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PHOTOS 2000 - 2009
 
  2000    2001    2002    2003    2004    2005    2006    2007    2008    2009    Bottom 
 
YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
2000
2000
Conrad and Evelyn Gordon Residence 2000 (1956 - S.419). Designed in 1956 by Frank Lloyd Wright, construction did not begin until 1963. Located in Wilsonville from 1963 until 2001 until it was rescued from destruction and moved to the Oregon Gardens in Silverton, Oregon. The original budget of $25,000, doubled to $56,000 because of construction delays. The 2,100-square-foot Gordon House was completed in 1964 and was based on Wright’s "House for a Family of $5-6,000 Income" plan, which was published in a 1938 issue of Life magazine. Photographed before the move. Hand Written on face: "9/15/00, AE Wright, Cordell, 1-13A." Typed on verso: "House/Home - W (Frank Lloyd Wright, Wilsonville)." Stamped on verso: "Dec 1 2000." Original 10 x 8 color photograph. 2000.83.0117
2002
2002
Harry S. Adams Residence, 2002 (1913 - S.179). Harry S. Adams was the Chicago manager of Eaton, Crane and Pike, manufacturers of fine writing paper. Wright’s first design dated September 4, 1912, was rejected, as was Wright’s second proposal dated May 31, 1913. Both were rejected as too elaborate. The third was scaled down and accepted by Adams. Covering the width of almost three Chicago city lots, the Adams House exemplifies Wright’s Prairie styled design. Constructed of brick, it includes broad overhanging eves, horizontal rows of windows, and a dominate horizontal line that incorporates the second story window sills and completely encircles the house. The Porte Cochere is on the far left. Just to the right, the Veranda appears to be enclosed. The Living Room is just to the left of the Entrance, the Dining Room is on the right. Bedrooms are on the upper level. This was the final home Wright would design for Oak Park. Set of eight 35mm slides and 14" x 9" high res digital images. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner in September 2002.
2002.119.1216 (1-8)
2002
Oscar B. Balch Residence Circa 2002 (1911 - S.168). The Balch Residence was one of Wright’s first commission upon his return from Europe. The home is very symmetrical in design, and like the Thomas Gale home, it was designed with a flat roof. There are built-in planters and a walled Terrace in front. Just below the soffit are horizontal bans of windows that dominate the front and back of the home. Frank Lloyd Wright used wood sash bars to create a design within the windows. The entrance is at the rear of the home. There are two upper balconies in front, and originally two in back that were enclosed long ago. Set of five 35mm slides and 14" x 9" high res digital images. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner in September 2002.
2002.113.1016 (1-5)
2002
William G. Fricke Home 2002 (1901 S.058). The William G. Fricke Residence was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1901. William G. Fricke was a partner in Weber, Costello, Fricke, a Chicago firm which manufactured and sold school supplies nationwide. Fricke commissioned Wright in 1901 to design his home. He lived in the home for five years until it was purchased by Emma Martin purchased the home in 1906-7. Patrick F. Cannon suggests that "Fricke sold the house because of Financial difficulties. According to divorce records. William Frick left for work on August 10, 1909, and never returned..." Hometown Architect, 2006. Like the Thomas Residence, also 1901 and in Oak Park, it is an all-stucco exterior. But unlike the Thomas Residence which is considered Frank Lloyd Wright's first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park, it includes elements of Wright's transitional designs. Broad... Continue...

2002.117.1116 (1-9)

2002
Rollin Furbeck Residence 2002  (1897 - S.044). The Rollin Furbeck Residence was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1897. Warren Furbeck gifted two Wright designed home to his sons, Rollin and George as wedding presents. The transition from Wright’s earlier homes with Sullivanesque details, toward his Prairie style is evident in the Furbeck Home. The facade of the upper two floors in the front is similar to the Winslow (1894), Heller 1896) and Husser (1899). But it also has the beginnings of his prairie style. Wright created horizontal bands that ran between the upper sills and soffits. Of particular note is the use of wood trim within the upper horizontal bands. This is possibly the first home to utilize this design element. He also hung trim with square holes, from the center of the soffit. A single horizontal diamond-paned leaded glass window runs the length of two single paned windows. The Furbeck Residence... Continue...
2002.115.1016 (1-7)
2002
Mary and Edward R. Hills Remodeling 2002 (1900, 1906 - S.051). Taken during a trip to Oak Park in September, 2002. A Victorian home was located one lot South of the Nathan G. Moore Home (1895 - S.034). Moore purchased the home in 1900 and hired Wright to remodel the home as a wedding gift for his daughter and her husband, Mary and Edward R. Hills. Work did not begin until 1906, and at that time, the home was moved one lot South, enabling Moore to expand his back yard. During the move, Wright turned the home 90 degrees. Where the front door originally faced the street (East), it now faced North obscured from view. One of the interesting features is Wright’s use of a double-sloped roof, which appears as a flare at the bottom of the roof. Another element is Wright’s use of a horizontal line that incorporates the window sills of the upper levels. Within the horizontal band, Wright adds additional wood... Continue...
2002.112.1016 (1-9)
2002
Emma Martin Garage 2002 (1907 - S.060). Emma Martin purchased the Fricke Residence in 1906, and commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a garage for herself. Plans were dated March 15, 1907. Wright designed a two-story garage which included a living space upstairs with a fireplace. For many years after the commission of the garage, Wright referred to house as the Emma Martin Residence. The upper level was reached via stairs a the rear of the garage. Set of two 35mm slides and 14" x 9" high res digital images. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner in September 2002.
2002.118.1116 (1-2)
2002
William E. Martin Residence, 2002 (1902 - S.061; Pergola 1909 - S.061A). William Everett Martin moved to Chicago in 1882 and formed Martin & Barton with his brother-in-law George F. Barton (1903 - S.103) which manufactured stove polish. He eventually established a partnership with his brother Darwin D. and formed the Martin & Martin, Inc. They manufactured polish under the brand E-Z Polish (1905 - S.114) for both stoves and shoes. William and Darwin were out driving in Oak Park, they passed Wright’s Studio, and were so "intrigued by its appearance stopped to call on the owner. That afternoon Wright received a commission for a house from W. E. And shortly thereafter was summoned to Buffalo to undertake an important series of commissions for Darwin..." Two Chicago Architects and Their Clients, Eaton, 1969, p.79-81. Constructed of stucco and wood trim, it is a beautiful example of Wright’s... Continue...
2002.121.1216 (1-6)
2002
Nathan G. Moore Residence, 2002 (1895/1923 - S.034). One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s early clients, Wright designed Moore’s first home (S.034) in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. According to Wright’s Autobiography, 1932, he wrote about Moore’s visit to his office. ‘Now we want you to build our house... but... I don’t want you to give us anything like that house you did for Winslow. I don’t want to go down back streets to my morning train to avoid being laughed at. I would like something like this,’ he said, and laid some pictures of English half-timber work on my table... They were delighted with the house, and so was everyone but me." He recounted that he took the work because his "Three children were now running around the streets without proper shows". Pages 125-127. The Moore home would become the only English Tudor styled home he would ever design... Continue...
2002.120.1216 (1-11)
2002
Nakoma Clubhouse Dining Room 2002. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923, the Nakoma Clubhouse was not completed until May 2001. Wright’s plans were adapted by the Taliesin Architects, headed by lead architect Arnold Roy. At the center of Wright's design is the octagonal "Wigwam Room" and the majestic stone "Campfire" incorporating two rotated squares. Surrounding the room above the walls on all eight sides of the interior is a 17-foot high intricate Indian-motif frieze accented by art glass clerestory windows. Photographed by Mary E. Nichols. Published in the November 2002 issue of Architectural Digest. Acquired from and courtesy of Architectural Digest. 8 x 10 Color photograph. 2002.03.0314
2002
Frank Wright Thomas Residence 2002 (1901 - S.067). Designed in 1901 by Frank Lloyd Wright. The Frank Thomas Residence is considered to be Wright’s first fully developed prairie styled house in Oak Park. It is also the first house in Oak Park to be completely designed in Stucco. Upon entering the archway, stairs lead up to the Terrace and main living quarters on the second level. The Living Room is to the left, Dining Room on the right. The Kitchen is strait ahead. A back stairway leads to the bedrooms on the third floor. The ground floor was for the house staff. Some of the design features included beaded molding and exquisite leaded glass windows. Photographs from the 1940s show that the stucco surface is covered in shingles. But during the 1975 restoration by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman, the stucco surface was restored. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner in September, 2002. Set of 13 - 35mm color... Continue...
2002.116.1116 (1-13)
2002
Harrison P. Young Residence Additions and Remodel, Oak park September, 2002 (1895 - S.036). View from the street. Frank Lloyd Wright’s extensive remodeled of the home in 1895 included moving the house further back into the lot, a new Living Room, two second floor Bedrooms, the addition of a wide porch, and reconfiguring the house’s interior spaces. The dramatic slope of the roof line is similar in slope of the Moore Residence, also 1895. The original front stairs that Wright designed have been restored and are reached at the end of the sidewalk where they paralleled the front porch. A left turn to the top of the stairs, then a right turn brought you up to the porch. The stairs were hidden behind the porch wall. The porch roof cantilevers over the drive on the North (left) end. 35mm slide and 14" x 9" high res digital image. Photographed by Douglas M. Steiner in September 2002. 2002.114.1016
2004
2004
Benjamin Adelman Residence, 2004 (1953 - S.344). Set of 5 images of the Exterior of the Adelman Residence, photographed in April 26, 2004 by Douglas M. Steiner. The 1957 entrance, originally on the South side of the house (left), has been blocked off and replaced with perforated/glazed blocks. The entry stairs that were on the left, have also been removed. The Entrance has been moved to the right side of the Living Room. Perforated blocks have been added to the fireplace chimney. The 1957 Living Rooms windows and built-in planter box remain intact. Glass corners are mitered. The original Carport is now enclosed. In 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed an addition to the back of the Carport, to be used the "Servant's Room." It appears that the Carport was enclosed instead. Windows were added to the two front corners. The Living Room was extended 10 feet South and two feet East in 1957. Windows were added to the Southeast corner, as well as the built-in planter. Five original 10 x 7.5 color images. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright Study.

2004.42.0404
(1-5)

  Arizona in May 2004.  This set of sixteen images correspond with the 1963 Set of twelve  2.25 x 2.25 transparencies.  Photographer Douglas Steiner.  
2004 1) Benjamin Adelman Residence.  Built in 1951.  Storrer #344. 2004.19.0606
2004 2) Boomer Residence.  Built in 1953.  Storrer #361. 2004.20.0606
2004 3) Gammage Memorial Auditorium.  Designed in 1959, built in 1962-64.  Storrer #432.  2004.21.0606
2004 4) Gammage Memorial Auditorium.  Designed in 1959, built in 1962-64.  Storrer #432.  2004.22.0606
2004 5) Pauson Residence (Ruin).  Built in 1939.  Storrer #250.  Constructed in 1939, destroyed by fire in 1942. “Desert Rubblestone” construction.  For nearly 40 years the concrete foundation, walls and fireplace remained in ghostly ruins.  These were destroyed in 1980 to make way for an extension of 32nd Street.   Architect Edward M. Jones salvaged the 70 ton fireplace chimney mass and relocated it 200 yards to the south and incorporated it in the entrance to Alta Vista Park Estates where the Boomer and Benjamin Adelman residences are located.  Chimney mass measures 9 x 11' at the base and is 26' tall. 2004.23.0606
2004 6) Harold Price, Sr., Residence.  Built in 1954.  Storrer #378. 2004.24.0606
2004 7) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.25.0606
2004 8) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.26.0606
2004 9) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.27.0606
2004 10) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.28.0606
2004 11) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.29.0606
2004 12) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.30.0606
2004 13) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.31.0606
2004 14) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. 2004.32.0606
2004 15) David Wright Residence.  Built in 1950.  Storrer #322. 2004.33.0606
2004 16) David Wright Residence.  Built in 1950.  Storrer #322. 2004.34.0606
2004
Jorgine Boomer Residence, 2004 (1953 - S.361). Set of five images of the exterior of the Boomer residence, photographed on April 26, 2004 by Douglas M. Steiner. The home is dominated by the large roof that begins in the rear of the home a few feet off the ground, and rises to the front, enhancing the two story home in front, then cantilevers out over the cantilevered balcony. The home is anchored to the desert with walls that are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete, in the nature of Taliesin West. Five original 10 x 7.5 color images. For more information on the Boomer Residence see our Wright Study. 2004.40.1014 (1-5)
2004
Set of 37 photographs, First Christine Church. In 1949, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Peyton Canary, the President of Southwest Christian Seminary in Glendale, AZ, to design the buildings for their 80 acre campus. Dr. Canary cofounded the Seminary in 1947. The campus was to include the administrative buildings, seminar rooms and library, a Greek theater, faculty housing and a chapel. Drawings were completed in 1950 but shelved after the Seminary closed in 1963.  After the Seminary closed, Boice convinced his congregation to approach the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and they acquired the chapel plans for their churches sanctuary. With the assistance of the Taliesin Associated Architects, under the direction of William Wesley Peters, working plans were generated. Ground was broken in 1971, and the church was completed in 1972. Twenty tons of native Arizona stone, collected from the 600 acres desert surrounding Taliesin West, were utilized for phase one, the construction of the Church building. Photograph on April 26, 2004 by Douglas M. Steiner. 2004.38.0614 (1-37)
2004
Aime and Norman Lykes Residence, 2004 (1959 - S.433). Set of ten images of the exterior Lykes Residence photographed on April 26, 2004. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1959, it was to be his last residential work. Working drawings were completed in 1966 by Taliesin Fellow, John Rattenbury, who had worked closely with Mr. Wright on the initial plans. Rattenbury also supervised the construction of the home. Based on intersecting and overlapping circles, the home is over 2800 square feet. The circular design is constructed of desert-rose tinted concrete blocks. The home is dramatically built into the hillside, overlooking Phoenix and the valley. As we approach the home it is viewed from below and reached by a steep hill on the East side of the property. Original 10 x 7.5 color images. For more information on the Lykes Residence see our Wright Study. 2004.69.0615 (1-10)
2004
Set of 13 photographs. Wright, David & Gladys Wright House (1950) 2004. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this home for his fourth child David, in March, 1950. Wright called the design "How to live in the Southwest", and was published in the June 1953, "House & Home." The lot was located in the middle of a citric grove, so Wright designed the living space to float above the tree line. David owned a company that manufactured and distributed concrete block. The decorative blocks were designed specifically for this home. Others were standard blocks manufactured by his company. David was born in 1895 and past away in 1997 at the age of 102. Gladys past away in 2008 at the age of 104. She was living in the home when these photographs were taken. Photographed on April 26, 2004 by Douglas M. Steiner. 2004.37.0614 (1-13)
2006
2006

Pope-Leighey House 2006. Set of eight photographs of the Pope-Leighey House, by Douglas M. Steiner, April 7, 2006. As you approach the home from the same direction as in 1939, the Carport, it has been positioned on a slope much like the original. Like many of Wright's designs, the entrance is hidden, and is not revealed until you reach the home. The lack of windows on the approach reveals little of the interior of the home. Perforated Light Screens allow soft light into the home, adding a measure of privacy and a decorative design element to the home. The roof of the Carport cantilevers out 8' 6" at the front, is 19' wide, and cantilevers out from the house 15' 6" in the back. The roof was designed with three layers of 2x4's, each... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House.

2006.44.0815 1-8
2007
2007 Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School exterior, 2007. (1921 - S.213). While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. Additional classrooms were added later creating a U-Shaped building seen on the far left. Arata Endo was Wright’s assistant on the Imperial Hotel. He was most likely responsible for the additional classrooms. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photograph by Jmho, August 21, 2007. Original 10 x 5.6 photograph. 2007.64.1111
2007 Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School two-story Living Room/Classroom exterior, 2007. (1921 - S.213). While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of the larger building in the center incorporating a two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. The rear included an Assembly Hall on the first floor and a Dining Hall on the second floor. Two classrooms where on either side of the main building. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photograph by Jmho, August 21, 2007. Original 10 x 7 photograph. 2007.65.1111
2008
2008 Jiyu Gakuen Girls’ School two-story Living Room/Classroom interior from the second floor balcony, 2008. (1921 - S.213). The glass and furniture were designed by Wright. While working on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923 - S.194), Wright was contacted by Mr. And Mrs. Hani. Wright’s design consisted of a larger building in the center incorporating this two-story Living Room/Classroom in the front. An effort began in 1990 to save and restore the building. In 1997 it was designated a National Important Cultural Status. Restoration began in January 1999 and was completed in September 2001. Photographed August 27, 2008. Original 10 x 7 photograph. 2008.15.1111
 
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