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PHOTOS 1930 - 1939
 
  1930    1931    1932    1933    1934    1935    1936    1937    1938    1939    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1930
C 1930
Henry Justin Allen (1868 – 1950) circa 1930 (1916 - S.205). Allen is facing slightly to the left, looking slightly to the right. He was the 21st Governor of Kansas (1919–1923) and U.S. Senator from Kansas (1929–31). He was involved in the newspaper publishing business. In 1916, Allen commissioned Wright to design a home in Wichita. A beautifully designed prairie styled home, it is the only Wright designed home in Kansas. Hand written on face: "To Major Espy, With Regards, Henry J. Allen." Signed: "Van Holsbeke." Original 6.5 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 0249.44.0416
C 1930
1) Aline Barnsdall Residence A, Circa 1930 (1920 - S.210). View of the North end of the West elevation. The Living Room and Dining Room is on the first and second levels. The Dining Room, top center, overlooks the two story Living Room. The large opening leads to the basement and possibly a garage. The Entrance is to the far right. Besides the main residence, Hollyhock House, the master plan also included a Theater (project), this home, the (Theater) Director’s House, Residence A, and Residence B (demolished). Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. In 1927, Barnsdall donated an additional 2 acres and Residence A to the City of Los Angeles, bringing the total to 13 acres, 11 of which included Hollyhock House. (Note: Dating this image circa 1930. The two trees on either side of the garage were just a few feet tall in 1923.) These four photographs were A. D. White Architectural Photograph Collection at the Cornell University Library. Andrew Dickson White was the first President of the University. Courtesy of the Cornell University Library. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0249.42.1115 -1
C 1930
2) Aline Barnsdall Residence A, Circa 1930 (1920 - S.210). Partial view of the North end of the West elevation. The Living and Dining Rooms are to the far left. The Dining Room overlooks the two story Living Room. The Entrance to the home is in the center, the Kitchen is above. (As far as dating the image, the tree to the right of the Kitchen, which now reaches past the roof, was barely visible in the 1923.) Besides the main residence, Hollyhock House, the master plan also included a Theater (project), this home, the (Theater) Director’s House, Residence A, and Residence B (demolished). Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. In 1927, Barnsdall donated an additional 2 acres and Residence A to the City of Los Angeles, bringing the total to 13 acres, 11 of which included Hollyhock House. These four photographs were A. D. White Architectural Photograph Collection at the Cornell University Library. Andrew Dickson White was the first President of the University. Courtesy of the Cornell University Library. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0249.42.1115 -2
C 1930
3) Aline Barnsdall Residence A, Circa 1930 (1920 - S.210). Partial view of the East elevation, from the Northeast. Three Bedrooms are on the left, the two-story Living Room is on the right. The Living room covers the whole North end of the house. Besides the main residence, Hollyhock House, the master plan also included a Theater (project), this home, the (Theater) Director’s House, Residence A, and Residence B (demolished). Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. In 1927, Barnsdall donated an additional 2 acres and Residence A to the City of Los Angeles, bringing the total to 13 acres, 11 of which included Hollyhock House. These four photographs were A. D. White Architectural Photograph Collection at the Cornell University Library. Andrew Dickson White was the first President of the University. Courtesy of the Cornell University Library. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0249.42.1115 -3
C 1930
4) Aline Barnsdall Residence A, Circa 1930 (1920 - S.210). Partial view of the North elevation, from the Northwest. Five doors open outward onto a balcony on the left. Patterned borders frame each two-story set of the windows and doors. The Living room covers the whole North end of the house. Besides the main residence, Hollyhock House, the master plan also included a Theater (project), this home, the (Theater) Director’s House, Residence A, and Residence B (demolished). Aline Barnsdall’s Residence A was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1920. In 1927, Barnsdall donated an additional 2 acres and Residence A to the City of Los Angeles, bringing the total to 13 acres, 11 of which included Hollyhock House. These four photographs were A. D. White Architectural Photograph Collection at the Cornell University Library. Andrew Dickson White was the first President of the University. Courtesy of the Cornell University Library. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0249.42.1115 -4
C 1930
E. A. Cummings Real Estate Office, circa 1930 (late 1920s - early 1930s) (1905 - S.112). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1905, little is know about the building, and few photographs exist. Broad overhanging eaves surrounds the building. Two pedestals on either side of the entrance hold large prairie styled concrete vases that appear to be round at the top, with four square legs setting on a square base. The two high walls that floated out from the front corners with ends attached to pedestal have been removed. Edmund Augustus Cummings was born in Lowell, Mass on Nov. 29, 1842. When he was a boy, his family moved to Elgin, Ill. He enlisted as a soldier in the war in 1860 at 18 years of age and served with General Grant. After the war, he moved to Chicago in 1864, working in the insurance and real estate business. He married Ellen M. Merrill in Chicago on Sept. 11 1867. In 1869 he formed the firm of E.A. Cummings & Co. He was very successful in the real estate business, considered one of the most successful at the time, creating as many as 250 subdivisions. He was one of the organizers of the Chicago Real Estate Board and was for a time president of the board. He was a founder and director of the Chicago Title and Trust, and vice president of the Avenue Trust and Savings Bank. He retired after being a realtor... Continue... 0249.41.0215
1930
Wright at 63. Portrait of Wright in 1930. Courtesy Library of Congress. Photographed by Price Studios. See Architectural Record, September, 1936, p 179. Published in "My Father Who is on Earth", Wright 1946, page 195, and "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 122. Image also used in 1932 Poster. 8 x 10 Print, High res digital image. 0249.16.0509
1930
Wright at 63 and 83, 1930 and 1950. UPI Caption: "4/9/59 - Phoenix, Arizona: Frank Lloyd Wright, 89, dean of American architects, died 4/9 in St. Joseph’s Hospital here. Wright underwent an operation 4/6. He is shown her in 1926 (1930) photo (top) and 1950 photo (bottom). UPI Telephoto/Files." 1930 photograph published in "My Father Who is on Earth", Wright 1946, page 195, and "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 122. Also used in the 1932 Poster. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 7 x 9.2 B&W Print. (1930 - S#249.21) (1950 - S#831.22) 0249.21.0910
1930
Wright at 63. 1930. Wright at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 24-25, 1930. Wright is looking at a model of the Richard Lloyd Jones Residence (S.227 - 1929). Traveling exhibition entitled "The Show" at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 25 - October 12, 1930. "The Show" exhibited in New York City; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; several European cities; and Milwaukee’s Layton Gallery. It included 600 photographs, 1,000 drawings and four models (three of which were the Richard Lloyd Jones Residence, Gas Station and St. Marks-in-the-Bouwerie Towers). On October 1 & 2, 1930, Wright delivered two lectures at the Art Institute of Chicago entitled "In the Realm of Ideas" and "To the Young Man in Architecture". These two speeches were published in 1931 as "Two Lectures on Architecture". Clipping pasted to verso: "Back into the Public Eye - Frank Lloyd Wright, America’s most famous architect, who has been some while in retirement, comes back into the public eye with an exhibition of his model buildings at the Art Institute of Chicago. Herald and Examiner photo" Stamped on clipping: "Herald & Exam. Sept 26, 1930". Published in the Herald and Examiner, Chicago, IL. Note: Richard Lloyd Jones was Wright’s Cousin. Second clipping pasted to verso: "Berlin Academy Honors Wright... Continue... 0249.24.0811
1930
Wright at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 24-25, 1930. Wright stands to the right of the St. Mark’s in-the-Bouwerie Model on exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1930. In 1929 Frank Lloyd Wright designed a group of four towers for St. Mark's-in-the- Bouwerie, New York City (project). The design featured an innovative "tap root" structure, with the floors cantilevered off a vertical core. The traveling exhibition entitled "The Show" at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 25 - October 12, 1930. "The Show" exhibited in New York City; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; several European cities; and Milwaukee’s Layton Gallery. It included 600 photographs, 1,000 drawings and four models (three of which were the Richard Lloyd Jones Residence, the Gas Station and St. Marks-in-the-Bouwerie Towers). To the left is the Wright designed Skyscraper Vase. Designed and executed circa 1905, it appeared in photographs of Wright’s 1907 exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago and published in "The Early Work" 1968, page 101-103, and measured 22.5 x 6.125 x 3.5. 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 0249.37.0614
1930 
St. Mark’s in-the-Bouwerie Model on exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1930. In 1929 Frank Lloyd Wright designed a group of four towers for St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie, New York City (project). The design featured an innovative "tap root" structure, with the floors cantilevered off a vertical core. The traveling exhibition entitled "The Show" at the Art Institute of Chicago, September 25 - October 12, 1930. "The Show" exhibited in New York City; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; several European cities; and Milwaukee’s Layton Gallery. It included 600 photographs, 1,000 drawings and four models (three of which were the Richard Lloyd Jones Residence, the Gas Station and St. Marks-in-the-Bouwerie Towers). To the left is the Wright designed Skyscraper Vase. Designed and executed circa 1905, it appeared in photographs of Wright’s 1907 exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago and published in "The Early Work" 1968, page 101-103, and measured 22.5 x 6.125 x 3.5. Original 7 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0249.31.0913
1930 
Wright exhibition at the Layton Art Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1930. The exhibition opened late November 1930. St. Mark’s in-the-Bouwerie Model (1929 project) is proximately featured, as is the Gas Station Model in the foreground. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation dates this project 1932, but it is seen here in 1930 (see Wright 1917-1942, Pfeiffer, pages 217-218). To the left is the Wright designed Skyscraper Vase. Designed and executed circa 1905, it appeared in photographs of Wright’s 1907 exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago and published in "The Early Work" 1968, page 101-103, and measured 22.5 x 6.125 x 3.5. Behind the vase on the left and right are the Nakomis (left) and Nakoma (right) Sculptures, designed in 1924, photographed in 1926. While Wright is setting up the display he is interviewed and is quoted on Nov. 20, 1930, in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "It will take Milwaukee fully a century to recover from the influence of these buildings" (their new courthouse). A firestorm erupted in the Milwaukee press, which increased attendance at the exhibition. See "Layton’s Legacy" 2013, pages 219-221. Original 6.25 x 8 B&W photograph. 0249.32.0913
1930 
Wright exhibition at the Layton Art Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1930. The exhibition opened late November 1930. The Richard Lloyd Jones Residence (1929 - S.227) is proximately featured in the center. Drawings and illustrations drape the wall. The Nakomis Model, designed in 1924, photographed in 1926, sets above the partition to the right. On the table in the foreground are stacks of additional drawings for the viewers to thumb through. Of interest is the seemingly lackadaisical approach Wright took in displaying the illustrations, many of which are considered priceless today. While Wright is setting up the display he is interviewed and is quoted on Nov. 20, 1930, in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "It will take Milwaukee fully a century to recover from the influence of these buildings" (their new courthouse). A firestorm erupted in the Milwaukee press, which increased attendance at the exhibition. See "Layton’s Legacy" 2013, pages 219-221. Original 8 x 6.25 B&W photograph. 0249.33.0913
Circa 1930
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House Terrace (1917 - S.208) Circa 1930-35. Hand written on verso: "Terrace of California Club by Frank Lloyd Wright whose architectural exhibition is now at Art Institute." The City of Los Angeles was approached by Aline Barnsdall to manage part of her estate at Olive Hill as a cultural arts centre. In 1926 the City of Los Angeles agreed to manage eight acres of the Hollywood estate. Part of the ensuing negotiations between the City and Miss Barnsdall included a provision that the California Art Club would be granted a fifteen-year lease on Hollyhock House. The California Art Club happily accepted on August 31, 1927 and it remained the club's gallery and headquarters from 1927 until 1942. For additional aerial images for dating this photograph, see "Hollyhock House and Olive Hill" Smith, pages 162-3 (1922) and 190-1 (1947). Original 6.25 x 8 B&W print. 0249.20.0310
1930
Lucius M. Boomer, ceremonially driving the first steel rivet of the new Waldorf Astoria, March 24, 1930 (1953 - S.261). Joining Boomer, left to right: Oscar Tschirky, Maitre de of the new Waldorf Astoria, "Oscar of the Waldorf"; Lucius Boomer, President; Charles Hayden, banker, Chairman of the Waldorf Astoria Board of Directors; and Augustus Nulle, Secretary and Treasurer of the new $40,000,000 Waldorf Astoria. 9.3 x 7.5 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0249.40.1114
Circa 1930
Imperial Hotel, Circa 1930s. Front View with reflecting pool in the foreground. Part of a set of at lease seven images. This is image number seven. Acquired from Japan, and was part of a scrap book. Original 3.8 x 2.7 B&W print. 0249.22.1110
1930
Nakoma black glazed Terra-cotta Sculpture circa 1930. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. Of interest is Charles L. Morgan’s involvement to create "a few black sets" of the Nakoma and Nakomis in 1930. (Frank Lloyd Wright and Madison, 1990, page 88). This sculpture is in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. Acquired from and courtesy of V&A Museum. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0249.35.0314
1930
Nakoma black glazed Terra-cotta Sculpture circa 1930. Terra-cotta Nakoma and Nakomis sets were created in 1929-1930. Frank Lloyd Wright’s project number for the Nakoma Sculptures was 2906, dating it as 1929. Of interest is Charles L. Morgan’s involvement to create "a few black sets" of the Nakoma and Nakomis in 1930. (Frank Lloyd Wright and Madison, 1990, page 88). On June 9, 1999, this sculpture were sold at Christie's Auction, "20th Century Decorative Arts". 12. in. high. Price realized $2,185 plus buyers premium. Acquired from and courtesy of Christie's, New York. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 0249.36.0314
Circa 1930
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) Circa 1930. Viewed from the West. Most of the mature trees are either dead or dying. The South side of the home seems to be fairing better than the South. The Living Room is on the left, the entrance in the center, and the Dining Room is on the right. An apartment building on Eastlake Terrace can be seen in the background on the right Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of Oak Park Public Library. Original 8 x 5.75 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 0249.27.0512
1931
1931
Lucius M. Boomer, Portrait, 1931, at 53 years old (1953 - S.261). Similar image published in "Behind the Scenes at the Waldorf-Astoria." Boomer was born in New York on August 22, 1878, and passed away on June 26, 1947 in Norway. Photographed by Blank & Stoller, Inc. New York. Courtesy of the Waldorf Astoria. 7 x 9 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0300.09.1114
C 1931-32
Hotel Geneva 1931-32 (1911 - S.171). Two females sitting on stairs in front lobby. Entrance is to the left and right of the lobby. "Hotel Geneva" lettered across the front of the Lobby above the windows." Acquired from a private scrap book, other photographs dated 1931-32. Original 8 x 5 B&W photograph. 4.75 x 3.25. 0300.08.0514
1931
Wright at 64, Circa 1931. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright by Samuel Johnson Woolf (1880 - 1948), drawn from life. S. J. Woolf interviewed Wright for the January 17, 1932 issue of the New York Times Magazine. Wright sat for the portrait during the interview with Woolf. Caption reads "Drawn from life by S. J. Woolf." According to Brier Hill Galleries, "Woolf was born in New York City into a family long active in the arts, Woolf was a portrait artist and printmaker. He studied at the Art Students League and at the National Academy of Design under Kenyon Cox and George deForest Brush. He is best known for his portraits, some commissioned by Collier's magazine, and others paired with interviews that appeared in The New York Times in the 1920s. Wolf served as an artist-correspondent during both World Wars I and II. His work was widely exhibited and resides in the permanent collections of numerous public and private institutions. He died at New York City." 6 x 9 B&W photograph. 0300.10.0115
1932
1932
Arizona Biltmore Circa 1932 (1927 - S.221). Arizona Biltmore from the front entrance. Viewed from the Southeast. Sign in the foreground on the left: "Danger. Keep Horses off the Concrete. Piestewa Peak in the background on the right. Clipping taped to verso: "Phoenix, Ariz. The Arizona Biltmore Hotel where the famous sportsman, William Wrigley, Jr., passed on. 1/26/32." Wrigley past away on January 26, 1932, and this image was used as an announcement. This would indicate that this photograph was taken in January 1932 or earlier. Stamped on verso: "International Newsreel, Los Angeles Calif." Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. 0361.04.0414
1932
Arizona Biltmore Circa 1932 (1927 - S.221). Arizona Biltmore from the front entrance. Viewed from the Southeast. Piestewa Peak in the background on the right. Clipping taped to verso: "Arizona Hotel Wrigley Owned. This hotel, the Arizona Biltmore, at Phoenix, one of the most pretentious in the state, represents an investment of more than three and a half million dollars by the late William Wrigley, Jr. It caters largely to wealthy easterners who want to spend their vacations on the desert. His winter home was on the same grounds as the hotel. 1/26/32 (West Coast)" Stamped on verso: "Associated Press Photo." "Jan 30 1932." Original 10 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 0361.09.0316
C 1932
larkinadm 2.jpg (1887 bytes)
Larkin Building.  Built 1903, Demolished 1950.  I have noticed a number of changes to the Larkin building in this later photo:
1) Globes are missing;  2) Plaques have been added at the street entrance;  3) Windows added top/side of building;  4) Fountain pool filled in;  5) Street has been widened;  6) Lights added to each side of fountain;  7) Chimney added to center column on right side at top;  8) Parking added on right side of building.  Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Larkin Building, Myth and Fact" Quinan, 1989, page 120.
0502.01.1001
C 1932
Larkin Administration Building circa 1932 (1903 - S.093). Original Magic Lantern Slide. Three-quarter view of the right side of the Larkin Administration Building. Photographed about the same time as S#502.01. There are a number of changes since the building was originally built: 1) Globes are missing; 2) Plaques have been added at the street entrance; 3) Windows added top/side of building; 4) Street has been widened; 5) Parking added on right side of building. Text on face: "University Prints Slide, made by Max Keller, Cambridge, Mass." Hand written on face: "GM71. Buffalo, N.Y. Larkin Building - Wright." Original 4 x 3.25 Magic Lantern Slide, and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0361.11.0218
1932
C. R. Secrest (he broke Wright’s nose) and his wife. Clipping pasted to verso: "Beaten By Students After Fight With Wright. Following street fight in which C. R. Secrest of Madison, Wisc., is said to have fractured the nose of Frank Lloyd Wright, world famous architect, four students of Wright’s trade and craft school at Taliesin, Wisc., drove to Madison, entered Secrest’s home, and horse-whipped him until the victim drove them off with a butcher knife. In court the students, Karl Jansen, 25, of Copenhagen, Denmark; Sam Ratensky, 22, New York City; Rudolph Mock, 29, Basel, Switzerland; and William Peters, 20, Spring Green, Wisc., plead guilty and are awaiting sentence. C. R. Secrest and his wife, who witnessed the attack, are shown above at their home. 11-4-32." Stamped on verso "Nov 8 1932." According to Wright in "An Autobiography", 1943, page 432-3, Wright was struck "violently several times on the back of the head." during the struggle he was kicked "on the bridge of the nose with his boot heel... Blood spurted all over him. ...unknown to me, my boys (four of them) went out after their man, got into his house... the police came and arrested the boys and the assassin. ...they spent a couple nights in the county jail... The boys were paying a fine of several hundred dollars. On the ‘installment... Continue... 0361.05.0614
1932
Wright at 65. 1932. Wright in court with apprentices. According to Wright in "An Autobiography", 1943, page 432-3, Wright was struck "violently several times on the back of the head." during the struggle he was kicked "on the bridge of the nose with his boot heel... Blood spurted all over him. ...unknown to me, my boys (four of them) went out after their man, got into his house... the police came and arrested the boys and the assassin. ...they spent a couple nights in the county jail... The boys were paying a fine of several hundred dollars. On the ‘installment plan,’ of course. The Taliesin Fellowship had got off to a very bad start." According to Brendan Gill, "Many Masks", page 332, "...his grievance against Wright was based on the fact that Wright allegedly had long owed his wife money for domestic service at Taliesin - by Wright’s account, he was found guilty, fined, and soon thereafter left town. Clipping pasted to verso: "Architect’s students admit whipping his foe. Rudolph Mock (left), Karl Jansen, Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait, noted architect; Sam Ratensky, and William Peters. The four students at Wright’s trade and craft school at Taliesin, Wis., who are shown here with the architect admitted horsewhipping C. R. Secrest of Madison, Wis., after Secrest had broken Wright’s nose in fight over debt... Continue... 0361.02.0811
1933
Circa 1933
Lucius M. Boomer, Portrait, Circa 1933 (possibly 55 years old) (1953 - S.261). By 1918, at the age of 39, Boomer was president of the Boomer-duPont Properties Corporation, owning and managing the McAlpin and the Claridge Hotels. That year they assumed control and management of the Waldorf-Astoria and then moved their headquarters to the Waldorf-Astoria. In 1929, they sold the property to make way for the Empire State Building, but maintained the name Waldorf-Astoria. They rebuilt, and on October 31, 1931 opened the new Waldorf-Astoria. Photographed by Fabian Bachrach. 5 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0370.11.1114
1933
Lucius M. Boomer, 1933 (55 years old). Portrait Lucius M. Boomer, looking to the left, arms crossed. In 1929, the Waldorf Astoria was sold to make way for the Empire State Building. On October 31, 1931 the new Waldorf-Astoria opened. Caption taped to verso: "From Ted Saucier, The Waldorf-Astoria, New York - ELdorado 5-3000. Lucius Boomer, President of The Waldorf-Astoria." Stamped on verso: "Mar 13 1933." Photographed by Underwood & Underwood. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0370.13.1014
1933
Lucius M. Boomer with President Herbert Hoover and his wife, Lou Henry Hoover at the Waldorf Astoria in 1933 (1953 - S.261). 7.75 x 10 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0370.12.1114
1933 
Midway Gardens Male Sprites (1913 - S.180). 1933 Press photograph. Heavily retouched photograph of page 77, from "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright" Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1925. Two views of the Male Sprite holding dodecahedrons. Stamped on verso: "Mar 14 1933." Hand written on verso: "Figures designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Midway Gardens, Chicago." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0370.03.0713
C 1933
Taliesin Spring Green, Yen Liang with Lamb Circa 1933. Yen Liang was born in 1908 in Tokyo. In 1910, his family moved to China . In 1928, he travel to the United States to study architecture. He attended Cornell, M.I.T. and Yale, and received his degree in three years. He enrolled in the Harvard graduate school, but after reading Frank Lloyd Wright’s "An Autobiography" he immediately applied to the Taliesin Fellowship. In 1932 at 23, he became Wright’s first apprentice. He and Edgar Tafel became close friends. In 1934, Liang returned to China where he became a prominent architect. "Colossus. Last week we had, among our visitors, two professors of architectural design from one of the leading universities of the east coast. They are typical of teachers of design of all the instituted architectural schools. They are graduates of some American school, were sent on bountiful scholarships to France to study... and have returned to teach what they have just been taught. They have had negligible contact with actual building practice..." Liang, "Taliesin", Volume 1, No 1, 1934, pp. 12-13. Also see "Frank Lloyd Wright, Recollections", Tafel, 1993, pp. 127-132, and "Years with Frank Lloyd Wright" Tafel, 1979, pp 136-143. Original 7.75 x 10 B&W photograph. 0370.14.0215
1933
Wright at 66. Frank Lloyd Wright facing slightly to the right, looking to the left. His left arm is raised, his had in hand. His overcoat is draped over his right arm. He stands in front of wood file cases. Stamped on verso: "Mar 14 1933." and "Photo by Acme Newspictures, Inc. Chicago Bureau, Tribune Tower, Chicago, Ill. Acquired from the achieves of the Chicago Tribune. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0370.04.1213
1934
C 1934
Taliesin, Spring Green, Taliesin Apprentices circa 1934. Taliesin apprentices pushing vehicle. In 1932, Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship with twenty-three apprentices who came to live, learn and work at Taliesin, in Spring Green. Published in "Taliesin," Wright, 1934 Volume 1, No 1., page 26. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0370.05.0514
C 1934
Taliesin, Spring Green, Taliesin Apprentices circa 1934. Taliesin apprentices farming. The young girl in the foreground could possibly be Wright’s daughter Iovanna, born on December 2, 1925. She would have been approximately eight years old in 1933. Possibly Mr. & Mrs. Wright are in the background to the right. In 1932, Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship with twenty-three apprentices who came to live, learn and work at Taliesin, in Spring Green. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0370.06.0514
C 1934
Taliesin, Spring Green, Taliesin Apprentices circa 1934. Possibly Olgivanna Lloyd Wright with apprentices sitting in the Tea Circle. In 1932, Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship with twenty-three apprentices who came to live, learn and work at Taliesin, in Spring Green. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0370.07.0514
C 1934
Taliesin, Spring Green, countryside circa 1934. View of Taliesin. Taliesin can been seen on the hillside in the background. In 1932, Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship with twenty-three apprentices who came to live, learn and work at Taliesin, in Spring Green. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0370.09.0514
C 1934
Taliesin, Spring Green, countryside circa 1934. Romeo and Juliet windmill and Taliesin can be seen on the hillside in the background. A Taliesin styled short wall can be seen in the foreground. In 1932, Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship with twenty-three apprentices who came to live, learn and work at Taliesin, in Spring Green. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0370.10.0514
C 1934
Willey Residence, Scheme II, 1934. Part of a set of six photographs. The drawing for Willey Residence Scheme II was Wright's Project #3401, which would indicate drawings were completed in 1934. Walls are complete, trellis is under construction. The roof of the master bedroom in the background is complete. Malcolm and Nancy Willey moved in to their new house in December 1934. This image of the set of six helps date the other five. (A thank you to Robert Barros for identifying this image.) 0370.08.0514
1934-35
Wright at 67. Frank Lloyd Wright Portrait. Original 5 x 7 Sepia tone. Given to Lucian Schlingen Sr. by Frank Lloyd Wright 1934-35.  Purchased from Son. (Note on back: Return to Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin) 0397.02.0606
1935
1935
Broadacre City, 1935.  Model Homes.  Photographed by Dan Keller, Seidman Photo Service, New York.  Caption on verso, handwritten by Frank Lloyd Wright reads "Collateral Detail Model: A Two Car House, Two Minimum Houses and a Medium House."  Verification, Kelmscott Galleries; Leslie Hindman Auctioneers 1990, page 41 item 143;  Additional analysis "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City" De Long 1998, page 29.  As with the 1938 and 1948 Architectural Forum issues which Wright designed, wrote and coordinated, details such as captions and photo selection were handled by Wright.  Published in Architectural Record, April 1935 page 247;  Junior Red Cross Journal, Feb 1936, page 137.  Original 8 x 10 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0393.02.0107
1935
Broadacre City, 1935.  Model Bridge.  Photographed by Dan Keller, Seidman Photo Service, New York.  Caption on verso, handwritten by Frank Lloyd Wright reads "Bridge Over Great Arterial Right of Way, Which Consists of Many Lanes of Speed Traffic Above, Monorail Speed Trains In the Middle, and Truck and Traffic on Lower Side Lanes.  Within the Highway Structures are Storage Facilities for Raw Material."  Verification, Kelmscott Galleries;  Leslie Hindman Auctioneers 1990, page 41 item 143;  Additional analysis "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City" De Long 1998, page 29.  As with the 1938 and 1948 Architectural Forum issues which Wright designed, wrote and coordinated, details such as captions and photo selection were handled by Wright.  Published in Architectural Record, April 1935 page 246.  Original 8 x 10 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0393.03.0107
1935
Broadacre City, John Howe stands next to section of Broadacre City, circa March 1935. John Henry Howe was born in 1913 in Evanston, Illinois. In 1932, a week after completing high school, he left to join Frank Lloyd Wright, who was forming the Taliesin Fellowship in Spring Green, Wisconsin. By 1937, Howe became Wright’s chief-draftsman. For more than twenty years, John Howe was known as "the pencil in Frank Lloyd Wright’s hand." How worked with Wright for 27 years. He then continued as one of the Taliesin Associated architects for another five years, when he left to form his own architectural firm. On January 23, 1935, the Taliesin Fellowship left en masse to start their trek to Arizona. This was pre Taliesin West, so their destination was La Hacienda in Chandler. "In the courtyard of our Hacienda the master and his apprentices are working on the model of Broadacre City. The model comprising an area of 12 square feet is placed at the head of the court and around it the apprentices have grouped their drafting tables..." Cornella Brierly, February 24, 1935, in "At Taliesin", Henning, 1992, p.111. Published in "At Taliesin", p.133, caption: "Broadacre City Model, Section A... apprentice John Howe proudly beside a finished section of the four-part, twelve-foot-square model; La Hacienda courtyard, Chandler, AZ)... Continue... 0397.28.0215
1935
Broadacre City. Frank Lloyd Wright and apprentices working on Broadacre City model, 1935. On January 23, 1935, the Taliesin Fellowship left en masse to start their trek to Arizona. This was pre Taliesin West, so their destination was La Hacienda in Chandler. "In the courtyard of our Hacienda the master and his apprentices are working on the model of Broadacre City. The model comprising an area of 12 square feet is placed at the head of the court and around it the apprentices have grouped their drafting tables..." Cornella Brierly, February 24, 1935, in "At Taliesin", Henning, 1992, p.111. Published in "Tales of Taliesin", Brierly, 1996, p.27. Left to right around the model: Burt Goodrich, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., Blaine Drake, Benny Dombar, Abe Dombar, John Lautner, Jim Thomson, Edgar Tafel, Alfie Bush, Bruce Richards, Jack Howe, Karl Monrad, Mr. Wright, Will Schwanke, Gene Masselink, Bob Bishop, Bill Bernoudy. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It consisted of architectural models and a full model 12 by 12 feet in size, of Broadacre City itself, complete with tiny forests, homes, schools, factories, farms, and more. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0397.29.0215
1935
Broadacre City. Cornelia Brierly working on Broadacre City model, 1935. On January 23, 1935, the Taliesin Fellowship left en masse to start their trek to Arizona. This was pre Taliesin West, so their destination was La Hacienda in Chandler. "In the courtyard of our Hacienda the master and his apprentices are working on the model of Broadacre City. The model comprising an area of 12 square feet is placed at the head of the court and around it the apprentices have grouped their drafting tables..." Cornella Brierly, February 24, 1935, in "At Taliesin", Henning, 1992, p.111. Published in "Tales of Taliesin", Brierly, 1996, p.25. Brierly (Left), Benny Dombar (right), Will Schwanke (back). Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It consisted of architectural models and a full model 12 by 12 feet in size, of Broadacre City itself, complete with tiny forests, homes, schools, factories, farms, and more. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0397.30.0215
1935
Broadacre City. Frederick Langhorst working on Broadacre City model, 1935. On January 23, 1935, the Taliesin Fellowship left en masse to start their trek to Arizona. This was pre Taliesin West, so their destination was La Hacienda in Chandler. "In the courtyard of our Hacienda the master and his apprentices are working on the model of Broadacre City. The model comprising an area of 12 square feet is placed at the head of the court and around it the apprentices have grouped their drafting tables..." Cornella Brierly, February 24, 1935, in "At Taliesin", Henning, 1992, p.111. Published in "At Taliesin", p.130. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It consisted of architectural models and a full model 12 by 12 feet in size, of Broadacre City itself, complete with tiny forests, homes, schools, factories, farms, and more. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0397.31.0215
1935
Broadacre City. Apprentices working on Broadacre City model in the La Hacienda courtyard, 1935. On January 23, 1935, the Taliesin Fellowship left en masse to start their trek to Arizona. This was pre Taliesin West, so their destination was La Hacienda in Chandler. "In the courtyard of our Hacienda the master and his apprentices are working on the model of Broadacre City. The model comprising an area of 12 square feet is placed at the head of the court and around it the apprentices have grouped their drafting tables..." Cornella Brierly, February 24, 1935, in "At Taliesin", Henning, 1992, p.111. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It consisted of architectural models and a full model 12 by 12 feet in size, of Broadacre City itself, complete with tiny forests, homes, schools, factories, farms, and more. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0397.32.0215
1935 
St. Mark’s Tower (project) 1935. Cornelia Brierly with the St. Mark’s Tower model at the Kaufmann Department Store, Pittsburgh. It became part of the Broadacre City traveling exhibition. Brierly attended the exhibitions at the Kaufmann Department Store and Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., talking with thousands of visitors each day, explaining Wright’s concepts of decentralization. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time from April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It was next exhibited in the museum of the State Historical Library in Madison, Wisconsin. From there it went to Kaufmann's Department Store in Pittsburg, Kaufmann being Broadacre's benefactor. It next moved to Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., made possible by Mrs. Avery Coonley. It headed back to Taliesin then was displayed at the Mineral Point Iowa County Fair in September. Photographed by N. M. Jeannero, Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Original 7.5 x 9.5 B&W photograph. 0397.20.0913
1935
Broadacre City model quarter section, 1935. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. It consisted of architectural models and a full model 12 by 12 feet in size, of Broadacre City itself, complete with tiny forests, homes, schools, factories, farms, and more. Text on the board in the background: "A New Freedom. An acre of ground minimum for the individual. Broadacre makes no change in existing system of land surveys. Has a single seat of government for each county administration by radio and aerotor. Architectural features determined by the character and typography of the region. No major or minor axis." Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0397.27.1214
1935
Broadacre City Model Detail of Stadium, 1935. Detail of the Broadacre City Stadium within the 12 foot by 12 foot model of Broadacre City. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. 0397.39.0117
1935
Broadacre City Model Detail of Stadium, 1935. Detail of the Broadacre City Stadium within the 12 foot by 12 foot model of Broadacre City. Broadacre was shown publically for the first time April 15 to May 15, 1935 at the Industrial Arts Exposition in Rockefeller Center, New York. Published in Frank Lloyd Wright, The Living City, Wright, 1958, p.103. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. (S#397.40) 0397.40.0117
C 1935-45
Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051) Circa1935 - 1940. A Victorian home was located one lot South of the Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home from Frank S. Gray in 1900 and hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills. The Frank S. Gray house, built in 1883. Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. During the move, Wright turned the home 90 degrees. Where the front door originally faced the street (East), it now faced North obscured from view. A signature of Wright’s. Photographed by Gilman Lane after the 1923 reconstruction of the Moore Residence, circa1935 - 1940. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. 0397.14.0512
C 1935-1940
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Front exterior viewed from the street, looking Southwest circa 1935-1940. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows. Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0397.15.0612
C 1935-1940
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Front exterior viewed from the street, looking South circa 1935-1940. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows. The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall on the right. Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. The Balcony on the east (left) was reached through the two smaller Bedrooms in the center of the upper level. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0397.16.0612
C 1935-1940
Samuel & Lena Horner Residence (1908 - S.142). Front exterior viewed from the street, looking Southeast circa 1935-1940. As you entered the sidewalk on the left side of the home, you passed the Garden Wall. Turning right into the Garden, you entered the home through the front door into the Reception Room on the left. Five wide stairs lead up to the balance of the first level. The Living Room Terrace in the center foreground was enclosed with a roof and windows. The Stairway landing and Kitchen overlooked the symmetrical Garden and Garden Wall on the right. Upper level. As you reached the top of the stairs, the Bedrooms and the Bath were reached by turning left. A row of art glass windows were just beneath the roof line of the Master Bedroom in the center. Turning right at the top of the stairs lead to the exterior balcony over the Kitchen. Both Balconies had built-in Planters on either end. The low pitch of the roof almost gives the appearance of being flat like the Gale Residence. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. Original 8 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Horner Residence. 0397.17.0612
C 1935
Larkin Administration Building circa 1935 (1903 - S.093). Three-quarter view of the left side of the Larkin Building. From its inception, the building was the Larkin Co. Administration building until 1939 when the building was sold to the Larkin Co Inc, and the Larkin department store was moved into the first three floors. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0397.22.0514
C 1935
Larkin Administration Building circa 1935 (1903 - S.093). Three-quarter view of the left side and front of the Larkin Building. The globe sculptures have been removed from the top of the piers. From its inception, the building was the Larkin Co. Administration building until 1939 when the building was sold to the Larkin Co Inc, and the Larkin department store was moved into the first three floors. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Original 4.5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0397.23.0514
C 1935
Larkin Administration Building circa 1935 (1903 - S.093). View of the entrance and front of the Larkin Building from the street. The cross-piece above the entrance piers reading "Administration Building" and the two "Larkin Co." name plates did not appear in the 1907 photographs published in the July Inland Architect. A lamp added to either side of the Bock fountain entrance sculpture is visible. From its inception, the building was the Larkin Co. Administration building until 1939 when the building was sold to the Larkin Co Inc, and the Larkin department store was moved into the first three floors. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 8 x 10 B&W photograph and original 4.5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0397.24.0514 A&B
C 1935
Larkin Administration Building circa 1935 (1903 - S.093). View of the entrance of the Larkin Building. Lamps have been added to either side of the Bock fountain entrance sculpture. From its inception, the building was the Larkin Co. Administration building until 1939 when the building was sold to the Larkin Co Inc, and the Larkin department store was moved into the first three floors. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Original 4.5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0397.25.0514
C 1935-1945
Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park (1903 S.094) Circa 1935-45. Printed in 1969. Stamped on verso: "Jul 1969. Field Enterprises, Inc." Date stamp: "May 29, ‘69." Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1935-45. Printed in 1969 by the Chicago Daily News for an article on the reconstruction of the Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park. Originally constructed in 1909, it was reconstructed 100 feet from it’s original location. The new reconstructed fountain was dedicated on June 8, 1969. Gilman Lane’s photographs were given to the Oak Park Public Library after his death in 1961. There are two images in the OPPL collection by Lane that appear to photographed at the same time. This one photographed from the park side, and the second photographed from the street. The Art Institute of Chicago has a copy of the second image and dates the image between 1935-1945. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 0397.07.0310
C 1935-1945 Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park (1903 S.094) Circa 1935-45. Originally constructed in 1909. Photographed by Gilman Lane circa 1935-45 photographed from the street. Note changes since the photograph in 1909. Street level is higher, decreasing the height of horse trough. Plants still growing on top. There is a chip on the lower right side of the fountain. Wrought iron fence beyond fountain now has hedge on park side. Trees just beyond the fence and the power poll to the right of the fountain are gone. 6.5 x 8.25 Print. High res digital image. 0397.08.0310
  Taliesin III, Spring Green circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). The Oak Park Library holds the Gilman Lane collection, including 32 images attributed to Lane of: Hillside Home School, Tanyderi (Porter), Romeo and Juliet Windmill, and Taliesin III. It is not clear when Gilman Lane visited Taliesin, or how many times. They were taken before 1938, when the original windmill was covered in shingles. In 1938 it was resurfaced in board and batten siding. This set of 14 photographs are of Taliesin, but taken at two different times It is not clear if the pre circa 1935 were taken by Lane or in his collection.  
C 1935-1 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green entrance, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). The "Entrance Wall" still exists, but the road and mailbox do not. Viewed from the Northeast, looking Southwest. To the left is the mail box. Midway Barn can be seen in the background directly above the stone with the letters "Taliesin" carved in it. Taliesin is out of the photograph to the right. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 8.25 x 5.5 and original 5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -1 A&B
C 1935-2 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green Mail Box, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Attached to the "Entrance Wall", constructed of stone, wood, and appears to be stucco. The lower door is open. Viewed from the Northeast. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -2 A&B
C 1935-3 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green Tower and Hill Apartment, First view, pre 1935 (1925 - S.218). These two views (3 & 4) indicate that either Lane made two trips to Taliesin, or that this image was in his collection. Viewed from the South toward the Tower and Hill Apartment. "The Hill Tower was originally planned primarily as a farm unit but was later adapted for housing and fellowship functions." "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin," Henning, 2011, page 36. The Southwest wall of the tower is covered with decorative horizontal boards and holes, creating a dovecote. A large dinner bell sets in the balcony. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -3 A&B
C 1935-4 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green Tower and Hill Apartment, second view, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). These two views (3 & 4) indicate that either Lane made two trips to Taliesin, or #3 was in his collection. Viewed from the South toward the Tower and Hill Apartment. The dovecote on the Southwest wall of the tower has been removed, and the wall extended and enlarged out to the edge of the overhanging eave. The large dinner bell sets in the balcony. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -4 A&B
C 1935-5 A&B
Taliesin, Spring Green Tower and Hill Apartment, pre 1935 (1925 - S.218). Viewed from the West toward the Tower and Hill Apartment. The Southwest wall of the tower is covered with decorative horizontal boards and holes, creating a dovecote. Just beyond it sets a large dinner bell sets in the balcony. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -5 A&B
C 1935-6 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green Tower and Hill Apartment, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Viewed from the Southeast toward the Tower and Hill Apartment. The Southwest wall of the tower has been extended and enlarged out to the fascia. The large bell sets in the balcony. A sculpture is seen on the right. Similar to the sculpture in the Living Room seen on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Select Houses 2." Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -6 A&B
C 1935-7 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green Tower and Hill Apartment, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Viewed from the West toward the Tower and Hill Apartment. The Southwest wall of the tower has been extended and enlarged out to the fascia. The wing and fireplace on the right, heading South from the tower has been added, (see #5). Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -7 A&B
C 1935-8 A&B
Taliesin III, Studio fireplace mass, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Viewed from the West. For similar views see "Frank Lloyd Wright Select Houses 2," page 60-61, 92-93, 96,100-101. Photographed by Gilman Lane. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -8 A&B
C 1935-9 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). View of Taliesin from the hillside. Appears to be a sculpture in the window. 8.25 x 5.5 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -9 A&B
C 1935-10 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Detailed view of Taliesin from the hillside. Appears to be a sculpture in the window. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -10 A&B
C 1935-11 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). View of Taliesin from the hillside. 8.25 x 5.5 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -11 A&B
C 1935-12 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Detailed view of Taliesin from the hillside. 8.25 x 5.5 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -12 A&B
C 1935-13 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). View of Taliesin. 8.25 x 5.5 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -13 A&B
C 1935-14 A&B
Taliesin III, Spring Green, circa 1935 (1925 - S.218). Detailed view of Taliesin. 5.5 x 8.25 and original 3.5 x 5 B&W photograph. 0397.26.0514 -14 A&B
C 1935
Taliesin, Spring Green, Romeo and Juliet windmill Circa 1935. Designed in 1896 for Wright’s two aunts Ellen and Jane Lloyd-Jones and the Hillside Home School, it was completed in 1897. "...The reservoir finished, the Aunts intended to erect a windmill over it. This was decided upon by a family gathering which the clan usually held to make such decisions concerning the school or important affairs of their own. Said Aunt Nell, managerial mind of the school: "Why not a pretty windmill tower in keeping with our school building instead of an ugly steel tower or, for that matter, the timber ones I have seen? I am going to ask Frank for a design." "An Autobiography," Wright, 1932, page 130. Wright’s 60 foot tall structure functioned as a windmill and a belvedere. The design combined a diamond-shaped column wedged into an octagonal structure, symbolizing the embrace of Shakespeare's lovers. The original windmill was covered in shingles, and in 1938 it was resurfaced in board and batten siding. Still covered in shingles, this photograph was taken before 1938. Label pasted to verso: "The Museum of Modern Art. Wright, Frank Lloyd. ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Windmill, Spring Green, Wisconsin, Hillside, 1896." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0397.38.0216
C 1935
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1935 (1932- - S.228). View from the Southwest. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887. Wright designed Hillside Home School I in 1892 (1897 - S.001). As the school grew, so did the need for more space. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. The gymnasium/theatre was on the left, two floors of classrooms and offices in the center, and a three story assembly hall on the right. Hillside Home School closed in 1915, and the building fell into disrepair. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, it became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. Edgar Tafel pictured the decapitated condition in 1932, "Years With Frank Lloyd Wright," p.29. Leaded glass windows broken and front columns above archway demolished. He began restoring and remodeling the building, windows have been replaced with plate glass, and lower portion of windows in the theatre now open. Lane visited Taliesin around 1935, and these could have been taken at this time. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 0397.33.0215
C 1935
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1935 (1932- - S.228). View from the West. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887. Wright designed Hillside Home School I in 1892 (1897 - S.001). As the school grew, so did the need for more space. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. The gymnasium/theatre was on the left, two floors of classrooms and offices in the center, and a three story assembly hall on the right. Hillside Home School closed in 1915, and the building fell into disrepair. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, it became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. Edgar Tafel pictured the decapitated condition in 1932, "Years With Frank Lloyd Wright," p.29. Leaded glass windows broken and front columns above archway demolished. He began restoring and remodeling the building, windows have been replaced with plate glass, and lower portion of windows in the theatre now open. Lane visited Taliesin around 1935, and these could have been taken at this time. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 0397.34.0215
C 1935-41 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1935-41. Designed in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the Southeast. Dining Room on the left, Living Room in the center, Sitting Room on the far right, first floor. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Noted that the second floor "Veranda" (balcony) on the far right has been enclosed, which was not originally intended by Wright. Published in "In The Nature of Materials" Hitchcock, 1942, pl 135. Acquired from the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 8 x 5.75 B&W Print. 0397.09.1011
C 1935-41 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1935-41. Designed in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the Southeast. Sitting Room on the left, Entrance to the Home in the center, first floor. Pergola in the center between the house and the Garage on the far right. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Noted that the second floor "Veranda" (balcony) on the far left has been enclosed, which was not originally intended by Wright. Courtesy of the OPPL. Original 8 x 5.75 B&W Print. 0397.10.1011
C 1935-41 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1935-41. Designed in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the Southeast. Entrance to the Pergola is on the left, the Pergola in the center and the Garage on the far right. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Courtesy of the OPPL. Original 8 x 5.75 B&W Print. 0397.11.1011
C 1935-41 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1935-41. Designed in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the East. Sitting Room on the left, Entrance to the Home in the center, first floor. Pergola is on the right. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Acquired from the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 8 x 6 B&W Print. 0397.12.1011
C 1935-41 Burton J. Westcott Residence (S.099 - 1904), circa 1935-41. Designed in 1904, built in 1905 (according to Storrer). Viewed from the Northeast. The Home on the left, Pergola in the center, the Garage is on the far right. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Acquired from the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 8 x 6.25 B&W Print. 0397.13.1011
1935
Wright at 68. Portrait of Wright in 1935 by Don Keller, Phoenix Ariz, 4-5-35. Courtesy Library of Congress. 8 x 10 print. Published in American Architect, May 1935, p.55. High res digital image. 0397.06.0509
1935
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) circa 1935. View from the street, left and front sides. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the home in 1895. It was originally built is the 1870s and designed by William E. Coman. Wright’s modifications which were pretty extensive in 1895, included moving the house 16.5 feet further back into the lot, a new Living Room, two second floor Bedrooms, the addition of a wide porch, and reconfiguring the house’s interior spaces. This would indicate the front of the house was an addition, and Wright’s design. Details such as semi-circular window on top, the diamond shaped panes of leaded glass, decorative bracing above the three upper windows and the roof overhang, the upper corner plaster panels, and the cantilevered porch roof. Wright also designed the fireplaces in the living room and master bedroom. The original front stairs that Wright designed were reached at the end of the sidewalk where they paralleled the front porch. A left turn to the top of the stairs, then a right turn brought you up to the porch. The stairs were hidden behind the porch wall. The porch roof cantilevers over the drive on the North (left) end. There is a similarity to the design of the A.W. Herbert Residence remodeling, Evanston, IL (1902 - S.089). Photographed by Gilman Lane. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0397.36.0116
1935
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) circa 1935. View from the street, front and right sides. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the home in 1895. It was originally built is the 1870s and designed by William E. Coman. Wright’s modifications which were pretty extensive in 1895, included moving the house 16.5 feet further back into the lot, a new Living Room, two second floor Bedrooms, the addition of a wide porch, and reconfiguring the house’s interior spaces. This would indicate the front of the house was an addition, and Wright’s design. Details such as semi-circular window on top, the diamond shaped panes of leaded glass, decorative bracing above the three upper windows and the roof overhang, the upper corner plaster panels, and the cantilevered porch roof. Wright also designed the fireplaces in the living room and master bedroom. The original front stairs that Wright designed were reached at the end of the sidewalk where they paralleled the front porch. A left turn to the top of the stairs, then a right turn brought you up to the porch. The stairs were hidden behind the porch wall. The porch roof cantilevers over the drive on the North (left) end. There is a similarity to the design of the A.W. Herbert Residence remodeling, Evanston, IL (1902 - S.089). Photographed by Gilman Lane. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0397.37.0116
1936
1936
“Arizona Biltmore Hotel Phoenix.”  Approaching Arizona Biltmore, 1936,  (Published by Frashers, Inc., Pomona. Calif.)  Frashers Fotos.  3.4 x 2.4. 0404.11.0507
1936
“Arizona Biltmore Hotel Phoenix.”  Arizona Biltmore from Canal Bridge, 1936,  (Published by Frashers, Inc., Pomona. Calif.)  Frashers Fotos.  3.4 x 2.4. 0404.12.0507
Circa 30-40's
Arizona Biltmore, (Horses).  8x10 print, 22x22 Matted and framed.  Framed print adorned guest rooms. 1940.01.0205

Circa 30-40's

Arizona Biltmore, (Pool, Cabanas and Old Ballroom).  8x10 print, 22x22 Matted and framed.  Framed print adorned guest rooms. 1940.02.0205
1936
Solomon R. Guggenheim, 1936 (1956 - S.400). Portrait of Solomon R. Guggenheim. Text of face: "Associated Press Photo, Solomon R. Guggenheim." Stamped on verso: "Solomon R Guggenheim." "Apr 27 1936." Frank Lloyd Wright was first approached in 1943 to design a museum for Solomon R. Guggenheim’s collection of non-objective art. A model of the museum was presented to the public on September 20,1945. But it would take another 14 years for the museum to come to fruition. Six months after Wright’s death, the museum opened on October 21, 1959. Original 5 x 7 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. 0404.27.0415
1936
Ralph Fletcher Seymour 1936. Photographed by Harold E. Way while Seymour was artist in residence at Know College, Galesburg, Illinois. In 1937, Seymour painted Abraham Lincoln, on stage, giving a speech at the Lincoln-Douglas debate at Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois, October 7th 1858. The painting hangs in the college’s Old Main. He also etched "Old Main" Knox College, A commemorative etching, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Knox College. Courtesy of Knox College. 8 x 9 B&W photograph. 0404.31.0517
1936
S.C. Johnson Building Model. 1936. Designed in 1936, the building was completed on April 22, 1939. The Research Tower was designed in 1944 and construction began in 1947. Caption on back: "Now in Wisconsin. For years Frank Lloyd Wright designed unique buildings in many parts of the world. He planned this factory of the Johnson & Co., Racine. It combines straight and curved lines, built without ornamentation, yet with a trim beauty of its own." Additional images of model in "Frank Lloyd Wright and he Johnson Wax Building" Lipman, page 36. "At the end of August Wright guided three of his apprentices Blaine and Hulda Drake, and Eugene Masselink, in the construction of a large, detailed model of the Administration Building that could be separated into two halves, allowing one to peer into a miniature Great Workroom." Construction of the model lead Wright to make changes to the design. Page 37. Paul’s Photos. 3702 N. Lakewood Avenue, Chicago 13, Illinois. "GF-901". Original silver gelatin photo. 10 x 5.8. 0404.22.0109
1936
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1936 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith, facing to the right, head lowered with a cigar in his left hand. George Getz is on the right. Label pasted to verso: "Chicago, IL. 6-2-36. Delegates Gather For Republican Convention. Cleveland, Ohio. – Frank L. Smith, at left, Republican Committeeman from Chicago and George Getz of Chicago, Treasurer Republican Committee, at Hotel in Cleveland after their arrival to attend the National Republican Convention." The 1936 Republican Presidential Convention was held in Cleveland, Ohio, from June 9 - 12, 1936. Frank L Smith was elected as the national committeeman for Illinois in 1932. The Republican Nation Committee (RNC) consisted of one member from each state to serve for four years. The Chicago Tribune reported, May 2, 1936, on the Republican state convention to be held on May 22, 1936. "There was some discussion on who would be elected national committeeman at Cleveland by the delegates to the national nominating convention due to the arrival here of Frank L. Smith of Dwight, candidate for reelection as national committeeman from Illinois. George F. Harding, one of the original sponsors of Brooks, also is a candidate... Smith was elected committeeman four years ago through the...  Continue...  See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0404.29.0716
1936
Frank L. Smith, Dwight, Illinois, 1936 (1905 - S.111). Frank L. Smith, facing to the right, head lowered with a cigar in his left hand. The 1936 Republican Presidential Convention was held in Cleveland, Ohio, from June 9 - 12, 1936. Frank L Smith was elected as the national committeeman for Illinois in 1932. The Republican Nation Committee (RNC) consisted of one member from each state to serve for four years. The Chicago Tribune reported, May 2, 1936, on the Republican state convention to be held on May 22, 1936. "There was some discussion on who would be elected national committeeman at Cleveland by the delegates to the national nominating convention due to the arrival here of Frank L. Smith of Dwight, candidate for reelection as national committeeman from Illinois. George F. Harding, one of the original sponsors of Brooks, also is a candidate... Smith was elected committeeman four years ago through the influence of Len Small, then the Republican nominee for governor." Smith was not elected as the national committeeman, but was a delegate to the convention. Stamped on verso: "From Acme Newspictures, Inc. Cleveland Bureau, 1200 West Third St." "6 18 36. N. E. A." Original 6.5 x 8.5 B&W photograph. See Wright Study on the Frank L. Smith Bank. 0404.23.1144
1936
Taliesin III, Spring Green, Enlarging Frank Lloyd Wright’s Bedroom 1936 (1925 - S.218). Published in "At Taliesin," Henning, 1992, p.197. Caption: "Last summer saw quite a bit this seasonal growth... a sunny new bedroom, also developed from an old one, for Mr. Wright" (Noverre Musson, "At Taliesin," March 12, 1937). Apprentices Blaine Drake and Jim Thomson enlarging Frank Lloyd Wright’s bedroom in 1936. Photo courtesy of John H. Howe, Architect. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0404.26.0215
1936
Wright at Taliesin Spring Green, Circa 1936. Frank Lloyd Wright operating a road grader at Taliesin, Spring Green circa 1936. Wright is wearing a double-breasted suit, tie, hat and work boots. Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932 with 23 apprentices. The tractor pulling the road grader could have been operated by one of the apprentices. In a letter to the Hanna’s on June 17, 1936, Wright wrote "...We are busy and pushing on. I got tossed [off] the road grader making our new road to Hillside. Wrenched neck and leg–couple of ribs knocked in–damn’d painful as I sit here writing, but worse when I try to lie down." "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hanna House" Hanna, 1981, p.25. One would assume that this was taken before his painful mishap on the road grader. Published in "At Taliesin" Henning, 1992, p.8. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0404.24.0215
1936
Wright at Taliesin Spring Green, Circa 1936. Frank Lloyd Wright operating a road grader at Taliesin, Spring Green circa 1936. Wright is wearing a double-breasted suit, tie, hat and work boots. Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932 with 23 apprentices. The tractor pulling the road grader could have been operated by one of the apprentices. In a letter to the Hanna’s on June 17, 1936, Wright wrote "...We are busy and pushing on. I got tossed [off] the road grader making our new road to Hillside. Wrenched neck and leg–couple of ribs knocked in–damn’d painful as I sit here writing, but worse when I try to lie down." "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hanna House" Hanna, 1981, p.25. One would assume that this was taken before his painful mishap on the road grader. 8 x 8 B&W photograph. 0404.25.0215
1936
Wright at 69.  High res digital 4x5 digital image, 1936.  (241KB)  4 x 5. 0404.10.0307
1936
Wright at 69. 1936. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright. Frank Lloyd Wright and his wife Olgivanna, seated together reading in the living room at Taliesin. Photographed by Melvin E. Diemer. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings", Volume 4, Pfeiffer, 1994, page 121; "Frank Lloyd Wright, His Life and His Architecture", Twombly, 1979, page 289 but dated early 1940s. 4.4 x 6 print. High res digital image. 0404.20.0509
1936
Wright at 69. 1936. Portrait of Wright in Taliesin studio with four apprentices (L to R) Gene Masselink, Ben Dombar, Edgar Tafel and John Howe. (Taken in the mid 1930's.) Published in "At Taliesin".  Newspaper Columns by Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship 1934-1937, Henning, page 9, dated mid 30's. 7 x 5 Print, High res digital image. 0404.21.0709
1937
1937
Fallingwater, Kaufmann House, Bear Run, Pennsylvania.  Bill Hedrich, Hedrich-Blessing Exterior view shows balconies cantilevered over the stream.  Photographed and printed in 1937 by Bill Hedrich of the photographic firm of Hedrich-Blessing, Chicago.  Published in:  "In the Nature of Material" Hitchcock 1942, plate 320;  "The Future of Architecture" Wright 1953, page 14;  "A Testament" Wright 1957, page 165;  "Frank Lloyd Wright, His Life, His Work, His Words" Wright 1966, page 128;  "An Autobiography" Wright 1977, page 320 plate 6;  "Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings, Volume 3" Pfeiffer 1993, page 281;  "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Living City" De Long 1998, page 67, 213. Original 9 x 7 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0429.01.1106
1937
Fallingwater, Kaufmann House, Bear Run, Pennsylvania.  Photographed in 1937 by Bill Hedrich of the photographic firm of Hedrich-Blessing, Chicago, printed May 12, 1944.  Verso: “(This picture is for release to papers of Sunday, May 28 and thereafter, with John Selby’s New York AP special story on Modern Architecture).  House Built Over a Waterfall.  This House created by Architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Edgar Kaufmann, Pittsburgh Department Store owner, at Bear Run, PA., is one of 47 structures chosen by authorities at the Museum of Modern Art’s new show in New York to illustrate the best modern trends of the last 12 years.  It is built over a waterfall, anchored to the mountain with stone quarried from the site, and cantilevered out into space so that its balconies give the impression of flying off over the mountainside.”  Original 9 x 7 vintage silver gelatin photograph. Second Print: Printed July 26, 1976. Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s exciting ‘Falling Water’ residence at Bear Run, Pa., was built in 1937. Cantilevered out over a water fall, it enjoys a more spectacular site than any of Wright’s Chicago houses, many of which were mentioned in the poll." Stamped on clipping: "Jul 26 1976". Stamped on verso: "Hedrich Blessing, Chicago, ILL. Neg. No: 4414 D3". Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0429.06.0707 0429.10.0811
1937
Fallingwater, Kaufman House, Bear Run, Pennsylvania (S.230 - 1935). Photographed in 1937 by Bill Hedrich of the photographic firm of Hedrich-Blessing, Chicago. Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. (Typed:) 1935, Edgar, J. Kaufmann House, Fallingwater." Stamped on label: "Filed Oct 30 1953." Clipping pasted to verso: "The materials of which a building is made help to determine its form and appearance, according to Frank Lloyd Wright. Fallingwater, built at Bear Run, Pa., in the mid-1930s, was his first house built of reinforced concrete. Of it, he commented, "The form took the grammar of that type of construction." The stream flows under the special platform that Wright designed and offers and unusual rustic touch." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 19 1954." There is a third clipping pasted to the verso dated "Apr 9 1959," and a fourth clipping dated "Aug 8 1976." Published in the Architectural Forum, January, 1938, p.37-38. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0429.37.0218
1937
Fallingwater 1937 (1938 - S.231). Set of 7 35mm B&W slides. View of Fallingwater from below the upper falls. The Living Room and balconies are cantilevered out over the stream. Published in the Architectural Forum, January 1938, p.37-38. Photographed in 1937 by Bill Hedrich, Hedrich-Blessing, Chicago. Number "11" of what appears to be part of a set of at least 19 slides (bottom left hand corner). 35mm slide mounted in plastic sleeve and 11.5 x 8 high res B&W digital photograph.
0429.36.0517 (1-7)
1937
S.C. Johnson Headquarters, preparation for the "Dendriform Column Test," 1937 (1936 - S.237). The actual test took place on June 3-4, 1937. This would have been taken a few days before that. Scaffolding for the test column for can be seen in the center. Reusable metal column forms are setting to the left of the scaffolding. Similar view published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buidlings, Lipman, 1986, p.58. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0429.18.0215
1937
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Dendriform Column Test" June 3-4, 1937 (1936 - S.237). Frank Lloyd Wright (right) stands with Contractor Ben Wiltscheck (far left), HF Johnson, Jr. (Center), during the testing of the dendriform column. The Wisconsin Industrial Commission denied permission to build the columns. According to builders a column with a nine-inch diameter at the base, could only support a maximum column height of 6 feet 9 feet. The nine-inch diameter of the Wright column carried a height of 21 feet 7.5 inches. Finally it was agreed that a test column would be built, and if it carried 12 tons, construction would proceed. A full scale mockup was created to specifications. According to The Milwaukee Journal, June 4, 1937, "Wisconsin’s internationally famous architect, Thursday (June 3) won the first round of an encounter with the Wisconsin Industrial Commission. He successfully loaded 24 tons of sand on the top of a test column which he designed for the new administration building of the S. C. Johnson & Sons Wax Co., at Racine without cracking the pillar." At twelve tons the commission was satisfied. But Wright was not. "At 6 p. m. the structure was still standing, and plans were made for continuing the test Friday, adding weight until the column crashes." According to Jonathan Lipman... Continue... 0429.12.0214
1937
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Dendriform Column Test" June 3-4, 1937 (1936 - S.237). Frank Lloyd Wright, HF Johnson, Jr. and Wes Peters sit on a stack of wood during the testing of the dendriform column. The Wisconsin Industrial Commission denied permission to build the columns. According to builders a column with a nine-inch diameter at the base, could only support a maximum column height of 6 feet 9 feet. The nine-inch diameter of the Wright column carried a height of 21 feet 7.5 inches. Finally it was agreed that a test column would be built, and if it carried 12 tons, construction would proceed. A full scale mockup was created to specifications. According to The Milwaukee Journal, June 4, 1937, "Wisconsin’s internationally famous architect, Thursday (June 3) won the first round of an encounter with the Wisconsin Industrial Commission. He successfully loaded 24 tons of sand on the top of a test column which he designed for the new administration building of the S. C. Johnson & Sons Wax Co., at Racine without cracking the pillar." At twelve tons the commission was satisfied. But Wright was not. "At 6 p. m. the structure was still standing, and plans were made for continuing the test Friday, adding weight until the column crashes." According to Jonathan Lipman, "At thirty tons, enjoying... Continue... 0429.13.0314 0429.17.0215
1937
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Dendriform Column Test" June 3-4, 1937 (1936 - S.237). Frank Lloyd Wright, HF Johnson, Jr. and Wes Peters sit on a stack of wood during the testing of the dendriform column. The Wisconsin Industrial Commission denied permission to build the columns. According to builders a column with a nine-inch diameter at the base, could only support a maximum column height of 6 feet 9 feet. The nine-inch diameter of the Wright column carried a height of 21 feet 7.5 inches. Finally it was agreed that a test column would be built, and if it carried 12 tons, construction would proceed. A full scale mockup was created to specifications. According to The Milwaukee Journal, June 4, 1937, "Wisconsin’s internationally famous architect, Thursday (June 3) won the first round of an encounter with the Wisconsin Industrial Commission. He successfully loaded 24 tons of sand on the top of a test column which he designed for the new administration building of the S. C. Johnson & Sons Wax Co., at Racine without cracking the pillar." At twelve tons the commission was satisfied. But Wright was not. "At 6 p. m. the structure was still standing, and plans were made for continuing the test Friday, adding weight until the column crashes." According to Jonathan Lipman, "At thirty tons, enjoying the... Continue... 0429.14.0514
1937
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Dendriform Column Test" June 3-4, 1937 (1936 - S.237). Frank Lloyd Wright and HF Johnson, Jr. On site during the testing of the dendriform column. The Wisconsin Industrial Commission denied permission to build the columns. According to builders a column with a nine-inch diameter at the base, could only support a maximum column height of 6 feet 9 feet. The nine-inch diameter of the Wright column carried a height of 21 feet 7.5 inches. Finally it was agreed that a test column would be built, and if it carried 12 tons, construction would proceed. A full scale mockup was created to specifications. According to The Milwaukee Journal, June 4, 1937, "Wisconsin’s internationally famous architect, Thursday (June 3) won the first round of an encounter with the Wisconsin Industrial Commission. He successfully loaded 24 tons of sand on the top of a test column which he designed for the new administration building of the S. C. Johnson & Sons Wax Co., at Racine without cracking the pillar." At twelve tons the commission was satisfied. But Wright was not. "At 6 p. m. the structure was still standing, and plans were made for continuing the test Friday, adding weight until the column crashes." According to Jonathan Lipman, "At thirty tons, enjoying the drama, Wright... Continue... 0429.15.0514
1937
Taliesin III, Spring Green, Aerial View1937 (1925 - S.218). Published in the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, page 4. Caption: "Air view of Taliesin in November . . . Hillside group of Fellowship buildings old and new are a quarter of a mile over the hill to the South." Hand written on verso: "Feb 13 / 38, pages 4 & 5. Frank Lloyd Wright - Home of." Clipping pasted to verso: "Taliesin from the air spreads out on the hillside with a serpent-like road almost surrounding it. Photo by Roy E. Peterson, Racine." Stamped on verso: "Photography by Roy E. Peterson, Racine, Wis." Photographed by Roy E. Peterson. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0429.39.0218
1937
Taliesin III, Spring Green, viewed from the Southwest 1937 (1925 - S.218). Photographed by Hedrich-Blessing at the time he photographed Taliesin in preparation for the January 1938 issue of the Architectural Forum. Similar detailed view published on page 17. Note: The shrine and furniture seen on the left side of page 17 is visible in this photograph. Large garden visible in the foreground on the left. Earlier view published in Monograph 1914-1923, p.2. Courtesy Hedrich-Blessing Photographers. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0429.20.0215
1937
Taliesin, Spring Green, 1937. Verso: "South corner of dining-room at Taliesin, Looking from the South across the top of the hill garden." "ROTO May 1, 1938." "April 2, 1954 P 36." Written in pencil: "Hedrich Blessing Studio, Courtesy The Architectural Forum." Photographed by Hedrich Blessing Studios, taken in preparation for the January 1938 issue of "Architectural Forum", published on page 17. Original 8 x 10 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0429.09.1209
C 1937
Taliesin III, Spring Green, Living Room circa 1937 (1925 - S.218). "View of Living room showing furniture as part of the building," Frank Lloyd Wright, caption page 11, Architectural Forum, January, 1938. Note Wright designed furniture and copper weed holder. Photographed by Hedrich-Blessing Studios, taken in preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Similar view published in the January 1938 issue, page 11. Published in "At Taliesin," Henning, 1992, p.52. Courtesy Hedrich-Blessing Photographers. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0429.19.0215
1937
Taliesin III, Spring Green, view of the Loggia 1937 (1925 - S.218). Photographed by Bill Hedrich, Hedrich-Blessing at the time he photographed Taliesin in preparation for the January 1938 issue of the Architectural Forum. Caption: "South wall of Loggia taken from under the balcony looking away from stone fireplace on North wall, across Taliesin farmlands to the South." Stamped on verso: "Feb 13 / 38, Pages 4 & 5. Frank Lloyd Wright’, Home of." Clipping pasted to verso: "Through the windows of the loggia at Taliesin, the Wright home near Spring Green, Wis., the view is south across the rolling farmlands. - Hedrich-Blessing Studio Photo." Stamped on verso: "Hedrich-Blessing Studio... Chicago." Published in the January 1938 issue, page 14. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0429.38.0218
1937
Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright with group of apprentices at Taliesin. Front row left to right: Benjamin Dombar, Kevin Lynch, Frank Lloyd Wright, James Thomson, Wesley Peters and Robert Mosher. Back row, left to right: Carey Carraway, John Lautner, John Howe, Eugene Masselink, Blaine Drake, Ellis Jacobs, E. Brookins, Herbert Fritz, Burton Goodrich and Edgar Tafel. According to Tafel, it was photographed by Kenn Hedrich, Hedrich Blessing, taken during the preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Caption on Face: "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright surrounded by apprentices in 1938. This rare photograph is one of 300 in Time Magazine’s anniversary issue; ‘The Amazing 60 Years in History.’ Stamped on verso: "Jul 16 1998". Published in "Letters to Apprentices", Wright, 1982, page 32; "Architectural Forum", January 1938, page 3. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 0429.07.0511
1937
Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright with apprentices at Taliesin. Behind Wright on the left is John Lautner. To his right is Robert Mosher, Edgar Tafel and Wesley Peters. According to Tafel, it was photographed by Kenn Hedrich, Hedrich Blessing, taken during the preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Similar photograph published in "Years With Frank Lloyd Wright, Apprentice to Genius", Tafel, 1979, on the cover of the soft cover version and page 162-163. 7x 5 print. High res digital image. 0429.08.0609
1937
Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright with apprentices at Taliesin. Behind Wright on the left is John Lautner. To his right is Robert Mosher, Edgar Tafel and Wesley Peters. According to Tafel, it was photographed by Kenn Hedrich, Hedrich-Blessing, taken during the preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Similar photograph published in "Years With Frank Lloyd Wright, Apprentice to Genius", Tafel, 1979, on the PB cover and page 162-163. Stamped on verso: "Hedrich-Blessing." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0429.16.0514
1937
Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin Spring Green, December 1937. Wright is standing under a tree, looking to the left of the camera. He is wearing a cap, scarf and long coat draped over his shoulders. His cane is in his right hand. Although not published in the issue, it was photographed by Hedrich-Blessing during the preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Published on the cover of "Truth Against the World," Meehan, 1992, attributed to Bill Hedrich. Very similar pose published in "Apprentice to Genius," Tafel, 1979, p.23, attributed to Edgar Tafel. It appears to be taken at the same time as the Hedrich photograph. Different view but similar photograph, also attributed to Tafel, published in "About Wright," Tafel, 1993, p.174. Two years later, 1939, Tafel photographed Wright in a very similar pose and outfit during a picnic at Taliesin, publishing three photographs in "About Wright," p.192-3. A photograph very similar to the 1939 images was published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright, Architectural Drawings and Decorative Art" 1985, and is attributed to Tafel. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0429.21.0315
  Set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. Stackpole was one of the original four staff photographers listed by Life Magazine which launched in November 1936. The other three photographers were Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Eisenstaedt and Thomas McAvoy.  
1937
1) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking out the window to the right. He has a cigarette in his right hand. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -1
1937
2) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking at the camera. His head is resting on his left hand, he has a cigarette in his right hand. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A proof of page 8, for the January issue is directly in front of him. Page 3 is to the right. The back cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the far right. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -2
1937
3) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking to the left. He has a cigarette in his mouth, his hands are ready to strike a match. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A proof of page 8, for the January issue is directly in front of him. Page 3 is to the right. The back cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the far right. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -3
1937
4) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking straight at the camera. He has a cigarette in his mouth, his hands are ready to strike a match. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A proof of page 8, for the January issue is directly in front of him. Page 3 is to the right. The back cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the far right. This image was published on page 1 of the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. (S#429.25-4) 0429.25.0715 -4
1937
5) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking down as he lights the cigarette in his mouth. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A proof of page 8, for the January issue is directly in front of him. Page 3 is to the right. The back cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the far right. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -5
1937
6) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, making notes on a sheet of paper. Two editors are to Wright’s left. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Page 12 is under the sheet of paper he is writing on. Page 3 is on the left, page 8 is on the right. A lit cigarette is in his left hand. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -6
1937
7) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, confirming with one of the editors at the Architectural Forum. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A pencil is in his right hand, a lit cigarette is in his left. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -7
1937
8) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, confirming with one of the editors at the Architectural Forum. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Page 12 is next to Wright’s hand, page 8 is in the foreground. Page 13 is in the center, page 3 on the far left. The back cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the far right. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0429.25.0715 -8
1937
9) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, confirming with the editors at the Architectural Forum. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. (S#429.25-9) 0429.25.0715 -9
1937
10) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, confirming with the editors at the Architectural Forum. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. (S#429.25-10) 0429.25.0715 -10
1937
11) Wright at 70, 1937. Frank Lloyd Wright at the office of Architectural Forum. He is sitting at a table, looking straight at the camera. He has a cigarette in his left hand. In December 1937, Wright visited the offices in preparation for publishing the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum, which Frank Lloyd Wright designed and wrote. A proof of page 12, for the January issue is directly in front of him. Page 8 is to the right. The cover of the December 13, 1937 issue of Life Magazine is to the right. Part of a set of 11 photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright at the offices of the Architectural Forum, which was published by Time, Inc., New York, which also published Life Magazine. Photographed by Peter Stackpole. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. (S#429.25-11) 0429.25.0715 -11
1937
Wright at 70, 1937. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright for cover of Time Magazine. Wright is wearing a dark jacket, dark suit and tie. He is facing slightly to the right, but looking toward the upper right corner. There is an illustration of Fallingwater behind him. There is also a small Asian figurine behind him on the left. This might indicate that it was photographed at Taliesin, Spring Green. This photograph was published on the cover of Time Magazine, January 17, 1938, which would indicate that the photograph would have been taken in the later part of 1937, so they would have it in time for the January 1938 issue. This photograph was also used on the cover of the 1977 edition of "An Autobiography," Wright, Horizon Press. Text on face: "Photograph of Frank Lloyd Wright, by Valentino Sarra. From: An Autobiography by Frank Lloyd Wright. Publication date: May 12, 1977. $17.50." Stamped on verso: "Jun 21 1977." Photograph by Valentino Sarra. Original 5 x 7.25 B&W photograph. 0429.27.1015
1938
1938 
Florida Southern College. Wright and Spivey visit construction site of Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251), December, 1938. Wright is looking off to the right, has a beret on his head and holding a cane behind his back. He is wearing a suit and a scare to keep the December chill off his neck. A pocket watch hangs on a cord around his neck. Spivey is pointing to the right, wearing a dark suit and light top hat. Rebar is protruding from the foundation on their right. Wright’s first visit to the Florida Southern College campus was in May, 1938. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Wright’s second visit was in December, 1938 to oversee construction of the Chapel. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Date is verified by the Lakeland Public Library, Dan Sanborn Collection. Possibly photographed at the same time as the portrait of Wright by Laura Gilpin, 1938, in which Wright is wearing the same suit and watch, holding the same beret and cane. Photographed by Dan Sanborn. Gift of of Randolph C. Henning. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0460.11.0913
1938 
Florida Southern College. Wright and Spivey visit construction site of Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251), December, 1938. Wright is leaning against the foundation, looking off to the right and pointing with his cane. He is wearing a suit, has a beret on his head and a scare to keep the December chill off his neck. A pocket watch hangs on a cord around his neck. Spivey is leaning against the foundation, looking to the right, wearing a dark suit and light top hat. Rebar is protruding from the foundation in front of them. Wright’s first visit to the Florida Southern College campus was in May, 1938. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Wright’s second visit was in December, 1938 to oversee construction of the Chapel. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Date is verified by the Lakeland Public Library, Dan Sanborn Collection. Possibly photographed at the same time as the portrait of Wright by Laura Gilpin, 1938, in which Wright is wearing the same suit and watch, holding the same beret and cane. Photographed by Dan Sanborn. Gift of of Randolph C. Henning. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0460.12.0913
1938 
Florida Southern College. Wright and Spivey visit construction site of Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251), December, 1938. Wright is leaning against a post, looking at Spivey. He is wearing a suit, has a beret on his head and a scare to keep the December chill off his neck. A pocket watch hangs on a cord around his neck. Spivey has his hand extended and resting on the same post, looking at Wright. He is wearing a dark suit and light top hat. Wright’s first visit to the Florida Southern College campus was in May, 1938. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Wright’s second visit was in December, 1938 to oversee construction of the Chapel. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Date is verified by the Lakeland Public Library, Dan Sanborn Collection. Possibly photographed at the same time as the portrait of Wright by Laura Gilpin, 1938, in which Wright is wearing the same suit and watch, holding the same beret and cane. Photographed by Dan Sanborn. Gift of of Randolph C. Henning. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0460.13.0913
Circa 1938
Hotel Geneva Entrance Circa 1938 (1911 - S.171). Lobby is in the center. Dining Room is to the left on the first floor. "Hotel Geneva" lettered is across the front of the Lobby above the windows, and neon lighting has been added to each letter. Decorative light pole bases are tied into built-in pedestals with a vase. Large globe light has been added to the patio pedestals and smaller on the corners of the balcony. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 0460.15.1213
1938
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) Circa 1938. View of the inner Garden Court and pool. Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design the Imperial Hotel. Construction began in 1917 and on July 4, 1922 the first section of Wright’s Imperial Hotel opened. In August 1923 the hotel was complete. On September 1, 1923 a major earthquake destroyed Tokyo. The Dining Room Terrace can be seen on the left. The main Dining Room, which is located just past the main Lobby as you enter from the front, is on the left just out of the picture. Photographed by Margaret Walbank. Original 8 x 12 B&W Print. 0460.09.0912
C 1938-40
Isidore Heller Residence Street View, Chicago, Manson, Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the East. Photographed during the winter, no foliage. Ivy vines still cover front of the house. The Living Room is on the first floor, one of five bedrooms is on the second floor. The bedroom doors open to a balcony. The Playroom is on the third floor. The side entrance on the North side can be seen on the far right. A short fence can be seen along the sidewalk. It also continues toward the house on the far left, similar to the Gilman Lane images. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Lane images, but less foliage. Possibly photographed by Grant Manson. Part of the Grant Manson collection. He took many of his photographs between 1937 and 1941 while researching for his doctoral dissertation titled "Frank Lloyd Wright's Work Before 1910", 1958. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 6 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0171.21.0514
C 1938-40
Isidore Heller Residence Street View , Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Southeast. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. Ivy vines still cover front of the house. The Living Room is on the first floor, one of five bedrooms is on the second floor. The bedroom doors open to a balcony. The Playroom is on the third floor. A short fence can be seen along the sidewalk. It also continues toward the house to the right of the stairs and walk. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Manson image, but more foliage. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates similar Lane images Circa 1935-1945. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 8 x 9.5 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0171.22.0514
C 1938-40
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance, Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Entrance viewed from the Southeast. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels with a quatrefoil design. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. The light fixture has been replaced with one more in sync with the design of the home. Photographed by Gilman Lane at the same time as other Lane images. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates similar Lane images Circa 1935-1945. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 0171.23.0514
C 1938-40
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Lane Circa 1938-40 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Southwest. Photographed during the summer, full foliage. Ivy vines cover the south side of the house. The Kitchen is on the far left. The Dining Room is in the center, the Reception Room is on the right. The main entrance is to the far right, out of the picture. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. Bedroom doors open to a balcony. The Playroom is on the third floor. A short wall that runs along the south boundary can be seen in the foreground. Appears to be photographed within a few years of the Manson image, but more foliage. Photographed by Gilman Lane. Part of the Gilman Lane collection. The Art Institute of Chicago dates this Lane images circa 1935-1945. Caption on verso: "I. Heller House, 1897, 5132 Woodlawn, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect. Imaginative articulation of space and surface treatment, and linear trim all expressive of home, sheltering and exciting at once." Stamped on verso: "Feb 8, 1960". The same year Wright designed the Heller Residence, he designed the title page for "The Eve of St. Agnes". Wright adapted the winged female figures from the title page for the Heller House Frieze. See our Wright Study on for more information. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8 x 10 B&W... Continue... 1458.36.1211 0171.24.0514
C 1938
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Great Room 1938 (1936 - S.237). Workmen working on dendriform columns in the great workroom. Wooden forms are still in place, and it appears that the concrete has been poured. Similar image published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings, Lipman, 1986, pp.78-9. Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 0460.17.0514
1938
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Great Room 1938 (1936 - S.237). Workmen installing Pyrex tubes in great workroom. Label pasted to verso: "Title: 1938 photograph of the workmen installing Pyrex tubes in skylights of the Johnson Wax Administration Building Great Workroom. Date: 1938. From the exhibition: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings (1986), circulated by the Smithsonian Institute Traveling Exhibition Service." Published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings, Lipman, 1986, pp.78-9. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0460.16.0514
1938
Wright at 71, 1938. Frank Lloyd Wright standing in front of a waterfall. Looking off to the right, he is wearing a double-breasted suit and tie, and beret. Location not identified, but possibly close to Colorado Spring, Colorado. Stamped on verso: "Shewmaker’s Camera Shop, May 12 1938, 36 N. Tejon, Colo. Springs, Colo." 2.75 x 5 B&W photograph. 0460.20.0115
1938
Wright at 71, 1938. Wright spoke at the Chicago Real Estate Board Conference in June. "If Real Estate were to go before some bar of judgement where human values were uppermost, it would be taken out and shot at sunrise as it stands. The good it has done is so little as compared to the injustice and misery it has deliberately caused for its own profit..." The whole speech is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings" Wright; Pfeiffer, 1993, p.267-270. Caption pasted to verso: "L. To R. Arthur Kruggel, President, Chicago Real Estate Board, Frank Lloyd Wright, world-renowned architect, speakers at Chicago Real Estate Board housing conference banquet in Palmer House June 2, 1938, attended by 1,000 realtors." Stamped on verso: "Daily Times. Jun 2 1938." 8 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0460.21.0115
1938 
Wright at 71, 1938 (published in 1942). Portrait of Wright by Laura Gilpin. Wright is seated in a chair facing the camera. His right arm is resting on the back of the chair, his finger is resting on the side of his face. He is wearing a suit and tie, holding a cane, with a beret resting atop his knee. A pocket watch hangs from a cord around his neck and is tucked in his breast pocket. This is exactly the same outfit he wore when he visited the construction site of the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel in December, 1938. This print is a photogravure, 5.5 x 6.5 on a page that is 6 x 8.5. Text at the bottom: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Laura Gilpin." This is actually a page cut out of "The Complete Photographer", September 20, 1942, page 2376c. The caption reads: "A portrait of a great American architect, taken in 1938. The pose is natural, as is the lighting - and the beret on the knee adds an almost whimsical touch." Full page measures 7 x 10. Gift from Randolph C. Henning. 0593.06.0913
1939
1939
Jorgine Boomer, 1939, with Crowned Prince of Norway. Jorgine Slettede was born on August 18, 1887 in Norway. In 1903, at the age of 16, she and her older sister immigrated to the United States. She attended Columbia University in New York City. Caption taped to verso: "From Ted Saucier, The Waldorf-Astoria, New York - ELdorado 5-3000. New York City, April 28th/29. For immediate release, please. H.R.H. Crown Prince Olay of Norway and Mrs. Lucius Boomer are shown as the visiting Prince experienced his first taste of New York night life at the Sert Room of The Waldorf-Astoria last night. (April 27th)" Stamped on verso: "5-2 ‘39." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 0501.26.1014
C 1939
Rose Pauson Residence (Shiprock) (1939 - S.250) 1939. Designed in 1939, it was completed in 1942. It burned to the ground on April 11, 1943, blamed on tenants who left a living room door open, causing the curtains to blow into the fireplace and catching fire. Hand written text on face of drawing, "A desert house just completed for the Pauson sisters, Phoenix, Arizona. Cost $7500.00..." Original illustration published in, "Building the Pauson House," Green, 2011, pp.4, 26. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.24.0514
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters.  “Great Workroom”.  Ken Burns considered the Johnson Wax Headquarters  “the greatest room in the United States today”.  Herbert Johnson addresses the employees in the Great Workroom during the 1939 profit-sharing meeting. To his left is the company choir and to his right is the company band.  Original silver gelatin photo.  Published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building  Lipman 1986, page 118-119.  Photographer unknown.  14 x 11. 0501.10.0107
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters 1939. Porte cochere, viewed from the east. The loading dock is visible at the lower left. The glazed bridge from the penthouse to the squash court is located top center. Stamped on verso: "From Photographic Department, S.C. Johnson & Sons, Inc., Racine, Wis. Makers of Johnson’s Wax. Photograph by Roy E. Petersen." Clipping on verso: "June 8 - 1949. The Johnson Wax Co. building at Racine, Wis., designed by Wright. Architects have called it the greatest contribution to business housing since the advent of the skyscraper. It is built without windows and doors (other than the main opening) and is heated through the floor and supported by ‘golf-tee’ columns, modeled on the structure of a flower." Also published: "Oct 30, 1964. Another of Wright’s masterpieces, a business building in Racine, Wis. It has no windows and no doors except the entrance." Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building" Lipman, 1986 page 99. Original silver gelatin 10 x 8 photo. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 0798.10.0310
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters 1939 (1936 - S.237). Administration building, viewed from the east. The Great Workroom is on the left, Administration offices are on the upper level. The carport is to the right. A similar view is published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, p.99 (0798.10), and in Frank Lloyd Wright Monogram 1924-1936 V.5, Pfeiffer, p.251. Stamped on verso: "Johnson Wax Photo, Neg #3864, S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Racine, Wisconsin." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0501.27.0216
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters 1939 (1936 - S.237). Recreational Terrace viewed from the South. The Great Workroom is on right, the globe would be across the street to the left. See Frank Lloyd Wright Monogram 1924-1936 V.5, Pfeiffer, p.246. Stamped on verso: "Johnson Wax Photo, Neg #3840, S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Racine, Wisconsin." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.28.0216
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters 1939 (1936 - S.237). Administration building, viewed from the Northwest. The West side of the Administration Building early evening. The Great Workroom is to the right, Administration offices are on the upper level. The carport is to the left. A similar view is published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, p.98. Stamped on verso: "Johnson Wax Photo, Neg #3993, S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Racine, Wisconsin." Second copy, hand written on verso: "S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc." Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Two original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.29.0216 0501.34.0817
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters.  “Detail of The Great Workroom”.   Note double-wing tub desks.  Original silver gelatin photo.  Photographer unknown #90018-F. S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. Racine, Wisconsin.  Similar image published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, 1986 page 107. 0501.14.0907
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters 1939 (1936 - S.237). Administration building Penthouse, Herbert Johnson’s office on the right. A similar view is published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, p.113. Stamped on verso: "15346." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.30.0216
C 1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1939 (1936 - S.237). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1936. Administration building Penthouse. View of Herbert Johnson’s office, and most likely Herbert Johnson. Clipping pasted to verso: "Offices almost entirely of glass are used by the wax firm's executives." Hand Written on verso: "April 30 / 39. Page 5. Racine, Wis. Johnson Wax Co." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.34.0817
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters.  “Private Penthouse Office”.  The desk engages the built-in cabinet.  Photographer unknown. Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photo.  “Photographic Department Neg. #3871 S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. Racine, Wisconsin.”  Published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building  Lipman 1986, page 115. 0501.11.0107
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Secretaries’ Office" 1939 (1936 - S.237). Furniture was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1936. Left: three legged arm chair with wheels; Center: desk; Right: three legged arm chair. The S.C. Johnson headquarters was designed in 1936, completed on April 22, 1939. Label taped to verso: "Believe it or not, Some secretaries get privacy. Frank Lloyd Wright, whose concern over the American way of life has resulted in so many basic changes in building, has finally got around to considering the plight of the secretary and in the recently completed S.C. Johnson & Sons plant at Racine, Wisconsin, saw to it that she would get privacy, in fact as well as name, through the development of such unit offices as the one illustrated here. During the next week, an architect’s model of this famous building will be exhibited in Chicago through the Office Equipment Display at the Palmer House." Stamped on verso: "From Photographic Department, S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. Racine, Wis. Makers of Johnson’s Wax. A-192." Published in "The Prairie School Tradition" Spencer, 1985 page 103. Original silver gelatin 8 x 10 B&W photo. 0501.20.1113
1939
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Theater 1939 (1936 - S.237). Administration building Theater, Mezzanine level. "Figure 108. Theater, mezzanine level, 1939. The ceiling is composed of stepped semicircles. A projection booth can be seen at right. Not visible in photograph our sliding panels located behind rostrum that separate the theater from the lobby and provide a projection screen." Published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building, Lipman, p.111. Stamped on verso: "Filed Dec 19 1967." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.36.0817
Circa 1939
George D Sturges House (1939 - S.272) circa 1939. Designed and built in 1939. Photographed shortly after completion. A major portion of the home is cantilevered over the hillside. Although extremely visible, the design affords it an excessive amount of privacy. It appears windowless from the street, but the east side of the home actually has six sets of floor to ceiling double doors that open outward. The living room covers about half the floor space. Two bedrooms are adjacent to the living room and share half of the floor to ceiling doors which open to the balcony. Constructed of brick and redwood. John Lautner, apprentice from 1933-38, handled the construction. Wright utilized this design again in the 1952, Frank S. Sander Residence (S.354) in Stamford, Connecticut. 4 - 2.5 x 2 B&W Proofs, 3 original B&W Negatives. 0501.23.0401
Circa 1939
Suntop Homes Model Circa 1939 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Similar view, photographed at the same time was published in the Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp. 142. Acquired from and courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. This Suntop Homes model was displayed at The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), November 12, 1940 - January 5, 1941. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.21.0314
Circa 1939
Suntop Homes Model Circa 1939 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. Published in the Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp. 142. Acquired from and courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. This Suntop Homes model was displayed at The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), November 12, 1940 - January 5, 1941. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.22.0314
Circa 1939
Suntop Homes Model Circa 1939 (1938 - S.248). Designed for Otto Mallery, Tod Company, Armore, PA. It was originally entitled "The Ardmore Experiment" by Wright. But when Otto Tod Mallery presents plans to the Armore neighbors, they objected to an "Experiment" on their street. Wright retitled it The Armore "Suntop Houses". Although delayed for a full year, designed were finally approved (Architectural Forum, August, 1939, pp142-3). The top level is a roof deck, for "sunning", thus the name "Suntop." Although plans were drawn for four units, only one was built. Construction began on May 1, 1939. Each unit had a basement utility room, carport and two story living room on the first level. The second level had the Dining Room and kitchen, with a balcony overlooking the living room below, Master Bedroom with outside balcony, small bedroom or nursery and bath. The third level had two bedrooms and the Sun Terrace. This Suntop Homes model was displayed at The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), November 12, 1940 - January 5, 1941. Label pasted to face: "AR-20. Wright. Suntop Apartments. 1939." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0501.31.0117
Circa 1939
Wright at 72, Circa 1939. Frank Lloyd Wright leaning over a desk, cigarette in his left hand, pencil in his right. In the January 1938 issue of Architectural Record, Wright was photographed with a cigarette in his mouth. In 1940 Yousuf Karsh photographed Wright with a cigarette in his hand. Wright is wearing a suit with "peaked" lapels, which he wore from the late 1920s through the early 1950s. 11 x 14 B&W photograph. 0501.25.1014
 
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