ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
PHOTOS 1950 - 1959
 
  1950   1951   1952   1953   1954   1955   1956   1957   1958   1959    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1950
C 1950
George Blossom Residence, Chicago (1892 - S.014) C 1950. Photograph by Wayne Andrews. Wayne Andrews was born on September 5, 1913. He graduated from Harvard College in 1936. He was the Curator of Manuscripts at the New York Historical Society, and an editor at Charles Scribner's Sons. He received a doctorate at Columbia University in1956. His PhD was published as Architecture, Ambition, and Americans, Harper's, 1955. He was the American Art Professor at Wayne State University, Detroit from 1964 to 1983. He published many articles: Harper’s Bazaar - July 1948, Pp 76; Perspectives USA No. 4 - Summer 1953, Pp 115-125; Marj - December 1953, Pp 5-10; The Saturday Review - November 14, 1953, Pg 15-16; House Beautiful - February 1965, Pp 90-103; He died August 17, 1987, in Paris. His collection of architectural photographs are in the stewardship of Esto Photographic. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Res. Geo. Blossom, Chicago, Ill. (1892). Head-on. Wayne Andrews #1864. Indiana University Fine Arts Department." Stamped on verso "Photo Wayne Andrews." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.50.0816
C 1950
Jorgine Slettede Boomer, circa 1950 (possible 63 years old). She was born on August 18, 1887 in Norway. In 1903, at the age of 16, she and her older sister immigrated to the United States, finally arriving at their Uncles farm in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. She eventually became a student nurse and then was admitted to Columbia University of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. In 1915, she married Richard Sloane, one of the faculty members at Columbia. Six months later she was widowed. She married Lucius Boomer in September, 1920. She hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home in 1953, the Boomer Residence, and gave it to the Phoenix Art Museum in 1958. She passed away on May 7, 1971. Possibly photographed on one of her trips to Norway. 4 x 5 B&W photograph. 0831.40.1014
1950
Mrs. Avery Coonley (1907 - S.135 ), Circa 1950. Queene Ferry Coonley, born Addie Elizabeth Ferry, (1874-1958), was born in Detroit to garden seed magnate Dexter Ferry and his wife Addie. Queene graduated from Vassar College in 1896, married Avery Coonley in 1901. They had one child, Elizabeth Ferry Coonley, born in 1902. Mrs. Avery (Queene Ferry) Coonley, a believer in the early childhood education, attempted to enroll her daughter in Kindergarten. She was denied entrance because her daughter was not yet five. In 1906, Mrs. Coonley formed the Cottage School in Riverside, Illinois, a private independent school. In 1912, Wright designed the Coonley Playhouse to accommodate the growth of the Cottage School. The school continued to grow, and In 1916, moved to a new facility. In addition to her duties at school she was treasurer of the National Women’s Party; a trustee of Vassar College and vice president of the Progressive Education Association. In 1954, Queene Ferry Coonley published "Great thoughts: an anthology of sayings, garnered over the years". She past away in the same year a Wright, 1959. Original 5 x 5.5 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Avery School. 0831.25.0112
1950

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida. Wright at graduation ceremony.  Wright third from left.

1950.16.1104
1950
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida. Wright receives honorary doctor of laws degree in March 1950 (#2).  5x4. 0831.11.0806
1950

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida. Wright on campus.

1950.17.1104
1950's
Photo Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida.  Wright walking campus.  Original silver gelatin 5x7.  See Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Summer 2001, page 22. 1950.12.0506
1950
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida. Wright walking campus (#2).  7x5.  See Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Summer 2001, page 22. 0831.09.0806
1950
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida. Wright walking campus (#3).  7x5.  See Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Summer 2001, page 22. 0831.10.0806
1950
1) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks at North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at North Carolina State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Wright described architecture as "the greatest of all the arts and mother of the arts, the very essence and soul of our culture. Organic architecture is founded upon the essential principles which we should call democracy. Organic architecture grows from within outward, a thing of the spirit. The nation’s schools should revamp their curricula to educate a man to see himself as himself..." When he concluded his remarks, he received another ovation. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was the moderator during an open forum discussion following the address. Wright is speaking at the podium. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner is seated behind him on the left, Hendrik Th. Wijdeveld is most likely seated on the right. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.55.0517
1950
2) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright walking with Henry L. Kamphoefner. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at North Carolina State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.56.0517
1950
3) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright, pointing with his cane, is walking with Henry L. Kamphoefner. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at North Carolina State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.57.0517
1950
4) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright is seated on a cushion, facing left, surrounded by a group of young men at the North Carolina State College. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at North Carolina State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.58.0517
1950
5) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright enters the Student Union at the North Carolina State College. Frank Lloyd Wright is on the left, Henry L. Kamphoefner, Dean of the School of Design is in the center, Frank Depasquale is on the right. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at NC State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.59.0517
1950
6) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright appears to be seated, facing right. His hands are folded and his can is resting on his left arm. A stage appears to be to the right. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at NC State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.60.0517
1950
7) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright appears to be standing, listening, and facing left. A stage appears to be to the right. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at NC State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.61.0517
1950
8) Frank Lloyd Wright Speaks and tours the North Carolina State College (University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC) 1950. Wright is heading for the car that appears to be waiting for him. The car door is being held open. The crowd behind him is watching him leave. On May 16, 1950, Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at NC State University. He spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum, at the time largest attendance for any US architecture lecture. He was given a rising ovation by the audience as he entered the Coliseum. He was introduced by H. Th. Wijdeveld, an early publisher of Wright’s work in the magazine Wendingen. He taught architecture in the U. S. Between 1947 and 1952. Dean Henry L. Kamphoefner of the School of Design was responsible for Wright’s visit and lecture at NC State College. 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the University of North Carolina. 0831.62.0517
1950
Frank Lloyd Wright at Florida Southern College - 1950.  Published in 1955 Yearbook 1950.08.1004
Circa 1950
Wright at 83. Circa 1950. Frank Lloyd Wright and an unidentified gentleman most likely at Florida Southern College, standing in front of palms branches. Stamped on verso: "Photograph by Paul Wille." Wille was the Florida Southern College photographer for 29 years, "The Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright at Florida Southern College", p.100. Wright visited the campus 8 times during the 40s and 50s (1942, 1945, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1954, 1955, 1957). The style of the lapels on Wright’s jacket were predominate during the 30s and 40s, and for Wright the latest in 1951. A similar image is dated 1950 (S#831.22). Taking all this into consideration, the March, 1950 visit seems most reasonable. Stamped on verso: "Date Used: 1959, 1968, 1986, 1988 (2), 1989, 1994, 1995 (2), 1997." Acquired from the archives of the Miami Herald. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.36.1213
1950
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida 1950. Viewed from the Northwest. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Stamped on verso: "Perkins Bros. Commercial Photographers, Lakeland, Florida." Hand written on verso: "7-20-50." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.29.0113
1950
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida 1950. Viewed from the Northwest. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Stamped on verso: "Oct 9 - 1950. Miami Herald Staff Photo. By Stan Wayman." Original 6.5 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 0831.30.0113
1950's
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida, 3x4, Five photos (circa 1950's)  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938. 1950.02.0604
1950 
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, 1950. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. Viewed from the South, looking North. Two students are sitting on the stairs close to the entrance. Text on face: "Sanborn Photo Service." Stamped on verso: "Sep 19 1950." "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Department, Lakeland, Florida." Description taped to verso, but miss-identifies building as the Administration Building. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.31.0113
1950
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library interior (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1950. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. View of the interior from the Southwest. The librarian’s desk is in the center of the circular room. A fireplace is directly behind the desk. Text on face: "Sanborn Photo Service." Stamped on verso: "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Department, Lakeland, Florida." "Sanborn Photo Service, Lakeland, Florida." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.32.0113
1950's 
Florida Southern College, Library, Lakeland, Florida, 5x7 (circa 1950's)  Built in 1941.  Published in 1955 Yearbook. 1950.06.0804
1950's
Florida Southern College, Library, Lakeland, Florida, 3x4, (circa 1950's) Built in 1941. 1950.03.0604
1950's 
Florida Southern College, Administration Building, Lakeland, Florida, 3x4, (circa 1950's)  Built in 1946. 1950.04.0604
1950's 
Florida Southern College, Administration Building, Lakeland, Florida, 3x4, (circa 1950's)  Built in 1946. 1950.05.0604
Circa 1950
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B) and Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C) Circa 1950. Viewed from the Southeast. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. The Esplanades can be seen on the far left. The Emile E. Watson Administration Building is in the background on the left. The Benjamin Fine Administration Building is on the right. The Water Dome is to the far right. Bernard Elmo Fulghum (1898-1972) was the contractor. Text on face: "Sanborn Photo Service." Stamped on verso: "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Department, Lakeland, Florida." "Sanborn Photo Service, Lakeland, Florida.". Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.33.0113
1950's
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Lakeland, Florida, Two 8x10s (circa late 40's early 1950's)  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938. 1946.02.1104 1950.07.0804
1950's
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida.  Annie Pfeiffer Chapel interior 8x10.  (circa 1950's)  First of Wright buildings at the College.  Built in 1938. 1950.09.1204
C 1950
William G. Fricke Home, C 1950 (1901 S.058). Viewed from the West, photographed during the Winter. The Pavilion which used to be on the South side the Fricke home was demolished to make room for the Brick home on the far right, which was originally built in 1949. Like the Thomas Residence, also 1901 and in Oak Park, it is an all-stucco exterior. But unlike the Thomas Residence which is considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park, it includes elements of Wright’s transitional designs. Like the Rollin Furbeck Residence (1897), it includes elements of Wright’s transitional period. Broad overhanging eves, corners are turned at a 45 degree angle, it includes a massive central tower, there are rectangular square windows with columns and it is more vertical than Wright’s prairie styled horizontal designs. It is also a three story home. Where the Rollin columns were round, these are closer to the appearance of the square Thomas columns. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Photographed by John Gordon Replinger. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.51.1116
1950
New Theatre, West Hartford, Connecticut. "Frank Lloyd Wright, Left, world’s most celebrated architect, is pictured discussing his controversial New Theater model with lovely Faye Emerson on whose TV-show, the architect was interviews. At the (center) is noted Playwright Tennessee Williams, who participated in the discussion. The site for the theatre is West Hartford, Connecticut, where the project is now being held up by the City Council. Mel Strauss, PL-9-6094. (Hand written: 9/22/1950.)" Assumed to be photographed by Mel Strauss, September 22, 1950. The interview aired on October 19, 1950. 7 x 6 B&W Print, High res digital image. (See additional information on the New Theater.) 0831.20.0110
1950
Bernard Schwartz Residence, Two Rivers, Wisconsin, C 1950 (1939 - S.271). A year after Frank Lloyd Wright published his design for a family with $5,000-6,000 income in Life Magazine, the basic concept was built for Bernard Schwartz. Wright did not include a Living Room, but called it the "Recreation Room." The smaller seating area he called the "Lounge." This is the "Lounge," tucked into the corner, and includes built-in seating and shelves. Just to the left, out of frame is a fireplace. Label pasted to mounting: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Re. Bernard Schwarz (sic), Two Rivers, Wis. (1939). Living Room. Wayne Andrews #1583. Indiana University Fine Arts Department." Original 9.5 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 0831.52.1216
1950
S.C. Johnson Research Tower, 1950. Round Mezzanines are visible through the glass tubing. The Research Tower was designed in 1944, construction began in 1947 and the opening ceremony was held on November 17, 1950. Published in "A Testament" Wright,1957, page 172-173. "Frank Lloyd Wright, His Life, His Work, His Words" Wright, 1966, page 133. Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, 1986, page 158 (dates image at 1950). Original silver gelatin photo. 8 x 10. 0831.19.1109
C 1950
S.C. Johnson Research Tower (1944 - S.238), circa 1950. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1944, the tower opened in November 1950. The tower was designed with a center core the was 54 feet deep. Fifteen floors cantilevered out from the core, floors alternated square and round, reaching a height of 153 feet. Stamped on verso: "Johnson Wax Photo, Neg #14260, S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Racine, Wisconsin." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0831.48.0216
C 1950
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) Circa 1950. Viewed from the Northwest, across the street on Rogers Avenue. The covered Porch is on the left, Living Room in the center and Dining Room on the far right. The front sidewalk that started at Rogers Avenue and passed in front of the Living Room to the Entrance, has been removed and the front yard has been paved. The exterior walls have been covered with asbestos shingles. Storm windows cover the Porch and Living Room windows. An apartment building on Eastlake Terrace can be seen in the background on the far right. Photographed by John Gordon Replinger. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago. Original 9 x 7.2 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 0831.26.0512
C 1950 
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1950 (1932- - S.228). View from the Southwest. Ellen (Nell) and Jane Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright’s aunts, formed the Hillside Home School in 1887 and ran it until 1915 when it closed. Wright designed Hillside Home School II in 1902, which was completed in 1903. It eventually became part of the Taliesin Fellowship complex. When Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. The gymnasium/theatre was on the left, two floors of classrooms and offices in the center, and a three story assembly hall on the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews before the fire that destroyed the theatre and classrooms in the Spring of 1952. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 0831.44.0215
Circa 1950
Mrs. Clinton (Della) Walker (1948 - S.306). Possibly a reception with Della Walker, circa 1950. Frank Lloyd Wright standing with a group of people looking at the camera.. He is wearing a suite and tie, a gold chain runs up to his breast pocket. He is holding a glass in his right hand, his left is in his coat pocket. He appears to be at a reception close to Monterey, California. Carmel is adjacent to Monterey. The Fawcett home (1955 - S.385) in Los Banos is an hour and a half away. The Kundert Medical Clinic (1955 - S.397), San Luis Obispo, CA, is two and a quarter hours away. Possibly Della Walker is the women to the right of Wright. Stamped on face: "Lee Blaisdell, Photographer." Stamped on verso: "Lee Blaisdell Photo Service. Monterey, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.41.0215
Circa 1950 
Mrs. Clinton (Della) Walker (1948 - S.306). Possibly a reception with Della Walker, circa 1950. Frank Lloyd Wright sitting with a group of men. He is looking to the left, jestering with his right hand. Same suit and tie as (S.831.41), but has added an overcoat. He appears to be at a reception close to Monterey, California. Carmel is adjacent to Monterey. The Fawcett home (1955 - S.385) in Los Banos is an hour and a half away. The Kundert Medical Clinic (1955 - S.397), San Luis Obispo, CA, is two and a quarter hours away. Stamped on face: "Lee Blaisdell, Photographer." Stamped on verso: "Lee Blaisdell Photo Service. Monterey, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0831.42.0215
Circa 1950
Frank Lloyd Wright along the Pacific Coast, possibly Carmel California on a visit to the area, circa 1950. Possibly on a visit to the Walker Residence (1948 - S.306) in Carmel California. Wright is standing with his arms behind his back, looking to the right. He is wearing a hat. A wind swept evergreen tree is in the background. Vegetation appears coastal. Overcoat appears to match the coat in (S#831.42). Original 8 x 10 color photograph. 0831.43.0215
1950
Wright at 83, 1950. (Brandoch approximate age 8). Frank Lloyd Wright and grandson, Brandoch Peters. His parents were architect William Wesley Peters and Svetlana Hinzenburg, Wright’s adopted daughter from Olgivanna’s previous marriage. In 1946 when Brandoch was four years old, his mother Svetlana and brother Daniel, were killed in an automobile accident at Taliesin in 1946. The Wrights helped raise Brandoch and raised him as their own. He grew up at Taliesin at his grandfather's side. The verso is stamped "Edgar L. Obma, A.P.S.A. Master of Photography. Dodgeville, Wisconsin." (Note: Obma Studio opened in Dodgeville on March 1, 1941 after Edgar and his wife Elizabeth purchased the former Letcher Studio. They were married for 38 years. He passed away on January 31, 1976, she on October 5, 2002.) Gift from Randolph C. Henning. 8 x 10 print, High res digital image. 0831.18.0709
1950
Wright at 83. 1950. Studio portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright in suit and tie, facing forward, looking slightly to the left. Photographed by Edgar L. Obma, Dodgeville, Wisconsin. Possibly photographed at the same time as portrait of Wright and Brandoch Peters. (We have verified a copy of this photograph that is dated August 24, 1950.) Press photograph for exhibition at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C., opening July 1, 1988. Label taped to verso: "Exhibition: ‘Frank Lloyd Wright: In the Realm of Idea’, an exhibition that explores the ideas and achievements of architectural theorist, designer and educator Frank Lloyd Wright..." (Note: Obma Studio opened in Dodgeville on March 1, 1941 after Edgar and his wife Elizabeth purchased the former Letcher Studio. They were married for 38 years. He passed away on January 31, 1976, she on October 5, 2002.) Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0831.24.0811
1950
Wright at 63 and 83, 1930 and 1950. UPI Caption: "4/9/59 - Phoenix, Arizona: Frank Lloyd Wright, 89, dean of American architects, died 4/9 in St. Joseph’s Hospital here. Wright underwent an operation 4/6. He is shown her in 1926 (1930) photo (top) and 1950 photo (bottom). UPI Telephoto/Files." 1930 photograph published in "My Father Who is on Earth", Wright 1946, page 195, and "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 122. Also used in the 1932 Poster. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 7 x 9.2 B&W Print. (1930 - S#249.21) (1950 - S#831.22) 0831.22.0910
Circa 1950
Wright in his 80s, Circa 1950s. Frank Lloyd Wright walking in the garden at Taliesin, Spring Green. Wright walking to the right. Wearing a suit and tie, overcoat, scarf and hat, a cane is in his right hand. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0831.27.0612
Circa 1950-1955
David & Gladys Wright House, set of 31 historic photographs. David & Gladys Wright House 1950-1955. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this home for his fourth child David, in March, 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest", and was published in the June 1953, "House & Home." The lot was located in the middle of a citric grove, so Wright designed the living space to float above the tree line. David owned a company that manufactured and distributed concrete block. The decorative blocks were designed specifically for this home. Others were standard blocks manufactured by his company. Courtesy of the David & Gladys Wright family. As originally designed by Wright, when visitors approach the home from the drive, they walk under the main level, across the garden court, past the pool, under the master bedroom which cantilevers over the ramp, to the base of the ramp. To the left is the massive circular column...  Continue... 0831.37.0614
1-31
1951
1951
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B) and Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C) 1951. Viewed from the Southeast. Students standing, sitting and walking around waterdome. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. The Esplanades can be seen on the left. The Benjamin Fine Administration Building is in the foreground adjacent to the water dome. The Emile E. Watson Administration Building is in the background on the left and right. Bernard Elmo Fulghum (1898-1972) was the contractor. Caption glued to verso: "The Frank Lloyd Wright designed administration building and waterdome at Florida Southern College." Stamped on verso: "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Department, Lakeland, Florida." "Photo by Harold Sanborn." "Mar 11 1951." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.15.0514
Circa 1951
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1951. Viewed from the Northwest. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. The Esplanades, covered walkways, can be seen in the foreground. Text on face: "Sanborn Photo Service." Stamped on verso: "Florida Southern College, Public Relations Dept., Lakeland, Florida." "Sanborn Photo Service, Lakeland, Florida." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.11.0113
Circa 1951
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1951. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. Viewed from the Southeast, most likely from the balcony of the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. Published in "Florida Southern College, Lakeland", 1953, p. 7 (airbrushed), and "Of Fact and Fancy", Thrift, 1979, p. 143. Label pasted to verso: "Exterior, The E. T. Roux Library, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.12.0113
Circa 1951
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library interior (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1951. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. View of the interior from the Southwest. The librarian’s desk is in the center of the circular room. A fireplace is directly behind the desk. Published in "Florida Southern College, Lakeland", 1953, p. 6. The caption reads, "...Mr. Wright’s design for natural lighting is so perfect that artificial illumination is needed only in the evening hours." Also published in "Of Fact and Fancy", Thrift, 1979, p. 78. Label pasted to verso: "Interior, The E. T. Roux Library, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Stamped on verso: "Photograph by Paul Wille." "Nov 7 1955". Published clipping taped to verso and stamped "Nov 20 1955." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.13.0113 0857.14.0113
Circa 1951
Huntington Hartford Art Colony, New York, Circa 1951. After Huntington Hartford abandoned the resort Frank Lloyd Wright designed for the 160 acres Hartford owned in the Hollywood Hills, he turned his attention to utilizing the property for an arts community. According to the UCLA Library, Special Collection, which houses all the documents related to the Foundation, in December 1948, Huntington Hartford established the Huntington Hartford Foundation; its purpose was to foster community creativity in the arts through fellowships which provided subsistence, living quarters and partial supplies at the Foundation's location in Rustic Canyon, Pacific Palisades, California. Applicants for fellowships were screened by three admissions committees (literary, music and art). He hired Lloyd Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright's son, to designed a studio apartment building for the property. Huntington ended the Foundation in September 1965. Published in the February 4, 1952 issue of Life Magazine. 9 x 7 B&W photograph. (See our Wright Study on the Huntington Hartford Resort Project.) 0857.26.0561
Circa 1951
Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938) (S.249). Photographed from the street, circa 1951.  Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Pedro Guerrero or Charles L. Manson.  4 x 5. 0857.02.0207
Circa 1951
Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938) (S.249). Photographed from the right side of the yard, circa 1951.  Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Pedro Guerrero or Charles L. Manson.  4 x 5. 0857.03.0207
1951
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1951 (1936 - S.237). Administration building Penthouse. View of Herbert Johnson’s office. Possibly after the 1951 remodel. When comparing this view to the 1939 view, published in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building," 1986, page 114, the outside wall in the background on the left has been raised about three feet. Also, setting on that wall is a portrait of Wright taken in 1950. Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.28.0817
1951
Taliesin West 1951, (1937 - S.241). General overall dessert view from the Southwest. Ezra Stoller first visited Taliesin West in May, 1946, then again in 1951. Photographed in 1951 by Ezra Stoller. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller, 1999, page 34-35. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0857.18.0523
1951
Taliesin West 1951, (1937 - S.241). Entry walk with cactus, viewed from the Northwest. Mr. Wright’s office was on the left, drafting room in the center. Ezra Stoller first visited Taliesin West in May, 1946, then again in 1951. Photographed in 1951 by Ezra Stoller. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller, 1999, page 36. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0857.19.0523
1951
Taliesin West Cabaret Theater 1951, (1949 - S.243). Cabaret Theater and gallery, designed in 1949. The seating was placed at a slight angle to the screen, the gallery is on the right. Ezra Stoller first visited Taliesin West in May, 1946, then again in 1951. Photographed in 1951 by Ezra Stoller. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller, 1999, page 43. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0857.20.0523
1951
Taliesin West Cabaret Theater 1951, (1949 - S.243). View west down the pergola. The bell tower and drafting room is on the right, the small movie theater (Hogan) is in the foreground on the right. Ezra Stoller first visited Taliesin West in May, 1946, then again in 1951. Photographed in 1951 by Ezra Stoller. Similar view published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller, 1999, page 80. Original 4 x 5 contact print and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0857.21.0523
1951
Wright at 84, 1951. Wright and Anne Baxter, Wright’s Academy Award winning Granddaughter. Both are looking to the right. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York," Hession; Pickrel, 2007, p. 23. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0857.16.0614
1951 (B)
Wright at 84, 1951. A) 1957 (90);  B) 1951 (84);  C) 1953 (86);  D) 1954 (87).
A) Top Left: Wright at 90. 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright inspects construction of the Guggenheim in 1957. Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. Wright visited the site many times. Wright pasted away April 9, 1959, six months before the grand opening. Grand opening October 21, 1959. Published in "The Guggenheim", 2009, p 1, and a similar image taken at the same time, "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York", Hession, Pickrel, 2007, p 104. Photographed by John Engstead. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
B) Top Right: Wright at 84, 1951. Wright in drafting room, Taliesin West in 1951. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Similar image in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West", Stoller, 1999, p 8. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
C) Bottom Left: Wright at 86, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright at drafting table with a large image of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop (S.310 - 1948) in the background. Photographed by John Engstead. Published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Decorative Designs Collection", 1990. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
D) Bottom Right: Wright at 87, 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, facing right, looking to the left. Photographed by Al Ravenna. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
Montage of four portraits of Frank Lloyd Wright. Stamped on verso: "Nov 9 1998". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Three copies.
0857.06.0911 0857.07.0911 0857.09.0213
C 1951
Wright, David Wright House circa 1951 (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the North. View of the master bedroom which cantilevers to the left. The walls and roof are complete. Waiting for installation of windows. The lower level of the large massive column houses the bath/ changing room for the pool. The second level of the column is the master bedroom fireplace. Although the column anchors the eastern end of the home, the main level cantilevers past it and seems to float above the ground. The master bedroom is on the left, the bedroom gallery is on the right. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0857.22.0215
1952
1952
Florida Southern College, Industrial Arts Building Pavillion (1942 - S.254) 1952. Originally designed in 1942 as a student center, it was redesigned in 1950 as the Ordway Industrial Arts Building. Wright visited the campus on October 24, 1951 and inspected the 30,000 square foot building. It was dedicated in March 1952 and called the Horsey Building, after J. William Horsey, a Canadian businessman, an early supporter of the building. It was rededicated in 1956 as the Lucius Pond Ordway Building. The center section of the building included the Pavilion and Amphitheater with an inner grass court yard on either side. The Pavilion was used as the Student Lounge. Photographed just after the completion of the building, and published in the September 1952 issue of Architectural Forum. Label on verso: "The Student Lounge, the Industrial Arts Building, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0910.24.0113
C 1952
Price Tower Model (1952 - S.355), Circa 1952. Four apprentices putting the finishing touches on the model of the "Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma." They are working in the drafting Room at Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin Fellowship," Marty; Marty, 1999, p.83. 7.75 x 10 B&W photograph. 0910.27.0714
  Set of ten photographs of Taliesin West, 1952.  There are a number of indicators that date these photographs circa 1952.  A) The Fountain Basin at the base of the Light Tower is visible in one photograph in this set.  According to "Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 3, Taliesin West" Pfeiffer 1989, page 66 the Fountain Basin was added in 1955.  But in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller 1999, Pages: Frontispiece, 18, 19, these 1951 photos show the Fountain Basin.  B) According to "Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 3, Taliesin West" Pfeiffer 1989, page 67 the 12 Chinese Theatre (Ching) pieces were purchased in 1950.  In "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West" Stoller 1999, Pages: 58-9, Dining room (1951), Chinese Theatre not installed. Page 82-3 Water Tower and Bridge (1951), Chinese pieces are installed.  Chinese piece in front of the Dining Room is installed in this set.   
1952
1) Taliesin West 1952, Light Tower with Fountain Basin photographed from entrance.  Work shop behind light tower is visible.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.08.0107
1952
2) Taliesin West 1952, Light Tower photographed from entrance court.  Work shop behind light tower is visible.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.09.0107
1952
3) Taliesin West 1952, Dining Room photographed from across the pool.  According to "Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses 3, Taliesin West" Pfeiffer 1989, page 86, the dining room was moved and this dining room was converted to a private dining room.  This set documents conversion exterior.  The Chinese Theatre (Ching) piece is installed.  "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West", Stoller 1999, Pages: 58-9 photographed in 1951 documents the dining room before the conversion. Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.10.0107
1952
4) Taliesin West 1952, Drawing Room (left) and Dining Room (center) photographed from the right of the pool.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.11.0107
1952
5) Taliesin West 1952, Dining Room photographed from the right side of the Terrace Prow.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.12.0107
1952
6) Taliesin West 1952, Dining Room photographed from the Terrace.  Shows the revised entry and stairs to the Dining Room Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.13.0107
1952
7) Taliesin West 1952, Pool and Drawing Room photographed between the Terrace Prow and the Terrace.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.14.0107
1952
8) Taliesin West 1952, Dining Room and Loggis (to right of dining room) photographed from the pool. Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him. Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.15.0107
1952
9) Taliesin West 1952, Cabaret theatre hall with bust. Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him. Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.16.0107
1952
10) Taliesin West 1952, Apprentices at work in the Kitchen.  Part of the Wes Peters collection, possible photographed by him.  Original 5 x 3.5 silver gelatin photograph. 0910.17.0107
C 1952
Unitarian Meeting House (1947 - S.291) Circa 1952. The Taliesin Fellowship dates the design for he Meeting House as 1947. Construction began in 1949 and on August 21, 1951, the church opened with a lecture by Frank Lloyd Wright and a performance by the Taliesin Fellowship musicians. In 1960, the American Institute of Architects designated it as one of 17 examples of Wright's contribution to American culture. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Published in the December 1952 issue of Architectural Forum, p.88. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0857.17.0513
C 1952
Unitarian Meeting House (1947 - S.291) Circa 1952. Text on face: "The First Unitarian Meeting-house of Madison, Wisconsin - originally intended by this Unitarian Society to be built downtown. Decentralization in mind, they were persuaded to go out into adjoining country to build a characteristic social center. The edifice is based upon the triangle (the symbol of aspiration in the form of prayer and symbolizes Unity above all. The singularly trussed roof is covered with copper. Walls are of native limestone." Stamped n verso: "Apr 10 1959". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0798.11.0112
1952
Unitarian Meeting House (1947 - S.291) 1952. View of the Unitarian Meeting House from the North. Hand written on verso: "First Unitarian Church built by Frank Lloyd Wright. (Madison - Churches.)" Stamped on verso: "Filed Apr 30 1952." "William Wollin Studio. Madison, Wisconsin." Photographed by William Wollin. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0910.33.0417
1952
Wright at 85. 1952. Frank Lloyd Wright seated outside, in a chair, a cane propped against his leg, gesturing with his hand. World Wide Photo. Original 6.25 x 9 B&W photograph. 0910.19.1210
1952
Wright at 85. 1952. Wright and Olgivanna relaxing during a Sunday afternoon picnic June 8, 1952. Press photo for "Frank Lloyd Wright", a film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. "Frank Lloyd Wright and his Third Wife, Olgivanna Milanov Hinzenberg Wright, June 8, 1952. While Wright managed to forge an innovative harmony in his works, his personal life was tangle of scandal and chaos. Scarred by the murder of a mistress and the breakup of his first marriage, Wright was in the midst of a bitter separation from his second wife when he met 26 -year-old Olgivanna, who was less than half his age. Intelligent and focused, Olgivanna was the driving force in Wright’s later years, urging him to lecture and write, and later, to set up the Taliesin Fellowship program." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0910.23.1112
C 1952
Wright at 85. Circa 1952. Frank Lloyd Wright and apprentices on hillside at Taliesin, Spring Green. Possibly a Sunday afternoon picnic which he was known for. Apprentices unidentified. Wright is standing, white shirt, dark pants, fingers wrapped around his belt holding a white handkerchief. He is wearing a white cap. He was photographed between 1951 and 1956 wearing this type of white hap. (Picturing Wright, p. 57-8, 1953.) Original 5 x 7 B&W photograph. 0910.30.0215
1952
Wright at 85, 1952. Wright seated in a chair, his legs are folded, holding a book on his lap. Stamped on verso: Nov 23 1952. Caption pasted to verso: "Father of Modern Architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright. The city is dated and the trend is toward decentralization." Original 6 x 9 B&W photograph. 0910.22.0811
1952
Wright at 86 (1952). Mr. Wright facing right, leaning over a drawing board, wearing a pork pie hat, pencil in his right hand. Published in "Picturing Wright," 1994, page 7, Guerrero wrote "...numerous occasions arose to photograph him him as he inspected work in progress at various sites, including here at the Usonia homes in Pleasantville, New York in 1952. There always were revisions to be made and challenges posed by unforseen problems; sometimes he would simply a drawing that had a workman confused." Photographed by Peter Guerrero. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0910.29.0815
Circa 1952?
Wright mid 80s, Early 1950, Circa 1952? Frank Lloyd Wright facing the camera, looking slightly to the right. "Frank Lloyd Wright, American architect, June 9, 1869 - April 9, 1959. International Portrait Gallery. Gale Research Co. - Book Tower - Detroit - 1968. 8.5 x 11, portrait 6 x 8. 0910.26.0414
1952
“‘The Outcasts of Poker Flat’ starring Anne Baxter, Dale Robertson”  1952.  52/141.  Published by 20th Century Fox Film Corp.  Anne Baxter was born in Michigan City, Indiana, on May 7, 1923.  She was the daughter of a salesman and his wife, Catherine, who herself was the daughter of Frank Lloyd Wright.  Anne was a young girl of 11 when her parents moved to New York City.  Original 8 x 10 vintage silver gelatin photograph. 0910.18.0307
1952
Unitarian Meeting House 1952 (1947 - S.291). View of the Unitarian Meeting House from the Southeast. The West Living Room is to the far left, the classrooms on the left, the Hearth Room and Auditorium in the center, and the Entrance to the right. Photographed before the Parsonage was added to the West (left) end. Hand written on verso: "Madison - Churches. Madison Wis. Unitarian Church designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. 1952." Stamped on verso: "Filed Apr 5 1952." "William Wollin Studio. Madison, Wisconsin." Photographed by William Wollin. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0910.34.0717
1952
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity House (1952). View From Southeast. House For Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity. Gainesville, Florida. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in1952, working drawings were competed on January 20, 1954. The large two story Social Room is circular on one end, and included 13 doors that open out to the terrace. There are built-in seats inside, and out in the circular terrace, and a built-in a planter box. The back wall of the Dining area and kitchen include perforated light screens. Six doors lead out to the Roof Terrace which is directly above the Social Room. The front, back and side walls include perforated light screens. Wright placed the entrance toward the back of the lot. The Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity House remained a project. One 10 x 7.5 Color photograph. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 0910.32.0915
1953
C 1953-54
Benjamin Adelman Residence Set of 15 photographs, circa 1953-54 (1951 - S.344). Although the Benjamin Adelman was the first Usonian Automatic House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, it was not the first to be built. In 1952, one year after designing the Adelman house, Wright design the second Usonian Automatic for Arthur Pieper, an apprentice, who also became his son-in-law on June 18, 1954. Pieper built his home in early 1952. Designed in 1951, the home was not built until 1953. Benjamin Adelman purchased a lot and a half from Jorgine Boomer. "For the consideration of Ten Dollars, and other valuable considerations, I, Jorgine Boomer, a widow, do hereby convey to Benjamin E. Adelman and Regina B. Adelman, his wife..." Warranty Deed, March 30, 1953. This set of 15 photographs were taken after the home was completed and landscaped...  Continue...  For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright study. 0987.82-0415 1-15
Circa 1953
Florida Southern College, Industrial Arts Building (1942 - S.254) Circa 1953. Originally designed in 1942 as a student center, it was redesigned in 1950 as the Ordway Industrial Arts Building. Wright visited the campus on October 24, 1951 and inspected the 30,000 square foot building. It was dedicated in March 1952 and called the Horsey Building, after J. William Horsey, a Canadian businessman, an early supporter of the building. It was rededicated in 1956 as the Lucius Pond Ordway Building. The center section of the building included the Pavilion and Amphitheater with an inner grass court yard on either side. Label on verso: "Exterior, The Industrial Arts Building, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.63.0113
1953
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence 1953. (1923 - S.216). Viewed of the Living Room looking South. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The two center doors open out to the balcony. The floor to ceiling perforated textile blocks on the left and right are enclosed by a glass door. The floor is oak. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Photographed by Julius Shulman. 0987.85.0216
1953
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence 1953. (1923 - S.216). Viewed of the Living Room and fireplace looking Northwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The floor is oak. The floor lamps on the far left and far right were designed by Wright for the Storer House. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Photographed by Julius Shulman. 0987.86.0216
1953
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence 1953. (1923 - S.216). Viewed of the Living Room looking South. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The two center doors open out to the balcony. The floor to ceiling perforated textile blocks on the left and right are enclosed by a glass door. The oak floor has been covered in carpet. The floor lamps on the far right was designed by Wright for the Storer House. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Photographed by Julius Shulman. 0987.87.0216
1953
Samuel and Harriet Freeman Residence 1953. (1923 - S.216). Viewed of the Living Room looking South. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, construction was supervised by Wright’s son, Lloyd Wright. A two-story home, the Entrance, Living Room, Balcony and Kitchen are on the main floor. The lower level includes two Bedrooms, Lounge, Bath and Storage. Both the West and East corners of the South elevation are formed by mitered glass corners that run the full length of two floors. This was Wright’s first use of mitered glass corners. Wright utilized this concept again in 1935 when he designed Fallingwater. Each textile block was 16" x 16". Wright continued the 16" measurement in the details of the design. Some blocks were perforated, glass was added, allowing additional light in, creating patters of light on the interior. The two center doors open out to the balcony. The floor to ceiling perforated textile blocks on the left and right are enclosed by a glass door. The oak floor has been covered in carpet. The floor lamps on the far right was designed by Wright for the Storer House. 10 x 8 Color photograph. Photographed by Julius Shulman. 0987.88.0216
Circa 1953 
Alvin Miller Residence (1946 - S.289), Charles City, Iowa. Circa 1953. Viewed from the hall leading to the Workspace (kitchen). Was designed as a small one bedroom home, built on the banks of the Red Cedar River. Built of natural stone and cypress. Built-in cabinets and shelves are on the left. The Dining Room table is built into the stone wall in the center. Dining Room chairs were designed by Wright. A coffee table is built into the wall in the background. The ceiling above the Living Room is raised and clerestory windows allow in additional non-direct light. Two sets of floor to ceiling doors and two singles open outward in the Living Room on the right. Although the home was only 1,000 square feet, Wright featured it in "The Natural House". This photograph appeared on page 192. Also published in House & Home - April1955, pages 120-121. Photographed by Marc Neuhof. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.45.0613
1953 
New York Usonian Exhibition House (1953 - S.369) and the New York Usonian Pavilion (1953 - S.370) Presentation Drawing. "Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Exhibition of Organic Architecture, Temporary Structure, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." The Exhibition House is on the far left, with the entrance on E. 89th Street. The back of the Pavilion is centered and faces 5th Avenue. Viewed from the North looking South. The House and Pavilion were built on the Guggenheim Museum site. The New York exhibit opened on October 22 through November 29, 1953. Original 8 x 5 color photograph. Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and the Guggenheim Museum. 0987.60.0913
1953 
Wright and Henken. Wright reviews plans with Henken for the Usonian Exhibition House (1953 - S.369) and the Pavilion (1953 - S.370) at the New York exhibition entitled "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" which was held at the site for the Guggenheim Museum from October 22 - November 29, 1953. Most likely photographed late summer, early fall. Label pasted to verso: "By-line Feature. Supplied by International News Photos, New York. For Release December 27, 1953. The Titan of Architects. Wright (A) – ‘World’s Greatest architect,’ Frank Lloyd Wright, goes over his designs for Solomon R. Guggenheim museum, New York, with its builder, David Henken, who studied under him. At 84, Wright considers museum showpiece in pioneering theories developed over 60-years career. (Picture by Guerrero. From International New Photos.)" Stamped on verso: "International New Photos." "Mr. Wright was always on hand at the site of his 1953 retrospective exhibition in New York City to solve construction problems as they arose. Here he reviews plans with David Henken, contractor for the Usonian model house, the centerpiece of the show." "Picturing Wright," Guerrero, 1994, page 144, also published in the same. Original 9.25 x 7 B&W photograph. 0987.46.0813
1953
Wright at 86 (1953). Frank Lloyd Wright overseeing the construction of the Pavilion at the New York exhibition entitled "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" which was held at the site for the Guggenheim Museum from October - November 1953. According to Pedro Guerrero in "Picturing Wright", pages 136-155, "fourteen apprentices came from Wisconsin and spent the better part of the summer and fall of 1953 construction a two-bedroom Usonian house... Next to it was constructed a huge pavilion to house Mr. Wright’s models and drawings as well as photographs..." Most likely photographed in October 1953. Published in "Picturing Wright", page 145 (flipped horizontally). Guerrero explains, "Either with a wave of his cane or a few well-directed words, Mr. Wright would explain what had to be done next, When, many years later, Michael Zingg of Madison, Wisconsin saw the photograph shown here, he said, ‘For myself, it goes beyond a simple workman trying to grasp and understand Mr. Wright. That worker is all of us struggling with his ideas, with a new order, struggling in the end with the genius of the man himself.’ " Clipping pasted to verso: "Detail in pavillion construction gets helpful comment from Mr. Wright. Building used glass in large amount, yet avoid the ‘indecent exposure’ which the architect considers a perversion...  Continue... 0987.41.0811
0987.84.1115
1953 
Wright visits the New York Usonian Pavilion (1953 - S.370). Construction of the Pavilion nears completion. The Pavilion was constructed on the site of the Guggenheim Museum. Frank Lloyd Wright poses next to a model of the museum. A model of the Malcolm Willey House, Scheme 1 (project 1932) sets on a table in the background. The left side of the Pavilion faces 5th Ave. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Original 10 x 7.5 color photograph. 0987.62.0913
1953
New York Usonian Pavilion (1953 - S.370). The opening reception for the New York Usonian Exhibition occurred on October 22,1953. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero just before the exhibition opened. He wrote, "A portrait of Mr. Wright standing at his Taliesin drafting table, one of my photographs, greeted visitors as they entered the exhibition pavilion. Mr. Wright had cropped this photograph at the level of the drafting board – to my vigorous protest. He responded: ‘I wanted the photograph to say, I am an architect - what’ll you have?’ What could I say?" "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, p.146-7. The show included sixteen models, 800 drawings and photographs, and a fully-finished four-room house. It was built on the site for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, in New York City. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.73.0115
1953
New York Usonian Pavilion (1953 - S.370). The opening reception for the New York Usonian Exhibition occurred on October 22,1953. Frank Lloyd Wright  in the Usonian Pavilion, holding a cup of tea, glancing at the camera. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero just before the exhibition opened. He wrote, "...he paused before a model of Wingspread. I had an assignment from the Ford Motor Company to shoot a portrait of him – but I did not have to pose him even for this one." Behind him to the right, is a model of the San Francisco Call Building model. " "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, p.148. The show included sixteen models, 800 drawings and photographs, and a fully-finished four-room house. It was built on the site for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, in New York City. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.74.0115
1953 
New York Usonian Exhibition House (1953 - S.369) and the New York Usonian Pavilion (1953 - S.370). The Exhibition House is on the left, the Pavilion is on the right. Built on the Guggenheim Museum site. New York was the seventh stop in the traveling exhibit "Sixty Years of Living Architecture, The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright." The New York exhibit opened on October 22 through November 29, 1953. The exhibition moved next to Los Angeles and then to Chicago. The Exhibition House was dismantled and auctioned, but never reconstructed. Published on the back of "The Usonian House" (1953) exhibition catalog. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Original 8 x 5 B&W photograph. 0987.57.0913
1953 
New York Usonian Exhibition House Interior (1953 - S.369). Viewed from the Terrace into the Dining area and Living Room. Sets of 12 foot doors open outward and extend to the full height of the Living Room. The cantilevered roof overhang is richly patterned with ornamental dentil bands. The dining area and work space are on the left, the living room to the right. The New York exhibit opened on October 22, 1953. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Original 7.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.59.0913
1953 
New York Usonian Exhibition House Interior (1953 - S.369). Viewed from the living room fireplace, looking toward the dining area, kitchen and bedrooms. The fireplace is behind the camera. The Living Room's wall of floor to ceiling doors and windows open outward to the terrace, blending interior with exterior. The dining area and work space is in the center, and the entry to the far right. The brick is a deep red, and is complimented by a patterned ceiling of red oak plywood. The Dining table and chairs were designed and built specifically for this exhibition house. (Yes that is a television on the far right.) The New York exhibit opened on October 22, 1953, most likely photographed mid October, before the opening. Photographed by Berenice Abbott. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.58.0913
1953 
New York Usonian Exhibition House Entrance (1953 - S.369). The pavilion is on the left, entrance to the home is on the right. The actual entrance to the exhibition on the corner of 5th and 89th was into the patio on the opposite site of the house. The Exhibition House was the first Wright building erected in New York City. The Chinese Stone Lion was part of Wright’s collection. A mobile by Alexander Calder hangs at the entrance. The brick wall between the two structures in the background faces E. 89th Street. "In this 1,700 sq. ft. house lie Frank Lloyd Wright’s suggestions to the average American who builds or buys a home - suggestions first made in 1900 when his houses embodying the same principles first appeared in the prairie outside Chicago." "The Usonian House." Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 0987.61.0913
1953
1) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero. Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.18.0207
1953
2) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.19.0207
1953
3) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.20.0207
1953
4) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.21.0207
1953
5) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.22.0207
1953
6) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.23.0207
1953
7) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.24.0207
1953
8) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.25.0207
1953
9) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.26.0207
1953
10) New York Usonian Exhibition House opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Similar view “Man About Town” Muschamp 1983, Page 129.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.27.0207
1953
11) New York Usonian Pavilion opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum.  Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.28.0207
1953
12) New York Usonian Pavilion opening reception, October 22,1953.  Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.  Built on the site for the Guggenheim Museum.  Contact sheet 8 x 10, twelve images each 2.25 x 2.25. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.29.0207
1953
Wright visits the New York Usonian Pavilion, Price Tower Model (1953 - S.370). Model of the Price Tower sets on a base at the New York Usonian Pavilion. Frank Lloyd Wright uses his cane to point to the model as he explains aspects of the Price Tower. Caption pasted to verso: "A Dream in Steel and Glass. New York: – World famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright points with his cane to a model of the Price Tower in Oklahoma, which he designed and which is his ideal skyscraper. He first designed this type of sheltered-glass tower building in 1924 for Chicago and in 1929 for St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie in New York. Wright was ob hand to explain his architectural theories to members of the press at a special preview of ‘Sixty Years of Living Architecture,’ the first comprehensive retrospective exhibition of Wright’s work. Show includes sixteen models, 800 drawings and photographs, and a fully-finished four-room house. It will be held in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, in New York City. (United Press Photo) 10-21-53." 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 0987.70.0115
1953
Wright with Guggenheim Model 1953. Wright standing to the left of the Guggenheim Model on October 25, 1953, holding Western Union cable. Label on verso: "Model Showing. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright stands beside a model of the new home he designed for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York on October 25, 1953. The model was displayed at an exhibition, ‘Sixty Years of living Architecture’ tracing Wright’s many innovations in architecture. AP Newsfeature photo. Please credit. (For use Sun., Aug 12, 1990 with Hugh Mulligan’s Oak Park APN story slugged Wright’s Stuff.) sav-7/25/90." Acquired from the archives of AP News. Original 11.5 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on Sixty Years of Living Architecture. 0987.36.1010
  Set of 15 photographs, most likely taken at the traveling exhibition "Sixty Years of Living Architecture. The work of Frank Lloyd Wright", held in New York City, October 22 - November 29, 1953, at the temporary pavilion, constructed for the exhibition on the plot of ground that would become the Guggenheim Museum. Six models exhibited were photographed which included: #47: St. Mark’s Tower, #53: Willey House (2), #59: Wingspread, #81: Jester, #83: Affleck, #106: New Theater. Also included are photographs of photos on display at the exhibition: Fallingwater (3), Anne Pfeiffer Chapel (1), Taliesin West (1); and two photographs of unidentified non-Wright buildings. Also one photograph of three males. Found in a dresser sold at an estate sale at a suburb North of New York City. Numbers correspond with the Catalog numbers from the exhibition catalog, "Sixty Yeats of Living Architecture" (New York). A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia (January 1951). The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy (June 1951) and ended in Chicago, October 1956.  
1953 
1) #47: St. Mark’s Tower Model, New York City, 1929. During the summer of 1935 Wright and his apprentices constructed a 12 foot square model of Broadacre City, including the large model of St. Marks Tower (1929 project), consisting of two-story apartments, built of copper, glass and concrete, constructed with a central core and cantilevered floor slabs. This model was exhibited in 1940, at the MOMA exhibited "Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect". Photograph of model is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright / Sixty Years of Living Architecture" (Zurich), 1952, page 24, "Frank Lloyd Wright: 60 Jabre Architektur" (Germany) 1952, page 33, and "The Future of Architecture" Wright, 1953, page 271. This later became the Price Tower (1952 - S.355). 3.25 x 4.5 sepia tone photograph, faded and out of focus. 0987.49.0813
1953 
2) #53: Willey House Model (1), Project for the Willey House, Minneapolis, Miss, 1932. Malcolm Willey House, Scheme 1 (project 1932). Although not called a Usonian design in 1932, it could be called an early forerunner to the design. The description in the 1953 "Sixty Yeats" (New York) catalog is "Model for a ‘Usonian’ house." Scheme 1 was two stories. The Malcolm Willey House (1933 - S.229), Scheme 2, built in 1933, was one story and built three years before the Jacobs Residence (1936 - S.234) which many call Wright’s first Usonian House. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.50.0813
1953 
3) #53: Willey House Model (2), Project for the Willey House, Minneapolis, Miss, 1932. Malcolm Willey House, Scheme 1 (project 1932). Although not called a Usonian design in 1932, it could be called an early forerunner to the design. The description in the 1953 "Sixty Yeats" (New York) catalog is "Model for a ‘Usonian’ house." Scheme 1 was two stories. The Malcolm Willey House (1933 - S.229), Scheme 2, built in 1933, was one story and built three years before the Jacobs Residence (1936 - S.234) which many call Wright’s first Usonian House. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.51.0813
1953 
4) #59: "Wingspread" Model, Herbert F. Johnson Residence (1937 - S.239). During construction of the SC Johnson & Son Administration Building (1936 - S.237), H.F. Johnson commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design his expansive home in Wind Point, Wisconsin. This model of Wingspread was constructed during the summer of 1940, by the Taliesin apprentices for the exhibition "Frank Lloyd Wright: American Architect" held at The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), November 12, 1940 - January 5, 1941. See "The Show to End all Shows", 2004. The 1940 caption: "The latest and largest of the ‘Prairie Houses’." Large color photograph of model published in "Frank Lloyd Wright / Sixty Years of Living Architecture" (Zurich), 1952, page 81-82. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph (notice little boy in the background looking at model). 0987.52.0813
1953 
5) #81: Ralph Jester House Model, Project, Palos Verdes, CA. Designed in 1938. Jester graduated from Yale in 1924. He moved to Paris for five years to study sculpting, and met Wright’s sister Maginel at an American Embassy Fourth of July party. After moving back to New York, he met Wright will they were both visiting Maginel. His first involvement with Hollywood was as a sculpture for the movie Cleopatra (1934). He was probably best known for his costume designs for such movies as The Ten Commandments (1956) and The Buccaneer (1958). Wright designed the home in 1938, but construction costs forced Jester to forgo building the home. The design was revived for Gerald Loeb "Hilltop House" (project) in 1946. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer later constructed the home next to Taliesin West in 1971. This model was exhibited in 1943 at the exhibition "Masters of Four Arts", Fogg Museum of Art, and named the "Pacific House". This model appeared in the background of the 1940 photograph of Wright with the Wingspread model at Taliesin in 1940 (Show to End all Shows, page 39), and is photographed at the show (page 52), but does not appear on the list of models displayed at the 1940 show at MOMA, or the Catalogue of the Exhibition in November (pages 215-228). Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.53.0813
1953 
6) #83: George Affleck Residence Model (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Gregor Affleck, a chemical engineer, was born in Chicago and spend his younger years near Spring Green, Wisconsin. Elizabeth Affleck was fond of Fallingwater. The site they selected for their home was sloped, and traversed by a small stream that lead to a pond. Wright designed the raised Usonian home for the property. The living area cantilevers dramatically over the stream bed. This model was exhibited in 1940, at the MOMA exhibited "Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect". Photograph of model is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright / Sixty Years of Living Architecture" (Zurich), 1952, page 60. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.54.0813
1953 
7) #106: New Theater Model for Hartford, Conn., Project, 1949. The design for this theater was first conceived for the New Theatre for Woodstock, New York (1931 Project). In 1938 Wright designed the Pfeiffer Chapel (S.251) at the Florida Southern College and utilized the original Woodstock floor plan. In 1949 the New Theater was revived again in Hartford, Connecticut. The model was first shown at a special exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum from January 26 - February 27, 1949. Photograph of model is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright / Sixty Years of Living Architecture" (Zurich), 1952, page 72. The concept for the "New Theatre for Woodstock" was finally executed in Dallas and the Dallas Theater Center opened with registration and classes on September 9, 1959 and its first production on December 27, 1959. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.55.0813
1953 
8) Photograph of three males, possibly Wright apprentices, but unable to verify at this time. Contacted Roy Arnold, he was not at the show, and did not recognize the three. Most likely just three friends who visited the show. Faded 4.5 x3.25 sepia tone photograph. 0987.56.0813
1953
Guggenheim Museum Drawing 1953. Photograph of Wright’s architectural rendering of the Guggenheim. Text written along the bottom of the drawing: "The Modern Gallery. Museum for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Holden and McLaughlin Associates." (Inside Square) "FLLW Aug 15 /47 or 51?" Caption pasted on verso: "The striking design of the Solomon R. Guggenheim museum reflects ‘one great space on a continuous floor’ and gets away from the ‘box’ building design disliked by Wright. The museum’s floor is a continuous spiral to the top." Stamped Dec 27, 1953. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 0987.35.1110
1953
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1953. View of the main entrance from across the pool. Label on verso: "One of Japan’s most famous hotels, the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, is scheduled to be reopened for civilian use in the near future. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, it is regarded as one of the most beautifully landscaped hotels in the world. From: American President Lines, San Francisco, California." Stamped on verso: "May 29, 1953". "Palmer Pictures, San Francisco, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.43.0612
1953
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Great Workroom" 1953. Caption on verso: "Pillars arranged in a unique pattern developed by Wright provide open areas in the Johnson Wax Co.’s administration offices at Racine, Wis. Wright cites this building as proof that an architect can obtain spaciousness in a building without making it appear awkward." Stamped on verso: "Dec 27, 1953. International Newsreel Photo, 235 East 65th Street, New York 17, N.Y." Original silver gelatin 9 x 7 photo. 0987.32.0510
C 1953
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1953. Viewed from the West. According to SC Johnson, the globe in the foreground was installed in 1952. Johnathan Lipman dates it to 1954, "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building," 1986, page 130. The Research Tower and complex is on the left. The opening Ceremony for the Research Tower was November 17, 1950. The Great Workroom is on the right. Stamped on verso: "S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Photographic Department, No. 10982-6." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.68.1114
C 1953
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1953. Viewed from the Southeast. The Research Tower complex is in the foreground, the Tower is in the background, the porte cochere is on the left. Photographed before the addition of the second and third floors over the east wing of the Research Tower complex, added in 1961. The car to the far right is a 1952 Ford Crestline Victoria. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.69.1114
1953
Taliesin, Spring Green, Blue Loggia Room. This room is the space between the living room on one end of the house and Wright’s private quarters on the other.  Wright was known for continually changing Taliesin.  In 1953 he acquired steel tresses and extended the loggia balcony forward several feet.  On the right is a pair of art glass doors and an iridescent wall scone (on shelf above), and in the hallway to the left is a mounted wall scone from the William R. Heath House, Buffalo (1905).  For a 1952 view of the room see “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 80.  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photograph. 0987.09.0207
1953
Wright at 86. 1953. Portrait of Wright seated behind his drafting table at Taliesin, dressed in a white suit facing to the right. Has a small leaf pinned to his lapel. Photographed on June 8, 1953 by James Roy Miller shortly before his birthday party. Published in "Truth Against The World", Meehan, 1987, page 230. Courtesy of the Ryerson & Burnham Archives, The Art Institute of Chicago. 8 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 0987.30.0509
1953
Wright at 86, June 8, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright  celebrates his 86th birthday at Taliesin Spring Green, photographed during the presentation of box projects. Wright is seated, dressed in a white suit and white shoes, facing to the left. He has a small leaf pinned to his lapel, and a gold chain hanging from his breast pocket. He points a pencil as he critiques the work of one of his apprentices, possibly the work of Nancy D'Astous, seated on the floor in the foreground. She and her husband David were apprentices in the 1950s. Both were from Canada. Wright appears to be seated in a chair similar to one he designed for Herman T. Mossberg. The carpet design has a variation of the Japanese Chrysanthemum crest within an octagon. Photographed by David Mann, photographer for the Sun Times. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.78.0215
1953
Wright at 86, June 8, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright celebrates his 86th birthday at Taliesin Spring Green, photographed during the presentation of box projects. Wright is seated, dressed in a white suit facing to the left. He has a small leaf pinned to his lapel, and a gold chain hanging from his breast pocket. He points a pencil as he critiques the work of one of his apprentices. Little girl to Wright’s left bits her finger nail. Publicity photograph made for an exhibition at the Kelmscott Gallery, Chicago, held in early 1980s. This is from an original silver gelatin photograph, with Wright's signature on the image lower left hand corner of the print. Photographed by David Mann, photographer for the Sun Times. Acquired from Kelmscott Gallery. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0798.07.1206
1953
Wright at 86, June 8, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright celebrates his 86th birthday at Taliesin Spring Green, photographed during the presentation of box projects. Wright is seated, dressed in a white suit and white shoes, facing to the right. He has a small leaf pinned to his lapel, a cap on his lap, and a gold chain hanging from his breast pocket. He has a pencil in his right hand as he critiques the work of one of his apprentices, possibly the work of Nancy D'Astous, seated on the floor to his right. She and her husband David were apprentices in the 1950s. Both were from Canada. The young girl to his left is Celeste Davison (leg brace), daughter of Kay and Davy Davison. Wright appears to be seated in a chair similar to one he designed for Herman T. Mossberg. The carpet design has a variation of the Japanese Chrysanthemum crest within an octagon. Photographed by David Mann, photographer for the Sun Times. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.79.0215
1953
Wright at 86, June 8, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright celebrates his 86th birthday at Taliesin Spring Green, photographed during the presentation of box projects. Wright is seated, dressed in a white suit, facing to the left. He has a small leaf pinned to his lapel, a cap on his lap, and a gold chain hanging from his breast pocket. He has a pencil in his right hand as he critiques the work of one of his apprentices. Wright appears to be seated in a chair similar to one he designed for Herman T. Mossberg. Possibly photographed by Marya Lilien. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.80.0215
1953
Wright at 86 (Circa 1953). Frank Lloyd Wright on the street in New York City. Facing toward the right, looking at the camera. Wearing a porkpie hat and suit. Overcoat is draped over his right arm, he is holding his cane in his right hand. His glasses are in his breast pocket. Photograph by Halley Erskine. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York", Hession; Pickrel, 2007, p.123. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.66.0714
1953
A conversation with Frank Lloyd Wright and Hugh Downs 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright photographed during the filming of the program, "Conversations with Elder Wise Men -- A Visit with Frank Lloyd Wright" Episode 105, filmed on May 8, 1953, Chicago. The host for the program was Hugh Downs. Downs is on the left, Wright is on the right, sitting on a chair, facing to the left of the camera, a book is setting on his lap. Clipping on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Gives His Views. Rugged Individualist Frank Lloyd Wright (right), famed stormy petrel of architecture, is shown being interviewed by Hugh Downs for Chapter of NBC’s "Great Thinker’ series. Scene is being filmed at Kling Studios in Chicago." Stamped on clipping: "Nov 23 1952(sic)." 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.72.0115
1953
Wright at 86, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright photographed during the filming of the program, "Conversations with Elder Wise Men -- A Visit with Frank Lloyd Wright" Episode 105, filmed on May 8, 1953, Chicago. The host for the program was Hugh Downs. Clipping on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, brilliant American architect, will be presented in a conversation with Hugh Downs of NBC’s Chicago staff, Sunday, May 17, at 2:30 p.m. CT over WNBQ - Channel 5 and NBC. This will be the fifth in a series of filmed conversations with distinguished figures of this age." Stamped on clipping: "May 20 1953." Note: Interesting to note the chair Wright brought to the interview. It appears to be a side chair designed in 1939 for the Lloyd Lewis Residence (S.265). This placed Wright much higher than Downs, forcing him to continually look up at Wright during the interview. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.75.0115
1953
A conversation with Frank Lloyd Wright and Hugh Downs 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright photographed during the filming of the program, "Conversations with Elder Wise Men -- A Visit with Frank Lloyd Wright" Episode 105, filmed on May 8, 1953, Chicago. The host for the program was Hugh Downs. Wright is sitting on a chair, facing to the left of the camera, a book is setting on his lap. Caption pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, brilliant American architect, will be presented in a conversation with Hugh Downs of NBC’s Chicago staff, Sunday, May 17, at 2:30 p.m. CT over WNBQ - Channel 5 and NBC. This will be the fifth in a series of filmed conversations with distinguished figures of this age." 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 0987.71.0115
1953
Wright at 86 (Circa 1953). Frank Lloyd Wright facing right. Clipping pasted on verso, (Stamped Oct 17 1957): "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright... will join five businessmen in the forum at 2 p.m. Oct. 30, in the Museum of Science and Industry. ‘Today, Chicago is launching a billion-dollar rebuilding program,’ said Edward L. Logelin, chairman of the Chicago Dynamic Committee. ‘Each of us is affected by the way our cities build, so it is vital that forums such as ours bring together the men who know, to give us direction,’ he said." Includes photograph. Second clipping of photo only stamped Nov 8, 1957. Third clipping pasted on verso, (Stamped Apr 11 1959): "The word nonconformist might have been invented to describe Frank Lloyd Wright. Both in his profession and in his personal life he defied convention at every turn. He had no doubt that he was the world’s greatest architect, and once said so in court. Twitted about his conceit, he retorted, ‘Well, I was under oath, wasn’t I?’ Not everyone agreed with Wright’s estimate of himself. From first to last he carried on a running battle with his fellow architects. In the cases where his competitors finally came reluctantly..." Published in 1953 on the back cover of "The Future of Architecture". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 8 x 10 B&W print and 4x5 B&W negative. 0987.34.1010 0987.44.0413
1953
Wright at 86 (Circa 1953). Mr. Wright facing right. Produced in 1960 as a promotion. "Frank Lloyd Wright: Writings and Buildings, the first compilation containing the full range of Wright’s thinking, will be published simultaneously on June 15 by Meridian Books as a paperback and Horizon Press in hard covers. Along with 150 photographs and drawings, editors Edgar Kaufmann and Ben Raeburn have included the first complete list of 500 Wright-executed structures keyed to a map of America." Published on the back cover of "The Future of Architecture", Wright, 1953. Also published in "Sixty Years of Living Architecture. The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright", Wright, 1954, inside front cover; "An American Architecture", Wright, 1955, Back cover and page 2; "Frank Lloyd Wright Selects the Taliesin Palette in Martin-Senour Paints", Martin-Senour Company, 1955, Cover (image flopped horizontally). Original B&W photograph. 5 x 7.2. 0987.31.1209
1953
Wright at 86. 1953. Portrait of Wright seated behind his drafting table at Taliesin. Photographed by Guerrero. Caption: "Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright in his private study at Taliesin". Published in "Picturing Wright", Guerrero, 1994, pages 62-63. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8.8 B&W Print. 0987.33.0910
1953 (C)
Wright at 86, 1953. A) 1957 (90);  B) 1951 (84);  C) 1953 (86);  D) 1954 (87).
A) Top Left: Wright at 90. 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright inspects construction of the Guggenheim in 1957. Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. Wright visited the site many times. Wright pasted away April 9, 1959, six months before the grand opening. Grand opening October 21, 1959. Published in "The Guggenheim", 2009, p 1, and a similar image taken at the same time, "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York", Hession, Pickrel, 2007, p 104. Photographed by John Engstead. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
B) Top Right: Wright at 84, 1951. Wright in drafting room, Taliesin West in 1951. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Similar image in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West", Stoller, 1999, p 8. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
C) Bottom Left: Wright at 88, 1955. Frank Lloyd Wright at drafting table with a large image of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop (S.310 - 1948) in the background. Photographed by John Engstead. Published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Decorative Designs Collection", 1990. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
D) Bottom Right: Wright at 87, 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, facing right, looking to the left. Photographed by Al Ravenna. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
Montage of four portraits of Frank Lloyd Wright. Stamped on verso: "Nov 9 1998". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Two copies.
0857.06.0911 0857.07.0911
C 1953
Wright at 86, circa 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright is seated, dressed in a white suit and blue tie, facing to the right. He has a gold chain hanging around his neck, hooked to his breast pocket. Published on the cover of the Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Spring 2000. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright talks with apprentices at Taliesin West in the 1950s. Photo courtesy Aaron G. Green." The white suite seems to match the suit he wore to his daughter Iovanna’s wedding to Arthur Pieper at the Holy Trinity Cathedral, in Chicago on June 18, 1954. Original 8 x 10 color photograph. 0987.81.0215
1953 
David Wright Residence (1950 - S.322) 1953. Viewed from the Southwest. Photographed for the June issue of House & Home 1953 by Pedro E. Guerrero. Label pasted to verso: "By-line Feature. Supplied by International News Photos, New York. For Release December 27, 1953. The Titan of Architects. Wright (F) – "Son’s house, designed by Mr. Wright for David Wright at Phoenix, Ariz., uses some of the sweeping lines and ‘openness’ which the architect believes takes greatest advantage to add to ‘living freedom’ with modern materials. (International New Photos.)" Stamped on verso: "International New Photos." Original 9.25 x 7 B&W photograph. 0987.48.0813
1953
David Wright House (1950) 1953.  The David Wright house was constructed in 1950.  Wright called the design “How to live in the Southwest”.  These were photographed for the June issue of House & Home 1953. Set of eight 4 x 5 proofs.  Similar views in “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 128-131. Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero.  1) Exterior, beginning of the ramp. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.10.0207
1953
2) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Exterior, mid view of the ramp. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.11.0207
1953
3) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Exterior, view from the top of the ramp. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.12.0207
1953 
4) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Interior, view to the left of the fireplace. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.13.0207
1953
5) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Interior, view of the fireplace. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof.  Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright” Treiber 1995, Page 109:  Similar views in “Picturing Wright” Guerrero 1994, Page 130. 0987.14.0207
1953
6) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Interior, view of the right side of the fireplace. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.15.0207
1953
7) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Interior, view from the fireplace to the right. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.17.0207
1953
8) David Wright House 1953.  Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero. Interior view of the Master Bedroom from the fireplace which is on the left. Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph proof. 0987.16.0207
1953
David Wright Residence 1853. (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the Southeast. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. The circular ramp rises to the upper main level. The cantilevered master bedroom is seen on the upper left. Camelback Mountain can be seen in the background on the far right. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest". These were photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero for the June issue of House & Home 1953. Guerrero wrote, "This is the essence of the house. We don’t need any others," Mr. Wright told me. House and Home thought otherwise." Published in "Picturing Wright" Guerrero 1994, P.131. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.76.0215
1953
David Wright Residence 1853. (1950 - S.322). View of the Living Room. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. The Dining area is to the far left. The Entrance to the home, at the top of the ramp, is to the right of the circular fireplace, behind the built-in seating. Door to ceiling glass doors on the far right, lead to a balcony over looking the courtyard. Wright designed furniture is seen in the foreground on the far right. The David Wright house was constructed in 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest". Photographed by Pedro E. Guerrero for the June issue of House & Home 1953. Guerrero wrote, "The exterior curves of David’s Wright house are mirrored inside in features such as the living room fireplace and the furnishings," p.130. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright" Treiber 1995, Page 109: Similar views in "Picturing Wright" Guerrero 1994, Page 130. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.77.0215
1954
1954
Jorgine Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361). Copy print of page 212 in "The Natural House", Wright, 1954. Caption pasted on verso, "The desert house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso, "Free Press, Feb 16 1955, Photo". Original 10 x 8 B&W Print.  For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 1092.39.0211
1954
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House Living Room Fireplace (1917 - S.208) 1954. In 1926, Aline Barnsall donated Hollyhock House to the City of Los Angeles, with a lease going to the California Art Club. By 1942, the city had condemned the house and ordered it to be vacated, due to structural damage. The home was left in shambles. A minor restoration project was undertaken in 1945. In 1954 Frank Lloyd Wright designed a Master Plan for Barnsdall Park which included a museum which remained a unbuilt. (Monograph 8, p.146-7). Also in 1954, Barnsdall Park was the one of the stops for Wright’s traveling exhibition "Sixty Years of Living Architecture." The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Photographed on May 27, 1954, days before the exhibition opened. Note the pond in front of the fireplace which has been filled in. Female is seated on a Frank Lloyd Wright designed living room chair. Stamped on verso: "Mirrorfoto by Bob Martin, Staff Photographer. May 27, 1954." (Two copies) 11 x 14 1045.40.0916 1045.41.0916
Circa 1954
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings and Water Dome. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B), Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C); Edgar Wall Water Dome (1938, 1948 - S.255A) Circa 1954. Viewed from the Northeast. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings, joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. The Water Dome, a 160 foot in diameter circular pool, was first filled in early 1948. The Water Dome is in the foreground. The Benjamin Fine Administration Building is on the water’s edge, the Emile E. Watson Administration Building is in the background on the right. Bernard Elmo Fulghum (1898-1972) was the contractor. Plant life can be seen growing in the pond. Published in the 1955 "Interlachen", Florida Southern College's yearbook, p. 2. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1045.21.0113
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Wright stands next to Price Tower model. Construction of the Exhibition nears completion. Photographed from the ground looking up at the model of the Price Tower and Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright is wearing a grey suit, tie and pork-pie hat. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Important set of five photographs, photographed by Gene Barnes. Courtesy of Gene Barnes and his daughter Christina Barnes. 5 x 7 B&W photograph. 1045.28.0115
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Wright stands next to illustration of Price Tower. Construction of the Exhibition nears completion. Wright is wearing a grey suit, tie and pork-pie hat. Displayed to his left is an illustration of the Price Tower. To his right is a photograph of the Robie House. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Important set of five photographs, photographed by Gene Barnes. Courtesy of Gene Barnes and his daughter Christina Barnes. 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 1045.29.0115
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Wright adds the finishing touches to the Ralph Jester illustration. Construction of the Exhibition nears completion. Wright is wearing a grey suit, tie and pork-pie hat. Behind Wright to the left is a photograph of the Imperial Hotel. To his right is the model of the Ralph Jester Residence. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Important set of five photographs, photographed by Gene Barnes. Courtesy of Gene Barnes and his daughter Christina Barnes. 5 x 7 B&W photograph. 1045.30.0115
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Wright studies the Ralph Jester Residence Model. Construction of the Exhibition nears completion. Wright is wearing a grey suit, tie and pork-pie hat. Wright is looking down at the model of the Ralph Jester Residence. Behind him to the left is an illustration of the Gordon Strong Automobile Objective and Planetarium. To his right is the Elizabeth Noble Apartment House, Los Angeles, CA. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Important set of five photographs, photographed by Gene Barnes. Courtesy of Gene Barnes and his daughter Christina Barnes. 6 x 5 B&W photograph. 1045.31.0115
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Wright jesters with a pencil with his left hand. Construction of the Exhibition nears completion. Wright is wearing a grey suit, tie and pork-pie hat. Behind him is a photograph of the Avery Coonley Playhouse. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park on June 1, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Important set of five photographs, photographed by Gene Barnes. Courtesy of Gene Barnes and his daughter Christina Barnes. 5 x 7 B&W photograph. 1045.32.0115
1954
Wright at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). View of the pavilion during the Grand opening June 1, 1954. In the foreground on the left is a model of the Ralph Jester Residence. The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Photographed by Los Angeles photographer Paegel. Courtesy of the University of Southern California Libraries. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1045.33.0115
1954
Wright and Anne Baxter at the Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Frank Lloyd Wright points to a photograph of La Miniatura (1923 - S.214). He and Baxter are facing to the left of the camera. Wright has a cane over his right arm and he is holding his hat. Baxter, Wright’s granddaughter is standing to the right. To their right is a photograph of the interior of the Larkin Building (1903 - S.093). The premiere of the exhibit in Los Angeles was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Center at Barnsdall Park. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. The entrance to the pavilion was through the Hollyhock House. (Wright, 1943-1959, p.346). Photographed by Los Angeles photographer Paegel. Courtesy of the University of Southern California Libraries. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1045.34.0115
1954
Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427). Set of 41 B&W and color photographs by Loch Crane, Wright apprentice from 1941-42. Note: this is one of the most extensive set of images for the Los Angeles exhibition we have seen to date. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright" was a traveling exhibition of Wright's work, consisting of models, photographs and original drawings. A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia (January 1951). The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy (June 1951). In "Sixty Years" (New York)...  Continue...
1045.42.1116 (1-41)
1954
Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence 1954 (1949 - S.314). Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at the University of Minnesota, October 5, 1954, then visits the Neils Residence. Label pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, center... house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Neils (Niles) of 2801 Burnham Blvd. He’s chairman of the board and treasurer, Flour City Ornamental Iron Company. Date: 5 October 54. Time 10:30-10:45. About: Frank Lloyd Wright in town for lecture at University of Minnesota." Stamped on verso: "Oct 7 1954." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1045.26.1114
1954
Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence 1954 (1949 - S.314). Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at the University of Minnesota, October 5, 1954, then visits the Neils Residence. Label pasted to verso: "Made by: Ted. Date: 5 October 54. Time: 1030-1045. Ordered by: pafiolis. Where Made: 2801 Burnham Blvd. What is it About? Frank Lloyd Wright in town for lecture at University of Minnesota. Names: Frank Lloyd Wright - stands in front of one of 3,500 fireplaces he’s designed into 670 projects." Stamped on label: "Oct 6-1954." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1045.39.0416
C 1954
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1954 (1932- - S.228). The Southeast corner of the assembly hall, viewed from the Northeast. The assembly hall became the Living room. When FL Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. In the Spring of 1952, a fire devastated the Theater on the west end of the facility and the two story section in the center of the complex. Wright took the opportunity to make changes. He completely changed the Theatre that was destroyed, retaining the masonry walls, but lowering the height of the roof. He lowered the center section, lowering to a single story. He also extended the lower level of the assembly hall to the south (seen to the left in this photograph. Judging from the landscape, this photograph appears to have been taken around 1954. (Note: the original photograph was flopped horizontally, we have corrected it.) Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 1045.35.0215
C 1954
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1954 (1932- - S.228). Example of stonework at the Taliesin Fellowship Complex. When FL Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the building. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. In the Spring of 1952, a fire devastated the Theater on the west end of the facility and the two story section in the center of the complex. Wright took the opportunity to make changes. He completely changed the Theatre that was destroyed, retaining the masonry walls, but lowering the height of the roof. He lowered the center section, lowering to a single story. He also extended the lower level of the assembly hall to the south. This photograph was taken on the North side of the complex, looking North. In the center of the image is the Romeo and Juliet Windmill, located halfway between the Fellowship Complex on the South and Taliesin on the North. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1045.36.0215
1954
Frank Lloyd Wright at 87. Head and shoulders portrait, facing left. Photographed in 1954 by Al Ravenna photographer. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 4.5 x 6 Print. High-res digital image. 0998.02.0706
1954 (D)
Wright at 87, 1954. A) 1957 (90);  B) 1951 (84);  C) 1953 (86);  D) 1954 (87).
A) Top Left: Wright at 90. 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright inspects construction of the Guggenheim in 1957. Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. Wright visited the site many times. Wright pasted away April 9, 1959, six months before the grand opening. Grand opening October 21, 1959. Published in "The Guggenheim", 2009, p 1, and a similar image taken at the same time, "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York", Hession, Pickrel, 2007, p 104. Photographed by John Engstead. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
B) Top Right: Wright at 84, 1951. Wright in drafting room, Taliesin West in 1951. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Similar image in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West", Stoller, 1999, p 8. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
C) Bottom Left: Wright at 86, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright at drafting table with a large image of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop (S.310 - 1948) in the background. Photographed by John Engstead. Published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Decorative Designs Collection", 1990. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
D) Bottom Right: Wright at 87, 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, facing right, looking to the left. Photographed by Al Ravenna. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
Montage of four portraits of Frank Lloyd Wright. Stamped on verso: "Nov 9 1998". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Two copies.
0857.06.0911 0857.07.0911
1954
Wright at 87. 1954. Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at Northwestern University. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 5/17/54. Photographer: Mann. Title: Frank Lloyd Wright speaks at N.U. Desc: L.to R.: Mrs. George Haight, Pres. of the University Guild, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mr. Arthur Bohnen, Art chairman." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10x8 B&W print. 1045.12.0310
1954
Iovanna Lloyd Wright Wedding. Iovanna Lloyd Wright married apprentice Waring Howe, March 20, 1945. She married apprentice Arthur Pieper (1952 - S.349), June 18, 1954, her second marriage. Clipping on verso: "The famed architects and Mrs. Wright attend their daughter’s wedding. Bridegroom, son of the Chester Piepers of St. Louis, studied under Wright." Second clipping on verso: "Eric Lloyd Wright, best man, and Heloise Schweizer, maid of honor, place crowns on newlyweds at climax of traditional ceremony preformed by the Rev. Emilian Solanka. Couple will honeymoon in Turkey. (Sun-Times Photo by Howard Lyon)." Stamped on clippings, "Jun 19, 1954". Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-times. Date: 6/18/54. Photographer: Lyon. Names L. to R.: Rev. Emilian Solanka; Mr. And Mrs. Arthur Pieper; Eric Lloyd Wright, Best Man; Heloise Schweizer, Maid of Honor." Original 8 x 10 B&W photo. 1045.18.1212
1954
Iovanna Lloyd Wright Wedding. Iovanna Lloyd Wright married apprentice Waring Howe, March 20, 1945. She married apprentice Arthur Pieper (1952 - S.349), June 18, 1954, her second marriage. Clipping on verso: "Iovanna Wright. Mr. And Mrs. Arthur Pieper leave Holy Trinity Russian Cathedral after wedding. She is the former Iovanna Wright, daughter of the Frank Lloyd Wrights." Stamped on verso, "Jun 19, 1954". Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-times. Date: 6/18/54. Photographer: Lyon. Names L. to R.: Mr. And Mrs. Arthur Pieper; she was Iovanna Wright." Original 8 x 10 B&W photo. 1045.19.1212
1954
Iovanna Lloyd Wright Wedding. Iovanna Lloyd Wright married apprentice Waring Howe, March 20, 1945. She married apprentice Arthur Pieper (1952 - S.349), June 18, 1954, her second marriage. Clipping on verso: "Mr. And Mrs. Arthur Pieper leave Holy Trinity Russian Cathedral Friday on way to reception at the home of Mrs. Lloyd Lewis (1939 - S.265) in Libertyville. With the newlywed couple are Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wrights, parents of the bride, the former Iovanna Wright." Stamped on clipping, "Jun 19, 1954". Original 8 x 10 B&W photo. 1045.20.1212
1954
Wright at 87. 1954. Wright attends the wedding of his daughter Iovanna, to Arthur Pieper (1953 - S.349) at the Holy Trinity Cathedral, 1121 Leavitt Street in Chicago on June 18, 1954. Iovanna's second marriage. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 6/18/54. Photographer: Lyon. Title: Social Wedding. 1121 Leavitt. Mr and Mrs Frank Lloyd Wright." Holy Trinity Cathedral was designed by Louis Sullivan and constructed in 1903, ten years after Wright left Sullivan’s office. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 1045.11.0310
1954
Wright at 87. Portrait of Wright in 1954, leaning against a doorway, holding hat, other hand in pocket. Photographed by Berenice Abbott, 50 Commerce Street, New York 14, N.Y. Stamped July 13, 1954 on verso. 4.5 x 5.75 Print. High res digital image. 1045.10.0509
1954
Wright at 87. 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954, leaning against a doorway, holding his hat in his left hand, his right hand thumb inserted in his suit pocket. Photographed by Berenice Abbott. Photographed in July, 1954. Original 11 x 14 photograph. 1045.17.0912
1954
Wright at 87. 1954. Frank Lloyd Wright being presented an award by Gordon Fox. "Frank Lloyd Wright, dean of modern American architects, was awarded the "Son of Wisconsin" medallion by the Wisconsin Society of Chicago at a dinner Tuesday night. E. Gordon Fox, president of the University Wisconsin Alumni Association, presented the medallion, which was mounted on a plaque shaped in the form of the state of Wisconsin. Medallion on plaque reads: "Wisconsin Society of Chicago. Son of Wisconsin Medallion. 1954." Plaque reads: "Awarded to Frank Lloyd Wright, October 26, 1954, For International Fame, In The Field of Architecture." Typed on 4x5 negative sleeve: "Wright – Fran k Lloyd. 10-27-54. Being presented an award by Fox – Gordon for his work in architecture." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative, one 46 x 34" High Res Digital image, one 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1045.37.0915
1954 
Wright at 87.  11/11/54 Associated Press.  Caption on back: "Feuding with Wisconsin. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, shown in a New York Hotel, Nov 11, said he is leaving his native Wisconsin because state authorities place "Money before merit". Wright cited a state supreme court ruling that his studio home architectural school, Taliesin, is not an educational institution in the meaning of Wisconsin state law and so is subject to taxation."  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photo. 1045.14.1202
1954
Wright at 87. 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, face turned slightly to the right, looking straight into the camera. Typed on verso: "Wright, Frank Lloyd 11-13-54". Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 4.6 x 6.25 B&W print. 1045.15.1110
1954
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1953. Viewed from Northeast, the exterior of Unity Temple’s main sanctuary. Lake Street is in the foreground, North Kenilworth Avenue is on the right. Reader board reads: "Unitarian Universalist Church. September 13, Welcome. Robert M. Rice, Minister." Clipping on Verso: "Poured concrete walls of Unity Universalist church at 845 Lake St. in Oak Park are only one of many unique features incorporated in the structure by its designer, Frank Lloyd Wright. The 50 years old church acts as a magnet for architectural students, said Dr. Leslie W. Beebe, Oak Park physician and surgeon and chairman of the church house committee." Stamped on clipping: "Sep 6 1953". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 0987.42.0212
  The Price Tower was based on the 1925 Saint Marks Tower project. Designed in 1952 for Harold C. Price, Sr., Construction began on November 10, 1953 and was completed on February 9, 1956. Nineteen floors, 37,000 square feet. This set of nine photographs that were displayed in the Price Tower and were produced for the Landmark Preservation Council.  
1954
1) Price Tower Construction 1954. “First form work begins around a dense thicket of steel rods and mesh.” Published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 44.  Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16 x 16. 1045.06.0707
1954
2) Price Tower Construction 1954. Construction detail of worker building scaffold.  Note the fold up ruler in his left hand.  Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16.75 x 16. 1045.07.0707
1954
3) Price Tower Construction 1954. “Interlace of floor levels can be seen in this view from the west. An office quadrant is at the left in this photo, and the small projecting sections will house laboratories and closets serving the offices. At the right is the building quadrant occupied by duplex apartments. The lower floor of each duplex apartment is the main living floor.  The upper apartment floor is the bedroom mezzanine, seen in this photo as the alternate parapets slanting backward. Each of the apartment floors corresponds to one office floor.  Glass will sheath the building, extending from one main floor level to the next. The bedroom mezzanine extends through the glazing as an outdoor balcony.” Similar photograph published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 77. Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 18 x 16. 1045.08.0707
1954
4) Price Tower Construction 1954. “The season has turned and snow lies on the ground as the seventeenth floor of the tower is poured.” Published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 81. Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16.75 x 16. 1045.09.0707
1955
5) Price Tower Construction 1955. Concrete work is virtually finished. View from the northwest. “...Tower now stands in iridescent splendor gracing the flat horizon of the Oklahoma prairie.” Similar photograph published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 90-92. Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16 x 20. 1092.17.0707
1956
6) Price Tower Living Room 1956. Most of the furniture and shelving is built in and designed by Wright, including the fabric.  “...Note the copper fireplace hood and gas-fired fireplace unit - an appropriate note in a region where so much of life is based on oil and the natural gas found with it. Similar photograph published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 127. Photograph by Joe D. Price.  Original silver gelatin photograph. 16 x 20. 1095.01.0707
1956
7) Price Tower Dining Room 1956. Most of the furniture and shelving is built in and designed by Wright, including the fabric and dining room chairs. Similar photograph published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 127. Photograph by Joe D. Price.  Original silver gelatin photograph. 16 x 20. 1095.02.0707
1956
8) Price Tower at Night 1956. Night time view from the southwest shows dramatic sweep of the sparkling tower against the encircling Oklahoma prairie. Illuminated television spire can be seen at top at night.  Similar day time photograph published in “The Story of the Tower”, Wright 1956, page 116-117. Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16 x 20. 1095.03.0707
1956
9) Price Tower Dedication Ceremony February 10, 1956, followed by three days of free tours for the public. Shown left to right, Harold C. Price, Jr., Harold C. Price, Sr. and Wright. Photograph by Joe D. Price. Original silver gelatin photograph. 16.5 x 16. 1095.04.0707
1954
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity House (1952). Set of 17 photographs of original 1954 drawings of the House Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity, University of Florida, Gainesville. Frank Lloyd Wright’s design of the Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity House is similar to a design for Wright’s second design for a Fraternity house, the Walter L. Fisher Memorial Chapter House, Chi of Sigma Chi, 1941. Wright’s first project for a fraternity house was in 1924, for the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, University of Wisconsin. The Zeta Beta was commissioned in 1952, and progressed to the working drawings which Wright dated January 20, 1954. Wright placed the building diagonally at a 32 degree angle on a trapezium shaped lot, placing the entrance toward the back of the lot. The ground floor included a large circular terrace which included a...  Continue...
1045.38.0915 1-17
1955
1955
Raymond W. Evans Residence (1908 - S.140), 1955. Originally surfaced in stucco, it was resurfaced in stone. Based on Wright’s "Fireproof House for $5,000", published in Ladies Home Journal, April 1907, but extended out on both sides. Clipping pasted to verso: "Modern home, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, built in 1908!" Stamped on verso: "1955 Jul 15". Original 10.75 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.42.0811
Circa 1955
Florida Southern College, Polk County Science Building, Lakeland, Florida Circa 1955 (1953 - S.256). Three quarter view of alternative scheme. Pitched roof replaced with flat roofs. Addition of a circular room on the first floor adjacent to the Planetarium. Walls of the Planetarium were also rounded on the first floor. Wright called it the Cosmography Building. The Polk County Science Building was the last Wright designed structure built on the Florida Southern College campus and was completed on March 11, 1958. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.55.0113
1955
Florida Southern College, Polk County Science Building, Lakeland, Florida 1955 (1953 - S.256). Wright inspects the Polk County Science Building November 4, 1955. Exterior view, facing to the right, pointing with his cane that is in his right hand. The Polk County Science Building was the last Wright designed structure built on the Florida Southern College campus and was completed on March 11, 1958. Original 5 x 7 silver gelatin B&W photograph. 1092.54.0506
1955
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida.  (1955) Wright visits construction site. Standing in front of scaffold.  Original silver gelatin photograph.  Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly, Summer 2001, page 15.  Also see page 12.  5x7. 0831.12.0806
1955
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida (Circa 1950's) Wright at construction site. He is signing a copy of "Florida Southern College, Lakeland: The Frank Lloyd Wright Campus", published by FSC in 1953, and includes a reprinted article about the campus from the September 1952 Architectural Forum. Wright’s first visit to the campus after the publication of the booklet was November 1955. Most likely the construction site for the Danforth Chapel which was completed in 1955. Original B&W 5x7 print. Acquired from the archives of the "News Bureau, Fla. So. College". 1092.40.0511
1955 
Florida Southern College, Danforth (Minor) Chapel, Lakeland, Florida 1955 (1954 - S.258). Exterior Viewed from the Southwest. The chapel is named after Dr. William H. Danforth. It is adjacent to the larger Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. Ground-breaking ceremonies were held in May 1954. It was the only building in which Frank Lloyd Wright used traditional leaded glass on campus. The chapel was dedicated on March 4, 1955. The 1955 "Interlachen" includes a photograph of the Chapel with Nils Schwizer, Wrights architectural representative on campus for the chapel (P. 257) and Dr. Danford (p. 259). Label on verso: "Exterior, The William H. Danforth Chapel, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Stamped on verso: "Photograph by Paul Wille." Wille was the college photographer for 29 years. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.56.0113
1955
Florida Southern College, Danforth (Minor) Chapel, Lakeland, Florida 1955 (1954 - S.258). Interior view looking Southwest. The chapel is named after Dr. William H. Danforth. It is adjacent to the larger Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. Ground-breaking ceremonies were held in May 1954. It was the only building in which Frank Lloyd Wright used traditional leaded glass on campus. Wright used bands of red, gold and frosted glass. The chapel was dedicated on March 4, 1955. The 1955 "Interlachen" includes a photograph of the Chapel with Nils Schwizer, Wright’s architectural representative on campus for the chapel (P. 257) and Dr. Danford (p. 259). Label on verso: "Interior, The William H. Danforth Chapel, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Stamped on verso: "Photograph by Paul Wille." Wille was the college photographer for 29 years. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.57.0113
1955
Wright designed Heritage-Henredon furniture (June 29, 1955). In 1955, Frank Lloyd Wright developed the "Taliesin Ensemble", a line of furnishings for those that did not live in one of his homes. Partnerships were formed with five companies: 1) Heritage-Henredon, a line of furniture designed by Wright. 2) Karastan, Rugs. 3) The Martin-Senour Company, the Taliesin Palette, 36 personally selected paint colors. 4) Minic, Accessories. 5) F. Schumacher & Co., Fabrics & Wallpaper designed by Wright. Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, internationally famous architect, has designed his first line of furniture for the general public, it was learned last week. Rumors to that effects were verified when Wright conferred with officials of Heritage-Henredon..." Stamped on verso: "1955 Jun 29". Stamped on face; "Fran Byne, Photography". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Image restored by Douglas M. Steiner. 1092.41.0811
1955 
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Wright designed Heritage-Henredon line of furniture in 1955. Dining and Living Room furniture includes (L to R): Moveable Bookshelf atop a chest of drawers shows versatility of Frank Lloyd Wright’s design; Dining room table with six side chairs; Expandable sofa (four pieces); Square cocktail table, original price $89.75 each. Just behind the left end of the sofa is a tall weed holder or vase. Of note is the Nakomis Sculpture, top left on the bookshelf. In 1924 Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Wright created models of the Nakoma and Nakomis sculptures which were photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green. In 1929-30, Charles L. Morgan created terra-cotta models of the Nakoma and Nakomis. Could this be a copy of one of the terra-cotta figures? (Left side of the room. See 1092.60 for right side.) 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.61.0314
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Wright designed Heritage-Henredon line of furniture in 1955. Living Room furniture includes: Expandable sofa (four pieces); Square cocktail table, original price $89.75 each (five pieces); Round cushioned revolving stool, original price $89 (single piece far right). Of note is the white Nakoma Sculpture to the right, atop the table. In 1924 Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design the Memorial Gateway to the Nakoma subdivision, which at the time was on the outskirts of Madison. Wright’s plans were well received by the Madison Realty Company. Wright created models of the Nakoma and Nakomis sculptures which were photographed on August 3, 1926 at Taliesin, Spring Green. In 1929-30, Charles L. Morgan created terra-cotta models of the Nakoma and Nakomis. Could this be a copy of one of the terra-cotta figures? Clipping pasted to verso: "Sofas, fabrics and occasional stock-on tables all are included in the new furniture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Backs of sofas are customary height, but seats are a little lower than most. Tables can be used singly, in pairs or stacked to make a lamp table, as are at end of sofa." Stamped on clipping: "Oct 18 1955." (Right side of the room. See 1092.61 for left side.)10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.60.0314
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Wright designed Heritage-Henredon line of Living Room furniture in 1955. Living Room furniture includes (L to R): Hexagonal hassock, original price $129 each (three pieces); Hexagonal accessory table, short, original price $$82.50 (two pieces); End tables, tall (two pieces, left and right of sofa); Sofa - Bumper end piece, original price $349 (two pieces); Hexagonal table with six triangle tables that can double as seats when equipped with small cushion (two cushions shown); Lounge chair, original price $237, (two shown). A tall weed holder or vase, sits atop the end table to the right of the sofa. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.62.0314
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Frank Lloyd Wright designed Heritage-Henredon line of furniture in 1955. Living Room furniture includes (L to R): Expandable sofa (two pieces); two Lounge Chairs, foreground: two Triangular seat-tables on either side of hexagonal coffee table. two triangular cushions, one triangular seat-table in window. Clipping pasted to verso: "Triangular seat-tables store under hexagonal coffee table, point up versatility of Frank Lloyd Wright’s new collection. (Heritage-Henredon)." Stamped on verso: "Oct 18 1955." Original 9 x 7.1 B&W photograph. 1092.68.0414
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Frank Lloyd Wright designed Heritage-Henredon line of furniture in 1955. Four-tiered shelf doubles as a dining room hutch and as a room divider. Shelves sit atop rectangular coffee table. Triangular seat-table is in the foreground. Bed frame can be seen in the background. Clipping pasted to verso: "Four-tiered deck atop rectangular coffee table makes an attractive room divider. Other side of deck has glass-enclosed shelves. (Heritage-Henredon)." Stamped on verso: "Oct 18 1955." Original 9 x 7.1 B&W photograph. 1092.69.0414
1955
Wright designed Heritage-Henredon furniture. Press Release photograph for promotion of the Heritage-Henredon line of Wright designed furniture. In 1955, Wright developed the "Taliesin Ensemble", a line of furnishings for those that did not live in one of his homes. Partnerships were formed with F. Schumacher & Co. to produce the Taliesin Line of fabrics and wall coverings designed by Wright. Martin-Senour developed the Taliesin Palette, 36 personally selected Martin-Senour Colors. Karastan manufactured rugs. Minic manufactured Accessories, and Heritage-Henredon developed a line of furniture designed by Wright. For more information and ads for each of the companies, see the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. Photographed by Wesley Bowman Studio, Chicago. Stamped on verso: "Jan 6 - 1956", "Wesley Bowman Studio, Chicago". Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore-Sun. 1147.46.0411
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Rectangle Dining Room Table and chairs. The edge of the dining room table repeats an engraved pattern. Chair fabric, table cloth and curtains are by Schumacher fabrics, part of the Frank Lloyd Wright designed "Taliesin Ensemble." Wright designed the Heritage-Henredon line of furniture in 1955. Clipping pasted to verso: "Chairs upholstered in green linen of Frank Lloyd Wright’s design complement lower-than-usual dining table in this grouping. (Heritage-Henredon)." Stamped on verso: "Oct 18 55." Typed on verso: "Furniture designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Original 9 x 7.1 B&W photograph. 1092.76.1014
1955
Heritage-Henredon Dining Room furniture 1955. Frank Lloyd Wright resting his arm on a piece of Heritage-Henredon dining room furniture. A cane is hanging on his left arm, a hat in his hand. His reflection is in a Heritage-Henredon mirror. Caption pasted to the verso: "Some people think it’s ‘Western,’ but that’s because of its natural matte finish on mahogany and carving at the edges. The carving is based on the Greek key design and that’s hardly ‘Western.’ Some critics think it harkens back to the dark age of furniture design, specifically, the first 25 years of this century. Again, that’s because some of the lines are so strong and so perfect in scale that they seem to some to be in poor taste. We’re not used to seeing velvet upholstery on modern furniture and Wright has used it on some occasional chairs. It reminds many people of the poorly designed velvet chair grandmother kept in her parlor, the one nobody dared use." Stamped on clipping: "Oct 18 1955." Stamped on verso: "Heritage Furniture Inc." 8 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1092.78.0115
1955
Heritage-Henredon furniture 1955. Wright seated at a Heritage-Henredon dining room table. Table and chair designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. This is actually two photographs glued together in 1955. Background image is a photograph of Schumacher wallpaper design No. 103. Image is published in "Schumacher’s Taliesin Line," page 3, bottom. Hidden behind the photograph of Wright is a side chair and end table from the Heritage-Henredon line of furniture designed by Wright in 1955. Hand written on verso, "17/11/55" (November 17, 1955). Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.70.0514
1955
Hoffman Auto Showroom 1955 (1954 - S.380). When the showroom opened in 1955, Hoffman displayed Porsches, BMWs and other cars. The showroom featured a revolving display on which three to four cars could be displayed. The ramp rose from the back and wrapped around the left side. The ramp allowed for additional displays as well as viewing cars from above. The Hoffman inspired Porsche emblem sits atop the circular planter. The circular emblem just to the right reads "Hoffman, Largest selling organization of fine European cars in the U.S.A." Photographed by Ezra Stoller. 10 x 8 B&W Photograph. 1092.59.0314
1955
Hoffman Auto Showroom 1955 (1954 - S.380). Hoffman began importing Jaguars in 1948, and selected Wright to design the interior of the showroom. It featured a revolving display on which three to four cars could be displayed. The ramp rose from the back and partially wrapped around the ramp. The ramp allowed for additional displays as well as viewing cars from above. In 1953, when Hoffman began importing Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar opened their own showroom. Although designed as a Jaguar Showroom, it was never used as such. When the showroom opened in 1955, Hoffman displayed Porsches, BMWs and other cars. The circular emblem which sits atop the circular planter, just to the left of the BMW logo reads, "Hoffman, Largest selling organization of fine European cars in the U.S.A." Mercedes Benz, who held the lease, vacated the space, and in March, 2013, the building owners covered the windows and demolished the Wright designed showroom. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. 10 x 8 B&W Photograph. 1092.74.1014
1955
Louis Sullivan Bungalow (1890 - S.005) Ocean Springs, MS, 1955. In 1890 Wright designed the Bungalow (S.005), Stable and Sevant’s Quarters (S.006). In 1955, Richard Nickel made a trip in search of Sullivan architecture. Part of that trip included Ocean Springs. Arriving exhausted from his extensive trip, he took only a few photographs and left for home. "The Sullivan and Charley cottages have been painted over and the stables have been demolished and all that remains of Sullivan’s proud rose garden is an elliptical scar of dead shoots,’ Nickels wrote. "The tall pines and the exotic plants, once controlled, now grow wild but the care once rendered this place is easily sensed." "They All Fall Down," Cahan, 1994, p.72. That same year, 1890, Wright designed a Bungalow (S.007), Guesthouse and Stable Cottage (S.008) for James Charnley. One year later Wright designed the Charnley Residence (1891 - S.009) in Chicago. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.73.0714
  Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  In 1954 the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled that Wright owed $10,000 in back taxes on Taliesin.  For years he had argued that Taliesin was primarily a school and therefore tax exempt. He was so mad he threatened to destroy Taliesin and move from the state. Cary Caraway, a former apprentice suggested that Wright’s friends express their appreciation and take up a collection. Mary Lescohier and Helen Groves made it happen. 380 supporters gathered in the Great Hall of the U.W. Memorial Union for a tribute. Wright took the opportunity to display the new Monona Terrace model. At the end of the program, he received a check for $10.000.  Set of eight 8x10 B&W photographs. Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Frank Lloyd Wright’s Monona Terrace, page 140.  
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Head table.  Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Seated at the head table (L to R) Wisconsin Governor Walter Kohler, Oligivanna Wright, Wright, William Evjue (friend, editor and published of the Capital Times), Ralph Walker (former president of the AIA) and Wright’s Daughter.  Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Monona Terrace”, page 140.  Original silver gelatin photo.  8x10. 1092.04.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Close-up of head table. Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Wisconsin Governor Walter Kohler, Oligivanna Wright and Wright (L to R).  Original silver gelatin photo.  8x10. 1092.05.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Wright looks over program before guests arrive.  Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Frank Lloyd Wright.  Model on right.  Published in “Monona Terrace: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Vision on the Lake”, page 6 & 16.  Published in The Master Architect: Conversations with Frank Lloyd Wright, Meehan, page 171.  Original silver gelatin photo.  8x10. 1092.06.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Wright talks with Ralph Walker about plans.  Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Ralph Walker (former president of the AIA) and Wright.  Original silver gelatin photo. 8x10. 1092.07.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  A lighter moment with Kohler and Evjue.  Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Wisconsin Governor Walter Kohler, Wright and William Evjue (friend, editor and published of the Capital Times) (L to R).  Original silver gelatin photo. 8x10. 1092.08.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  A moment with Mr. Evjue. Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  William Evjue and Wright first met in 1914. Evjue was a long time friend and supporter, as well as editor and published of the Capital Times, Madison.  Original silver gelatin photo. 8x10. 1092.09.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Photo op.  Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Photo op (L to R) Ralph Walker (former president of the AIA), Unknown, Unknown, Wright, William Evjue, Unknown.  Original silver gelatin photo. 8x10. 1092.10.0606
1955
Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet.  February 10, 1955.  Wright chats with Governor. Possibly shot by a Capital Times Staff Photographer.  Wright (L) chats with Wisconsin Governor Walter Kohler (R).  Other guest unknown.  Original silver gelatin photo. 8x10. 1092.11.0606
1955
Nakomis Sculpture, gilded concrete, 1955. During the early 1950s, when he was 21, Prince Giovanni Del Drago became an apprentice at Taliesin. His interests were architecture and the arts. As an apprentice, he reproduced the Nakoma and Nakomis sculptures. "I remember working on them in Arizona during the winter of 1955-1956 under Mr. Wright’s guidance, casting them in concrete and gilding them in the studio of a sculptor in Phoenix," he recalled. Photographed in 2013 at Taliesin, Spring Green, by Tom Waddell. This Nakomis Sculpture stands 44 inches tall. Acquired from and courtesy of Tom Waddell, Spring Green, Wisc. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 1092.66.0314
1955
Nakoma Sculpture, gilded concrete, 1955. During the early 1950s, when he was 21, Prince Giovanni Del Drago became an apprentice at Taliesin. His interests were architecture and the arts. As an apprentice, he reproduced the Nakoma and Nakomis sculptures. "I remember working on them in Arizona during the winter of 1955-1956 under Mr. Wright’s guidance, casting them in concrete and gilding them in the studio of a sculptor in Phoenix," he recalled. Photographed in 2013 at Taliesin, Spring Green, by Tom Waddell. This Nakoma Sculpture stands 36 inches tall. Acquired from and courtesy of Tom Waddell, Spring Green, Wisc. 8 x 10 Color photograph. See our Wright study on the Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures. 1092.67.0314
C 1955
Robie House, South Side by Richard Nickel (1906 - S.127) C1955-60. Possibly photographed in 1957 during talks of possible demolition. Stamped on Verso: Jun 1974, Field Enterprises, Inc. Clipping on verso stamped June 6 ‘86: "The Robie House, designed in 1909 by Frank Lloyd Wright, is one of the city’s most famous residential works. Illustrating the perfection of Wright’s Prairie Style, the house is located on a narrow city lot. The house, now a Registered National Landmark is featured on both Hyde Park Tours sponsored by the Chicago School of Architecture Foundation. The walking tour departs at 2 p.m. Sunday June 16, July 7 and 21, August 4 and 18, September 1 and 15 and October 6 and 20, from Rockefeller Chapel, 59th Street and Woodlawn Avenue. The bike tour leaves at 2 p.m. Sunday July 21, August 18 and October 20, from Harper Court, 52nd Street and Harper Avenue. Both tours cost $2. For more information, call the Glessner House at 326-1393. Published in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House", Hoffmann 1984, page 18. Original 10 x 8 silver gelatin photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1092.35.0310
1955
Schumacher/Heritage-Henredon Dining Room 1955. This is a copy of the photograph published in the "Schumacher’s Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpaper," Schumacher/Wright, 1955, as an example of "Design No. 705" fabric and wallpaper. A similar design was used in 2001 at the Nakoma Clubhouse, Cleo, CA. The furniture was produced by Heritage-Henredon, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The buffet cabinet in the background is a combination of three small chests, No. 2002 (L), 2003 and 2001 (R). The table appears to be possibly a prototype of the dining room tables to come. The legs are correct, with the bullnose outer edge and carved patterned design. The round table top has the bullnose edge, but no design. To date, we have seen rectangular table tops as well as other furniture with the decorative design, but the round table tops, No. 2000 and 2001, are trimmed with copper moulding. The chairs do not appear to be designed by Wright, and were possibly used due to the lack of samples at the time. There is a note in House Beautiful, November, 1955, p.282 which might shed some light in explaining the discrepancies. "Much of this merchandise was not available for photograph as this issue went to press..." (Thanks to Peter Kelley, MassModern for his insight.) 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See additional information about the Nakoma Clubhouse. 1092.93.0416
1955
Schumacher/Heritage-Henredon Dining Room 1955. This is a copy of the photograph published in House Beautiful, November, 1955, p.283. Drapes and wallpaper are "Design No. 705", "Schumacher’s Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpaper," Schumacher/Wright, 1955, fabric and wallpaper. A similar design was used in 2001 at the Nakoma Clubhouse, Cleo, CA. The furniture was produced by Heritage-Henredon, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The buffet cabinet in the background is a combination of four small chests (L to R), No. 2003, 2002, 2003 and 2001. The shelf was an optional add-on. The table appears to be possibly a prototype of the dining room tables to come. The legs are correct, with the bullnose outer edge and carved patterned design. The round table top has the bullnose edge, but no design. To date, we have seen rectangular table tops as well as other furniture with the decorative design, but the round table tops, No. 2000 and 2001, are trimmed with copper moulding. The bench is No. 1904. There is a note in House Beautiful, November, 1955, p.282 which might shed some light in explaining the discrepancies. "Much of this merchandise was not available for photograph as this issue went to press..." (Thanks to Peter Kelley, MassModern for his insight.) 8 x 10 Color photograph. See additional information about the Nakoma Clubhouse. 1092.94.0416
1955
J. L. Smith Elevations Blueprint 1955. "House For Mr. & Mrs. J. L. Smith. Kane County, Illinois. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Frank Lloyd Wright, Jan 20 / 55. Elevations. Scale 1/4" = 1' - 0"." Upper: "Southeast Elevation." The Terrace is on the far left. The ceiling in the Workspace is lowered for the first three feet, then raises up to the height of the Living Room. The Loggia is to the right of the Living Room, and lines up with the Carport in the foreground. The Gun Shop is to the far right, embedded into the hillside. Lower: "Southwest Elevation." The two Bedrooms are on the left. Both have corner doors that open outward. The Workspace is to the right of the Bedrooms, the ceiling has been lowered. The Living room has four sets of floor-to-ceiling doors that open outward, set between two foot wide columns. The carport is to the far right. There are handwritten notes in pencil toward the bottom right. "Print of Preliminary Plans for Grading Prints on Forms as Soon as Possible. Workshop - Dry - Gun Shop. Fireplace Storage. No Cabinets over Sink. Carport. View out of Kitchen... Laundry Equip, deep sink. Canoe Storage. Lanai Larger. Laundry Larger." The notes on both sheets, and the fact that Gun Shop was relocated, would indicate that the Smiths were very serious about completing...  Continue...  See Wright Study on J. L. Smith Residence Project. 1092.100.0317 -1
1955
J. L. Smith General Plan Blueprint 1955 (Project) . "House For Mr. & Mrs. J. L. Smith. Kane County, Illinois. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. Frank Lloyd Wright, Jan 20 / 55. General Plan. Scale 1/4" = 1' - 0"." The home is built into a hillside and faces Southwest. The elevation at the South corner of the Terrace is 92 feet. The elevation of the North corner of the Gun shop is 110 feet, a change of 18 feet. As in other Usonian Automatic homes, these blocks are 1' x 2' in size, and the floor plan is designed in 2' x 2' modules. The home is built on two levels. As you drive up to the graveled forecourt, and park in the Carport, a covered walk leads to the Entrance which is along the back of the house. The Lanai is on the right, the Gun Shop is embedded into the hillside. Double doors lead to the Entryway which is on the upper level. The Gallery on the right leads to two Bedrooms, the Bath, and a thin passageway leading down five stairs to the Workspace on the lower level. As you walk down the Loggia to the left, there are built-in bookshelves on the left, low built-in cabinets on the right. The wall on the right side is open, creating the Loggia. At the end, five stairs lead down to the Living Room. The bookshelves that cover the right side of the Loggia wrap around the end, then continue into the Living...  Continue...  See Wright Study on J. L. Smith Residence Project. 1092.100.0317 -2
C 1955
Taliesin, Spring Green Loggia (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218) Circa 1955. Photographed by Maynard L. Parker. "Loggia Room overlooking low rolling hills of Wisconsin." Published in "House Beautiful" November 1955, page 234 in color. Hand written on verso: "Loggia, Taliesin, Spring Green, Wis., Credit: House Beautiful Magazine." This room is a space between the living room on one end of the house and Wright’s private quarters on the other. For a 1952 view of the room see "Picturing Wright" Guerrero 1994, Page 80. Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1092.36.0310
1955
Unity Temple Sanctuary (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1955. The lower level viewed from Northeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1904, Unity Temple is lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. A band of horizontal art-glass windows, just beneath the ceiling, adds additional light to the Temple. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. The lower portion of the Temple is unbroken by doors and windows. Stamped on verso: "July 25, 1955," "Maynard Parker Photography, Los Angeles, Calif." Photographed by Maynard Parker. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.91.0216
1955
Unity Temple Sanctuary (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1955. The upper level viewed from Northeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1904, Unity Temple is lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. A band of horizontal art-glass windows, just beneath the ceiling, adds additional light to the Temple. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. The lower portion of the Temple is unbroken by doors and windows. Stamped on verso: "July 25, 1955," "Maynard Parker Photography, Los Angeles, Calif." Photographed by Maynard Parker. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.92.0216
1955
“Wright and apprentices at the Hillside Drafting Room in 1955.”  Unknown Photographer. Photographed in 1955, printed in 1998 as part of the press kit for the Ken Burns and Lynn Novick film “Frank Lloyd Wright”.  Seated, from left to right, John Howe of Illinois;  Frank Lloyd Wright; Wright's grandson Eric Lloyd Wright of California; Wes Peters of Indiana and John Amarantides of Michigan. First five standing from left to right, Mark Heyman of New York; Gene Masselink of Michigan; Raja Aederi of Kashmir; John Watson or James Pfefferkorn and Alan Wool. Standing just to the right of Wright: Ling Po of China; David Dodge of England; Tom Casey of California and Donald Brown of Vermont.  Standing to the right of Eric Wright: Stephen Oyakawa of Hawaii and Kenneth Lockhart of Iowa.  Original silver gelatin photo.  See “Letters to Apprentices” Wright 1982, Page 106 for a similar image. 8x10. Two copies. 1092.12.1006 1092.50.0213
1955
Wright plays piano before Monona Terrace Testimonial Banquet. Caption on face: "Madison, Wis. Feb. 11 – Versatile Genius – Frank Lloyd Wright, renowned architect, relaxes at piano before Feb. 10 testimonial dinner when he was given $10,000 to help pay taxes on his studio-home at Spring Green, Wis. Wright said he plans to stay in Wisconsin, not move away and he threatened last fall when tax case came to fore. (AP Wirephoto) 1955." Stamped on verso: Associated Press Wirephoto". Stamped on verso: "Feb 14 1955". Original 7.5 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.43.0911
1955 
Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Frank Lloyd Wright in the drafting Room, Taliesin, Spring Green, Wisconsin. Facing and looking to the right. Detail of the truss support is to the right. The center drawing on his left is possibly the Tracy Residence (1954-5 - S.389). The drawing of the Price Tower (1952 - S.355) is on his right. See "Story of the Tower" page 22. Two original 14 x 11 B&W photographs. 1092.49.0113
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright with a slight smile on his lips. He is facing and looking to the right of the camera. He is wearing a suit, white shirt and a neckerchief tie. It appears to be photographed outside. In the early 1920's before Olgivanna married Frank Lloyd Wright, she studied dance with George Gurdjieff. Diana Faidy became a member of the Chicago Gurdjieff group in 1930 and spent time with Georges Gurdjieff there and in New York on several occasions. In the late 1930s to early 1940s, she married Chicago architect Abel Faidy, well known for his Art Deco designs. According to Diana's biography, Olgivanna, a student of Gurdjieff, became her 'second teacher in the work,' as she puts it, in 1953. Acquired from the estate of Diane Faidy. Original 4 x 5 B&W photograph. 1092.97.1216
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright facing and looking to the right of the camera. He is wearing a suit, white shirt and a neckerchief tie. It appears to be photographed outside. 4.25 x 5.25 B&W photograph. 1092.98.1216
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). "Mr. Wright at home in Spring Green, Wisconsin, on his 86th birthday." June 8, 1955. Caption and photograph published in the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful, page 240. Wright is standing on stairs, leaning against a column at Taliesin, Spring Green. He is wearing a medium blue suit and tie. His left hand is in his pocket. Photographed by John Engstead for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. 6.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.84.0715
1955
Wright and apprentices, 1955. William Wesley Peters (left), Frank Lloyd Wright and Gene Masselink (right) at the Hillside Drafting Room, Taliesin Spring Green. Photographed by John Engstead for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful, page 242. Possibly photographed on Wright's 88th birthday. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.72.0714
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. He is leaning up against a tree, a carved Asian panel is on his right, he is holding his glasses in his right hand. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie, handkerchief and belt as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. 6.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.86.0715
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Mr. & Mrs. Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. They are sitting outside having tea. Wright is on the left, hat by his right hand, cane leaning against his leg. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Both are also wearing the same outfits used on the cover and frontispiece of "Our House." On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. Note image on page 243, bottom right. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.87.0715
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Mr. & Mrs. Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. They are sitting outside having tea. Wright is on the right, hat is to the right, cane is in his left hand. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Both are also wearing the same outfits used on the cover and frontispiece of "Our House." On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. Note image on page 243, bottom right. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.88.0715
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Mr. & Mrs. Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. Both are looking to the left. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Used on the cover and frontispiece of "Our House." On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. Also published in "Letters to Apprentices" Wright 1982, Page 192. Press release photo for "Our House," Horizon Press, 1959. Original 2 x 2 B&W photograph. 1092.85.0715
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Mr. & Mrs. Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. Frank Lloyd Wright and his wife Olgivanna seated together at Taliesin, she is looking up at him. Photographed at the same time as the image used on the cover and frontispiece of "Our House." Different view. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. 5 x 6.25 B&W photograph. 0531.23.0509
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Frank Lloyd Wright possibly at Taliesin, Spring Green. Wright is at his drawing table, hands on his t-square, pencil in his right hand. A photograph of V. C. Morris Gift Shot (1948 - S.210) in the background. Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. Note images on page 242. 6.5 x 8 B&W photograph. 1092.89.0715
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green. Wright is sitting at his desk enjoying a cup of tea. Photographed by John Engstead in 1955. Possibly around the same time when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. Possibly the same suit and handkerchief, but different tie. On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.90.0715
1955
Wright at 88.  Wright visits the Capital Building in 1955.  Limited edition 8.5 x 11 print from digital negatives on satin semi gloss Semisatinado paper.  4/100.  2007.  8.5 x 11. 1092.13.0307
1955
Wright at 88 (1955). Wright visits Washington DC July 1955. Frank Lloyd Wright is looking at the camera while he is speaking. He is wearing a porkpie hat, light suit and neckerchief tie. Clipping pasted to verso: "Protest Lodged – famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 86-years-old pioneer of modern architecture, is pictured as he talks with newsmen in Washington D. C., after testifying before a house appropriations subcommittee in closed session. Wright, urging congress to postpone work on the air force academy at Colorado Springs, Colo., until new plans are prepared, called the current design ‘half-baked’ and said the planned ultra-modern buildings would turn the academy into a ‘wayside market.’ (AP wirephoto)." Stamped on clipping: "Jul 9 1955." Original 6 x 7 B&W photograph. 1092.102.0517
Circa 1955
Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Published in the Chicago Tribune, Sep 28, 1973. "Frank Lloyd Wright prized the individual and the environment long before either was in vogue. A legend even in his own time, Wright is reemerging as a practical example for the 70s. Some 1,000 designs have made an indelible mark on the look - and the outlook of the 20th century. Instinctively, he has measured the social, behavioral, and moral dimensions of architecture." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 5 x 7 B&W print. 1092.37.0910
1955
Frank Lloyd Wright at 88 (1955). Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West, looking to the left, holding a cane in his right hand, scarf around his neck. Photographed by John Amarantides. Courtesy of the The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 8.25 x 8.5 Color photograph. 1092.77.1214
Circa 1955 
Wright at 88 (Circa 1955). Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright facing the camera, looking slightly to the left. Wearing a suite and tie, a porkpie hat and scarf. He is holding glasses in his right hand, his cane is draped over his left arm. 8 x 9.5 B&W photograph. 1092.71.0714
1955
David Wright Residence Exterior View Circa 1955, (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the Northeast. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. The circular ramp in the foreground rises to the upper main level. The cantilevered master bedroom is on the left. Just to the right of the massive master bedroom fireplace chimney are the windows in the gallery. The large windows in the center are the living room. Glass corners are mitered. A set of doors open out to a balcony overlooking the garden court. The entrance is on the right at the top of the ramp. The circular ramp on the far right, which wraps around the kitchen, leads to the rooftop sundeck above the living room. Photographed by Maynard L. Parker. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1092.79.0215
1955
David Wright Residence Master Bedroom Circa 1955, (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the Southwest. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest". One of the two circular fireplaces in the home is on the far left. Built-in seating covers the North wall, just below the horizontal band of windows. Three drawers are built into the seating. Two Wright designed end-tables border the built-in seating. Not only is the room and fireplace circular in design, but the red Philippine mahogany ceiling continues the design. Photographed by Maynard L. Parker. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1092.80.0215
1955
David Wright Residence Master Bedroom Circa 1955, (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the Northeast. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest". Built-in cabinetry is in the background on the left. The Gallery that leads past the other two bedrooms to the Living Room is in the center. One of the two circular fireplaces in the home is on the far right. A Wright designed end-tables is seen on the far right. Not only is the room and fireplace circular in design, but the red Philippine mahogany ceiling continues the design. Photographed by Maynard L. Parker. 8 x 9.5 B&W photograph. 1092.81.0215
1955
David Wright Residence Exterior Circa 1955, (1950 - S.322). Viewed from the Northwest. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the David Wright house in 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest". The ramp begins on the left and wraps around up to the entrance on the second level. The master bedroom is in the background on the left. on the left, the main entrance is in the center, the large circular kitchen is on the right. The circular ramp on the right, which wraps around the kitchen, leads from the outer entrance to the rooftop sundeck above the living room. Courtesy of the David Wright family. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1092.82.0215
1956
Circa 1956
Jorgine Boomer Residence Circa 1956 (1953 - S.361), viewed from the West. A rare color image showing the natural colors of wood and stone used in the construction of the Boomer residence. The walls are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete. The row of plantings on the left were approximately 1-2 feet in 1954 images published in "The Natural House". They are now approximately 3 feet tall, and in full bloom. That would date this image circa 1956. The larger tree on the left, has also gained 2-3 feet which appears on the far right in the 1954 image. This image also shows the original second floor, before the expansion of the south end. The walls are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete. Piestewa (Squaw) Peak can be seen in the background. Photographer unknown. Published in "Arizona Highways", February, 1956. 10 x 6.5 Color photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 1147.61.1014
Circa 1956
Jorgine Boomer Residence Circa 1956 (1953 - S.361), viewed from the West. The walls are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete. First floor: The Bedroom is on the left, the Dining Room in the center, the Work Space is on the right. Perforated light screens add a measure of privacy to the Dining Room and Work Space. Upper floor: The Balcony and Roof cantilever out over the Lanai. The Sitting Room (Bedroom) is on the left, the Maid's Room (Bedroom) is on the right. Note the upper window on the far right. Like the windows in the front of the house, this window also has a mitered glass corner. The concrete center mass house the bathrooms and fireplaces on the first and second floors, and mimics the same angle of the large dramatic roof that reaches skyward. Piestewa (Squaw) Peak can be seen in the background. This image was published in "The Seven Ages of Frank Lloyd Wright" Hoppen, 1993. Photographer unknown. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 1147.62.1014
Circa 1956
Florida Southern College, E. T. Roux Library interior (1941 - S.252) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1956. The design is dated 1941, but due to the war was not completed until 1945. The library was named after Edwin Timanus (E. T.) Roux (1876-1946). Sometime between 1969 and 1970 the library was renamed the Thad Buckner Building. Construction superintendent for the Library was Robert D. Wehr, a member of the faculty. The dedication ceremony was held on March 17, 1945. View of the interior from the Southeast. The librarian’s desk is in the center of the circular room. A very similar view is published in the 1957 "Interlachen", Florida Southern College's yearbook, p. 64. Label pasted to verso: "One of the busiest places on the Florida Southern College campus is the circular reading room of the Roux Library - internationally known as one of several buildings at the college designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "News Bureau, Fla. So. College Lakeland, Fla." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.51.0113
Circa 1956
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings roof detail. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B) and Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C); Circa 1956. Viewed from the entrance of the Benjamin Fine Building, just outside the Lobby. Looking up through the Esplanades at the roof detail. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. Stamped on verso: "News Bureau. Fla. So. College, Lakeland, Fla." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.52.0113
Circa 1956
Florida Southern College, Danforth (Minor) Chapel, Lakeland, Florida 1956 (1954 - S.258). Exterior viewed from the Southwest. The chapel is named after Dr. William H. Danforth. It is adjacent to the larger Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. Ground-breaking ceremonies were held in May 1954. It was the only building in which Frank Lloyd Wright used traditional leaded glass on campus. The chapel was dedicated on March 4, 1955. The 1955 "Interlachen" includes a photograph of the Chapel with Nils Schwizer, Wright’s architectural representative on campus for the chapel (P. 257) and Dr. Danford (p. 259). Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.53.0113
1956
Guggenheim Museum Drawing 1956 (1956 - S.400). Caption of face: "The Modern Gallery. Memorial Museum for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Label pasted on verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. 120 Broadway, New York 5, N.Y. Rector 2-9740. Release for Publication in Newspapers of Monday, May 7, 1956. May 4, 1956. Sketch of the new Museum of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, architect. -o0o-" Clipping pasted to verso: "Startling New Structure sketched here will become the first building by Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, nearly 87, to grace New York City. The six-story cylindrical building will be the new art museum for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Construction will begin immediately on Fifth Ave. And 85th St. The edifice is wire-glass-dome and concrete with hollow center. Gallery walls will slope. Spiral construction will permit the visitor to enter or leave the gallery at an level he chooses by means of a continuous ramp girdling the building." Stamped on clipping: "May 7 1956." Stamped on verso: "Cleveland Press, May 7, 1956, Reference Library." Acquired from the archives of the UPI. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1147.54.1113
1956
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) Circa 1956-57. View of the main entrance from across the pool. On December 1, 1952 the first annex was opened, which can be seen in the background just to the left of the left chimney. Construction of the second annex (not visible) began on January 21, 1957 and was completed on July 31, 1958. So most likely taken before second annex. On November 15, 1967 the doors were closed and Wright’s Imperial Hotel was demolished. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative and 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.59.0514
1956
Price Tower Living Room 1956 (1952 - S.355). Printed on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s first skyscraper soars over the American prairie. Interior view of the eight two-level residential apartments in Price Tower in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Two bedrooms and a bathroom are located on the recessed second level. The living room overhead area extends tow stories high, thus lending a light and airy feeling to he living room. (Photo No. 56-9769.)" Stamped on verso: "United States information services, American Embassy, Grosvenor Square, London." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1147.47.0712
1956
S.C. Johnson Headquarters "Great Workroom" 1956. August 8, 1956. Stamped on verso: "From Photographic Department, S.C. Johnson & Sons, Inc., Racine, Wis. Makers of Johnson’s Wax. Aug 8, 1956." Original silver gelatin 10 x 8 photo. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. 1147.27.0310
C 1956
S.C. Johnson Administration Building (1936 - S.237) and Tower (1944 - S.238), circa 1956. Viewed from the West, the Research Tower is on the left, Administration building on the right. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1944, the tower opened in November 1950. The tower was designed with a center core the was 54 feet deep. Fifteen floors cantilevered out from the core, floors alternated square and round, reaching a height of 153 feet. According to SC Johnson, the globe in the foreground was installed in 1952. Johnathan Lipman dates it to 1954. A similar view is published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building Lipman, p.130. Stamped on verso: "11545." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.70.0216
   Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May.  Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112.  
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is looking directly into the camera. His right hand is holding his cane, his left hand is resting on top. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines. 7.5 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.16.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is looking directly into the camera, a pleasant smile on his face. His left hand is resting on top of his cane. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines. 8 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.17.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is leaning against a doorway. He is wearing a hat, looking off to the left, holding his cane in his left hand. Alfred had suggested he pick his favorite cane. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 54. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines. 7.75 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.18.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. At Eisenstaedt’s suggestion, Wright sits down at his desk to read his mail. "As he reads his mail, Wright loosed consciousness of the camera". Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 54. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7.75 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.19.0609
1956 
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright reading at his desk. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1147.65.0115
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is seated at his desk. He is reading a copy of "Florida Southern College, Lakeland. The Frank Lloyd Wright Campus." Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 54. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7.6 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.20.0609
1956
Wright at 89 (1956). Photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Date stamped on verso: "Jul 16 1992". Caption pasted on verso: "The life of architect Frank Lloyd Wright gets an operatic treatment in ‘Shining Brow’ next April." 5 x 7 B&W photograph of 1990 postcard (Halftone dot pattern.) 1147.45.1110
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is looking directly at the camera. His head is turned slightly to the left. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Time Magazine, June 11, 1956, page 61; Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 53 and 55. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.21.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is seated at a drawing table, framed by the gabled beams. Wright is engrossed in his work. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 56. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7.5 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.22.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is seated at a drawing table, engrossed in his work. He is wearing a pair of glassed. A pencil is in his right hand. The fireplace is in the background to the far right. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. A similar pose is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 56-57. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7.6 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.23.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is seated behind a drawing table, looking directly at the camera with a slight smile on his face. His arms are crossed and to the right one of his assistants is working on the drawing. Shelves are in the background. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  7.5 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.24.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Wright is seated behind a drawing table, looking directly at the camera with a slight smile on his face. His arms are crossed. One of his assistants hands can be seen on the right. Shelves are in the background. Photographed at Taliesin possibly in May. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. This is just one of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  8 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.25.0609
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Contact sheet with 25 images. Alfred Eisenstaedt writes in Time Magazine (June 11, 1956, page 17) and Modern Photography that "I shall always remember my assignment to photograph Frank Lloyd Wright. It was done under such rushed, almost impossible conditions." He had just photographed Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Dr. Jacques Maritain in Princeton, N.J. early in the day. He rushed back to his office. Caught a plane to Madison arriving a midnight. Had a few hours of sleep, and rushed to Taliesin to photograph Wright the next day. He was only at Taliesin for two hours. All were shot within 45 minutes and with three rolls of film. These are just 25 of the many images photographed that day. An in depth article describing his photo shoot at Taliesin is published in Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 52-57, 110-112. Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt. Published in Time Magazine, June 11, 1956, page 61; Modern Photography, September 1957, pages 53-57. Courtesy Time/Life Magazines.  8 x 10 print. High res digital image. 1147.26.0609
1956
May 25, 1956. Wright at 89. Wright at Taliesin seated next to Chinese Stone Lion. Verso: "Artful Relaxation. Relaxing at Taliesen (caption spelling) near Spring Green, Wis., Frank Lloyd Wright sits beside an ancient stone lion from China. The piece is said to be one of the first examples of Chinese art, perhaps going back 4000 or 5000 years. Wright has a strong feeling for the art and architecture of the Orient. His greatest affinity appears to be for the Japanese and their work in these fields. The two Taliesens, in Wisconsin and Arizona, are considered "typical Wright." The word is Welsh for "shining hours." Both groups of buildings are designed according to Wright’s theories of "organic architecture," fitting the terrain, materials, function and people who will use the place. The Wisconsin Taliesen seems to grow out of the hills with soothing effects on the eyes. The Arizona Taliesen is as severe and jagged as the desert which surrounds it. 5/25/56." (For use Sunday, June 3, with Relman Morin’s Taliesen AP-N story on Frank Lloyd Wright) AP Newsfeatures Photo, Please Credit. Stamped Jun 7, 1956. 10 x 7.6 print, High res digital image. Second Version: Note: this "Stone Lion" appeared at the 1953 Usonian Exhibition in New York at the site for the Guggenheim Museum. Stamped on verso: "Jun 3, 1956" Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. 1147.15.0609 1147.29.1110
1956
July 10, 1956. Wright at 89. Portrait of Wright in 1956. Passport photograph of Wright seated, cane hooked on his arm. Photographed by Reierson Studio on July 10, 1956. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 4 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 1147.13.0509
1956
July 10, 1956. Wright at 89. Portrait of Wright in 1956. Passport photograph of Wright, light background. Photographed by Reierson Studio on July 10, 1956. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society. 4.25 x 6 Print, High res digital image. 1147.14.0509
1956 
Frank Lloyd Wright and Wife at Taliesin, 1956.  From the Archives of the Los Angeles Examiner.  In pencil on back: "Frank Lloyd Wright and wife Olga Lazovich Wright".  Original 8 x 10 silver gelatin photo.  (Note: Many Masks, Brendan Gill, page 495).  Published in the "New World Odyssey" 1986 John Gurda, Pg 57. 1950.00.1203
1956
Wright at 89. Circa 1956. Wright seated outside at Taliesin. Facing and looking toward the left. His arms are crossed. His stripped tie and suit match photograph #1950.00 and #1205.42. (Note photograph: Many Masks, Brendan Gill, page 495). Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright in his later years." Stamped on clipping: "Nov 25 1961." Original 6 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.55.1213
1956
Wright at 89. Frank Lloyd Wright sitting in a chair, his fingers intertwined in front of his right knee. He is wearing a stripped tie and suit that matches photographs #1950.00 and #1147.55. Date stamped on verso: "Jan 27 1957". Partial caption pasted on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, 87 year old architect announced at Santa Barbara, California he will go to Iraq in M... to design and build..." Original 7 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.42.1210
1956 
Wright working on a large drawing of the Mile High Building "The Illinois", 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright in his drafting room at Taliesin Spring Green, finishing the drawing of the Mile high Building. Three drawings were prepared for the news conference held on October 16, 1956, in conjunction with "Sixty Years of Living Architecture," exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman. On October 16, Wright held a Press conference at the Hotel Sherman to open the exhibition and unveil the Mile High Building "The Illinois" for the first time. Wright proposed the building for Chicago. Photograph by Edgar Obma. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.64.0115
1956
Wright at 89. 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright working at his desk in the Workroom at Taliesin, Spring Green. At the left is an floor lamp adaptation of the Pendant Lamp Wright originally designed in 1933 for the Taliesin Fellowship Playhouse Theater. The original light pendants were suspended from the ceiling. In 1952, after the theater was rebuilt following a fire, Wright modified the original design. Situated around Wright’s desk are possibly three Allen Friedman chairs (1956 - S.403). The design is also similar to the Hanna and Olfelt designs. On the far right is a Dana windows. Photographed by Edgar Obma. 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1147.68.0615
1956
Wright at Taliesin, Spring Green, 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright is standing outside the Drafting Studio at the Taliesin Fellowship complex. Two Mercedes-Benz automobiles have been delivered. The Mercedes on the left, a four-door red and black 300C for Wright. The one on the right is Wes Peters 300SL, gull-wing sports car. 10 x 5.5 B&W photograph. 1147.73.0416
1956
William Wesley Peters,1956. Set of nine 35mm slides of Wes Peters' Mercedes-Benz 300SL. Peters was born on June 12, 1912. He attended Evansville College and MIT. He came from a wealthy family, his father was a newspaper publisher. In July, 1932, after he completed his second year at MIT, he visited Taliesin. He had read about Wright starting the Fellowship. After speaking with Wright, Wes paid the tuition in advance, becoming Wright’s first apprentice. In 1935 he married Wright's adopted daughter, Svetlana, with whom he had two children, Daniel and Brandoch. In 1946 when his son Brandoch was four years old, Svetlana and son Daniel, were killed in an automobile accident at Taliesin. Max Hoffman introduced the Porsche to the US market in 1951, and by 1952... Continue...
1147.72.0316 (1-9)
1956 
Mile High Building "The Illinois", 1956. Pasted on verso: "Mile-High Building. Chicago: A mile-high building proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright is pictured in this artist’s sketch alongside two present day versions of ‘Skyscrapers.’ Drawn by George Charney, of the Chicago Daily News, the sketch compares Wright’s proposed building with the Prudential Building in Chicago and the Empire State Building in New York. Wright, who suggests his building should be placed alongside Lake Michigan in Chicago, says the structure could hold 100,000 people. Typical of the comments which greeted Wright’s proposal was one from an architect; He suggested the 510-story project be built on its side. (United Press Photo) 9/5/56." Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1147.50.0513
  
Frank Lloyd Wright Day, October 17, 1956. Mayor Richard Daley, Chicago, proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day.
"Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mile-High Building was shown for the first time Tuesday, October 16, with a 22-foot visualization of mile-high building which Wright proposed for Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day.
October 6 (Saturday): Wright meets with Mayor Richard Daley at the Mayor’s office in Chicago. Most likely the official presentation of the certificate proclaiming October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day.
October 16 (Tuesday): Wright holds a Press conference at the Hotel Sherman to open the exhibition and unveil the Mile High Building "The Illinois" with a 22-foot visualization, proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Chicago. The giant visualization was prepared by Wright and his apprentice architects at Taliesin.
October 17 (Wednesday): Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Other guests of honor included  Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright and Mayor Richard Daley who presented a plaque declaring "this day to be Frank Lloyd Wright Day". Other honored guests included Ludd M. Spivey, President of Florida Southern College who sat to Wright's left at the speaker's table, and Ivan Nestigan, Mayor of Madison Wisconsin. Wright’s sister Mrs. Maginel Wright Barney was also in attendance. The proposed Mile-High would be 528 stories tall, could hold 100,000 people and would cost about $100 million. The "eighth wonder of the world" was to be erected of steel and glass, with floors extending outward from a central core like branches from a tree trunk. Wright’s design drew jeers and cheers. The architect insisted the structure was "practical and expedient."
October 19 (Friday): Frank Lloyd Wright Spoke at Orchestra Hall, Friday Evening, October 19, at 8:15pm.
 
1956
Wright meets with Mayor Richard Daley at the Mayor’s office in Chicago on October 6 1956. Most likely the official presentation of the certificate proclaiming October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. Major Daley presented Wright with a plaque proclaiming the official proclamation. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Label pasted on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 10/6/56. Photographer: Joe Kordick. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright. Location: Mayors Office. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright visits Mayor Richard J. Dailey." 5.5 x 6.8 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.44.1210
1956
Wright meets with Mayor Richard Daley at the Mayor’s office in Chicago on October 6 1956. Most likely the official presentation of the certificate proclaiming October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. Major Daley presented Wright with a plaque proclaiming the official proclamation. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Text typed on negative sleeve: "Wright – Frank Lloyd, architect cdn 10-6-56, with Mayor Dailey." Acquired from the archives for the Chicago Daily News. Original 4x5 B^&W negative, 10 x 8 B&W photograph, 43 x 35" High Res digital image. 1147.69.0915
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright Press Conference, October 16, 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. On October 16, Wright held a Press conference at the Hotel Sherman to open the exhibition and unveil the Mile High Building "The Illinois" for the first time with a 22-foot visualization, proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Chicago. The giant visualization was prepared by Wright and his apprentice architects at Taliesin. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Caption reads: "The Mile High Illinois, Illinois Sky-City, or simply the Illinois was a proposed mile-high (1,609 meters/5,280 feet) skyscraper, envisioned by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1956. the design, intended to be built in Chicago, would have included 528 stories, with a gross area of 18.46 million square feet (1.71 million square meters/171 hectares). If built, it would be the tallest building in the world." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 8 x 10 B&W print, original 4 x 5 B&W negative. 1147.30.1210
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright Press Conference, October 16, 1956. Twenty-two foot illustration behind him, Price Tower to the left, smaller tri-fold to the right. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. On October 16, Wright held a Press conference at the Hotel Sherman to open the exhibition and unveil the Mile High Building "The Illinois" for the first time with a 22-foot visualization, proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Chicago. The giant visualization was prepared by Wright and his apprentice architects at Taliesin. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright & Mile High Bldg 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright stands in front of a model sketch of his Mile High Building at the Sherman Hotel October 16, 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.31.1210
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright Press Conference, October 16, 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. On October 16, Wright held a Press conference at the Hotel Sherman to open the exhibition and unveil the Mile High Building "The Illinois" for the first time with a 22-foot visualization, proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Chicago. The giant visualization was prepared by Wright and his apprentice architects at Taliesin. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Caption on face: "10/16/56 - Chicago: Frank Lloyd Wright, world famous architect, gestures at press conference here 10/16 during which he explains details of mile-high skyscraper which he believes can be constructed. Wright, standing in front of sketch of the proposed skyscraper, would build structure in Chicago." Stamped on verso: "Reference, Oct 22 ‘56, N. E. A." Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1147.63.1014
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright Day.  Proclaimed by Mayor Richard J. Daley.  Sponsored by The Day Committee, October 16, 17, 18, 1956.  Hotel Sherman, Chicago.  Photographed on October 16, 1956.  Limited edition 8.5 x 11 print from digital negatives on satin semi gloss Semisatinado paper.  2/100.  2007.  8.5 x 11. 1148.02.0307
1956
Mile High Building "The Illinois", 1956. Pasted on verso: "From: J. Dennis O’Brien (Chicago Office). Harshe-Rotman, Inc. For: Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund. 29 S. LaSalle St., Chicago. Oct. 16, 1956. For Immediate Release. First view of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Mile-High Building. Shown for the first time Tuesday (Oct. 16) was this 22-foot visualization of mile-high building proposed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for Chicago. Details of the mammoth structure will be explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor to be held Wednesday (Oct. 17) at the Hotel Sherman. The giant visualization was prepared by Wright and apprentice architects at Taliesin, unique architectural school conducted by Mr. And Mrs. Wright at their Spring Green, Wis. Home. The dinner is being sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin." Clipping on verso: Stamped "Feb 4, 1959". "That Mile-High Skyscraper? - Famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright proposed in 1956 to build it in Chicago. He said it would be 528 stories tall, could hold 100,000 people, would cost about $100 million. The "eighth wonder of the world" was to be erected of steel and glass, with floors extending outward from a central core like branches from a tree trunk. Wright’s design drew jeers and cheers. The architect insisted the...  Continue... 1147.28.0310
1956
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright arrive at the Hotel Sherman for a dinner in Wright’s honor the evening of October 17, 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright with wife at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.32.1210
1956
Wright and Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright explaining architecture to honorable guest Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.33.1210
1956
Wright and Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Photograph taken from a lower angle looking up. Wright is gesturing with his hand, Daley is listening to Wright. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Label pasted on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 10/17/56. Photographer: Mel Larson. Location: Sherman Hotel. Caption: Candids on Frank Lloyd Wright explaining architecture to honorable guest Mayor Richard Dailey." Caption pasted on verso: "Mr. Wright speaks, Mr. Daley Listens. Frank Lloyd Wright (left) engages in an animated discourse at testimonial dinner in his honor at Hotel Sherman. Famed architect admits that the speakers who referred to him as a genius were speaking the truth. But when Wright begins to discuss his proposed mile-high building, Mayor Daley (right) doesn’t seem to fully accept the idea. The controversial 87-year-old Wright was glum about modern architectural trends...  Continue... 1147.34.1210
1956
Wright and Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Photograph taken from a higher angle looking down. Wright is gesturing with his hand, his fist is balled for emphasis, Daley is listening to Wright. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright explaining architecture to honorable guest Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.35.1210
1956
Wright and Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Wright has an envelope in his hands. Both he and Daley are looking up at the display. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright explaining architecture to honorable guest Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.36.1210
1956
Wright greeting guests before dinner at the Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright making speech on architecture at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.37.1210
1956
Mr. & Mrs. Wright seated at speakers table before dinner. Mrs. Maginel Wright Barney, Wright’s sister and children’s book illustrator, congratulates Wright with a kiss on the cheek. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Label pasted on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 10/17/56. Photographer: Mel Larson. Location: Sherman Hotel. Names L. to R.: Mrs. Wright. Frank Lloyd Wright. Mrs. Magda Barney of New York City. Caption: Mrs. Barney Frank Lloyd Wright’ sister plants kiss on his cheek at speakers table." 5.5 x 6.8 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.38.1210
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright is presented a plaque by Mayor Daley declaring this day to be "Frank Lloyd Wright Day" at the Sherman Hotel. Mrs. Wright is on the left, Ludd M. Spivey, President of Florida Southern College is seated, between Wright and Daley. Two exhibition catalogs sit on the table. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright & Wife 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright and his wife at a special ceremony where he was presented a plaque by Mayor Daley declaring this day to be ‘Frank Lloyd Wright Day’ October 17, 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.39.1210
1956
Wright listens to introductions. Mrs. Wright is seated on the left, Ludd M. Spivey, President of Florida Southern College is seated on the right waiting to speak. Exhibition catalog and plaque sit on the table in front of him. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright with wife at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.40.1210
1956
Wright speaks at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956. Wright describes the details of the Mile-High "Illinois" building at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. Ludd M. Spivey, President of Florida Southern College is seated on the left. Exhibition catalog and plaque sit on the table. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright making speech on architecture at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.41.1210
1956
Wright shakes Mayor Richard Daley’s hand and speaks with he and Mayor Ivan Nestigan after dinner at the Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright, meets some of honored guests, Mayor Richard Daley and Mayor Ivan Nestigan, of Madison Wis. at Sherman Hotel. Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.42.1210
1956
Wright speaks with Mayor Richard Daley and Mayor Ivan Nestigan after dinner at the Sherman Hotel. Mrs. Wright is seated on the left. Oct 17 1956. "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" was exhibited in Chicago from October 16, 17 and 18, 1956 at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Mayor Daley proclaimed October 17, Frank Lloyd Wright Day. Details of the mammoth structure were explained by Wright at a dinner in his honor Wednesday evening at the Hotel Sherman. The dinner was sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Endowment Fund for the perpetuation of Taliesin. Wright was the guest of honor. Caption reads: "Frank Lloyd Wright with wife and Mayor Richard Daley at Sherman Hotel Oct 17 1956." 8 x 10 B&W print, High Res image. 1147.43.1210
1956 
Wright at 89. 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright stands next to aerial view of Minneapolis, November 26, 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright speaks his mind in Minneapolis. Clipping pasted to verso: "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright  looked at Minneapolis Monday (11/26/56). Shown with aerial photo at Minneapolis-Honeywell hanger. Architect speaks his mind." Stamped on verso: "Donald Black. Nov 26 1956." He also visited the Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314). Photographed by Donald Black. Acquired from the archives of the Minneapolis Tribune. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.66.0115
1956 
Wright at 89. Circa 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314). Label taped to verso: "Date: Nov 27, 1956. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright leaving the house of Henry Neils, 2801 Burnham Blvd, Minneapolis, Minn. Photographer: Paul Siegel." Reported in the November 28, 1956, Minneapolis Tribune, (yesterday) "Frank Lloyd Wright, the 87-year-old champion of American modernist architecture, visited the Twin Cities to address the annual meeting of the Citizens League of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. He picked up ammunition for his speech during a tour earlier in the day, visiting the new Southdale shopping center in Edina, Prudential building in Minneapolis and other landmarks. He didn’t have many kind things to say about anything, including our climate. ‘Minneapolis is just too far north,’ he said. But he did praise the Twin Cities’ lakes and parks as a ‘beautiful gift from nature.’ And he managed to recall ‘with a chuckle’ his 1926 visit to Minneapolis during which he landed in jail in a dispute with his estranged wife. ‘Nothing came of it,’ he said, somewhat cryptically." He visited the Neils Residence during his tour. Original 9 x 7.25 B&W photograph. 1147.49.0613
1956
Wright at 89. Circa 1956. Frank Lloyd Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence (1949 - S.314). Stamped on verso: "Paul Siegel," and "Nov 27 1956." Published in the November 28, 1956, Minneapolis Tribune, "Frank Lloyd Wright, the 87-year-old champion of American modernist architecture, visited the Twin Cities to address the annual meeting of the Citizens League of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. He picked up ammunition for his speech during a tour earlier in the day, visiting the new Southdale shopping center in Edina, Prudential building in Minneapolis and other landmarks. He didn’t have many kind things to say about anything, including our climate. ‘Minneapolis is just too far north,’ he said. But he did praise the Twin Cities’ lakes and parks as a ‘beautiful gift from nature.’ And he managed to recall ‘with a chuckle’ his 1926 visit to Minneapolis during which he landed in jail in a dispute with his estranged wife. ‘Nothing came of it,’ he said, somewhat cryptically." He visited the Neils Residence during his tour. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1147.58.0514
1956
Frank Lloyd Wright visits Henry J. Neils Residence 1956 (1949 - S.314). Wright sits in front of fireplace. Kettle in background. Clipping pasted to background: "A Tour and a Lecture. For Him Wright Is Kind To City. By Frank Murray. Minneapolis Star Staff Writer. Frank Lloyd Wright, dean of American architecture and ancient foe of the ‘city concept,’ was taking a good long look at Minneapolis today. In a manner of speaking, you could say he was praising it with faint damns - and quite a few explosive ones. (Caption) Frank Lloyd Wright in Henry Neils’ Home. Kettle in background was his idea." Stamped on verso: "1956 Nov 27." 8 x 9.75 B&W photograph. 1205.62.1214
1956
Wyoming Valley School perspective 1956 (1956 - S.401). After the school district voted to consolidate a number of one-room school houses in January 1956, a referendum was past in April. In October, the board selected Frank Lloyd Wright to design their school. Wright immediately set out to design the school and on November 28, received a letter from the Board that "the building committee accepted the plans with enthusiasm" along with a few revision. The initial plans submitted to the Board was a resurrection of the unrealized Oak Park Kindersymphonies design, with a few modifications. In June, 1958, Wright published The Living City, an update to his Broadacre plan, and included this drawing of the Wyoming Valley School and a floor plan, with the caption, "Small School" and "Small School, Plan." Courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 5 color photograph. 1147.76.0317
1957
C 1957-58
Benjamin Adelman Residence Living Room Fireplace, circa 1957-58 (1951 - S.344). Photograph of the Fireplace, circa 1957-58. The Living Room features a geometric wall mural above the fireplace, designed by Eugene Masselink. One major change is the wood ceiling. The coffered blocks have been covered. Although the trim follows a two foot square pattern. The pottery on the shelves is the same as the 1953-54 image #12, but rearranged. Besides documenting the fireplace, this image reveals its original details and colors. The walls are painted a light pink, What Wright called "Desert Rose." The chair seats and backs are a red vinyl. A clue to the paneled ceiling could be a note written on the plans for the 1957 remodel. "Note: Cover all inside faces of all exterior walls and ceilings with 3/8" waterproof finish plywood, veneered on exposed face with ribbor-striped Philippine mahogany..." This photograph was taken at night by Maynard Parker. 8 x 10 Color photograph.  For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright study. 1205.64.0415
1957
Arizona: New State Capitol. “Pro Bono Publico - Arizona. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect, February 17, 1957.” “(PN1) Phoenix, Ariz., April 5 - New State Capitol - Architect Frank Lloyd Wright presented this sketch today for new Arizona state capitol, but had little hope it would be built. Spires are radio-tv towers atop legislative chambers, wings are lawmakers’ offices, two extensions in rear are for governor and supreme court, and large canopy covers open portico for “the wind to blow in and out and birds to fly through.” Original silver gelatin photograph. 10 x 7.5. 1205.28.1007
1957
Fiberthin Air House for U.S. Rubber Co. (1956 - Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation #5725). View of Miss Home Show in the Living Room of the Fiberthin Air House. Text on face: "New York, April 26 (1957) – Living Room of ‘Airhouse’ – Mary Ann Fisher, who has been chosen as Miss Home Show for the International Home Exposition show at the coliseum May 4-12, relaxes in the living room of the inflatable plastic ‘airhouse’ that will be displayed at the exposition. The structure, designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, was previewed here yesterday. The ‘airbouse’ is anchored to the ground by a sand-filled tube and is supported by air pressure alone." Fiberthin Air Houses were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the U. S. Rubber Company. Wright also designed Rubber Village, a complex of Air House variations in Mishawaka, Indiana. Walls were constructed of double panels which were inflated by an exterior air pump. Stamped on verso: "Plain Dealer News Library. May 3 - 1957." Similar photograph published in Domus, March 1966, p.18. Acquired from the archives of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.83.0917
1957
Fiberthin Air House Perspective Drawing for the U.S. Rubber Co. (1956 - Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation #5725). Aerial perspective of the Rubber Village. Fiberthin Air Houses were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the U. S. Rubber Company. Wright also designed Rubber Village, a complex of Air House variations in Mishawaka, Indiana. Walls were constructed of double panels which were inflated by an exterior air pump. "Rubber Village. Fiberthin Air House for U. S. Rubber Company. Mishawaka, Indiana. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Courtesy of the Avery Library and the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 7 Color photograph. 1205.84.0917
1957
Fiberthin Air House Plot Plan Drawing for the U.S. Rubber Co. (1956 - Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation #5725). Plot plan for Rubber Village. Fiberthin Air Houses were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the U. S. Rubber Company. Wright also designed Rubber Village, a complex of Air House variations in Mishawaka, Indiana. Walls were constructed of double panels which were inflated by an exterior air pump. Four example were indicated on this plan. It appears that the domes came in three sizes, large, medium and small. 1) Top Left: Single large two-bedroom dome, includes Living /Dining Room, Workspace, Bath and Storage. 2) Top right: Double two-bedroom dome. Large dome included Living/Dining Room, Workspace, Bath, Storage and one bedroom. Second small dome consisted of one bedroom. 3) Bottom left: Triple three-bedroom dome. Large dome included Living/Dining Room, Workspace and Bath. Medium dome included two bedrooms, and the small dome consisted of one bedroom. 4) Bottom right: Quad four bedroom dome. Large dome included Living/Dining Room, Workspace, Bath and a centrally located fireplace. One medium dome included two bedrooms, and two smaller domes consisted of one bedroom each. "Fiberthin Air House for U. S. Rubber Company. Mishawaka, Indiana. Frank Lloyd Wright Architect." Courtesy of the Avery Library and the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. 10 x 7 Color photograph. 1205.85.0917
1957
Florida Southern College, Accepted Master Plan 1957. Northwest Campus, FSC, Lakeland, Florida. Drawn in August 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright Architect. McDonald and Johnson Avenues. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 6.25 B&W photograph. 1205.50.1113
Circa 1957
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida circa 1957. Viewed from the North. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. The Esplanades, covered walkways, can be seen in the foreground. Label pasted on verso: "Exterior, The Annie Pfeiffer Chapel, Florida Southern College, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect." Stamped on verso: Photograph by Paul Wille." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.51.0113
Circa 1957
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel interior (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida, Circa 1957. Viewed from the interior. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. On October 19, 1944 Lakeland was struck by a hurricane with winds up to 75 mph. Part of the main structure of the Chapel collapsed, the huge skylights were shattered, and many of the seats in the auditorium were damaged. It took more than a year to repair the chapel. The original pulpit has been replaced as well as the original seating on the lower level. Benches on the lower level are in the general style of the seating used in the Danford Chapel and were constructed by students. This photograph published in "The Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright at Florida southern College", MacDonald, Galbraith and Rogers, p. 33. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.52.0113
Circa 1957
Florida Southern College, Administration Buildings. Emile E. Watson (1945 - S.255B), Benjamin Fine (1945 - S.255C) Circa 1957. The Administration Buildings, two separate buildings, joined by the Esplanades, were completed in 1948. The Esplanades can be seen on the far left. The cube shaped structure seen in the foreground, just to the left of the sidewalk, is a Sundial, donated by Florida Southern College's Class of 1957. Bernard Elmo Fulghum (1898-1972) was the contractor. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.53.0113
1957
Florida Southern College Music Building 3 (Project) 1957. Perspective. Circular Auditorium is on the left, practice and study rooms in the center, circular music, band and choir room on the right. Originally part of the 1938 master plan, the plans for the Music and Theater Building were designed in 1938. After starts and stops, and involvement by Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, Music Building 3 was designed in 1957. It remained unbuilt. Text on face: "Music Building for Florida Southern College, Lakeland Florida. Frank Lloyd Wright architect." Dated 1957. See "Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly", Spring 2013 for more detail. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.56.0514
1957
Florida Southern College Music Building 3 (Project) 1957. Main floor plan. Circular Auditorium is on the left, practice and study rooms in the center, circular music, band and choir room on the right. Originally part of the 1938 master plan, the plans for the Music and Theater Building were designed in 1938. After starts and stops, and involvement by Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, Music Building 3 was designed in 1957. It remained unbuilt. Text on face: "Main Floor Plan. Music Building for Florida Southern College, Lakeland Florida. Frank Lloyd Wright architect." Dated 1957. See "Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly", Spring 2013 for more detail. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.57.0514
1957
Guggenheim Museum during construction 1956-57 (1956 - S.400). Set of 27 historic photographs. According to "The Guggenheim," 2009, Hilla Rebay first approached Frank Lloyd Wright in June 1943. He immediately began conceptual drawings, but it would take over two years to revise and approve final drawings. On September 20, 1945 the model of the Guggenheim Museum was unveiled. From October 22 - December 13, 1953, the Guggenheim hosted the exhibit "Sixty Years of Living Architecture." Wright designed, and Guggenheim built the Usonian Exhibition House on the site of the Guggenheim Museum. On May 4, 1956 Harry Guggenheim announced the beginning of construction, and Ground was finally broken on August 14, 1956. The Guggenheim Museum opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after Wright's death. This set of 27 images were taken in February and July (and possibly August) 1957 by Taliesin apprentice Samuel Matthews, who joined the Fellowship in January 1954. Original 5 x 3.5 B&W photograph. 7.2 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.58.1014
1957
Guggenheim Museum during construction April-May 1957 (1956 - S.400). On May 4, 1956 Harry Guggenheim announced the beginning of construction on the Guggenheim Museum, and Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. The Guggenheim Museum opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after Wright’s death. Foundation has been poured in the main Gallery section (foreground), and rebar is being set in place for pouring the main Gallery floor. In the background, foundation walls for the lower level are in progress (top left), while framework is being built to support the concrete ceiling that will cap the lower level (top right). 8 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1205.59.1114
1957
Guggenheim Museum during construction June 1957 (1956 - S.400). On May 4, 1956 Harry Guggenheim announced the beginning of construction on the Guggenheim Museum, and Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. The Guggenheim Museum opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after Wright’s death. Work progresses on the Museum. In the foreground, the ramp between the ground and first level is complete. Main Gallery floor is storing piles of wood. On the Northeast end of the complex the ceiling has been poured over the lower level, and the ground level forms for the walls of the Monitor Building are in place. It is interesting to note that the ceiling of the lower level on the far end is now supporting a crane. 8.75 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.60.1114
1957
Guggenheim Museum during construction June 1957 (1956 - S.400). On May 4, 1956 Harry Guggenheim announced the beginning of construction on the Guggenheim Museum, and Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. The Guggenheim Museum opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after Wright’s death. In the foreground, the first level nears completion. The walls for the ground floor café in the bottom right are complete. One the far end, the Monitor Building, the ceiling for the ground floor is also near completing. 8.75 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.61.1114
1957
Guggenheim Museum during construction 1957 (1956 - S.400). Frank Lloyd Wright visits the Guggenheim Museum and tours construction site with William Short. Wright looking to the right of the camera. Caption glued to verso: "Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 88th St. and 5th Ave. Frank Lloyd Wright inspects construction of new museum – he is shown with architect representative William Short - George N. Cohen, President Euclid Construction C. and contract superintendent Charles W. Spero. 9/6/57." Clipping taped to verso: "Problem – Wright and his assistant talk things over. ‘Here for the first time,’ Wright declares, ‘you will see twentieth-century arts and architecture in their true relation.’ " Photographed by Sam Falk, The New York Times. 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 1205.63.0115
1957
Marin County Civic Center (S.416-417 - 1957). Aaron Green (left) and Frank Lloyd Wright (right) as they board helicopter at the Clairmont Hotel, Berkeley, CA, April 27, 1957. "Aaron Green with Frank Lloyd Wright and Helicopter rented to fly to San Francesco airport after his lecture series at University of California, Berkeley, July 1957." Caption, An Architecture For Democracy, 1990, p.21. "In early July, Mr. Wright was scheduled for a series of lecturers at the University of California, Berkeley, and I was able to arrange the initial meeting (with the Marin County architect search committee) in conjuncture with that trip. The meeting was held in our San Francisco office with members of the search committee and the Marin Board of Supervisors..." Aaron Green, p.21. Published on page 21. In Frank Lloyd Wright and San Francisco, Paul Turner, 2016, "On April 27, Wright’s last day in the Bay Area, He was scheduled to give a seminar for architects at the university of Berkeley. Aaron Green, making the arrangements for the visit, realized there wasn’t enough time to get to the San Francisco airport following the seminar... After the seminar, Wright and Green returned to the Claremont, where reporters... Continue... 1205.75.0816
1957
Monona Terrace Model - September 21, 1957. Caption on face: "Madison, Wis., Sept. 21 - Law Blocks Frank Lloyd Wright Building – Gov. Thompson today signed a bill which prevents construction by the city of Madison of a four million dollar civic auditorium on Lake Monona. It prohibits construction of a building higher than 20 feet on the state-owned shoreline. The Wright building (one of several models shown above) would be 60 feet high. (AP Wire Photo) 1957." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Acquired from the AP News archives. 1205.46.1011
1957
Monona Terrace Site - September 21, 1957. Proposed site for Monona Terrace, Madison Wisconsin, 1957. Clipping pasted to verso: "Proposed site for FLW Madison Project which was dealt blow Saturday. Cliff Hutchinson photo." Stamped on verso: "1957 Sep 21." Gov. Thompson signed a bill which prevented construction by the city of Madison of the four million dollar civic auditorium on Lake Monona. The law prohibited construction of any building higher than 20 feet on the state-owned shoreline. The proposed Wright designed building was 60 feet high. Photographed by Cliff Hutchinson. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.87.0917
1957
Isabel Roberts Residence 1957 (1908 - S.150). Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. View of the Dining Room wing from the West, the Dining Room is on the left, Living Room is on the right. Original 2" x 2" B&W negative, high res 21" x 21" digital image and 8x10 B&W photograph. 1205.70.0215 -1
1957
Isabel Roberts Residence 1957 (1908 - S.150). Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. Detail view of the Dining Room wing from the West, the Dining Room is on the left, the entrance is up the stairs in the foreground then to the right. Note the 1-foot ruler placed by the left hand mullion for scale. Original 2" x 2" B&W negative, high res 21" x 21" digital image and 8x10 B&W photograph. 1205.70.0215 -2
1957
Isabel Roberts Residence 1957 (1908 - S.150). Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. Viewed from the Southwest. The Living Room is on the left, screened Porch is on the right. Original 2" x 2" B&W negative, high res 21" x 21" digital image and 8x10 B&W photograph. 1205.70.0215 -3
1957
Isabel Roberts Residence 1957 (1908 - S.150). Isabel Roberts was Frank Lloyd Wright's secretary, bookkeeper and office manager in his Oak Park studio. Viewed from the West. The Living Room is on the left, screened Porch is to the right. Original 2" x 2" B&W negative, high res 21" x 21" digital image and 8x10 B&W photograph. 1205.70.0215 -4
1957 
Robie House Photo #1 - March 1957 - This set of seven photos was taken during the time that the Robie House was nearly destroyed.  These were purchased along with five newspaper clipping about the same subject. 1205.08.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #2 - March 1957 1205.09.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #3 - March 1957 1205.10.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #4 - March 1957 1205.11.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #5 - March 1957 1205.12.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #6 - March 1957 1205.13.0302
1957 
Robie House Photo #7 - March 1957 1205.14.0302
1957
Wright at 89, 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright wearing a black suit coat and tie, facing to the right. He is in front of a drawing of his proposal for the Arizona State Capital which he titled "Pro Bono Publico - The Oasis", dated February 17, 1957. Most likely photographed at the April 5, 1957 presentation. Stamped on verso: Dec 15, 1957. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.44.0811
1957
Wright at 89 (1957). Wright wearing a gray suit, white shirt and a neckerchief tie. He is facing to the right, laughing. His left hand is on his chin. Stamped on verso: "Apr 12 1957. Ray Matjasic, Staff Phonograph, Cleveland Plain Dealer." Acquired from the archives of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1205.76.0417
1957 
Wright at 89 (1957). Frank Lloyd Wright holds news conference at Taliesin West, circa 1957. Wright is dressed in a suit, with a scarf around his neck. He is directing one of the newsmen, pointing with his left hand. There is a grand piano in the background. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright discusses how he things T.V. Show should be." Stamped on verso: "Howard Dewald, Phoenix Arizona. Neg. No. 1." Label pasted to verso: "Globe Photos, 275 7th Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10001." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.74.0416
1957
Wright at 89 (1957). Frank Lloyd Wright holds news conference at Taliesin West, circa 1957. Wright is dressed in a dark suit, vest, tie and overcoat. He has a cane in his right hand and is holding it straight up in the air. He is standing behind the Memorial to Svet, William Wesley Peters' first wife. In 1946 when Peters' son Brandoch was four years old, Svetlana and son Daniel, were killed in an automobile accident at Taliesin. Wright designed this memorial to Svet, located on the Sunset Terrace at Taliesin West. The triangle shape, originally of redwood, supports three plowshare discs. Looking South into the dessert, which within a few decades would be fully developed. The triangle swimming pool is to the right. Stamped on verso: "Howard Dewald, Phoenix Arizona. Neg. No. 7." Label pasted to verso: "Globe Photos, 275 7th Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10001." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.72.0116
1957
Wright at 89 (1957). Frank Lloyd Wright holds news conference at Taliesin West, circa 1957. Wright being filmed walking on the Sunset Terrace toward the Breezeway. Wright is dressed in a dark suit, vest and tie. White handkerchief in his breast pocket. He is walking toward the left. Camera man is in the jeep to the left. Stamped on verso: "Howard Dewald, Phoenix Arizona. Neg. No. 11." "Globe Photos, 275 7th Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10001." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.73.0116
1957
Wright at 89 (1957). Frank Lloyd Wright holds news conference at Taliesin West, circa 1957. Wright is dressed in a dark suit, vest and tie. White handkerchief in his breast pocket. He has a cane in his right hand, and is walking toward the left of the camera. Drafting boards are on the left and the right, and the drafting room at Taliesin West can be seen in the background. Behind Wright is a TV camera for NBC Phoenix affiliate KVAR. Channel 12 was changed to KVAR in 1955, then changed again in 1959 to KTAR-TV. One of the TV crew members is holding a sign that reads "But it Takes Boldness." Stamped on verso: "Howard Dewald, Phoenix Arizona. Neg. No. 15." "Gilloon Agency, 570 Fifth Avenue, New York 36, N. Y." "Globe Photos, 275 7th Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10001." (Possibly related to 1205.44?) Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.69.1015
1957 
Frank Lloyd Wright at 90 (AP wirephoto)  (June 8, 1957).  Caption reads: "Spring Green, Wis., June 8  -  Wright Celebrates 88th Birthday, Frank Lloyd Wright, the world famous architect, posed with his wife, Olgivanna (right), and his daughter Iovanna, at his 88th birthday celebration here tonight.  Over 125 guests toasted Wright as he spoke of his commission from King Faisal of Iraq to design and plan a cultural center on a Tigris River island in Bagdad.  He called the commission a wonderful present."  This photo is also published in the Saturday Evening  Post, 2/4/61, Pg 38. 1957.00.0500
1957
Frank Lloyd Wright at 90.  Photographed in 1957 by Edgar L. Obma.  Published on the cover of “Frank Lloyd Wright Decorative Designs Collection Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation 1988.  Similar view in “The Master Architect, Conversations with Frank Lloyd Wright” Meehan 1984, Pg 313. (See Obma Article.) Verso second photograph: Stamped Dec 9, 1986, (written) 3C, and stamped Feb 26, 1994, (written) D27. Two original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.26.0507 1205.35.1209
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Wright is standing behind a podium at Taliesin, arms outstretched. There is a stack of notes on the podium, and prints atop a book shelf in the background. He was working on the Baghdad project at the time. He was photographed for an article in "Look Magazine" entitled "A visit with Frank Lloyd Wright’", published on September 17, 1957. This photograph is on pages 32-33. Photographed by Michael A. Vaccaro on July 5, 1957. Stamped on verso: "(C) Michael A. Vaccaro. Frank Lloyd Wright, 1957. Heller Gallery (New York)." Original 9.75 x 8 B&W print. 1205.40.0510
1957
Wright at 90. Wright stands behind a podium at Taliesin, he is gesturing with his left hand, pointing out and up. There is a stack of notes on the podium, prints atop a book shelf in the background. He was working on the Baghdad project at the time. It was photographed for an article in "Look Magazine" entitled "A visit with Frank Lloyd Wright’", published on September 17, 1957. Photographed by Michael A. Vaccaro on July 5, 1957. Similar image is on page 32. 7 x 4.9 print, High res digital image. 1205.30.0609
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Frank Lloyd Wright, San Rafael, California, August 2, 1957 (Marin County Civic Center, 1957 - S.415-417). Wright most likely on the grounds of the Marin County Civic Center, San Rafael, California. He is looking above the camera to the left, pointing in the same direction with his cane. Caption printed on verso, "International News Soundphoto - (8/2/57) - San Rafael, Calif... Waving his cane in anger, Frank Lloyd Wright, distinguished architect, is shown leaving Marin Board of Supervisors meeting after accusations that he was politically inclined towards communism, a charge he vehemently denies... San Francisco Examiner. Photo by George Wheeler." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1205.68.0815
1957
Wright at 90. Family portrait at Taliesin. Wright is seated looking to the left. Olgivanna is in the center, her head is turned to the right, but looking at the camera. Iovanna is on the floor seated on the left, looking directly into the camera. Verso: "For release: Monday A.M.’s, September 2, 1957. New York Bureau. Family Man. Madison, Wisc.: Posing for his first family portrait, world renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright is the picture of patriarchal dignity in his home near Madison, WI. Wright, one of the pioneers in the development of modern architecture, is shown with his wife, Olgivanna, and daughter Iovanna (left), youngest of his eight children. He posed for the portrait for an article appearing in the new issue of Look Magazine. (This picture is released for publication in United States and Canadian newspapers for a period of two weeks and is subject to mandatory credit to Look Magazine). Credit (Look Magazine photo from United Press) 8/30/57. For release: Monday A.M.’s, September 2, 1957." Stamped Sep 3, 1957. It was photographed for an article in "Look Magazine" entitled "A visit with Frank Lloyd Wright’", published on September 17, 1957. Photographed by Michael A. Vaccaro around July 5, 1957. Published on page 30. (See S#1205.30) 7.7 x 10 print, High res digital image. 1205.31.0609
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Mr. & Mrs. Wright meeting with Anne Baxter (left) and Charlton Heston (to the right of Anne) at Taliesin West. Anne Baxter was Wright’s grand daughter and an actress. In 1956 Baxter stared as Nefretiri the Egyptian queen, opposite Charlton Heston and Yul Brenner in "The Ten Commandments". Baxter and Heston acted together again in "Three Violent People". It was released in late 1956 and early 1957. Set in the American West after the Civil War, Charlton Heston was an ex-Confederate officer Colt Saunders who returns to the family ranch with his new bride Lorna Hunter (Anne Baxter) and faces problems from carpetbaggers and his jealous brother, and a secret from Baxter's past. One the verso, is hand written "Press Interview". The gentleman between Heston and Wright is wearing a badge (star) that reads "Sheriff Posse". This would indicate the press interview was for "Three Violent People". Stamped "From the Jimmy Starr Collection". Jimmy Starr (1904 – 1990) was an American screenwriter and columnist. Starr worked as a screenwriter in Hollywood during the 1930s. During the 1940s he worked as a film writer and columnist, providing reviews and insights into the film world. After retirement from the Hollywood scene, Starr moved to Phoenix, Arizona. (Note: Also in 1957 Wright designed...  Continue... 1205.32.0709
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Wright meeting Charlton Heston and his grand daughter Anne Baxter (center) possibly at Taliesin West. In 1956 Baxter stared as Nefretiri the Egyptian queen, opposite Charlton Heston and Yul Brenner in "The Ten Commandments". Baxter and Heston acted together again in "Three Violent People". It was released in late 1956 and early 1957. Set in the American West after the Civil War, Charlton Heston was an ex-Confederate officer Colt Saunders who returns to the family ranch with his new bride Lorna Hunter (Anne Baxter) and faces problems from carpetbaggers and his jealous brother, and a secret from Baxter's past. Heston and Baxter held a press conference at Taliesin (1205.32) and this could possibly been in the evening, as Wright was fond of entertaining guests. Wright is wearing the same suite jacket and scarf. 5 x 6.25 print, High res digital image. 1205.33.0709
1957
Wright at 90 (Circa 1957). Mr. & Mrs. Wright are holding hands as they arrive at Taliesin. He is holding a cane and looking at the camera. She is looking at him. The Wisconsin hillside can be seen in the background. Gift from Randolph C. Henning. 8 x 10 print, High res digital image. 1205.34.0709
1957
Frank Lloyd Wright at the Robie House (1906 - S.127) 1957. Clipping on verso: "A Couple of Pioneers. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright stands by Robie House in Chicago, March 18, during a visit to the structure which has been called ‘the cornerstone of modern architecture.’ The aging pioneer and a committee seek to preserve the architectural landmark. The Chicago Theological Seminary, owner of the building, plans to demolish the structure to make room for a new dormitory. The building stands at 58th street and South Woodlawn Avenue, on the south side. Associated Press Photo, From Chicago. 3/18/57." 10.5 x 8 Print, High Res image. From the archives of the Associated Press. 1205.39.0410
1957
Frank Lloyd Wright at the Robie House (1906 S.127) 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright visits the Robie house on March 18, 1957 to attempt to stop the demolition of the Robie House. The Chicago Theological Seminary, owner of the building, plans to demolish the structure to make room for a new dormitory. Associated Press Photo. 3/18/57. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. From the archives of the Associated Press. 1205.55.0614
1957
Frank Lloyd Wright in Drafting Room, Taliesin, Spring Green, 1957. Photographed by Al Krescanko (1927-2005), staff photographer for S. C. Johnson. "At the time he took the pictures of Wright touring the Administration Building and in his drafting room at Taliesin, Krescanko didn't think of Wright as much more than just one in a long line of famous people he photographed during his career at SC Johnson. ‘It didn't faze me because I'd photographed some other architects who were big and famous. My job was a lot of celebrities,’ Krescanko recalls." Mark Hertzberg. Wright in Drafting Room, Taliesin, Spring Green. Wright is looking to the right, studying drawings in front of him. Reproduction of a print signed: "FLLW / 57." Published in "Apprentice to Genious," Tafel, 1978, p.170. The set included two photographs and a copy of a letter from Eugene Masselink to Al Krescanko. Original 11 x 14 B&W photograph. 1205.80.0817
1957
Frank Lloyd Wright montage of eight portraits, 1957. Photographed by Al Krescanko (1927-2005), staff photographer for S. C. Johnson. "At the time he took the pictures of Wright touring the Administration Building and in his drafting room at Taliesin, Krescanko didn't think of Wright as much more than just one in a long line of famous people he photographed during his career at SC Johnson. ‘It didn't faze me because I'd photographed some other architects who were big and famous. My job was a lot of celebrities,’ Krescanko recalls." Mark Hertzberg. Frank Lloyd Wright touring the S.C. Johnson Headquarters Great Room. Reproduction of a montage of Wright prints initialed five times: "FLLW / 57." Three of the photographs published in "Apprentice to Genious," Tafel, 1978, p.185-187. Background is a photograph of the glass dome in the Advertising Department. The set included two photographs and a copy of a letter from Eugene Masselink to Al Krescanko. Original 11 x 14 B&W photograph. 1205.81.0817
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Wright interviewed at WTTW, Mile High drawing behind him. Clipping on verso: (Stamped Oct 25, 1957) "This ‘spectacular’ will feature a conversation between Frank Lloyd Wright and Carl Sandburg and a story of modern architecture as told by George Edson Danforth. Alistair ‘Omnibus’ Cooke will be host and emcee on the program. Live on WTTW..." This was photographed before the "live" interview on October 29, 1957. Possibly an earlier interview at WTTW in 1956 or 1957, or a few days before the October 29th interview in preparation for, or for the promotion of the live interview. On October 29, 1957, Wright and Carl Sandburg were interviewed by Alistair Cooke for the program "Chicago Dynamic", which was broadcast on WTTW Chicago. For the complete interview see "The Master Architect" Meehan, 1984, pages 254-270. Illustration of Mile High Building in background. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. Two copies. 1205.36.0310 1205.43.0811
1957 
Wright at 90 (1957). October 29, 1957, Chicago, IL. Two of the country's most distinguished citizens, architect Frank Lloyd Wright (left) and poet Carl Sandburg, pose after appearing on a television forum for the first time together. They talked about modern architecture with Alistair Cooke on "Omnibus." On October 29, 1957, Wright and Carl Sandburg were interviewed by Alistair Cooke for the program "Chicago Dynamic", which was broadcast on WTTW Chicago. For the complete interview see "The Master Architect" Meehan, 1984, pages 254-270. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative, One 10 x 7 B&W photograph, One 43 x 30" B&W High Res Digital image. 1205.48.0513
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Wright signing a copy of "The Future of Architecture". Caption: "11/2/57 - Indianapolis: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright signs an autograph for 17 year old Stephen Mooring, an architectural student at the University of Cincinati (sp), at a reception for Wright 11/2 at Indianapolis. Wright is to speak to a group at the Herron Art Museum tonight. United Press Telephoto." Note: Mooring was a contributing author of "A.D. Profiles 16: Bruce Goff. Architectural Design: Vol. 48, No. 10". 1978. By Bruce Goff, John Sergeant, Lionel March, Charles Jencks, Stephen Mooring, Joe Price, Herb Greene, David De Long, Jeffrey Cook. Acquired from the archives of United Press Associations. Original 7 x 9 B&W print. 1205.38.0310
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Stamped on verso: "Nov 1957." Caption on verso: "A date with Marilyn Monroe. Frank Lloyd Wright and him wife as they left via American Airlines for Phoenix Ariz. Where they will have as their guest Marilyn Monroe. Wright is building a home for the Millers in Conn. And they will go over the plane. Asked how big the home would be Wright replied as he gestured so high on top of a mountain top." Clipping on verso: Stamped: "Sat. Mar 2 ‘85" "Frank Lloyd Wright and his wife, Olgivanna Lloyd Wright, get ready to fly to Arizona in 1957 to meet with Marilyn Monroe, for whom he was building a house. Olgivanna Wright died yesterday at 87 in Scottsdale, Ariz." Stamped on verso: "Metro News Photo, 5700 S, Cicero Ave., Chicago, IL." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 1205.37.0310
1957 (A)
Wright at 90, 1957. A) 1957 (90);  B) 1951 (84);  C) 1953 (86);  D) 1954 (87).
A) Top Left: Wright at 90. 1957. Frank Lloyd Wright inspects construction of the Guggenheim in 1957. Ground was broken on August 14, 1956. Wright visited the site many times. Wright pasted away April 9, 1959, six months before the grand opening. Grand opening October 21, 1959. Published in "The Guggenheim", 2009, p 1, and a similar image taken at the same time, "Frank Lloyd Wright in New York", Hession, Pickrel, 2007, p 104. Photographed by John Engstead. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
B) Top Right: Wright at 84, 1951. Wright in drafting room, Taliesin West in 1951. Photographed by Ezra Stoller. Similar image in "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West", Stoller, 1999, p 8. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
C) Bottom Left: Wright at 86, 1953. Frank Lloyd Wright at drafting table with a large image of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop (S.310 - 1948) in the background. Photographed by John Engstead. Published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Decorative Designs Collection", 1990. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
D) Bottom Right: Wright at 87, 1954. Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, facing right, looking to the left. Photographed by Al Ravenna. Original 3.75 x 4.75 B&W photograph.
Montage of four portraits of Frank Lloyd Wright. Stamped on verso: "Nov 9 1998". Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. Two copies.
0857.06.0911 0857.07.0911
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). November 9, 1957. "Architect Frank Lloyd Wright gives a lecture at Lane Tech in Chicago. November 9, 1957." Original 4 x 5 B&W negative and 8 x 10 B&W Print. 1205.41.0810
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Caption on face: "4/9/59 – Phoenix: World-famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright died early 4/9. The 89-year-old Wright died following surgery here. He is shown in 1957 file photo. UPI Telephoto." Stamped on verso: "United Press International Photo". Wright was born on June 8, 1867 and passed away in Phoenix on April 9, 1959, age 91. Original 8 x 4.75 B&W photograph. 1205.45.0911
1957 
Guggenheim Museum during construction 1957 (1956 - S.400). Foundation work began early 1957, and extended through 1958. Most likely photographed late 1957, early 1958. The Monitor Building roof (the Northwest section of the building) is on the left. The deck for the balcony has been poured, but the walls of the balcony have not been started. The sweeping concrete overhand of the second level that runs the length of the building along fifth avenue has been completed. The spiral ramps to the right are under construction. The job trailer sits on the corner. Original 10 x 6.25 B&W photograph. 1205.49.0913
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). December 17, 1957. Wright with Model of Dome Theater project. Clipping taped to verso: "Dome Theater, a model of which is shown above, will be designed and built by Frank Lloyd Wright, Sylvester Weaver (left), Mike Todd (standing) and Henry J. Kaiser (right). Wright is to be master architect for world-wide operations of the firm known as Dome Enterprises. The proposed multi-purpose auditorium theater would be housed in a shell of aluminum." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 17 1957." Producer Mike Todd, is best known for his 1956 production of Around the World in 80 Days, which won an Academy Award for Best Picture. He was Elizabeth Taylor's third of seven husbands, and his third wife. They were married on February 2, 1957 when he was 47, she 24. Todd hired Wright who design a domed theater with a geodesic roof using aluminum from Kaiser Aluminum. The theater featured and showcased the wide screen movies his company was producing. See "Treasures of Taliesin, Seventy-Seven Unbuilt Designs." Todd and Taylor’s relationship was tempestuous, but he was one of her husbands she did not divorce. On March 22, 1958, Todd's private plane Lucky Liz crashed near Grants, New Mexico. After his death, his heirs did not continue the project. Note: Photographed in Wright's New York Plaza Hotel apartment...  Continue... 1205.54.0514
1957
Wright at 90 (1957). Wright seated at desk, facing forward. He is looking slightly left of the camera, a pencil in his right hand. In the background is a photograph of Wright with apprentices at Taliesin Spring Green, which was photographed in 1937 by Ken Hedrich, Hedrich Blessing, during the preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1205.47.0712
1958
C 1958
Gregor S. Affleck House, Circa 1958 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Exterior viewed from the South. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. The Living Room and Balcony are cantilevered out over the ravine. Photographed by Balthazar Korab. Similar image published in the December, 1959 issue of AIA Monthly Bulletin, Michigan, page 22-23, and the March-April 1978 issue of the Frank Lloyd Wright Newsletter, page 2. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.44.0514
C 1958
Gregor S. Affleck House, Circa 1958 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Interior view of Loggia looking South. Floor to ceiling doors open to the Balcony. Skylights flood the area with light. The Living Room is on the left. Designed by FLW in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Photographed by Balthazar Korab. Published in the December, 1959 issue of AIA Monthly Bulletin, Michigan, page 23, and the March-April 1978 issue of the Frank Lloyd Wright Newsletter, page 2. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.45.0514
1958
Interior of the Ennis-Brown House. Caption on back: “House on Haunted Hill, A William Castle-Robb White Production for Allied Artists, stars Vincent Price, Carol Ohmart, Richard Long and Alan Marshal with Carolyn Craig and Elisha Cook in supporting roles. It was produced and directed by William Castle from an original screenplay by Robb White. Pictured here are, left to right: Carolyn Craig, Richard Long, Elisha Cook, Julie Mitchem and Alan Marshal.” Stamped on the back “Manbeck Pictures Corp. 3621 Wakonda Drive, Des Moines, Iowa, 50321-2132 U.S.A.” The House on Haunted Hill was filmed in 1958 and released on February 17, 1959.  This photograph is from the collection of Manbeck Pictures in Des Moines, Iowa. Mr. Manbeck collected 16mm movies and showed them in his garage as a teenager in the 1930's. He also collected movie posters and other advertising material that went with the films with the hopes of someday opening a movie museum. He retired in the early sixties as TV took over. He was still a source for rare 16mm prints up until the 1990's. Original 8 x 10 B&W photo. 1259.15.1208
1958
Erdman Prefabricated Home #1 (1956-1961 - 406-411). Frank Lloyd Wright and Marshall Erdman study model of prefabricated home #1. Erdman’s first contact with Wright was as contractor for the Unitarian Meeting House in Madison, designed in 1947. Construction began in 1949 and was completed in 1951. The two first discussed the idea of working together on a prefabricated design in 1954. It wouldn’t be until the end of 1955 that Wright would deliver his first design. Erdman convinced Wright to attend the show in January 1958. On January 22 he delivered a lecture on prefabrication and his prefab design in the Crystal Ballroom of Chicago’s Blackstone Hotel. This model was most likely created for the show and his lecture. Clipping on verso: "A New Wright Project. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, left, and manufacturer Marshall Erdman, Madison, Wis., look over a model of a prefabricated three-bedroom house that is expected to sell for about $20,000. The new creation of the 88-year-old architect is expected to go into production early in 1959. The two-story house model is being displayed at the National Association of Home Builders annual convention in Chicago." Stamped on clipping: "Jan 23 1958." Stamped on verso: "1946 Jan 22." (SIC. Should be 1958 Jan 22.) Nine homes were completed: Van Tamelen (1956 - S.406)...  Continue... 1259.48.0115
1958

Florida Southern College, Polk County Science Building, Lakeland, Florida 1958 (1953 - S.256). Viewed from the Southwest, Wright called it the Cosmography Building. The round dome is the Planetarium which is on the Southeastern end of the building. Clipping pasted on verso: "Wright Hand. Florida Southern College’s new Polk County Science Building, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, will be the site of the Lakeland school’s three-day audio-visual conference, beginning June 16. More than 150 educators will attend. Theme will be ‘better utilization of instructional materials.’ " The Polk County Science Building was the last Wright designed structure built on the Florida Southern College campus and was completed on March 11, 1958. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

1259.37.0113
1958
Florida Southern College, Polk County Science Building, Lakeland, Florida 1958 (1953 - S.256). Viewed from the Southeast, Wright called it the Cosmography Building. The round dome in the foreground is the Planetarium which is on the Southeastern end of the building. The Watson Administration Building can be seen in the background on the far left. The Polk County Science Building was the last Wright designed structure built on the Florida Southern College campus and was completed on March 11, 1958. Original 9 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.38.0113
1958
Guggenheim Museum 1958 (S.400). Caption "8/23/58 - New York: Here’s an excellent view of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Memorial Museum (see NXP 1165061) which is nearing completion on Fifth Ave. The structure was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, who’s internationally known for his unusual architectural designs. UPI Telephoto." Printed on verso: "New York City - Bldgs - Solomon R. Guggenheim Memorial Museum". Stamped on verso: "Received Examiner Reference Library. Aug 24 1958". Original 9.2 x 7 B&W print. 1259.19.1010
1958 
Guggenheim Museum 1958-59 (1956 - S.400). Wright visits the Guggenheim. Wright is on a balcony of the Monitor Building (the Northwest section of the building) with a painter in the background on a scaffold, painting the exterior wall. According to "The Guggenheim", Wright visited the Guggenheim on November 7, 1958 (page 212) and for the last time in January, 1959 (page 214). He seems to be wearing the overcoat as in the November 7 visit, but they date this image circa 1959 (page 224). "The Guggenheim Correspondence" dates this image 1959 (page 289). Part of the PR program for the PBS documentary by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, "Frank Lloyd Wright". Photographed by William H. Short. 35mm color slide, 8.5 x 11 sheet. 1259.35.0813
1958 
Guggenheim Museum 1958-9 (1956 - S.400). Wright visits the Guggenheim. Wright is on a balcony of the Monitor Building (the Northwest section of the building) with painters in the background on a scaffold, painting the exterior wall. According to "The Guggenheim", Wright visited the Guggenheim on November 7, 1958 (page 212) and for the last time in January, 1959 (page 214). He seems to be wearing the overcoat as in the November 7 visit, but they date this image circa 1959 (page 224). "The Guggenheim Correspondence" dates this image 1959 (page 289). Photographed by William H. Short. Original 5.6 x 7 B&W photograph. 1259.36.0913
1958
Lindholm Service Station Under Construction 1958 (1956 - S. 414). Ray W. Lindholm’s first contact with Frank Lloyd Wright was for the design of his home just outside of Cloquet Minnesota called Mäntylä (1952 - S.353). R. W. Lindholm was the president of Lindholm Oil, Inc., a distributor of petroleum headquartered in Cloquet. The company owned several gas stations in Minnesota. Lindholm commissioned Wright again in 1956 to design a service station on Highway 33 in Cloquet. Wright utilized his earlier Broadacre City service station design, which he had exhibited as early as 1930. Construction began on April 27, 1958 and opened on October 31, 1958. Stamped on verso: "Roy Swan. Sep 9 1958." 1982 clipping taped to verso: "By Paul Goldberger. New York Times. There is, in gas stations, a kind of miniature history of American architecture - or at least there used to be. In the 1920s, 1930s, and even into the 1940s gasoline stations were built in the form of little colonial houses, Chinese pagodas, art deco palaces, Spanish mission haciendas and Greek temples. Almost every town had a different kind of building in which to purvey its gasoline, and architects seemed to struggle to make each station something of a landmark in its location... Caption: The Cloquet, Minn., station designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is shown under...  Continue... 1259.39.1113
C 1958
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1958. Viewed from the West. According to SC Johnson, the globe in the foreground was installed in 1952. Johnathan Lipman dates it to 1954, "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building," 1986, page 130, which is a similar view, minor changes. The Research Tower and complex is on the left. The opening Ceremony for the Research Tower was November 17, 1950. The Great Workroom is on the right. Stamped on verso: "S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Photographic Department, No. 11009 297." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.46.1114
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Master Bedroom Balcony, 1958 (1953 - S.358). Bethesda, Maryland. Stamped on verso: "ROTO Jun 29, 1958". Clipping n verso: "Apr 9, 1959. Wright. Looking Out - Cantilevered balcony projects off master bedroom. Door to utility room is below ground level." Robert Llewellyn was Wright’s sixth child. The home was featured in the November 1959 issue of House Beautiful, pages 244-245.  Original 8 x 10 B&W photo. 1259.17.0310
C 1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358) Circa 1958. Exterior viewed from the West. Lower level: The Dining room is under the balcony, the Living Room and Terrace to the right. Upper level: The Master Bedroom and Balcony are on the left, two more bedrooms are to the right. Hand written on verso: "Third Scheme: Robert Lleyellyn Wright, Bethesda, MD." Robert Llewellyn was Wright’s sixth child. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.42.0514
C 1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358) Circa 1958. Exterior viewed from the East. Lower level: The Living Room is on the left, the stairway leading upstairs is to the right. The entrance is to the right of the built-in triangular planter. The circular workspace it on the far right. Upper level: The Southeast bedroom is on the left, stairway and gallery in the center, circular bath above the workspace on the right. The horizontal wood siding on the left and along the roof line, slants outward as it rises. Hand written on verso: "Entry side - Less Carport." Robert Llewellyn was Wright’s sixth child. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.43.0514
1958
Frank Lloyd Wright at 90.  Associated Press Caption: “Wright Dies. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 89, Died April 9 in Phoenix, Ariz., following an operation for an intestinal obstruction on April 4.”  AP caption accompanying the photo.  Photograph shot in 1957-58 with Baghdad Opera House and Gardens Drawing as backdrop.  For Illustration note: “Truth Against the World”, 1987, Meehan, page 419;  “Arch Forum”, May 1958, page 89-102;  “Frank Lloyd Wright Quarterly” Winter 2004.  Stamped on back “Filed Apr 16, 1959 Not Used” and “Published May 17, 1970".  Original 5 x 7 silver gelatin photo. 1205.19.1006
1958
Wright at 91, 1958. Caption "Spring Green, Wis., June 9 - Birthday Party - About 80 persons attended a birthday party Sunday for Frank Lloyd Wright, noted architect, who was 89, at his palatial Taliesin estate near here. With Wright (left) are Mr. And Mrs. Harold C. Price, Bartlesville, Okla., two of the guests. AP Wirephoto. 1958." Stamped on verso: "Jun 1958." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1259.18.0310
1958
Wright at 91, 1958. Frank Lloyd Wright and Mr. And Mrs. Harold C. Price at Wright’s 91st birthday. About 80 visitors celebrated Wright’s birthday party Sunday June 8, 1958 at Taliesin, Spring Green. Stamped on verso: "Associated Press." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 9.75 x 6 B&W photograph. 1259.52.0617
C 1958 
Wright at 91, 1958. Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright standing outdoors next to car. Facing slightly to the left, looking to the left of camera. Wright’s right arm is behind his wife, left arm resting on his cane. Stamped on verso: "Metro Group Editorial Service... For Release on or After Jun 22 1958." Stamped on verso: "St. Paul Sunday Pioneer Press." Caption pasted to verso: "Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright. The architect is 89." (SIC) Hand written on verso: "Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1259.47.1214
1958
Frank Lloyd Wright at 91.  Fall 1958 Wright and female at Plaza Hotel, to discuss the Radcliffe Scholarship Tour of the incomplete Guggenheim Museum.  (This photograph was pasted inside the first page of a book that was purchased.  Handwritten below the photograph: "At the Plaza Hotel fall 1958 to discuss the Radcliffe Scholarship Tour of the incomplete Guggenheim Museum.")   5.3 x 3.2.  Original silver gelatin B&W photograph.  5.3 x 3.2 1259.14.0507
   Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Set of 13 photographs. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child.  
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Exterior viewed from the West. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Lower level: Workspace (Kitchen) is on the far left, Dining room in the center (foreground corner), Living Room and Terrace to the right. Upper level: Bath is on the far left, Master Bedroom and Balcony in the center and right (foreground corner). Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 2. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.22.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Exterior viewed from the Southeast. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Lower level: The circular Terrace is on the far left, Living Room is in the foreground. Upper level: The Master Bedroom Balcony can be seen cantilevered on the far left. The Master and center Bedrooms open to a Balcony on the left. The Southeast Bedroom is in the foreground. The horizontal wood siding slants outward as it rises. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 1. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.23.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Exterior viewed from the Southeast. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Lower level: The circular Terrace is on the far left, Living Room is in the foreground. Upper level: The Master Bedroom Balcony can be glimpsed on the far left. The Master and center Bedrooms open to a Balcony on the left. The Southeast Bedroom is in the foreground. The horizontal wood siding slants outward as it rises. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184. Dec 24 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.24.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Workspace (Kitchen) viewed from the West. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Exterior wall of circular Workspace is on the left. Main Entrance is through the doorway on the right. Counter top stove is on the left. In the center under the counter is a Kitchenaid Dishwasher on the left, a General Electric combination Washer/Dryer on the right. Note the cantilevered shelves to the upper left of the doorway. Built-in over is on the far right. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 6. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.25.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Dining Room viewed from the Living Room. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. The intersection of the circular design forms less than a 90 degree angle. Built-in circular Dining Room table is on the left. Behind it on the left are built-in shelves. Built-in cabinets are in the background. Note the vertical double vase on the dining room table to the left. Most likely designed by his father. Very similar to the double vase designed by Wright for Heritage Henredon in 1955. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184. Dec 24 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.26.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). Circular Living Room Fireplace. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Smaller circular Fireplace intersects larger circular Workspace, which intersects larger Northern circular segment. Circular metal grate sets inside the Fireplace. Robert’s older son Thomas Llewellyn (1935) had left home by 1958 when the home was completed. Pictured is Timothy Kehler (1938), Robert’s younger son. Timothy would have been approximately 20 years old. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 4. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.27.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the Living Room from the Eastern end. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Llewellyn, as he was known, looks out of the floor to ceiling doors and windows of the Southern side of the circular wall. The Southern wall consists of equally sized windows and doors, where every other panel opens. One window in the Dining area opens, four floor to ceiling doors open, and three windows open above built-in cabinets in the foreground on the left. All open outward. In between each glass panel is a one foot full length glass panel. A second vertical double vase can be seen on the built-in cabinet on the left. The circular fireplace in on the far right. Circular lines embedded in the Cherokee red concrete floor are at three foot increments. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 3. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.28.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the Living Room from the Eastern end. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Llewellyn, as he was known, is seated reading, his back to the stair wall. The dining room is to the left, circular fireplace to its right, the main entrance is directly behind him. The stairway is to his back. Circular lines embedded in the Cherokee red concrete floor are at three foot increments. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184. Dec 24 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.29.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the Eastern end of the Living Room. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Llewellyn’s wife Elizabeth, relaxes on the built-in Living Room seating. Built-in cabinets on the right. Note the tall vertical vase just to the right of Elizabeth. Most likely designed by Llewellyn’s father. It is very similar to the vase designed by Wright for Heritage Henredon in 1955. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184. Dec 24 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.30.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the second level Gallery and circular stairway. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. The Northern wall is to the left. Pictured is Llewellyn’s daughter, Elizabeth Catherine (1943) who would have been about 15-16. Built in cabinets are on the far left. The half height circular wall on the right is of wood construction. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184. Dec 24 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.31.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the second level Gallery. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Windows in the Northern wall create light patterns. Vertical windows open outward. Pictured is Llewellyn’s daughter, Elizabeth Catherine (1943) who would have been about 15-16. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 8. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.32.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the second level Master Bedroom looking toward the western corner. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion. Doors on the far left open outward to the Balcony. Built-in shelving covers the Northern exterior wall. To the left is a built-in cabinet or night stand. Llewellyn’s wife Elizabeth is straightening the pillows. Note the tall vertical vase to the left of Elizabeth behind the chair. Most likely designed by Llewellyn’s father. It is very similar to the vase designed by Wright for Heritage Henredon in 1955. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 5. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.33.0513
1958
Robert Llewellyn Wright Residence Bethesda, Maryland (1953 - S.358). View of the center Bedroom on the second level. Photographed in 1958, after construction was completion, from the Northern corner. The bed is to the far left in the foreground. Llewellyn’s daughter, Elizabeth Catherine (1943) who would have been about 15-16 years old, is seated at the built-in desk. Built-in shelves are on the wall above her. Two sets of doors open outward to a Balcony. Stamped on verso: "Robert L. Wright: Home. 284 - 184 - 7. Nov 2 - 1958." Photographed by Larry L. Stevens. Robert Llewellyn was Frank Lloyd Wright’s sixth child. Original B&W 8 x 10 photo. 1259.34.0513
1958
Wyoming Valley School Sign 1958 (1956 - S.401) Wyoming Valley, Wisc. After the school district voted to consolidate a number of one-room school houses in January 1956, a referendum was past in April. In October, the board selected Frank Lloyd Wright to design their school. Wright immediately set out to design the school and on November 28, received a letter from the Board that "the building committee accepted the plans with enthusiasm" along with a few revision. The first plans submitted to the Board was a resurrection of the unrealized Oak Park Kindersymphonies design, with a few modifications. Wright included some of the same design elements of the original, like the large circular vases, noting "bowl and spheres cast in red concrete for flowers and lights. One addition was a large round table surrounded by chair in the Kindergarten room, which he noted as "The Round Table." As changes were requested, a need to enlarge the building and at the same time cut costs, many of the original "fanciful" details were deleted. Wright did specify the light fixtures, "white balls." Not only did Wright donate his fee, he donated $7,000 toward the memory of his mother, helping to lower the cost of construction and for $750 he purchased an adjoining 2 acres, bringing the site to just over five acres. Wright received a letter in January, 1957...  Continue... 1259.51.0317
1959
1959
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church (1956 - S.399). Caption on face: "Milwaukee, May 18 – Architect’s widow speaks – Standing before an outdoor alter, Mrs. Olgivanna Lloyd Wright, widow of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, addresses members of Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church at a groundbreaking ceremony in suburban Wauwatosa for a new church designed by her late husband. Behind her, wearing clerical robe, is the Rev. E. N. Vergis, Annunciation pastor. Mrs. Wright helped turn the first shovelful of earth. (AP Wirephoto) 1959." Published in "New World Odyssey", Gurda, 1986, p 89. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1377.53.0911
1959
Peter A. Beachy Residence Remodel, Oak park (1906 - S.117) 1959. Label on verso: "Date: 12 Aug ‘59. Photographer: Gekler. Title: Wright Homes. Location: Oak Park. Caption: Home at 238 Forest Ave, Oak Park." Clipping on verso: "Oak Park home built early in the century has gabled roofs instead of the flat overhanging roofs which later characterized Wright’s prairie houses. It is now the home of Mr. And Mrs. Wallace W. Tudor. (Stamped) Aug 23 1959." Also stamped on verso: "Daily News, Jun 6 1964". Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1377.39.0310
1959
Beth Sholom Synagogue, Elkins Park, PA. (1954 - S.373) Circa 1959. Founded in 1919 the new Synagogue was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954, dedicated on September 20, 1959. Stamped on verso: "194 - Exterior. Beth Sholom Synagogue, Elkins Park, Pa. Approx. 21,000 corrugated wire glass, sandblasted .032 aluminum accessories. Archt. Frank Lloyd Wright, Phoenix, Arizona. Contractor - Culwell Construction Co., Oklahoma City, Okla. & Philadelphia, Pa. Mfg & Furn. Pennsylvania Wire Glass Co., 1612 Market St., Phila., Pa." "May 3 1961 H. B. Mills Co." Photographed shortly after completion of construction. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1377.61.0613
1959
George Blossom Dining Room (1892 - S.014) 1959. Stamped n verso: "Apr 11, 1959". Clipping on verso: "Dated Apr13, 1959. Wright house at 4858 S. Kenwood was built in 1892. It is now occupied by Donald C Baum and his wife Alice, both artists. Doorways are widely arched, after style of Wright’s teacher Sullivan. House has 12 rooms but the Baums say they don’t find the size overwhelming." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8.5 x 10 B&W print. 1377.33.0310
1959 
The Cass House (S.409.2) was the first of two prefab houses designed by Wright, constructed for the Marshall Erdman Co.  This was a Erdman Co Prefab No. 1.  Cass House Package.  Package includes:  1) 2 photos of interior showing installed High Fidelity system.   2) 4 pages of hand written instructions   3) Letter from High Fidelity Magazine, July 15, 1959  4) New York Times, July 5, 1959, Article on Cass Home. 1959.08.1201
1959
Francisco Terrace Apartments (1895 - S.030) 1959. Caption on verso: "The Sullivan influence is seen again in the arch of court building at 253 N. Francisco. This is one of the Wright structures that shows signs of neglect." Stamped "Apr 13, 1959". Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 4/10/59. Photographer: Larson. Title: Wright Homes... Location: 253 N. Francisco. Caption: Building at 253 N. Francisco designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Original 7.5 x 10 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.37.0310
1959
Arthur Heurtley Residence, Oak park (1902 - S.074) 1959. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 12 Aug ‘59. Photographer: Gekler. Title: Wright Homes. Location: Oak Park. Caption: Home at 318 Forest Ave, Oak Park." Also stamped on verso: "Aug 1959". Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.40.0310
1959
Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium (1959 - S.432), circa 1959. Grady Gammage (left) and Frank Lloyd Wright (right) review drawing of the Auditorium. According to ASU, Wright and Gammage walked the length and breadth of the campus that warm May afternoon in 1957, seeking a site for a university auditorium that was as yet only an improbable dream... Mr. Wright studied the grassy area in momentary silence, noting its circular frontage bounded by a busy highway, and then declared: "I believe this is the site. The structure should be circular in design - yes, and with outstretched arms saying 'Welcome to Arizona!' " Frank Lloyd Wright celebrated his 90th birthday on June 8, 1957, 125 guests toasted Wright as he spoke of his commission to design the Bagdad cultural center and opera house for King Faisal in Iraq. Wright had received the commission in January 1957, and while in Santa Barbara, CA announced that he would be traveling to Iraq in May. On July 14, 1958, King Faisal was assassinate, ending the commission. Sometime after the assassination of King Faisal in July, 1958, Wright made the decision the utilize the Bagdad design for the ASU Auditorium. The Foundation dates Wright’s design of the Auditorium to 1959. After Wright’s death in April 1959, the Universities’ Board of Regency voted on April 30, 1960 to retain the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, under the direction of William Wesley Peters. 10 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 1377.68.0714
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Caption pasted on verso: "Couldn’t give it away. So comments Frank Serkal (right), long time resident of the Fifth Avenue area and a fitter in new York’s Saks Fifth Avenue store. He tells AP Newsfeature’s Writer Hugh Mulligan (left) that he doesn’t like the design created by architect Frank Lloyd Wright for the new Solomon R, Guggenheim Museum, still under construction (in background). The building has stirred up a lot of comment – pro and con –and some of it is pretty extreme. It’s the sort of hub-bub generally attending the works of Wright. Serkel told Mulligan that style is his business and as far as the museum goes he knows he ‘couldn’t sell that thing to anybody. I couldn’t give it away.’ 3/31/59" AP Newsfeature Photo. Acquired from the achieves of the Associated Press. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. 1377.46.0211
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Caption pasted on verso: "Work of Art of Trash Can? Along New York’s Fifth Avenue, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum comes in for considerable discussion. There seems to be no middle ground - people either like it or hate it. That’s not unusual considering it is the architectural creation of Frank Lloyd Wright, whose works have generally been attended by controversy. The museum has been called everything from a work of beauty to a ‘concrete toilet bowl.’ Wright calls it an ‘archeseum,’ which he says means ‘a building in which to see the highest.’ The museum will house the Guggenheim collection of priceless modern art. 3/31/59. (For use Sunday, April 12, with Hugh Mulligan’s New York APN story on the museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.)" AP Newsfeature Photo. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. 1377.56.0213
1959

Imperial Hotel and the Guggenheim Museum 1959 (two photographs). Caption: "(NY15-April 9) Wright Structures - Two of the late architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s structural designs are exemplified in Tokyo’s famed Imperial Hotel and the still uncompleted Guggenheim Museum on New York’s upper Fifth Avenue. Wright, who died today in Phoenix at the age of 89, designed the Tokyo hotel 40 years ago as an earthquake-proof building to withstand the frequent seismological disturbances. The museum, built to house the Solomon Guggenheim collection of priceless modern art, has excited considerable comments - both criticism and praise. (AP Wire photo)" Stamped on verso: "April 9, 10:16pm and April 10, 1959. Associated Press Wirephoto." Acquired from the archives of The Baltimore Sun. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1377.41.0910 1377.42.0910
1959 
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Guggenheim Museum nears completion, early spring 1959. Exterior walls have been completed and the dome is enclosed. Plywood wall in the foreground are still in place, tree branches upper left have not sprouted buds. Circles can be seen imprinted in the exterior walkways in the foreground. Label pasted to the verso: "Guggenheim Museum, 89th and 5th Ave. Frank Hurley (possibly the photographer). Pix shows an overhead view of the Multimillion dollar Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum now near competition... Architect Frank Lloyd Wright, creator of the controversial building just passed away..." Stamped on verso: "The News Library. Received April 17 1959. 220 East 42nd Street, N.Y." The museum opened to the public on Oct. 21st. Original 7 x 10 B&W print. 1377.74.1114
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Guggenheim Museum nears completion, spring 1959. Plywood wall on the left and center has been removed, tree branches upper right have not sprouted buds. Landscaping and trees have not been completed yet. The museum opened to the public on Oct. 21st. Original 7 x 10 B&W print. 1377.60.0213
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Caption pasted on verso: "Modern Showcase for Modern Art. New York: A huge cover-all dome of wire-supported glass funnels sunlight into the open center of the cylinder-shaped Guggenheim Museum here, Oct. 19th. The newly-completed building, designed by late architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is a spiraling showcase for modern art. The Guggenheim collection spans 70 years of modern art with emphasis on nonobjective paintings. The museum will be opened to the public Oct. 21st. Credit (UPI Photo). 10-19-59." Original 7 x 9 B&W print. 1377.58.0213
1959 
Guggenheim Museum Auditorium 1959 (1956 - S.400). The two-story "Lecture Room" was located in the lower level (basement). It is located directly below the spiral galleries. It continues Wright’s circular theme. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Art Museum Theater, New York City, N. Y. 12/59." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1377.65.1213
1959
Guggenheim Museum Auditorium 1959 (1956 - S.400). Detail of the auditorium seating, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The two-story "Lecture Room" was located in the lower level (basement). It is located directly below the spiral galleries. It continues Wright’s circular theme. Typed on verso: "Guggenheim Museum auditorium, New York City, NY. Designed and furnished by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "Dec 11 ‘59." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1377.69.0714
1959
Guggenheim Museum Grand Opening 1959 (1956 - S.400). Crowds line the street for the grand opening of the Guggenheim Museum, on October 21, 1959. Partial clipping pasted to verso: "...building, giving a perspective that is impossible in the conventional gallery. Some modern ‘non-objective’ paintings, that may look confused and haphazard up close, can be... ...is a museum for people, as much as for pictures. One of the most exciting features of the building, in fact, is its panoramic design. The visitors are an integral part of the exhibition..." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 28 1959." Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 1377.66.1113
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Viewed from the South of the entrance and spiral walls. Exterior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. View of the entrance and spiral walls. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Published in "Guggenheim, New York," Stoller, 1999, page 11. Photographed by Ezra Stroller. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1377.71.0914
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). View of the interior ramps from the upper levels shortly after the grand opening. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Published in "Guggenheim, New York," Stoller, 1999, page 33. Photographed by Ezra Stroller. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1377.72.0914
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). View of the interior ramps from the lower levels shortly after the grand opening. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Similar image published in "Guggenheim, New York," Stoller, 1999, page 23. Photographed by Ezra Stroller. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1377.73.0914
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Caption pasted on verso: "Time to Unwind. New York: Winding its way spectacularly from level to level, a gleaming ramp dominates the interior of the new Solomon Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan (at 5th Ave. and 88th St..). The dramatic ramp, which corkscrews its way from floor to floor in the six-story structure, is perhaps the most exciting innovation in the modernistic museum, which was designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright. The building, housing many valuable painting, has aroused a storm of controversy, pro and con, because of its radical design. Credit (UPI Photo). 10-23-59." Two copies. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. 1377.59.0213 1377.86.1017
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959. Caption on face, right side: "(NY17 - Oct. 20) New Museum in New York – This is an exterior view of the new Solomon R. Guggenheim museum on New York’s Fifth Avenue which is to be formally opened October 21. The unusual looking structure, built round and round like a corkscrew, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It is a memorial to the late Solomon R, Guggenheim, industrialist, philanthropist and patron of the art. (AP Wirephoto) (see story) (pr31331H) 1959. (Advance for release at 11 A.M., EST, Wed. Oct. 21, with story by W.G. Rogers)." Stamped on verso: "1959 Oct 20. Associated Press Wirephoto." Acquired from the archives of the Associated Press. Original 10 x 7.4 B&W print. Two copies. 1377.45.1210 1377.57.0213
1959 
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). View of glass dome. Caption pasted on verso: "Art in Round: Looking up to the translucent glass dome of the new Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. The dome is 92 feet above the floor of the well, around which the exhibit ramp spirals. It is illuminated at night." Stamped on verso: "Nov 29 1959." Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1377.63.0813
1959
Guggenheim Museum 1959 (1956 - S.400). Stamped on verso: "Dec 19, 59". Caption pasted on verso: "Wright Angles. Typical of the late Frank Lloyd Wright’s devotion to new and daring design is the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. The building is featured in the current events portion of the latest issue of Screen News Digest. Acquired from the archives of the Seattle Times. Original 8 x 5 B&W print. 1377.54.0912
1959 
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1959. View of the back Entrance of the Imperial Hotel, the Southeast end from above. Viewed from the East. Typed on verso: "Imperial Hotel Tokyo Japan. Designed by the late Frank L. Wright." Stamped on verso: "Apr 23, 59, U.P.I. Telephoto." Wright past away April 9, 1959. Photograph most likely produced to coincide with articles about his death. Original 5 x 4.25 B&W print. 1377.62.0513
1959
Lloyd Lewis Residence (1939 - S.265) 1959. Label pasted on verso: "Reporte. Frank Lloyd Wright Home. Libertyville, Ill. Exterior of the (Frank)Lloyd Wright home in Libertyville, Ill. This is a Frank Lloyd Home that belongs to Lloyd Lewis." (Sun-Times Photo by Carmen Reporte)." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1377.47.0311
1959
Lloyd Lewis Residence (1939 - S.265) 1959. View of cantilevered carport and North side of home. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Photographer: Reporte. Title: Lloyd Wright Home. Libertyville, Ill. Caption: Exterior of the (Frank) Lloyd Wright home in Libertyville, Ill. This is a Frank Lloyd Home that belongs to Lloyd Lewis." (Note: Taken at the same time as #1377.35 dated Aug 14, 1959.) Photographed by Carmen Reporte. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10.5 x 8.5 B&W print. 1377.34.0310
1959
Lloyd Lewis Residence (1939 - S.265) 1959. View of cantilevered balcony and South side of home. Stamped on verso: "Aug 14, 1959". Clipping on verso: "Architectural students from all over the world make pilgrimages to Chicago where Wright built houses for more than half a century. He built this one in 1940 on the banks of the Des Plaines River near Libertyville for the late Lloyd Lewis and Mrs. Lewis. The overhanging roofs and cantilevered balconies are typical. (Sun-Times Photo by Carmen Reporte)." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10.5 x 8.5 B&W print. 1377.35.0310
1959
Perspective of Clinic For Dr. Jarvis H. Luechauer 1959. In 1958, at the age of 44, Lauchauer established a dental practice in Mariposa, CA, three hours east of San Jose, bordering the Yosemite National Park. It was during 1958 that Dr. Jarvis Luechauer approached Frank Lloyd Wright about designing a Dental/Medical Clinic with the intent of building it 70 miles to the south in Fresno, California. The project is numbered 5814, 1958, project number 14, one of 31 projects Wright accepted in 1958. It appears that the presentation drawings, perspective and plot plan were dated by Wright in 1959. It is apparent that the project was accepted and moved ahead because the final plans were finished by William Wesley Peters and Aaron Green and dated February 18, 1960. 10.5 x 6 Color Photograph. 1377.87.1117
1959
Plot Plan for Clinic For Dr. Jarvis H. Luechauer 1959. The design for the clinic, utilizing a four foot grid, is rectangular in shape except for the waiting room which is a semi-circular. Up two flights of stairs, there is an East and West entrance to the waiting room. In the waiting room a horizontal window rests on top of a 2 1/2 wall. The waiting room has built-in seating along the exterior curved semi-circular wall, and a fireplace on the opposite side of the room. There's a built-in semi-circular planter at the front that follows the curve of the windows. Along the back of the building a built-in planter runs the length, with a small semi-circle built into the center of the planter wall. On the south side of the parking lot, on the property line, there are two stone walls with an opening in the center that forms a partial circle. On the north side of the building perpendicular to the built-in planter is an 87 foot long pool. It is 8 feet wide, and has four jets spaced 17 feet apart. On either side of the pool Wright penciled in future buildings using the same design as the first. Medical offices are on the west side of the building dental are on the right. 10.5 x 6 Color Photograph. 1377.88.1117
1959 
Luis Marden Residence (1952 - S.357) circa 1959. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1952, the home was completed in 1959. Like the Robert Llewellyn Wright home, Wright utilized what he called a hemicycle design. The home overlooks Potomac River rapids. Marden worked for National Geographic. Viewed from the Southeast, it is a single leveled home, but terraced with retaining walls because of the slop of the property. The Garage is on the far left, the study to its right behind the perforated wall. The Living Room is to the right. Hand written on verso: "View of Rapids on Potomac below. Mr. & Mrs. Luis Marden Res. McLean, VA. (Washington D.C.) (Less Copper Facia)." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1377.70.0514
1959
Warren McArthur Residence 1959 (1892 - S.011). One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s bootleg projects, Warren McArthur and his family were friends of the Wrights. Placed on a thick foundation, like many of Wrights prairie styled homes, Roman brick was used below the window sills. Plaster above. The front door which is on the side of the house, is arched at the top, as are the openings of the covered terrace at the front of the home, which originally was an open terrace. Warren’s eldest son Albert, worked as an apprentice in Wright’s Oak Park Studio from 1907 to 1909 He is best known as the lead architect of the Arizona Biltmore, although he is overshadowed by Wright’s influence over the project. Note: Original drawings of the Dining Room sideboard include the copper urn designed by Wright...  Continue...

 

1377.77.0915 1-4
1959
Taliesin, Spring Green, circa 1937. View of the South corner of dining-room at Taliesin, Looking from the South across the top of the hill garden. Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright, most famous and controversial American architect of the century, died Thursday in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 89. For most of each year Mr. Wright lived and worked at Taliesin East (above), combination studio, farmhouse and school near Spring Green, Wisc." Stamped on clipping: "Apr 10 1959." Photographed by Hendrich-Blessing Studios, taken in preparation for the January 1938 issue of Architectural Forum. Published in the January 1938 issue, page 17. Photograph of published image. Original 10.75 x 8.75 B&W photograph. 1377.64.0513
1959
Edward C. Waller Apartments (1895 S.031) looking East (1959). Edward C. Waller was an important early Wright patron. He lived in River Forest near Wright's William Winslow house. Waller sold Winslow the property upon which his home was built. Waller commissioned several projects to be designed by Wright: the Francisco Terrace Apartments 1895 (S.030) (since demolished); the Waller Apartments 1895 (S.031); the remodeling of his home in River Forest 1899 (S.047); the Edward C. Waller Gates (S.065) and Stables (S.066) 1901; and the Edward C. Waller Bathing Pavilion 1909 (S.166). Waller's son Edward C. Jr. commissioned Midway Gardens 1913 (S.180). The Waller Apartments consisted of five units. Unit #1 on the East end (right) #5 in the foreground at the West end (left). Unit #4 was demolished in 1968 after a fire gutted the unit. The Francisco Terrace Apartments (S.030) were directly behind these units. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative and 8 x 10 Print. 1377.43.0810
1959
Ward W. Willits Residence (1901 - S.054) 1959. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 4/11/59. Photographer: Lyon. Title: Frank Lloyd Wright House. Location: Highland Park. Caption: House Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright at 1445 Sheridan Road Highland Park." Clipping on verso: "April 13 1959. Wright-designed house at 1445 Sheridan, Highland Park, built in 1902, is considered his first prairie masterpiece. Still an architectural showplace, it was scene of an art exhibit in February. ‘Our home is more than a house. It’s art,’ said Mrs. Belle Kerman." Ward W. Willits was the president of the Adams and Westlake Company, a brass and bronze foundry. Orlando Giannini, an artist who designed art glass and murals for Wright, also worked for Adams and Westlake. In 1905, Willits and his wife accompanied Frank and Catherine Wright on their first trip to Japan. Ward Willits lived in his home until his death in 1951 at the age of 92. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1377.32.0310
1959
Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 - S.004) 1959. Label on verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: 4/11/59. Photographer: Nocerino. Location: Wright bldgs.... 949 Chicago ave., Oak Park, Ill., Caption: building on S.W. corner of Chicago & Forest ave., or 949 Chicago ave., Oak Park, Ill." Caption on verso: " Wright built this home for himself at 949 Chicago, Oak Park, in 1891 and lived there for 19 years. (Sun-Times Photo)." Stamped: "Apr 13 1959". Original 10.25 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.36.0310
1959 
Wright’s Funeral, Taliesin, Spring Green. Paul bearers carrying Frank Lloyd Wright's coffin from his home to the horse drawn wagon. Wesley Peters is on the left, Gene Masselink is second from the right. Wright was born on June 8, 1867 and passed away in Phoenix on Thursday, April 9, 1959, age 91. The horse draw wagon was driven by Wesley Peters and Gene Masselink. The service was held Sunday, April 12, 1959, and was officiated by the minister of the Madison Unitarian Society. A horse drawn wagon bearing the body of Wright took a half-mile trek to the country churchyard where the he was buried. Wright’s widow and daughter lead a procession of more than 50 mourners who walked to the chapel and graveyard services. Photographed by Michael Rougier. 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 1377.75.0215
1959
Wright’s Funeral, Taliesin. Caption on face: "Spring Green, Wis., April 12 – Wright’s Funeral Cortege. A horse drawn wagon bearing the body of Frank Lloyd Wright begins its half-mile trek to the country churchyard where the famed architect was buried today. Wright’s widow and a daughter are directly behind the wagon, leading a procession of more than 50 mourners who walked to the chapel and graveyard services. Wright died Thursday in Phoenix, Ariz.., at age 89. (AP Wirephoto)." Wright was born on June 8, 1867 and passed away April 9, 1959, age 91. Driving the cart are Wesley Peters on the left and Gene Masselink on the right. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 10 x 8 Print. 1377.48.0411
1959
Wright’s Funeral, Taliesin. Label pasted on face: "Spring Green, Wis., April 13 – Wright’s Service – The widow of Frank Lloyd Wright and their daughter, Iovanna Lloyd Wright, at funeral services for architect Sunday. A horse drawn wagon carried the bough covered coffin from the Wright home to cemetery. Wright died Thursday at age 89. (AP Wirephoto) 1959." Wright was born on June 8, 1867 and passed away April 9, 1959, age 91. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1377.49.0811
1959
Wright’s Funeral, Taliesin. Caption on face: "Spring Green, Wis., April 11 – Site of Wright’s Burial -- This small almost secluded Unitarian cemetery will provide the final resting place for Frank Lloyd Wright, famed Wisconsin-born architect who lived a controversial and turbulent life through most of his 89 years. Wright, who died in Arizona Thursday, will be buried here tomorrow afternoon near the Hillside Unitarian chapel, a church he frequently attended during his youth. Many of his mother’s relatives also are buried here. (AP (AP Wirephoto) 1959." Wright was born on June 8, 1867 and passed away April 9, 1959, age 91. Stamped on verso: "Apr 14 1959". Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1377.50.0811
1959
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) 1959. Stamped on verso: "Sep 2, 1959". Clipping on verso: "This living room fireplace is original with the house. Built in 1894 and the famed architect designed the motto, the cushioned seat railing and even the andirons. (Stamped) Sep 11, 1959." Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.38.0310
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) 1959. Frank Lloyd Wright remodeled the home in 1895. It was originally built is the 1870s and designed by William E. Coman. Wright’s modifications which were pretty extensive in 1895, included moving the house back 16.5 feet further back into the lot, a new Living Room, two second floor Bedrooms, the addition of a wide porch, and reconfiguring the house’s interior spaces. This would indicate the the front of the house was an addition, and Wright’s design. Details such as semi-circular window on top, the diamond shaped panes of leaded glass, decorative bracing above the three upper windows and the roof overhang, the upper corner plaster panels, and the cantilevered porch roof. Wright also designed the fireplaces in the living room and master bedroom. The original front stairs that Wright designed were reached at the end of the...  Continue... 1377.78.0915
1959
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) 1959. View of the Reception Room Hallway from the Reception Room. Columns have been painted. The oak five paneled door to the left of the stairs has been replaced with a flush door, and has been decorated with circular designs. The stairs have been covered with carpet. The floor has been covered with vinyl squares. The Living Room is to the left, the hall leading to the Dining room and Kitchen is to the right. Sheet accompanying negative: "25 Aug ‘59. Gekler. Home Interior, Oak Park. Exterior and interior of early Frank Lloyd Wright home at 334 N. Kenilworth Ave, Oak Park. Home is occupied by the Hubert Kampp family." Photographed by Charles Gekler. One 4x5 B&W negatives and one 36 x 45" B&W digital photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.79.0915
1959
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park (1895 - S.036) 1959. View of the Den (left), Dining room (center) and Reception Room on the right. Columns have been painted. The floor has been covered with vinyl squares. Cabinets cover the wall of the Reception Room. Sheet accompanying negative: "25 Aug ‘59. Gekler. Home Interior, Oak Park. Exterior and interior of early Frank Lloyd Wright home at 334 N. Kenilworth Ave, Oak Park. Home is occupied by the Hubert Kampp family." Photographed by Charles Gekler. One 4x5 B&W negatives and one 36 x 45" B&W digital photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. 1377.80.0915
 
   1940-1949     BACK TO TOP    1960-1969 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017