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INLAND ARCHITECT & NEWS RECORD
   



Detail
Date: 1888

Title: The Inland Architect & News Record - V. XI No.7 - June 1888 (Published by The Inland Architect Press)

Author: Signed Frank L. Wright

Description: Illustration by Frank Lloyd Wright. "Houses for Victor Falkenau, Chicago. Adler & Sullivan, Architects, Chicago." Signed: "Frank L. Wright." In 1887 Frank Lloyd Wright joined the firm of Adler & Sullivan where he worked for six years. A description was published in "The Daily Inter Ocean," December 16, 1888: "The Material Of The Fronts Is Blue Bedford Stone, With Pressed Brick For The Other Walls. There Are Elegant Copper Bays At The Second Storey And Much Beautiful Carving In Stone, Especially About The Cornice And In The Open Lattice-Work Of The Basement. Two Cherub Heads Are Introduced Very Effectively. The Houses Are Three-Storey And Basement, With Hardwood Finish Throughout The First Floor, Very Elaborate Gas-Fixtures, And The Most Liberal Provision Of Sanitary Appliances. … The Sidewalks Are Stone, And So Are The Steps Of The House, And The Latter Are Protected By Wrought Iron Rails. The Houses Have Electric Annunciators, Furnaces, Cemented Basement Floors, And Especially Handsome Mantels. The Parlor Floor And The Chambers Up Stairs Are Admirably Arranged, All Space, Even The Nooks, Being Utilized By A Cunning Hand." While employed by Adler & Sullivan he also designed the Sullivan Bungalow and Stables (1890 - S.006), the Charnley Bungalow (1890 - S.007), Guesthouse and Stables (1890 - S.008), Charnley Residence (1891 - S.009) and the Albert Sullivan Residence (1892 - S.019). The three row-houses were located at 3420-24 South Wabash avenue, Chicago. They were demolished in 1958. (Sweeney 5)

Size: 13.5 x 9.25

Pages: Plate 7

S#:
0005.00.0819


 Signed: "Frank L. Wright"
   
Date: 1888

Title: Victor Falkenau Row House Element, Chicago, 1888. Adler & Sullivan, Architects, Chicago.

Description: Terra-cotta Cherub, designed for the face of the three houses in 1888, salvaged from the Victor Falkenau Row Houses during demolition. In 1887 Frank Lloyd Wright joined the firm of Adler & Sullivan where he worked for six years. An illustration of the Falkenau Row Houses was published in the Inland Architect & News Record - V. XI No.7 - June 1888. "Houses for Victor Falkenau, Chicago. Adler & Sullivan, Architects, Chicago." Signed: "Frank L. Wright." A description was published in "The Daily Inter Ocean," December 16, 1888: "The Material Of The Fronts Is Blue Bedford Stone, With Pressed Brick For The Other Walls. There Are Elegant Copper Bays At The Second Storey And Much Beautiful Carving In Stone, Especially About The Cornice And In The Open Lattice-Work Of The Basement. Two Cherub Heads Are Introduced Very Effectively. The Houses Are Three-Storey And Basement, With Hardwood Finish Throughout The First Floor, Very Elaborate Gas-Fixtures, And The Most Liberal Provision Of Sanitary Appliances… The Sidewalks Are Stone, And So Are The Steps Of The House, And The Latter Are Protected By Wrought Iron Rails..." The three row-houses were located at 3420-24 South Wabash avenue, Chicago. They were demolished in 1958. Salvaged by Richard Nickel, They All Fall Down, Cahan, 1994, p.80-81. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago. 31 ½ x 35 ½ x 18."

Size: 10 x 8 Color photograph.

S#:
0005.01.0919
   
Date: Circa 1950

Title: Victor Falkenau Row House, Chicago, Circa 1950.

Description: Adler & Sullivan, Architects, Chicago. Photographed by Richard Nickels. In 1887 Frank Lloyd Wright joined the firm of Adler & Sullivan where he worked for six years. An illustration of the Falkenau Row Houses was published in the Inland Architect & News Record - V. XI No.7 - June 1888. "Houses for Victor Falkenau, Chicago. Adler & Sullivan, Architects, Chicago." Signed: "Frank L. Wright." A description was published in "The Daily Inter Ocean," December 16, 1888: "The Material Of The Fronts Is Blue Bedford Stone, With Pressed Brick For The Other Walls. There Are Elegant Copper Bays At The Second Storey And Much Beautiful Carving In Stone, Especially About The Cornice And In The Open Lattice-Work Of The Basement. Two Cherub Heads Are Introduced Very Effectively. The Houses Are Three-Storey And Basement, With Hardwood Finish Throughout The First Floor, Very Elaborate Gas-Fixtures, And The Most Liberal Provision Of Sanitary Appliances… The Sidewalks Are Stone, And So Are The Steps Of The House, And The Latter Are Protected By Wrought Iron Rails..." The three row-houses were located at 3420-24 South Wabash avenue, Chicago. Photographed by Richard Nickel. They All Fall Down, Cahan, 1994, p.80-81. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Size: 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
0831.77.0919
   
Date: 1888

Title: The Inland Architect & News Record - V. XI No.8 - July 1888 (Published by The Inland Architect Press)

Author: Signed F. Ll. Wright: del.

Description: "Residence For J. L. Cochran, Edgewater, ILL. J. L. Silsbee, Architect." Signed: "F. Ll. Wright: del." After attending the University of Wisconsin, Frank Lloyd Wright headed for Chicago. In 1887 he took a position as draftsman for Joseph Lyman Silsbee, an architect well known for Queen Anne and Shingle-Style homes. Later that year, he moved to the office of Alder and Sullivan. Wright wrote about his experience working with Joseph Lyman Silsbee. "Silsbee was doing Edgewater at the time, the latest attempt at high-class subdivision, and doing it entirely for J. L. Cochran, a real-estate ‘genius’ in his line... His work was a picturesque combination of gable, turret and hip, with broad porches quietly domestic and gracefully picturesque... The office system was a bad one. Silsbee got a ground-plan and made his pretty sketch, getting some charming picturesque effect he had in his mind. Then the sketch would come out into the draughting room to be fixed up into a building, keeping the floor-plan near the sketch if possible. But the sketches fascinated us. 'My God, Cecil, how that man can draw!’ " An Autobiography, Wright, 1932, p.70. Silsbee must have been impressed with Wright’s ability to illustrate, giving him credit for this illustration, published in 1888. (Sweeney 8)

Size: 13.5 x 9.25

Pages: Plate 8

S#:
0008.00.0819
   

Left: Detail.

Right:
Signed "F. Ll. Wright: del."
   
Date: 1894

Publication: Inland Architect & News Record - Vol. XXIV No.1 (August 1894) (Published by the Inland Architect Press)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Residence of W. I. Clark, La Grange, Illinois. Frank L. Wright, Architect." W. Irving Clark Residence (S.013 - 1893). In 1887 Wright joined the firm of Adler & Sullivan. To earn extra income Wright designed "bootleg" houses while still working for Adler & Sullivan. The W. Irving Clark house was one of Wright’s first bootleg homes, commissioned in 1892 and completed in 1893. A dispute grew out of his acceptance of independent commissions, and in 1893 Sullivan fired Wright. Wright began his own firm, and this example of Wright’s work was published in August, 1894. Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. (Sweeney 16)

Size: 13.3 x 9.1

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0016.00.0811

   
Date: 1895

Title: Inland Architect & News Record - Volume XXIV No.6, August 1895 (Published by the Inland Architect Press)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Residence By Architect Frank L. Wright, For Himself, Oak Park, Illinois. View of Frank Lloyd Wright’s home from the South, on Chicago Avenue. Wright designed his home in 1889, added the Playroom, Dining Room and Kitchen in 1895, and his Studio in 1897. (Sweeney 17)

Size: 10 x 8 color photographic copy.

Pages: Pp 1

S#:
0017.00.0519
   
Date: 1898

Publication: The Inland Architect And News Record - Vol. XXXI, No.5 (Published by the Inland Architect Press)

Author: Anonymous

Description: “Residence at Oak Park, Illinois. Frank L. Wright, Architect.”  Photograph of the original 1895 home before the fire that destroyed it in 1922.  It was reconstructed in 1923 by Wright.  IA&NR had a very small circulation at the time and these prints only appeared in a very limited number of issues that were distributed to a few prominent architects.  Photogravure only, Hors-texte Plate. (Sweeney 32)

Size: 12.75 x 9

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0032.00.0606

   
Date: 1899

Title: Inland Architect and News Record - Volume XXXIII No. 1 1899 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author:

Description: Street View Rollin Furbeck Residence. "Residence For Mr. Furbeck, Oak Park, Illinois. Frank L. Wright, Architect." This is one of the earliest photographs of the Furbeck Residences and captures Wright’s original intent. The Porte Cochere is on the left, with the driveway leading in from the street. By the 1940s the Porte Cochere had been enclosed, and the driveway removed. The entrance was reached through low exposed walls that were removed by the 1940s. The transition from Wright’s earlier homes with Sullivanesque details, toward his Prairie style is evident. The facade of the upper two floors in the front is similar to the Winslow (1894), Heller 1896) and Husser (1899). But it also has the beginnings of his prairie style with the horizontal bands from the upper sills to the soffits. Of particular note is the use of wood trim within the upper horizontal bands. This became a design element in Wright’s later Prairie styled homes. This is possibly the first home to utilize this design element. Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. (Copy) Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 36)

Size: 7 x 10

Pages: Pp 1

S#:
0036.00.1016
   
Date: 1902

Title: Inland Architect and News Record - Volume XXXIX No. 6 1902 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: Street View Frank Wright Thomas Residence. "Residence Oak Park, Illinois. Frank L. Wright, Architect." It is considered to be the first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park. It is also the first house in Oak Park to be completely designed in Stucco. Upon entering the front door, stairs lead up to the main living quarters on the second level. The bedrooms on the third floor. Some of the design features included beaded molding and exquisite leaded glass windows. Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 52)

Size: 7 x 10 Photographic copy.

Pages: Pp 1

S#:
0052.00.1016
   
Date: 1905

Title: I
nland Architect and News Record - Volume XLVI No. 1 1905 (August 1905) (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Description:
Street View William G. Fricke Residence From the Southwest. "Residence, W. G. Fricke, Oak Park, ILL. Frank L. Wright, Architect." Like the Thomas Residence, also 1901 and in Oak Park, it is an all-stucco exterior. But unlike the Thomas Residence which is considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park, it includes elements of Wright’s transitional designs like the Rollin Furbeck Residence: Corners turned at a 45 degree angle; Massive central tower; Rectangular square windows with columns; More vertical than Wright’s prairie styled horizontal designs. It is also a three story home. The Living and Dining Rooms, Kitchen, Hall and Reception Room are on the first level. The Bedrooms are on the second level. Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 56)

Size:
7 x 10 Photographic copy.

Pages:
Pp 1

S#:
0056.00.1116
   
Date: 1907

Title: Inland Architect & News Record, Volume L (50), July 1907 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: Front View. "Administration Building for the Larking Co., Buffalo, N. Y. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 71)

Size: 7 x 10 (Copy)

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0071.00.05171 A

   
Date: 1907

Title: Inland Architect & News Record, Volume L (50), July 1907 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: View of the east side. "Administration Building for the Larking Co., Buffalo, N. Y. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 71)

Size: 7 x 10 (Copy)

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0071.00.05171 B

   
Date: 1907

Title: Inland Architect & News Record, Volume L (50), July 1907 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Interior View, Administration Building for the Larking Co., Buffalo, N. Y. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect. (See descriptive article.)" Photogravure, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 71)

Size: 7 x 10 (Copy)

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0071.00.05171 C

   
Date: 1907

Publication: Inland Architect & News Record, Volume L (50), September 1907 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Remodeled Entrance. The Rookery Building. Chicago. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect for Remodel. Work Executed by the Davis Marble Co., Chicago." Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. (Copy) Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 75)

Size: 7 x 10.25 (Copy)

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0075.00.0512

   
Date: 1907

Publication: Inland Architect & News Record, Volume L (50), December 1907 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Residence of Mr. Moore, Oak Park, Ill. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." This is actually the Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling (1900, 1906 - S.051). Mary Hills was Nathan G. Moore's daughter. He hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter. Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 77)

Size: (Copy) 7 x 10

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0077.00.0512

   
Date: 1908

Title: Inland Architect & News Record - Volume LII December 1908 (Published by The Inland Architect & News Record)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Unity Temple and Unity House, Oak Park, Ill. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Photogravure only, no text, Hors-texte Plate, printed single side only. (Copy) Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Archives. (Sweeney 84)

Size: 7 x 10.

Pages: Pp 1

S#: 0084.00.0914

   
Date: 1972

Title: Inland Architect - December 1972 (Published monthly by the Inland Architect Corporation, Chicago)

Author: Bowly, Devereux, Jr.

Description: Unity Temple, A Masterpiece on the Way to Restoration. Frank Lloyd Wright once said: "Unity Temple, Robie House and the Imperial Hotel, these are what I had to say." The Imperial Hotel, sadly, has gone; the Robie House happily has been saved, although it no longer is used for its original purpose; Unity Temple not only survives but is still a working church – one with the growing membership. Indeed, Wright’s early concrete monolith, a block and a half from the rattling "L" in Oak Park, stands today as the best remaining example of his public buildings. And, unlike the Imperial, Midway Gardens and the Larkin Building, to take three examples of distraction, it apparently is on its way to preservation... Includes three photographs, one which includes Lloyd Wright (son). Original cover price $1.00. (Sweeney 1888)

Size: 8.5 x 11 (

Pages: Pp 18-19

S#: 1
888.00.0519
   
Date: 1973

Title: Inland Architect - June 1973 (Published monthly by the Bruce Publishing Company, Minneapolis, Minn)

Author: Miller, Nory

Description: "Four architects with their own design for living." One of the four homes includes the Mrs. Thomas Gale Residence. "Howard Rosenwinkel's home is the realization of a boyhood dream. A partner in the firm of... he was inspired to study architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright's Oak Park houses, and now he owns one – the Mrs. Thomas Gale of 1909. He and his wife Nancy bought it in 1963 from Sally Gale, daughter of the original owner. It was stuffed with Victorian furniture; the front balcony had fallen onto the lawn; and surfaces were encrusted from years of non-maintenance. Neighbor had even circulated a petition to demolish the eyesore. But the young couple worked hard, with limited funds, to restore a loved it object and have been repaid manifold. ‘When you actually live here,’ says Rosenwinkel, ‘you notice the small touches of Wright’s genius – how the simple technique of adding two steps makes the dining room is sitting place, how the flat plane of the fireplace keeps the heat from driving you to the edge of the room..." Includes three photographs of the Gale Residence. (Sweeney 1933)

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 8-13

S#:
1933.00.0719
   
Date: 1982

Title: Inland Architecture - November/December 1982 (Published 10 times a year by Inland Architect Press, Chicago, IL)

Author: O’keefe, Daniel R.

Description: Inlandscape: "Grand entrances. ...were what the colorful mining heiress Susan Lawrence Dana liked to make, and them she did in the vast, vista-filled house that a 32-year-old Oak Parker named Frank Lloyd Wright designed for her down in Springfield, Illinois. Commissioned in 1899 and opened with a Christmastime party for the workers who built it in 1904, the Dana house became a showplace where many a governor was entertained..." Includes five photographs. Original cover price $2.50. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 8.75 x 11.5

Pages: Pp Cover, 30-31

ST#:
1982.141.0616
   
Date: March/April 1984

Publication: Inland Architect (Published by Inland Architect Press, Chicago)

Author: 1) Morgan, Maya   2) Birkey, Randal   3) Stubbs, John H.   4) Anonymous

Description: 1) "In the Garden with Frank Lloyd Wright". The lasting impressions of Wright influenced one Wright house inhabitant to generate a profusion of garden flowers and plants. Tomek House, Riverside, Illinois. Original List Price $2.50.
2) Ad: "Randal Birkley Architectural Delineation". Uses Plate 40, Hardy House perspective, Wasmuth Portfolio. Original List Price $2.50.
3) Ad: "Rare Books & Prints". Uses cover of 1934 Taliesin Publication "Taliesin, Volume 1, No 1". Original List Price $2.50.
4) Events: Milwaukee Art Museum thru May 13. Illustrations for Architecture: Wright’s Wasmuth Portfolio. Includes one illustration. Original List Price $2.50.

Size: 8.75 x 11.5

Pages: 1) Pp Cover 1 26-9    2) Pp 52   3) Pp 52   4) Pp 52, 55

ST#: 1) 1984.22.0305   2) 1984.23.0305   3) 1984.24.0305   4) 1984.25.0305

   
Date: 1985

Title: Inland Architect - J/A 1985 (Published six times a year by Inland Architect Press, Chicago)

Author: Clarke, Jane H.; Weigard, Elizabeth

Description: 1) "A Moving Violation? ...On March 21, 1985, Wright’s body was disinterred by a local mortician. Following cremation in Madison, Wisconsin, the famous architect’s ashes were removed to Arizona to be placed next to those of his third wife, Olgivanna, who died March 1..."
2) "The Arts At Midway Gardens. The Midway Gardens were to be, Frank Lloyd Wright said, a place of ‘light, color, music, movement.’ Briefly they were. Designed by Wright in 1913-14, the indoor-outdoor garden-theater, concert hall, and dining room, built at the southwest corner of Cottage Grove Avenue and 60th Street..." Includes five photographs, two of which are miss identified as Anna Pavlova at Midway Gardens. Original cover price $3.00.

Size: 8.75 x 11.5

Pages: 1) Pp 1 3-4    2) Pp 45-47

ST#:
1985.60.1116
   
   
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