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E-Z POLISH FACTORY (1905-S.114)
   
E-Z Polish Factory (1905 - S.114). The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. William E. Martin was born in New York state in 1863. He moved to Chicago in 1882. According to Jack Lesniak, (William Everett Martin House, 2000), by 1884 was a partner with Frank H. Gano, Gano & Martin). In 1888 he was with the Common Sense Stove Polish Company. In 1889 he formed Martin & Barton with his brother-in-law George F. Barton and manufactured stove polish. In 1895, Darwin Martin bought out Barton, and moved him to the Larkin Company in Buffalo, N.Y. They established Martin & Martin and manufactured polish for stoves and shoes under the E-Z Polish brand. The E-Z Polish Factory building was not the first for the Martins. In 1902 Wright designed a home in Oak Park for William E. Martin (S.061).This established a long line of projects for the Martin families. Other related structures included: Larkin Building, Buffalo (1903 - S.093); Darwin Martin, Buffalo (1904 - S.100); George and Delta (Martin) Barton, Buffalo (1903 - S.103) (Darwin Martin’s sister); William Heath, Buffalo (1904 - S.1904) (Larkin Attorney); Darwin Martin Gardener’s Cottage, Buffalo (1905 - S.090). Frank Lloyd Wright designed the E-Z Polish Factory (1905 - S.114) for William and Darwin Martin. Isabel Martin, Graycliff, Derby, NY (1927 - S.225-226).
       Frank Lloyd Wright’s initial design for the E-Z Polish Factory is published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer, p.187. Wright designed a two story building with a daylight basement facing Fillmore Street. The building was of reinforces concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These were capped by limestone or concrete that ran the full length of the building. The entrance was reached between two smaller rectangular sections of the building that were perpendicular to the main structure. These were reached only by a bridge from the main building. A large planting was in the center of the courtyard that lead to the entrance. Just past the planting was the entrance. The lower doors, the employee entrance lead to into the basement. On either side of the lower doors, were brick piers with large concrete vases. On either side of the employee entrance, stairs lead up to the visitor’s entrance on the main floor. To the outside of the entrance, on either side, light flooded the two stairways with tall vertical windows.
       There do not appear to be any photographic records of the original two-story building as Wright designed it, that have been discovered at this time. But there is evidence that what was designed was a two-story building. What was built appears to be a much simpler design. Plans of the revised design have not been discovered at this time. The elaborate entrance set back from the street was replaced by two simple doorways on Carroll Street, one near the east end, and a similar entrance near the west end. Where the front was set back from the sidewalk, it was brought forward in-line with other buildings on the block. Brendan Gill details William Martins struggle in working with Frank Lloyd Wright, who was also building Darwin Martin’s house and the Larkin Building at the same time as the E-Z Polish building. When the contractor Paul Mueller (Wright worked with him in Sullivan’s office) began
   excavating for the foundation, he did not have the final blueprints for the building. Wright was very busy on other projects. William Martin wrote to his brother of his frustration (p.159). "Many Masks, 1987, p.156-161. One aspect that made this building unique was Wright’s use of reinforced concrete, a concept not widely utilized at the time.
      One aspect of the E-Z Polish building is puzzling. The quality of the brickwork would not seem to pass Wright’s standards. He was always very specific about standards of quality in stone and brick work. Wright’s first public building of brick was the Roloson Rowhouses (1894). The brick facade that faced the street was clean and deliberate. The sides and back resemble the brickwork seen in the E-Z Polish building. Wrights second and third public projects, The Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments, both 1895, appeared the same, clean and deliberate. The sides and back resemble the brickwork seen in the E-Z Polish building. The Francis Apartments (1895), demolished, also appear clean. The Larkin and Abraham Lincoln Center, both 1903, again, exceptional workmanship on the brickwork. Even the stonework of the Frank L. Smith Bank (1905), even after more than 110 years, the craftsmanship is exceptional. But when you look closely, the craftsmanship of the E-Z Polish building is sub-par. It does not have the appearance of the type of brickwork Wright would have specified. It resembles the unfinished side and rear of the low income Waller Apartments. One can only surmise.
       When you read Brendan Gill account of the construction of the E-Z Polish Factory, it may explain the lack of quality in the brickwork on the face of the building. With Wright buried in the Larkin and Darwin Martin projects, he may have lacked the time or interest to invest in the oversight of the construction of the E-Z Polish Building. And when you take into account the first design compared to what was actually built, it became a much lesser design. In some respects, it is reminiscent of the Abraham Lincoln Center (1903) which was designed for Frank Lloyd Wright’s uncle, Reverend Jenkin Lloyd Jones. As the All Souls Church outgrew their facility, Reverend Jones wanted a facility that could meet the needs of the community as well as the Church. The design went though many modifications. A perspective view of the first design for "The Lincoln Center" was published in The Architectural Review, June 1900, Spencer, p.72. A revised design for the "Abraham Lincoln Center," Frank Lloyd Wright and Dwight Heald Perkins, Associated Architects, was published in The Chicago Architectural Annual, 1902. Jones was still dissatisfied, and Wright resigned as architect. Perkins also resigned. Elements of Wright’s original design remained, but the finished project lost many of Wright’s ideas.
      The building was altered greatly in 1913. The additions were designed by Harry H. Mahler. Two floors were added above. Evidence remains of the additions. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin, was added after the addition. It was visible in Gilman Lane’s 1935-1945 photograph. Wright and William must have reconciled their relationship. In 1909, Wright designed a Pergola for William E. Martin’s Residence. William past way on September 23,1938.
   
Date: Circa 1900

Title: E-Z Polish Glass Bottle Circa 1900s.

Description: A Blown in mold glass bottle with raised lettering. The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. Little remains of Frank Lloyd Wright’s original design for the E-Z Polish Factory, designed in 1905 for William and Darwin Martin. This bottle is most likely pre Frank Lloyd Wright designed building. Raised text on front: "Trade Mark, E-Z, Martin&Martin, Chicago, U.S.A." Raised text on Back: "Trade Mark, E-Z."

Size: 5.6" Tall x 2.6" Wide x 1.7" Deep.

S#:
0041.29.0319
   
Date: 1905

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Drawing Circa 1905 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Drawing of the front elevation for the Martin & Martin E-Z Polish Factory. The building was constructed of reinforces concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These were capped by limestone or concrete that ran the full length of the building. The entrance was reached between two smaller rectangular sections of the building that were perpendicular to the main structure. These were reached only by a bridge from the main building. A large planting was in the center of the courtyard that lead to the entrance. Just past the planting was the entrance. The lower doors, the employee entrance lead to into the basement. On either side of the lower doors, were brick piers with large concrete vases. On either side of the employee entrance, stairs lead up to the visitor’s entrance on the main floor. To the outside of the entrance, on either side, light flooded the two stairways with tall vertical windows. Text on lower right: "Elevation on Fillmore Street. Scale One Quarter Inch Equals One Foot." Text lower far right: "From Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Forest and Chicago Avenues, Oak Park, Illinois. Telephone Oak Park Fifty Three. In Chicago By Appointment Only." Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer, p.187. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Size: 10 x 4.5 B&W Photograph

S#:
0058.23.0219
   
 
 
 
 
 
Date: 1905

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Ground and Floor Plan Circa 1905 (1905 - S.114). 

Description: Drawing of the ground and floor plan for the Martin & Martin E-Z Polish Factory. The building was constructed of reinforces concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These were capped by limestone or concrete that ran the full length of the building. The entrance was reached between two smaller rectangular sections of the building that were perpendicular to the main structure. These were reached only by a bridge from the main building. A large planting was in the center of the courtyard that lead to the entrance. Just past the planting was the entrance. The lower doors, the employee entrance lead to into the basement. On either side of the lower doors, were brick piers with large concrete vases. On either side of the employee entrance, stairs lead up to the visitor’s entrance on the main floor. To the outside of the entrance, on either side, light flooded the two stairways with tall vertical windows. Text on lower right: "E-Z Stove Polish Factory. Martin and Martin, Chicago. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Chicago. First Floor Plan. Scale One Quarter Inch Equals One Foot." Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer, p.187. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Size: 8 x 8.5 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0058.24.0219
   
 
E-Z Polish Factory Ground and Floor Plan.
   
Date: 1905 (2011)

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Axonometric Drawing of Ground and Floor Plan Circa 1905 (2011) (1905 - S.114).

Description: Axonometric drawing of the ground and floor plan for the Martin & Martin E-Z Polish Factory. The building was constructed of reinforces concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These were capped by limestone or concrete that ran the full length of the building. The entrance was reached between two smaller rectangular sections of the building that were perpendicular to the main structure. These were reached only by a bridge from the main building. A large planting was in the center of the courtyard that lead to the entrance. Just past the planting was the entrance. The lower doors, the employee entrance lead to into the basement. On either side of the lower doors, were brick piers with large concrete vases. On either side of the employee entrance, stairs lead up to the visitor’s entrance on the main floor. To the outside of the entrance, on either side, light flooded the two stairways with tall vertical windows. Created by Ryan Zegarelli in 2011. Text on lower right: "E-Z Stove Polish Factory. Martin and Martin, Chicago, Illinois. Frank Lloyd Wright - Architect." Courtesy of the University of Buffalo.

Size: 8 x 8.4 B&W Photograph.

S#:
0058.25.0219
   
   
Date: C 1905

Title: E-Z Polish Factory monogram 1905 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Copy of Martin & Martin Logo. Brendan Gill published a copy of the pre-1905 E-Z Polish letterhead, and the 1905 Frank Lloyd Wright designed letterhead that included this Martin & Martin monogram. Many Masks 1987, p.158. This also hung above the entryway in the form of a sign.

Size: 6.25 x 3.25 Color Photograph.

S#:
0058.26.0319
   
Date: Circa 1906

Title: E-Z Ola Watch Fob Circa 1906.

Description: Metal watch fob. The E-Z Polish Factory, located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments, manufactured stove and show polish. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the E-Z Polish Factory in 1905 for William and Darwin Martin. An ad that ran in the January 20, 1906 "Boot and Show Recorder" read: "Join the E-Z-Ola Club. Benefits – increased respect from all. Admission to polished society. The club emblem is a handsome watch fob complete with leather strap and buckle. It’s E-Z to join! Martin & Martin. Chicago." Text on face of fob: "I Am A Shining Member Of The E-Z-Ola Club." Verso: "E-Z-Ola Made By Martin & Martin Chicago."

Size: 1.5 x 1.5

S#:
0064.24.0219
 
   


Date: Circa 1910

Title: E-Z Stove Polish Souvenir Tin Art Tray, Circa 1910s.

Description: The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. Little remains of Frank Lloyd Wright’s original design for the E-Z Polish Factory, designed in 1905 for William and Darwin Martin. Text on base: "This Souvenir Art Tray Is Presented With E-Z Stove Polish. The Great Invention for Shining Stoves. -- Shines for All Nations – Martin & Martin Mfr's. Chicago." Top side is brown. Bottom side is black with white letters.

Size: Oval tray 6.1 x 4.4 inches

S#:
0094.57.0219
   
Date: Circa 1910s

Title: E-Z Stove Polish Glass Bottle Circa 1910s.

Description: Glass bottle with raised lettering. The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. Little remains of Frank Lloyd Wright’s original design for the E-Z Polish Factory, designed in 1905 for William and Darwin Martin. Raised lettering on front: "Trade Mark, E-Z Stove Polish. Does It Easy. Martin&Martin, Chicago." Raised lettering on Back: "Keep From Fire. Shake Before Using." Text on base: "2."

Size: 5.3" Tall x 2.6" Wide x 1.7" Deep.

S#:
0094.58.0219
   
Date: C 1915

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Postcard Circa 1915 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Aerial view of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northeast. Not dated. Illustrated after the building was altered by adding two floor atop the original two floors in 1913. The additions were designed by Harry H. Mahler. The building shown on the left, now demolished was actually much larger than illustrated. It covered nearly all of the East elevation. The building to the right, is not consistent with what is there today. It is actually taller than the E-Z Polish building. The two smaller buildings in the back center, actually follow the floor plan of Wright’s original floor plan for the building. Illustration is vaguely reminiscent of the illustration for the Larkin factories., letters along roof top, etc. Text on face: "Stove Polish. E-Z. Show Polish. Martin & Martin. The E-Z Plant The Guarantee of a Good Shine. Courtesy of "William Everett Martin House," Lesniak, 2000, p.45.

Size: 10 x 6 B&W photograph.

S#:
0128.58.0319
   
Aerial view of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northeast. It almost appears as if the "Martin & Martin" sign can be seen above the entrance, which can be seen at the front of the building on the left.
   
Date: Circa 1939

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Entrance Circa 1939 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Copy photograph of image published in Many Masks Gill, 1987, p.158. Photographed by Grant Manson, possibly shortly after his re-discovery of the building. Manson writes, "The factory which Wright built in 1905 for the Martin Brothers, the ‘E-Z’ Polish plant on Chicago’s West Side...was lost to memory until 1939... and was noticed by the author from the window of a train en route to Geneva, Illinois." Address reads "3005." This entrance has been altered since this photograph was taken. The two brick columns were removed and replace with glass. Text reads: "Help Cleaners." Note: A Martin & Martin business card published in William Everett Martin House Lesniak, 2000, p.45, reads: "E-Z Polishers" and "Help Cleaners." Below the text is the "Martin & Martin" sign, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. "3005. Gold Star Press - Printers." This would also indicate that the enhance of the East end of the building originally matched the entrance on the West end of the building. Decorative stone has been added to the doorway. There is also a "For Sale" sign, top left. William past way on September 23,1938. Upon his death, Martin & Martin Co.'s management was passed on to his son Everett (obituary). The family may have decided to put the building up for sale after his death.

Size: 4.25 x 7.75 B&W copy photograph.

S#:
0501.39.0319
   
Date: Circa 1940-1941

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior Views (A-I) Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I). The Oak Park Public Library dates these photographs 1935-1945. Image "F" with the couple in the lower right hand corner, was published in "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 99. Gilman would have photographed these prior to 1942. Hitchcock credits Lane for the photograph on page [xv]. Hitchcock writes... Continue...

Size: Eight 8 x 10 B&W photographs

S#:
0531.76.0419 (1-8)
   

 See additional photographs...
   
E-Z Polish Factory Exterior Views (A-I) Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I). The Oak Park Public Library dates these photographs 1935-1945. Image "F" with the couple in the lower right hand corner, was published in "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 99. Gilman would have photographed these prior to 1942. Hitchcock credits Lane for the photograph on page [xv]. Hitchcock writes, "The E-Z Polish Factory in Chicago was long forgotten and only rediscovered two years ago by Grant Manson, who followed up a clue that Wright’s only factory lay somewhere along the Galena division of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway by riding back and forth  

on the line until he spotted it. It is of concrete construction with spandrels surfaced with brick and horizontal windows very similar to those of the sides of the Larkin Building. The plain facade is terminated by open stair bays, their vertical flanking piers framing the composition. The more elaborate scheme for an open court between side wings at the rear, found in drawings at Taliesin, was never executed." Hitchcock, 1942, p.52. It is interesting that Hitchcock credits Manson for rediscovering the E-Z Polish Factory, but does not use his photograph of the building in the book, possibly because he had not photographed it prior to publication, although Manson did publish one of his photographs of the building in his book "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910," Manson, 1958, p.163, which appears to be photographed prior to the installation of the water tank seen in his images in the Oak Park Public Library collection. Eight 8 x 10 B&W photographs.

   
1) A: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I). Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. (S#0531.76.0419-1)
 
2) B: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I). The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin." Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-2)
 
3) C: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I), note shadow along the lower part of the image. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin." Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 7 x 10 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-3)
 
4) D: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I), note shadow along the lower part of the image. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin." Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-4)
 
5) E: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. This copy courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. The building was altered greatly in 1913. Two floors were added above. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin," was added after the addition. Windows that have now been bricked, still existed. The building on the right still stands, the building to the left has been demolished. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1935-45. Text in negative lower left : "67351." Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 10 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-5)
 
5A) E: Detail of E-Z Polish Factory Exterior. (S#531.76.0419-5A)
 
6) F: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I), note shadow along the lower part of the image. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin." Note couple in the lower right hand corner. Published in "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock, 1942, Plate 99. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 7 x 10. B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-6) (Note: Image G is very similar to image D, but has a telephone pole in the image.)
 
7) H: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory South Elevation from the Southwest taken from behind the building. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I), note shadow along the lower part of the image. There appears to be the remains of a brick wall, lower left hand corner. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-7)
 
8) I: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1940-41 (1905 - S.114). Set of nine B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Gilman Lane, from the archives of the Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory South Elevation from the Southwest taken from behind the building. These would have been photographed on two different occasions, the first was possibly when cars were parked in the street (A-B), blocking the view, and on a return trip when the cars were missing (C-I), note shadow along the lower part of the image. There appears to be the remains of a brick wall, lower left hand corner. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1940-41. Courtesy of the Gilman Lane Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 7 B&W Photograph. (S#531.76.0419-8)
   
Date: C 1945-50

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior Views Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. This set appears to be taken at a later date then the Gilman Lane collection. The water tower that appears on the Northwest corner was not in the Lane set, but was in a much later photograph published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906," Pfeiffer, 1986, p.186 taken in the early 1970s, which shows the windows bricked up, the building to the east demolished and a second water tower above the center of the North elevation. It also shows the original "E-Z" signage along the roof line and the "Martin & Martin" sign above the 3005 entrance was removed. William Everett Martin’s obituary dated October 6, 1938 indicated that Martin & Martin was now managed by his son, Everett K. Martin. Concerning dating these images, the Martin & Martin building is for sale. Martin & Martin still has the signage on the building and above the door, but Gold Star Press - Printers also occupied the building. Just above the entrance sign it reads "Help Cleaners" which was a water softener, another company owned by William Martin. Although Grant Manson published "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910" in 1958, he chose a much earlier photograph (page 163) he had taken around the same time period as the Gilman Lane photographs...  Continue...

Size: Six 8 x 10 B&W photographs.

S#:
0647.36.0419 (1-6)
   

 See additional photographs...
   
E-Z Polish Factory Exterior Views Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. This set appears to be taken at a later date then the Gilman Lane collection. The water tower that appears on the Northwest corner was not in the Lane set, but was in a much later photograph published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906," Pfeiffer, 1986, p.186 taken in the early 1970s, which shows the windows bricked up, the building to the east demolished and a second water tower above the center of the North elevation. It also shows the original "E-Z" signage along the roof line and the "Martin & Martin" sign above the 3005 entrance was removed. William Everett Martin’s obituary dated October 6, 1938 indicated that Martin & Martin was now managed by his son, Everett K. Martin. Concerning dating these images, the Martin & Martin building is for sale. Martin & Martin still has the signage on the building and above the door, but Gold Star Press - Printers also occupied the building. Just above the entrance sign it reads "Help Cleaners" which was a water softener, another company owned by William Martin. Although Grant Manson published "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910" in 1958, he chose a much earlier photograph (page 163) he had taken around the same time period as the Gilman Lane photographs. In "In The Nature of Materials", Hitchcock   writes, "The E-Z Polish Factory in Chicago was long forgotten and only rediscovered two years ago by Grant Manson, who followed up a clue that Wright’s only factory lay somewhere along the Galena division of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway by riding back and forth on the line until he spotted it. It is of concrete construction with spandrels surfaced with brick and horizontal windows very similar to those of the sides of the Larkin Building. The plain facade is terminated by open stair bays, their vertical flanking piers framing the composition. The more elaborate scheme for an open court between side wings at the rear, found in drawings at Taliesin, was never executed." Hitchcock, 1942, p.52. It is interesting that Hitchcock credits Manson for rediscovering the E-Z Polish Factory, but does not us his photograph of the building in the book, possibly because he had not photographed it prior to publication. Manson did publish one of his photographs of the building in his book "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910," Manson, 1958, p.163, which appears to be photographed prior to the installation of the water tank, and taken around the same time as the Lane photographs. Manson wrote, "The factory which Wright built in 1905 for the Martin Brothers, the ‘E-Z’ Polish plant on Chicago’s West Side...was lost to memory until 1939... and was noticed by the author from the window of a train en route to Geneva, Illinois." Six 8 x 10 B&W photographs.
 
1) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northwest taken on W. Carroll Avenue. The entrance is on the left side. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin. Established 1882." The "For Sale" and "Printers" sign are visible. The Printers sign reads "Gold Star Press. Printers. Tel. Nevada 2060." Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-1)
 
2) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northeast taken on W. Carroll Avenue. The main entrance is to the left. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin. Established 1882." A water tower has been added that was not present when Grant Manson first photographed the building, "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910," Manson, 1958, p.163, or when Gilman Lane photographed the building. The text on the water tower appears to read "Internat... Sales..." Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-2)
 
3) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the E-Z Polish Factory from the Northeast taken on W. Carroll Avenue. The main entrance is to the left. The signage atop the North elevation reading "Stove Polish - E-Z - Show Polish. Martin & Martin. Established 1882." A water tower has been added that was not present when Grant Manson first photographed the building, "Frank Lloyd Wright to 1910," Manson, 1958, p.163, or when Gilman Lane photographed the building. The text on the water tower appears to read "Internat... Sales..." Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-3)
 
4) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the East Entrance. Two brick columns set within the open stairwell above the entrance. Address reads "3005 - " and appears to have space and a smudge where the "17" used to be. This entrance has been altered since this photograph was taken. The two brick columns were removed and replace with glass. Text reads: "Help Cleaners." Note: A Martin & Martin business card published in "William Everett Martin House" Lesniak, 2000, p.45, reads: "E-Z Polishers" and "Help Cleaners." Below the text is the "Martin & Martin" sign, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. "3005 - . Gold Star Press - Printers, 1st floor." This would also indicate that the enhance of the East end of the building originally matched the entrance on the West end of the building. Decorative stone has since been added to the doorway. The original "Gate" in the doorway is uniquely Wright, and still visible. There is also a "For Sale" sign, top left. William past way on September 23,1938. Upon his death, Martin & Martin Co.'s management was passed on to his son Everett (obituary). Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-4)
 
5) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the East Entrance. Two brick columns set within the opening above the entrance. Address reads "3005 - " and appears to have space and a smudge where the "17" used to be. This entrance has been altered since this photograph was taken. The two brick columns were removed and replace with glass. Text reads: "Help Cleaners." Note: A Martin & Martin business card published in "William Everett Martin House" Lesniak, 2000, p.45, reads: "E-Z Polishers" and "Help Cleaners." Below the text is the "Martin & Martin" sign, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. "3005 - . Gold Star Press - Printers, 1st floor." This would also indicate that the enhance of the East end of the building originally matched the entrance on the West end of the building. Decorative stone has since been added to the doorway. The original "Gate" in the doorway is uniquely Wright, and still visible. There is also a "For Sale" sign, top left. William past way on September 23,1938. Upon his death, Martin & Martin Co.'s management was passed on to his son Everett (obituary). Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-5)
 
5A) Detail of the "Martin & Martin" sign, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.
.
5B) E-Z Polish Factory Circa  1945/2019, Entrance Gate Adapted from Grant Manson’s Photograph of the Entrance Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). In two of the six Grant Manson images, M-115 and M-119, the original "Gate" in the doorway is still visible and uniquely Frank Lloyd Wright. Illustration is adapted from the Grant Manson photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2019. (S#0647.36.0419-7)
 
6) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1945-50 (1905 - S.114). Set of six B&W photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory photographed by Grant Manson, from the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. View of the East Entrance from the North. Two brick columns set within the opening above the entrance. Address reads "3005 - " and appears to have space and a smudge where the "17" used to be. This entrance has been altered since this photograph was taken. The two brick columns were removed and replace with glass. Text reads: "Help Cleaners." Note: A Martin & Martin business card published in "William Everett Martin House" Lesniak, 2000, p.45, reads: "E-Z Polishers" and "Help Cleaners." Below the text is the "Martin & Martin" sign, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. "3005 - . Gold Star Press - Printers, 1st floor." This would also indicate that the enhance of the East end of the building originally matched the entrance on the West end of the building. Decorative stone has since been added to the doorway. The original "Gate" in the doorway is uniquely Wright, and still visible. Photographed by Grant Manson circa 1945-50. Courtesy of the Grant Manson Photograph Collection, Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. (S#0647.36.0419-6)
 
   
E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View Circa 1965 (1905 - S.114). Published in Chicago’s Famous Buildings. Siegel, 1965, p.126. Caption: "Now the Universal Foods Corporation. 3005 West Carroll (338 N). Little remains of the original design here. The building has been enlarged, the windows filled up, and the original open stair-towers at the ends closed. The interior has been remodeled and the original surfaces covered."
 
E-Z Polish Factory Floor Plan (1905 - S.114). Published in Chicago’s Famous Buildings. Siegel, 1965, p.127. Basement Floor. Approximately 55 x 150 feet.
   
Date: 2018

Title: E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114).

Description: Set of 38 photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory. The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. There do not appear to be any photographic records of the original two-story building as Wright designed it, that have been discovered at this time. But there is evidence that what was designed was a two-story building. What was built appears to be a much simpler design. Plans of the revised design have not been discovered at this time. Original plans were published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer... Continue...

Size: Set of 38 high res 20 X 13.5 digital images.

ST#:
2018.11.0219 (1-38)
   

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E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Set of 38 photographs of the E-Z Polish Factory. The E-Z Polish Factory is located a quarter mile from the Wright designed Francisco Terrace and Waller Apartments. There do not appear to be any photographic records of the original two-story building as Wright designed it, that have been discovered at this time. But there is evidence that what was designed was a two-story building. What was built appears to be a much simpler design. Plans of the revised design have not been discovered at this time. Original plans were published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1902-1906, Pfeiffer, p.187. What Wright designed was a two story building with a daylight basement facing Fillmore Street. The building was constructed of reinforced concrete faced with brick. Rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These were capped by stone that ran the full length of the building. The entrance was reached between two smaller rectangular sections of the building that were perpendicular to the main structure. These were reached only by a bridge from the main building. A large planting was in the center of the courtyard that lead to the entrance. Just past the planting was the entrance. The lower doors, the employee entrance lead to into the basement. On either side of the lower doors, were brick piers with large concrete vases. On either side of the employee entrance, stairs lead up to the visitor’s entrance on the main floor. To the outside of the  

entrance, on either side, light flooded the two stairways with tall vertical windows.
      The elaborate entrance set back from the street was replaced by two simple doorways on Carroll Street, one near the east end, and a similar entrance near the west end. Where the front was set back from the sidewalk, it was brought forward in-line with other buildings on the block.
       All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The stone header that topped the second floor window opening has been removed and replaced with brick. The walls set on a concrete base. Thick stone headers cap the daylight basement windows. On either side of the door, four simple stone squares form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone window headers of the daylight basement. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The original horizontal stone that capped the East and West elevation atop the second floor is still evident. Two floors were added above.
       The building was altered greatly in 1913. Two floors were added above. On October 9, 2018, I had the opportunity to visit the E-Z Polish Factory. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018. Set of 38 high res 20 X 13.5 digital images.

 
1) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northwest. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The building has been altered greatly from Frank Lloyd Wright's original two-story design. The original horizontal stone that capped the West elevation is still evident. Two floors were added above. The stone header that topped the second floor window opening has been removed and replaced with brick. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-1)
1A) Detail of the original horizontal stone that capped the West elevation. Two floors were added above. (ST#2018.11.0219-1A)
1B) Detail of the missing stone header that topped the second floor window opening which was removed and replaced with brick. (ST#2018.11.0219-1B)
2) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northwest. The building was constructed of reinforced concrete faced with brick. In the original Wright plans, rows of large horizontal windows were broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. These ran the full height of the building and were capped by stone that ran the full width of the building. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-2)
 
3) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Rows of large horizontal windows are broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-3)
4) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). The walls set on a concrete base. Thick stone headers cap the daylight basement windows. Four simple stone squares form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone headers. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-4)
4A) Detail of the four simple stone squares that form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone headers. (ST#2018.11.0219-4A)
5) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View of one of the entrances on the North elevation. This one on the West end of the building is simpler than the entrance on the East end, and appears to be what Wright designed for both entrances. See Grant Manson's 1939 photograph. On either side of the door, four simple stone squares form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone window headers of the daylight basement. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-5)
 
6) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). The entrance is capped by a simple horizontal stone header and a rusty sign that reads "3017 Carroll Ave." 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-6)
 
7) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the four simple stone squares that form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone window headers of the daylight basement. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-7)
 
8) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the four simple stone squares that form a larger square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-8)
 
9) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the four simple stone squares that form a larger square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-9)
 
10) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the four simple stone squares that form a larger square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-10)
 
11) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation. Rows of large horizontal windows are broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-11)
 
12) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation. Rows of large horizontal windows are broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. Few windows remain. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-12)
 
13) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation from the sidewalk below. Rows of large horizontal windows are broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-13)
 
14) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation from the sidewalk below. Rows of large horizontal windows are broken by vertical brick piers projecting out from the exterior surface of the brick wall. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-14)
 
15) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation from the street below. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-15)
 
16) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation from the street below. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-16)
 
17) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detailed view looking up at the North elevation from the street below. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-17)
 
18) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detailed view looking up at the North elevation from the street below. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-18)
 
19) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Thick stone headers cap the daylight basement windows. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-19)
 
20) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Thick stone headers cap the daylight basement windows. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-20)
 
21) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the horizontal stone that trims the openings above and below the windows. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-21)
 
22) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). The walls set on a concrete base. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-22)
 
23) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View of one of the entrances on the North elevation. This one on the East end of the building was revised since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. Originally it appeared identical to the entrance on the West end of the building. Stone has been added to the header and both sides. On either side of the door, four simple stone squares form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone window headers of the daylight basement. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-23)
 
24) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View of one of the entrances on the North elevation. This one on the East end of the building was revised since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. Originally it appeared identical to the entrance on the West end of the building. Stone has been added to the header and both sides. On either side of the door, four simple stone squares form a larger square and are parallel with the large stone window headers of the daylight basement. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-24)
 
25) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail view of the four simple stone squares which form a larger square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-25)
 
26) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail view of the four simple stone squares which form a larger square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-26)
 
27) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail view of the simple stone square. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-27)
 
28) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. This stonework was added since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-28)
 
29) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. This stonework was added since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-29)
 
30) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. This stonework was added since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-30)
 
31) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. This stonework was added since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-31)
 
32) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. This stonework was added since Grant Manson photographed it in 1939. The stairs and foundation are concrete. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-32)
 
33) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Detail of the East entrance stonework. The stairs and foundation are concrete. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-33)
 
34) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northeast. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The building has been altered greatly from Frank Lloyd Wright's original design. Two floors were added above. The stone header that topped the second floor window opening has been removed and replaced with brick. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner.  (ST#2018.11.0219-34)
 
35) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northeast. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The building has been altered greatly from Frank Lloyd Wright's original design. The original horizontal stone that capped the East elevation is still evident. Two floors were added above. Two brick columns set within the window directly above the entrance and were removed and replace with glass after 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner.  (ST#2018.11.0219-35)
 
36) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northeast. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The building has been altered greatly from Frank Lloyd Wright's original design. The original horizontal stone that capped the East elevation is still evident. Two floors were added above. Two brick columns set within the window directly above the entrance and were removed and replace with glass after 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner.  (ST#2018.11.0219-36)
 
37) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). View looking up at the North elevation from the sidewalk below. Two brick columns set within the window directly above the entrance and were removed and replace with glass after 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner.  (ST#2018.11.0219-37)
 
38) E-Z Polish Factory Exterior View 2018 (1905 - S.114). Viewed from the Northeast. All but a few of the original window openings have been enclosed with brick. Horizontal stone trims the openings above and below the windows. The building has been altered greatly from Frank Lloyd Wright's original design. The original horizontal stone that capped the West elevation is still evident. Two floors were added above. The stone header that topped the second floor window opening has been removed and replaced with brick. Two brick columns set within the window directly above the entrance and were removed and replace with glass after 1939. 20 x 13.5 digital images photographed by Douglas M. Steiner on October 9, 2018. Copyright 2018, Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2018.11.0219-38)
 
 
   

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