chicago (1915 - S.193) 1975. Caption pasted on verso: "Frank L. Miller stands in front of his Frank Lloyd Wright house in Roger’s Park for which he is asking $135,000. (Sun-Times photo by Carmen Roperto.): Label pasted on verso: "Photographer: Carmen Roperto. Date: 11/10/75. Address: 7415 N Sheridan Rd. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright house. Caption: Frank L. Miller as he stands in front of his home on 7415 N. Sheridan Road. This house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." 10 x 8 B&W High res digital image. 1996.07.0311
1975 Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104) 1975. Viewed from the sidewalk, looking Southeast. The stairs on the left lead past the gardens on the ride of the house to the back entrance. The Terrace can be seen on the right. Stamped on the verso: "Mar 11 1975. Chicago Tribune Photo by Ray Gora". Clipping pasted to verso: "The Edwin Cheney home designed by Wright in 1904, at 520 N. East Av., Oak Park." Stamped on clipping: "Mar 20 1975". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 1996.10.0112
1975 Cheney Residence (1903 - S.104) Living Room 1975. The Living Room ceiling is patterned and vaulted on the left, lowered on the right above the Fireplace. The Dining Room can be seen in the background. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Tribune, Photo by Ray Gora. Mar 10 1975". Clipping pasted to verso: "Expansive interior panoramas such as this are a hallmark of Wright’s houses. Mrs. Robert Head relaxes before fireplace of her home, the Cheney house. Tribune photo by Ray Gora." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1996.14.0212
1975 Raymond W. Evans Residence (1908 - S.140) Exterior 1975. Label pasted to verso: "Daily News Photog: Tweedle. Date 2/12/75. Location: 9914 s. longwood. Caption: pix shows frank lloyd wright house at 9914 s. longwood." Caption pasted to verso: "Housing in Beverly Hills-West Morgan Park runs the gamut from $20,000 bungalows (above) on Hale and 118th St. to a $60,000-plus Frank Lloyd Wright home on Longwood Dr. (right)." Stamped on verso: "Daily News Feb 14 1975". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10.5 x 7.8 B&W Print. 1996.08.0311
1975 George Furbeck Residence (1897, S.043) 1975. Warren Furbeck purchased a lot in Oak Park, and commissioned Wright to build a home for his Son George W. Furbeck. George Furbeck was an electrical contractor, working in Chicago. On April 9, 1897 the Oak Park Reporter announced that George Furbeck would be erecting a Frank Lloyd Wright designed home on the site his father had purchased five years earlier. On June 29, 1897, two weeks after ground was broken on his new home, Furbeck married Sue Allin Harrington of Michigan. Stamped on verso: "Mar 11 1975. Chicago Tribune. Photo by Ray Gora." Pasted on verso: "George Furbeck House, 1897, 223 N. Euclid Av., Oak Park." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7.1 B&W print. 1996.11.0112
1975 George Furbeck Residence (1897, S.043) 1975. "Frank Lloyd Wright homes, Exterior. Note: Front room (at right) was originally a courtyard. 223 H. (N) Euclid, Oak Park. Daily News Photographer Riddle. Date 9/8/75. Field Enterprises, Inc." In 1922 the courtyard and open front porch were enclosed. The courtyard walls were used as the exterior walls. The existing roof over the open front porch was used and extended. A third floor dormer was also added at a later date. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 7.25 B&W print. 1996.03.0210
1975 George Furbeck Residence Fireplace, Oak Park (1897 - S.043) 1975. Label on verso: "Daily News Photog: Riddle. Date: 9/8/75. Slug: Frank Lloyd Wright house. Location: 223 H. (N) Euclid, Oak Park. Caption: Fireplace in Dining Room." Stamped on verso: "Perry C. Riddle". Also stamped on verso: "Sep 1975, Field Enterprises, Inc." 5 x 7.25 Print, High res image. From the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1996.04.0410
1975 Walter M. Gale Residence, Oak Park (1893 S.020) 1975. Clipping pasted on verso: "Distinctive 1975 homes in Oak Park slated for restoration... Trib photo by Harding Wieting". Stamped on verso: "Apr 14, 1975. Chicago Tribune. Photo by Hardy Wieting". Original 8 x 10 B&W Photograph. 1996.09.0811
  Richard Lloyd Jones Residence, "Westhope" built for Wright's cousin Richard Lloyd Jones in 1929, Tulsa, Oklahoma (S.227).  This set of five photographs were used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 176 - 181.  
1975 1) Entryway side of the home, from the street.  Photographed by Wright associate Yugio Futgawa, Japanese author and architectural photographer.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  9.75 by 6.75.  This photograph was used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 176. 1966.02.1206
1975 3) Detail of Entryway.  Photographed by Wright associate Yugio Futgawa, Japanese author and architectural photographer.  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1924-1936 Volume 5", 1990 Pfeiffer, Image 138 in color;  "Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 8, 1991 Pfeiffer", Page 101.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  6.75 by 9.75.  This photograph was used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 177. 1966.03.1206
1975 2) Left side of Entryway.  Photographed by Wright associate Yugio Futgawa, Japanese author and architectural photographer.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  9.75 by 6.75.  This photograph was used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 178. 1966.04.1206
1975 5) Living Room.  Photographed by Wright associate Yugio Futgawa, Japanese author and architectural photographer.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  9.75 by 6.75.  This photograph was used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 180. 1966.05.1206
1975 4) Glass Conservatory.  Photographed by Wright associate Yugio Futgawa, Japanese author and architectural photographer.  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1924-1936 Volume 5", 1990 Pfeiffer, Image 139 in color.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  6.75 by 9.75.  This photograph was used in publishing “GI 9: Global Interior #9: Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright 1" Futagawa 1975, pages 181. 1966.06.1206
1975 Melvyn Maxwell Smith Residence, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. (1946 - S.287). Exterior. Article taped to verso: "...It has been 25 years now. A quarter of a century since Smith, an English teacher now retired, finished building it. A quarter of a century after Smith, a would-be architect, suggested a design change that Wright -- acknowledged as one of the great architects – accepted and praised. A quarter of a century of utter fascination with the house and the man who designed it. It’s rare for a man to possess one great possession, said Smith, ‘but my most precious possession is my home.’ From the road, the house shows little more than cypress wood, brick, and a succession of tiny off-shaped windows. But on the other side of the house, the side a passer-by can’t see, complex geometries of glass sheets project in and out of that brick and cyprus framework. ‘It seems like a natural outcropping,’ said Smith, staring at the building. ‘Like a rock, or a bush or a tree." Wright believed that architecture should complement and blend with he land which surrounds it. So when Smith shows off his house, like any good advocate of Wright’s ‘organic architecture,’ he begins with a tour of the three acres of grounds. ‘This was all a swamp meadow before we dredged it up,’ he says... No other homes are visible from the rear of the house. Smith prefers it that way. Stamped on verso: "Photo by Richard Lee" and "Detroit Free Press, Aug 21, 1975". Published August 29, 1975. Acquired from the archives of the Detroit Free Press. Original 10x 8 B&W photograph. 1996.06.0311
1975 Melvyn Maxwell Smith Residence Living room, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. (1946 - S.287). Caption pasted on verso: "Thirty-six feet of built-in couch and shelf space provide space for lots of people and things in Smith’s living room." Stamped on verso: "Photo by Richard Lee" and "Aug 29, 1975". Published August 29, 1975. Original 10x 8 B&W photograph. 1996.05.0211
1975 Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1975. View of lobby and balcony. The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Label pasted to verso: "Photographer: Pete Peters. Date: 1/15/75.Caption: Over-all pix of the renovated Rookery." Stamped on verso: "Sun Times Jan 18 1975". Clipping pasted to verso: "Wright On. Interior of the Rookery Building, 209 S. La Salle, where Continental Bank has opened personal banking and international services facilities. Commission on Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks honored Continental for its "‘sensitive renovation work’ on the first floor of the building, designed in 1886 by Burnham & Root. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the central court of the Rookery in 1905." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1996.17.0512
1975 Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), 1975. Photographed from across the street on Chicago Ave. Exterior view of the drafting room is on the left, the Reception Hall in the center, the Library is on the right and the Home is in the background on the right. Clipping pasted on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, 951 Chicago Ave., Oak Park. Tribune photo Ernie Cox Jr." Stamped on clipping: "Mar 27 1975". Hand written on verso: "Ernie Cox Jr. 1/14/75". Original 10 x 4.5 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. 1996.13.0212
1975 Wright’s Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004), 1975. Photographed from the corner of Chicago Ave. and Forest. Studio is on the left, Home on the right. Label pasted to verso: "Oak Park Tour Center 848-1978. Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park, Illinois built between 1889 and 1898. Photo courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation. Also written on verso: "Photo: Donald G. Kalec". Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park, Illinois, 1975, Kalec, Heinz, page 1. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 1967.01.0711
1976
1976 James Charnley Proposed Condos 1976 (1890 - S.009). Clipping on verso: "Mondo condo: It’s not Wright. Frank Lloyd Wright, thou shouldn’t be living at this hour. You shouldn’t let them do what they’re planning to do to your Charnley House. Yes, the Charnley House at 1365 N. Astor, that veritable emblem of modern architecture, is due for ‘renovations.’ It is to be remodeled into Gold Coast condominium apartments after 84 years as a family residence -- and with the approval of Chicago’s city landmarks commissioners, at that. We can imagine Wright’s outrage if he still were alive. He gave up humility at an early age, and his angry outcries stopped the proposed razing of his most famous Chicago house, the Robie House at 5757 S. Woodlawn. Stamped on verso: "Jun 23 76." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 2020.08.0811
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint fumes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#15) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.13.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint fumes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#16) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.14.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint fumes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#17) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.15.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint fumes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#18) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.16.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint umes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#19) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.17.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. Fire fighters working to extinguish fire. In 1975, Tom and Irene DeCaro purchased the Hills Residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright between 1900 - 1906. They began a meticulous restoration to Wright’s original plans with the aid of architect John Tilton. On January 3, 1976 a fire devastated most of the structure. It was determined that cleaning fluids and paint fumes were ignited by an electric sander on the second floor cause of the blaze. When Irene DeCaro returned to the burning home to search for her pet cat she was injured in the fire. The fire completely destroyed the entire second and third floors. Although the first floor was also badly damaged, several of the first floor built-in furnishings and both fireplaces survived. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 35mm B&W negative (#20) and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.18.0812
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. A Victorian home was located one lot South of Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home from Frank S. Gray in 1900 and hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills (1900, 1906 - S.051). Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. On January 3, 1976 the home caught fire and destroyed the second floor. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Tribune Photo by Roy Hall. Jan 3, 1976." Label on verso: "Date: 1/3/1976. Oak Park Fire. Roy Hall. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright Home fire in Oak Park at 313 N. Forest Ave., oak Park, Ill." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 2020.11.0412
1976 Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) 1976. A Victorian home was located one lot South of the Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home from Frank S. Gray in 1900 and hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills. Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. On January 3, 1976 the home caught fire and destroyed the second floor. The home was restored in 1977 to Wright’s original plans. Sign being painted reads "Join our Forest Ave. house walk Sat. May 8th 10 to 4. Help rebuild this Wright house. For tickets call 3__-7270. Neighbor Walk to the..." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Tribune Photo by Ray Gora. Apr 1, 1976." Clipping on verso reads "Neighborhood youngsters have joined effort to fix up fire-damaged Frank Lloyd Wright landmark in Oak Park by painting on fence inviting residence to join a house walk to raise money." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 2020.10.0212
1976 Nathan G. Moore Residence (1923 - S.034) 1976. Viewed from the Northeast. Forest Avenue is on the left, Superior Street is on the right. Clipping pasted to verso: "House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright at 333 Forest Av., Oak Park, one of numerous landmarks in the suburb featured in a new guidebook." Stamped on verso: "Chicago Tribune Photo by George Quinn. Printed by Robert Williams. June 25 1976". Three clippings pasted to verso dated: "Jul 1 1976, Apr 1 1977, Aug 19 1977." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 2020.09.0112
1976 Nathan G. Moore Residence (1923 - S.034) 1976. Article taped to verso (excerpt): "Wright Stamped Genius on Chicago Suburbs. ...at 333 Forest, is one of Wright’s strangest homes. Built in 1895 to satisfy a client who demanded Tudor styling, the place burned in 1922, much to Wright’s joy. He then incorporated several of his current ideas onto the Tudor shell to produce this unique and compelling home." Photo’s caption: "Built upon the shell of a mock Tudor structure, this is one of 24 buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Oak Park." Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. 2020.06.0211
1976 Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004), 1976. View of Studio. Label on verso: "Sun-Times Photog: Gene Pesek. Date: 4-15-76. Location: Oak Park., Subject: Oak Park All-American City. Caption material: Views of the famous Frank Lloyd Wright studio and house on the corner of Chicago Ave. and Forest." Stamped on verso: "Sun-Times Oct 15 1976". Original 10.5 x 7.3 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 2020.07.0311
1977
1977 Copper Urn, 1978. Wright began experimenting with variations of the design for the Urn as early as 1894. He included it in a number of drawings and projects he worked on, including those for the Husser house, Edward C. Waller house, Wright's own Home and Studio, the Dana house, the Coonley house and Browne's Bookstore. Eighteen inches tall, it was executed by James A. Miller and Brother. Label pasted to verso: " 'The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright', Renwick Gallery, December 16, 1977 through July 30, 1978. Urn 1899. From Edward C. Waller House, River forest, Illinois. Copper and galvanized tin. 18.5 x 18.5. Lent by Mr. & Mrs. Wilbert R. Hasbrouck, Ill. Photograph courtesy Art Institute of Chicago." Clipping pasted to verso: "Wright's copper and tin urn topped a newel-post in the 1899 Waller House in River forest." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Acquired from the achievers of the Chicago Tribune. 2033.09.0712
1977 William G. Fricke Home (1901 S.058) 1977. "Frank Lloyd Wright’s William G. Fricke home at 540 Fair Oaks is subject for lookers and photographers on tour of seven Wright-designed structures and three others designed by colleagues of his. Photographer Graff. Date 5/21/77. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright Tour." Sun-Times Caption pasted on verso dated May 22, 1977 "It’s the Wright look. The William G. Fricke home at 540 Fair Oaks, Oak Park, has its share of admirers Saturday. It was one of seven Oak Park homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and three others designed by his colleagues open for inspection on a tour sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation, 951 Chicago. Some 2,200 persons paid $15 each to tour the structures. The fund will go to restore the Wright home and the studio’s dining room." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Daily News. Original 10.75 x 7.75 B&W print. 2033.02.0210
1977 Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1977. View from the West, of the exterior of Unity Temple’s sanctuary. Lake Street is on the far left, North Kenilworth Avenue is on the far right. The stairs on the right lead to the Entrance. Photographed in October 1977 by Walter Smalling Jr.. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 2033.04.0112
1977 Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1977. View of Unity Temple’s sanctuary. Both Unity Temple and Unity House are lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. A band of horizontal windows, just beneath the ceiling adds additional light to the Temple. The lower portion of the Temple is unbroken by doors and windows. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. Photographed in October 1977 by Walter Smalling Jr.. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 2033.05.0112
1977 Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1977. View of Unity Temple’s ceiling. Both Unity Temple and Unity House are lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. A band of horizontal windows, just beneath the ceiling adds additional light to the Temple. The lower portion of the Temple is unbroken by doors and windows. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. Photographed in October 1977 by Walter Smalling Jr.. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 2033.06.0112
1977 William H. Winslow House (1894 - S.024) Exterior front door 1977. Stamped on verso: "Chicago Daily News, May 12, 77. Ray Burley". Caption pasted on verso: "An oak tree is carved into this massive front door of the Winslow home. (Daily News Photo / Ray Burley)." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 2033.08.0612
1977 Wright's Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), Dining Room 1977. Photographed during the restoration of the Dining Room which was completed in 1977. This was before the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation placed the reacquired original dining room set in the dining room. The five chairs seen in this photograph are the "Slant Back" chairs Wright designed just after the turn of the century (circa 1903). Variations appeared in a number of buildings during that time period. The Larking Building (1903), Wright’s own home (1904) and the Robie House. Caption on face: "5/2/77 -- Oak Park, Ill.: Joan Cook, a visitor on tour of the Wright house, looks at the ceiling panel which probably was the world’s first residential use of indirect electric lighting. The panel, in the dining room, was covered with rice paper to conceal bulbs. (UPI)" Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8.3 x 10.25 B&W Print. 2033.07.0112
1977 Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), Play Room 1977. Photographed during the initial restoration of the Home and Studio. Caption on face: "5/2/77 -- Oak Park, Ill.: Illumination from skylight fills the play-room of the Frank Lloyd Wright house at 951 Chicago Ave., where he and his family lived until 1090. A sophisticated plan is underway to restore the house to its original design. It will take about a decade and cost more than $1 million. (UPI)" Stamped on verso: "Sep 4, 1977". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8.3 x 10.25 B&W Photograph. 2033.10.0912
1977 Wright’s Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 S.004), 1977. Photographed from Chicago Avenue. Caption pasted on verso: "With all the intrigue of archeology, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio in Oak Park is being fully restored at an estimated cost of $1 million." Caption written on verso: "The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park is the Village’s most treasured monument where preservation has become a "community value". Also written on verso: "Photo: Donald Kalec". Stamped on verso: "Sun-Times Daily News. Jan 28 1979". (Note: Dated 1977. Published in The Plan for Restoration and Adaptive Use of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, 1978, page 42. Very similar view.) Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1979.23.1210
1978
1978 E. Arthur Davenport Residence (1901 S.068), River Forest, Illinois. Caption reads: "Wright/Goldberger. NYT Pictures/Yuichi Idaka. Oak Park, Ill.: The Davenport House is an excellent example of a small Wright home. NYT07287809. (Fourth of Six)". Stamped on verso "Nov 30 1978." Photographed by Yuichi Idaka for the New York Times. By 1970 "...it had fallen into sorry condition through neglect. The garage was near collapse, the house gutters and downspouts were full of holes, which caused damage to the cedar board-and-batten exterior; glass was broken in some of the windows, and the seventy-year build-up of paint and wallpaper was beginning to part company with the walls." Restored America, 1975, p138-141. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1978.32.0610
1978 E. Arthur Davenport Residence (1901 S.068), River Forest, Illinois. Caption on Face: " Oak Park, Ill.: The Davenport House is an excellent example of a small Wright home. (Fourth of Six) Wright/Goldberger. NYT Pictures/Yuichi Idaka". Published in the New York Times on August 27, 1978, accompanying a story about Wright by Paul Goldberger. Caption pasted to verso and stamped Aug 27 1978: "The Davenport House is an excellent example of a small Wright home." Article pasted to verso (Excerpt): "Oak Park, Ill. - The moment a workman comes in here, he takes one look around and says, ‘Oh, this house is one of his, isn’t it?’ Then he groans and lets you know how much more work it’s going to mean for him," said Jeannette Fields, sitting in the living room of her 77-year-old house. Mrs. Fields did not have to say who ‘he’ is - her house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, who lived in Oak park from 1889 until 1909. In that period and the years just following, Wright designed or altered almost 30 houses here and in neighboring River Forest, where the Field’s house was built originally for Arthur Davenport in 1901... Several Wright houses have sold recently for about $170,000, about 20 to 25 percent more than other homes in the neighborhood..." Photographed by Yuichi Idaka for the New York Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1978.35.0111
1978 Arthur Heurtley Residence, Oak park (1902 - S.074) 1978. Caption on Face: "Oak Park, Ill.: The Heurtley House, a noble, self-assured mass of reddish brick built for a Chicago banker in 1902. (Second of Six). Wright/Goldberger. NYT Pictures / Yuichi Idaka" Published in the New York Times on August 27, 1978, accompanying a story about Wright by Paul Goldberger. Caption pasted to verso and stamped Aug 27 1978: "The Heurtley house (left) is a noble, self-assured mass of reddish brick built for a Chicago banker in 1902. Jack Prost (above) now lives in the house, which has a leaded glass skylight and an arched fireplace in the livingroom." Article pasted to verso (Excerpt): "Oak Park, Ill. - ...Just a couple of doors down Forest Avenue, (from Wright’s Home & Studio) is one of Wright’s best coherent wholes - the Heurtley House at No. 318, a noble, self-assured mass of reddish brick built for a Chicago banker in 1902. The Heurtley House is now owned by Jack Prost, a biology professor who purchased th house in 1973, three years after moving to Oak Park in the hope of setting in a Wright House. It is one of Wright’s finest prairie houses, as many of his early works were called. It gathers its many rooms under a vast, sprawling hipped roof, with rows of windows, in neat horizontal strips, tucked up near the top and a grand arched entrance." Photographed by Yuichi Idaka for the New York Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1978.34.0111
1978 Arthur Heurtley Residence, Oak park (1902 - S.074) 1978. Caption on Face: "Oak Park, Ill.: Jack Prost now lives in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Heurtley House, with leaded glass skylight and arched fireplace in living room. (First of Six). Wright/Goldberger. NYT Pictures / Yuichi Idaka" Published in the New York Times on August 27, 1978, accompanying a story about Wright by Paul Goldberger. Caption pasted to verso and stamped Aug 27 1978: "The Heurtley house (left) is a noble, self-assured mass of reddish brick built for a Chicago banker in 1902. Jack Prost (above) now lives in the house, which has a leaded glass skylight and an arched fireplace in the livingroom." Article pasted to verso (Excerpt): "Oak Park, Ill. - ...Just a couple of doors down Forest Avenue, (from Wright’s Home & Studio) is one of Wright’s best coherent wholes - the Heurtley House at No. 318, a noble, self-assured mass of reddish brick built for a Chicago banker in 1902. The Heurtley House is now owned by Jack Prost, a biology professor who purchased the house in 1973, three years after moving to Oak Park in the hope of setting in a Wright House. It is one of Wright’s finest prairie houses, as many of his early works were called. It gathers its many rooms under a vast, sprawling hipped roof, with rows of windows, in neat horizontal strips, tucked up near the top and a grand arched entrance." Photographed by Yuichi Idaka for the New York Times. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1978.33.0111
1978 Gregor Affleck House Exterior 1978. Gregor S. Affleck House (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Clipping taped to verso: "Southfield College will Get Mansion. One of Detroit area’s most famous houses, the Affleck House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has been donated to the Lawrence Institute of Technology... The Home in Bloomfield Hills was given to the college by the children of the late George S. and Elizabeth B. Affleck. A chemical engineer, Affleck was president of Colloidal Paint Products. "Mother and Dad loved the house and we wanted to help LIT by providing students an historic and creative architectural example from which to learn," said Mrs.. Mary Ann Lutomski of Bloomfield Hills. She and her brother, Gregor Affleck of Royal Oak, gave the house jointly. The house was completed in 1941 and is considered a fine example from the period of Wright’s architectural career he called ‘;Usonian’ - a way of building a structure in harmony with a site. The style included open planning in the living area and small bedrooms. It features shiplapped siding and then-novel radiant heating n polished concrete floors..." Stamped on verso: "Feb 21 1978"; "Walt Bizon". Hand written on verso: "78J6R1-20 #6". Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Detroit free Press. 1978.39.1011
1978 Gregor Affleck House Window detail 1978.  Gregor S. Affleck House (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Photographed by Walt Bizon for the Lawrence Institute of Technology.  The home was donated to the Lawrence Institute of Technology in 1977.  It was restored in the 1980s.  "There are two things wrong with a Frank Lloyd Wright house.  People will hardly let you get one built and will hardly let you live in it when it's done." client Gregor Affleck.  Dating photograph: The thee lined printing "THIS PAPER / MANUFACTURED / BY KODAK" was commonly used in the 1970s-80s. Original 5 x 7 silver gelatin photograph.  #78J6R1-24. 1978.26.0207
1978 Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1978. Sheet pasted on verso: "Unity Temple, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1905-1908, is a three dimensional monument to ‘the worship of God and the service of man.’ executed in poured concrete, Wright’s first use of this material. Designed of a series of completely interlocking rectilinear solids, it is a testimony to Wright’s extraordinary gift to translate blueprints into sculpture. The church itself is a simple cubic volume of space lighted from above by a skylight of beautiful art glass. The intimate interior spaces are an intricate arrangement of broad uninterrupted wall planes, balconies, passageways, massive decorated piers, alternating windows and art glass, achieving an unparalleled strong sense of repose. The Unitarian Universalist Church building (called Unity temple) was declared a national historical Landmark in 1969 and has undergone an extensive careful restoration under supervision by Lloyd Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright’s eldest son. The church will be shown on all tours during the Oak Park Festival July 22-30." Clipping pasted to verso: "Open housed can be humdrum but not when oak Park, Ill, holds its annual festival July 22-30. Oak Park, west of Chicago, boasts the largest array of Frank Lloyd Wright homes. It also has the birthplace and boyhood home of Earnest Hemingway. I-04 gets you there." Stamped on verso: "June 25, 1978". Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. 1978.38.0211
1979
1979 Gregor Affleck House Exterior 1979. Gregor S. Affleck House (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Stamped on verso: "Detroit Free Press, Dec 4 1979. Photo by Mary Schroeder". Caption pasted to verso, dated Jan 8 1980: "Before he sat down to his drawing board, Frank Lloyd Wright had Gregor Affleck select a site where no other architect would build. This house Wright designed in Bloomfield Hills sweeps over a steep ravine split by a brook." Article pasted to verso, dated Dec 12 1988: "500 inspect house built by Wright. By Jeanne May, Free Press Staff Writer. "When you walk through the Affleck House – the Bloomfield Hills house that architect Frank Lloyd Wright built in 1941 – you often feel squeezed from above above by low ceilings or squeezed from both sides by narrow hallways. ‘You have that continually in Wright buildings, because he wanted you to have the feeling you were moving through space.’ said Anthony Gholz, a member of the board of governors of the Friends of Frank Lloyd Wright-Affleck house. The land-hugging house – L-shaped and built on three levels – has an entrance room, a living-and... Dirt and waxed, through which ran hot water pipes that heat the house. Caption: The Frank Lloyd Wright-Affleck House, designed by Wright in 1941, sweeps over a steep ravine split by a brook in Bloomfield Hills." Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Detroit Free Press. 1979.24.0411

 

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