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PHOTOS 1960 - 1969
 
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YEAR DESCRIPTION ST#
1960
1960 Dallas Theatre Center’s Kalita Humphreys Theater, 1955 (S.395). Caption reads: "(DN1) Dallas, Tex., Jan. 26 - Dallas Theater Center - This is the Dallas Theater Center which opened its first production on December 27, 1959. The building is situated in one of Dallas’ most beautiful, wooded areas, on a hill of trees and stone overlooking the fashionable Turtle Creek area. Costing more than a million dollars to build, it was the only theater the late Frank Lloyd Wright ever designed. (AP Wirephoto) (cel31445ho) 1960." The design for this theater was first conceived for the New Theatre for Woodstock, New York (1931 Project). In 1938 Wright designed the Pfeiffer Chapel (S.251) at the Florida Southern College and utilized the original Woodstock floor plan. In 1949 the "New Theatre" was revived again in Hartford, Connecticut, but was never executed. The concept for the "New Theatre for Woodstock" was finally executed in Dallas and the Dallas Theater Center opened with registration and classes on September 9, 1959 and its first production on December 27, 1959. This is the actual print that was used and published in the Detroit Times on March 6, 1960. Photographed by the Associated Press. Original B&W 9 x 6.75. 1458.27.1109
Circa 1960
Florida Southern College, Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S251) Lakeland, Florida circa 1960. Viewed from the Northeast. This was the first Wright building at Florida Southern College. The ground breaking ceremony was held on May 24, 1938. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. The Esplanades, covered walkways, can be seen in the foreground. Stamped on verso: "News Bureau. Fla. So. College, Lakeland, Fla." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1458.43.0113
Circa 1960
Florida Southern College, Polk County Science Building, Lakeland, Florida Circa 1960 (1953 - S.256). Viewed from the West, Wright called it the Cosmography Building. The round dome is the Planetarium which is on the Southeastern end of the building. Clipping pasted on verso miss identifies the building as the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. The Polk County Science Building was the last Wright designed structure built on the Florida Southern College campus and was completed on March 11, 1958. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1458.44.0113
1960
Guggenheim Museum 1960 (1956 - S.400). Viewed from the Southwest of the entrance and spiral walls. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Stamped on verso: "Mar 29 1960." Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y., Rector 2-9770. Exterior of the new Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, as viewed across Fifth Avenue from 88th Street. The gallery is on the right and the administration building on the left." Published in "Guggenheim, New York," Stoller, 1999, page ii-iii. Photographed by Ezra Stroller. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1458.46.0914
1960
Guggenheim Museum 1960 (1956 - S.400). Viewed from the North, from eighty-ninth street, of the entrance and spiral walls. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Photographed by Ezra Stroller. 8 x10 B&W photograph. 1458.47.0914
1960
Guggenheim Museum Exterior Circa 1960 (1956 - S.400). Viewed from the North, from eighty-ninth street, of the entrance and spiral walls. The Guggenheim opened on October 21, 1959. Note: Two trees in the foreground have filled out since the opening in October 1959. Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York 28, N. Y. Exterior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1458.50.0216
1960

Guggenheim Museum Interior Circa 1960 (1956 - S.400). The sculpture in the foreground is "St. Sebastian, No. 2," 1957, by Eduardo Paolozzi, b. 1924, Leith, Scotland; d. 2005, London. The sculpture in the background to the right is "The Miracle (Seal [I]) (Le Miracle)," 1930-32, by Constantin Brancusi, b. 1876, Hobitza, Romania; d. 1957, Paris. Both were part of the Guggenheim collection. Label pasted to verso: "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York 28, N. Y. Interior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

1458.51.0216
1960
Guggenheim Museum Interior 1960 (1956 - S.400). Interior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim, photographed soon after the grand-opening of the Guggenheim Museum. The sculpture in the foreground is "St. Sebastian, No. 2," 1957, by Eduardo Paolozzi, b. 1924, Leith, Scotland; d. 2005, London. The sculpture in the background to the right is "The Miracle (Seal [I]) (Le Miracle)," 1930-32, by Constantin Brancusi, b. 1876, Hobitza, Romania; d. 1957, Paris. Both were part of the Guggenheim collection. Label pasted to verso: "Guggenheim Museum - Interior #2. This interior of the six-story spiral museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, shows the dramatic, curved, quarter-mile ramp along which an extensive collection of 20th century ‘non-objective’ art is displayed. Located in uptown Manhattan, this museum is a two-fold attraction because of its unique architecture and its art treasurers. If possible, please credit The New York Convention and Visitors Bureau." Stamped on verso: "Apr 19 1977." Published in "The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum," 1960, p.39. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1458.55.1216
C 1960
Guggenheim Museum Interior Circa 1960 (1956 - S.400). Interior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim. View looking down toward the pool and fountain. Possibly photographed soon after the grand-opening of the Guggenheim Museum. The sculpture in the lower foreground was in a photograph published in "The Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright" 1960, pages 42, 47 and 68. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century, United States. Wright, F. L. Guggenheim Museum. New York City. 1956. Interior. Department of Architecture." Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 7.75 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 1458.67.1218
C 1960
Guggenheim Museum Interior Circa 1960 (1956 - S.400). Interior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim. View of the artwork displayed along the ramp supports and outer walls. Photographed around the same time as 1458.67. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century, United States. Wright, F. L. Guggenheim Museum. New York City. 1956. Interior. Department of Architecture." Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 7.75 x 7.75 B&W photograph. 1458.68.1218
1960
Herbert F. Johnson Residence, Wingspread 1960 (1937 - S.239). View of the Living Room from the mezzanine. Hand written on verso: "The Johnson Foundation has opened Wingspread the Frank Lloyd Wright designed home, which will be used as the foundation administrative headquarters and conference center. (SC Johnson and Son Corp.)." Clipping pasted to verso: "The building is designed around a central room. A view from the mezzanine shows just a section of the room. The spiral stair at right leads to an observation tower." Stamped on clipping: "Nov 11 1960." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1458.62.1217
1960 Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread (1937 - S.239) 1960. Clipping pasted to verso: "Racine, Wis. - Aerial view shows advanced design of Wingspread, huge ‘prairie house’ designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright and built near Racine in 1938. Its opening as a conference center was announced by the Johnson Foundation, with the first parley there to be a meeting of the Midwest Regional American assembly Nov. 17-20. Authorities on foreign relations will discuss who should be next secretary of state. Home formerly was residence of H. F. Johnson, board chairman of S. C. Johnson & Sons, Inc., wax manufacturers", stamped "Nov 12, 1960". Published in "The Johnson Foundation, Wingspread" 1961. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 6.9 B&W photograph. 1458.37.1211
1960
Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread (1937 - S.239) 1960. View of the home from the South. The swimming pool is on the right in the foreground, the center of the home with the tower is in the background. Caption pasted to verso: "An exterior view of Wingspread, above, shows clerestory roof of Frank Lloyd Wright designed building with glass observation tower dominating the domed central portion of the structure. The building at Wind Point, North of Racine, Wisconsin, will serve as a conference center and as administrative headquarters for the Johnson Foundation." Stamped on verso: "From the photographic dept. S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. Negative No. 18758-6." "Reference Dec 2 60, N. E. A." Herbert F. Johnson (1899 - 1978) donated their home, Wingspread, to The Johnson Family Foundation in 1959 as an international educational conference facility. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1458.52.0316
1960
Marin County Civic Center Aerial View 1960 (S.416-417 - 1957). Viewed from the Northeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Almost three months since work has begun, earth has been moved, roads have begun to be take shape, and work has begun on the on and off ramp between the property and the freeway. Stamped on verso: "Date photographed May 4, 1960." Stamped on face: "Aero Portraits. Aerial & Commercial Photography. Sausalito, Calif." Lucile Fessenden Dandelet (1919-2007) earned her degree in Photo-Journalism at Wellesley College. A resident of San Anselmo for five decades, she specialized in architecture and has been recognized for her photographs of Frank Lloyd Wright work. Ten photographs of the Marin County CC were published in the December 1970 issue of Architectural Forum. An exhibit of Dandelet work was held in 1974 and in 2004 at the Marin County's Civic Center highlighting the construction from the first bulldozer on. Her collection is now part of the permanent J. Paul Getty Museum Photographic Collection. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1458.56.0217
1960
Marin County Civic Center Aerial View 1960 (S.416-417 - 1957). Viewed from the Northwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Construction has begun on the center of the Administration Building. The on and off ramp between the property and the freeway, begun in the earlier image has been paved. Two houses located on the eastern corner of the property have been removed. The large circular property has been leveled. The lagoon has not yet been dug. Stamped on face: "Aero Portraits. Aerial & Commercial Photography. Sausalito, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1458.57.0217
1960
Taliesin, Spring Green Catwalk and Living Room from Below Circa 1960 (1925 - S.218). View looking up toward the Catwalk on the left and the Living Room on the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews circa 1960, possibly 1945, but going by the Andrew’s numbering system, 1945s were numbered in the 900s. Photographed at the same time as 1458.65 and 1458.66 Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century - United States. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Taliesin East. Spring Green, Wisconsin. 1925 -. Far View. Andrews 2053. Department of Architecture." Published in "Architecture in America" Andrews, 1960/1977, p.136. Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9.5 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1458.64.1218
1960
Taliesin, Spring Green, Mr. Wright’s Bedroom Circa 1960 (1925 - S.218). View of Mr. Wright’s Bedroom from the West. A planter is built-in to both exterior corners. The corner of the pool can be seen in the lower left. Stairs lead down to the Terrace, and the Balcony is to the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews circa 1960, possibly 1945, but going by the Andrew’s numbering system, 1945s were numbered in the 900s. Photographed at the same time as 1458.64 and 1458.65. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century - United States. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Taliesin East. Spring Green, Wisconsin. 1925 -. Mrs. Wright’s wing. Close-up. Andrews 2057. Department of Architecture." Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9.5 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1458.65.1218
1960
Taliesin, Spring Green, Mr. Wright’s Bedroom Circa 1960 (1925 - S.218). View of Mr. Wright’s Bedroom from the southwest. The fireplace mass for Mr. Wright’s bedroom fireplace is on the left. A planter is built-in to both exterior corners. Stairs lead down to the Terrace, the Balcony is to the right. Photographed by Wayne Andrews circa 1960, possibly 1945, but going by the Andrew’s numbering system, 1945s were numbered in the 900s. Photographed at the same time as 1458.64 and 1458.65. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century - United States. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Taliesin East. Spring Green, Wisconsin. 1925 -. Mrs. Wright’s wing. Far View. Andrews 2058. Department of Architecture." Published in "Architecture in America" Andrews, 1960/1977, p.138. Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9.5 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1458.66.1218
1960
Taliesin West Circa 1960 (1937 - S.241). View of Mr. Wright’s office and the courtyard fountain from the east. The fountain was added in 1956. Early photographs show the fountain as a bowl (1259.59-4). By 1959, it matched this shape, "Frank Lloyd Wright Select Houses 3" Pfeiffer, 1989, p.48. The light pole in the background has a flag. Mr. Wright’s office was also dramatically altered since 1940 (531.74). Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century, United States. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Taliesin West. Phoenix, Arizona. Back of study and water fountain 1938. Don Palmer photo. Department of Architecture." Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9.25 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1458.69.1218
1960
Olgivanna Wright Visits Milan, Italy, 1960. Olgivanna appears to be speaking. Clipping pasted to verso: "Milan Italy – UPI – The widow of Wisconsin architect Frank Lloyd Wright was guest of honor on Thursday night at a dinner given by some of the man she had criticize severely on the 24 hours earlier. The dinner was sponsored by Milan's College of architects. Mrs. Olgivanna Wright is in Milan for the Triennale art show here. In a speech at the show Wednesday night, she assailed architects who "falsify" her late husband's ideas. She said her husband was a great genius and only architects from his Taliesin centers in Wisconsin and Arizona were his true followers and spiritual sons." Stamped on verso: "Oct 14 1960." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1458.71.0719
1960 Wright in 1960. Caption on verso: "Double Exposure. Rome: Almost real as life, a giant portrait of the late American architect Frank Lloyd Wright is the camera target of a shutterbug who is herself caught candidly on film in Rome. The Wright portrait is part of an exhibition detailing his achievements and designs in the last ten years of life. Wright died at the age of 89 in early 1959. (UPI Photo) 12/22/60." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 9 x 7 B&W print. 1458.31.0310
1961
1961
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1961 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Viewed from the Southeast, down in the ravine. The Living Room and Balcony are cantilevered out over the ravine on the left, the Dining Room, Workspace and Carport are on the right. Gregor Affleck was born in born 1898. Elizabeth Affleck, born 1903. He was about 43 years when they moved into the home and would have been about 63 when this photograph was taken, so he is most-likely the gentleman in the foreground. They lived in the home until their deaths, Elizabeth in 1973 and Gregor in 1974. The home was donated to the Lawrence Institute of Technology in 1977. Photographed in July, 1961 by Joe Clark. 10 x 6.25 B&W photograph. 1483.24.0514
1961
Gregor S. Affleck House, 1961 (1940 - S.274), Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940, the home was completed in 1941. Viewed from the South, the three bedrooms and two baths are on the left. The Loggia, with four sets of floor to ceiling doors, and balcony are in the center. The Living Room and Balcony are cantilevered out over the ravine on the right. Greger Affleck was born in born 1898. Elizabeth Affleck, born 1903. He was about 43 years when they moved into the home and would have been about 63 when this photograph was taken, so he is most-likely the gentleman in the foreground. Hand written on verso: "7-18-16." Stamped on verso: "Joe Clark, H.B.S.S., 20 Bartlett at Woodward, Detroit 3, Michigan, TUlsa 3-3912, Photographic Ideas. Pictures that tell a story." They lived in the home until their deaths, Elizabeth in 1973 and Gregor in 1974. The home was donated to the Lawrence Institute of Technology in 1977. Original 13.5 x 9.25 B&W photograph. 1483.23.0514
1961
Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251) 1961. Viewed from the west. Wright’s first visit to the Florida Southern College campus was in May, 1938. The ground breaking ceremony for the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on May 24, 1938. Wright’s second visit was in December, 1938 to oversee construction of the Chapel. Dedicated or the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel was held on March 9, 1941. Label taped to verso: "Smooth, flowing lines and unusual features characterize the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel on the Florida Southern College campus at Lakeland designed by the famous but controversial architect, the late Frank Lloyd Wright. Other buildings designed by Wright on this central Florida campus include the Administration Building, Science Building, Library, and small chapel. (36695-9-1-61) News Bureau of the Florida Development Commission, Tallahassee. Florida State News Bureau." Stamped on verso: "Aug 3 1963." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1483.20.0113
1961
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church Set of Four Prints 1961 (1956 - S.399). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1956, the ground breaking ceremony took place a month after Wrights death on May 18, 1959, in Wauwatosa, a suburb of Milwaukee. The church was dedicated on July 2, 1961. Set of four color photographed in 1961 after the completion of the church. 1) View of the church from the Southeast.  2) Stylized cross designed by Frank Lloyd Wright stands at the Entrance.  3) View of the interior balcony and sanctuary. The alter is to the right. The stairway wraps around a light tree.  4) Detail of the stairway light tree. Stamped on verso: "October 1961." Four 5 x 7 color photographs.
1483.31.0415 (A-D)
1961 Hotel Geneva Terrace, January 1961. Looking West along enclosed Southwest Terrace. Originally Terrace was not enclosed. The Dining Room is on the right. The wall sconces on right are original. Windows, ceiling light fixtures and the radiator on the right were added after enclosure. Original 3.5 x 3.5 (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See Wright Study.) 1483.11.0209
1961 Hotel Geneva Engine Room, January 1961. This panel controlled the Boiler System. Notice the illustration on the right on the Boiler Systems. The Panel indicates that there were two Boiler Systems. Original 3.5 x 3.5 (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See Wright Study.) 1483.12.0209
1961 Hotel Geneva Boiler System, January 1961. The Boiler System was controlled by the panel in the Engine Room. Al Hermansen indicated that it was a coal operated system. The Hotel Geneva was kept open during the winter of 1961 as a test for the Eisenhower Administration. They were looking at the site as a possibility for the Air Force Academy. Many politicians and press visited. Coal trucks delivered coal daily. It was built as a summer Hotel, hence there was no insulation. Original 3.5 x 3.5 (Digital version) Thank you to Allen Hermansen for providing an original copy. (See Wright Study.) 1483.13.0209
1961
Marin County Civic Center Model 1961 (S.416-417 - 1957). Clipping pasted to verso: "The Miami Herald, Sunday, July 9, 1961. Dream of the late Frank Lloyd Wright for a Marin County (California) Civic Center ‘So flexible and simple as to be almost unbelievable’ is taking shape in the rolling hills north of San Rafael. This artist’s conception shows the $12 million center as it will appear when completed. The circular structure at left is the auditorium. The round center of the ‘crippled V’ type of building is the library. Behind the curved arches of the wings are corridors running the full length of the building. Glassed-in offices will open to them. United Press International Photo." Stamped on verso: "Jun 28 1961." Acquired from the archives of the Miami Herald. Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1483.22.0214
1961 Roloson Rowhouses (1894 S.026) 1961. Photographed on June 26, 1961 by Chicago Daily News photographer Robert Stiewe. Stamped on verso: "Daily News. Dec 13, 1961." Caption pasted on verso: "Little-known landmarks, the ‘Roloson houses’ at 3213-19 S. Calumet, were built by Frank Lloyd Wright in the 1890s. For many years they were lost to architectural memory. Today they stand in the midst of a bad slum marked almost entirely for clearance. Will they too be cleared? Nobody knows." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. Two original 4x5 B&W negative and one High Res 46 x 36" B&W photograph..  For more informamtion see our Wright Study on Robert W. Roloson Rowhouses. 1483.15.0310 1483.17.0910 1483.27.0915
1962
1962
Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938) (S.249). Photographed from the right side of the yard, dated Oct. 1962.  Original 3.5 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Charles L. Manson.  3.5 x 5. 1526.04.0207
1962
Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938) (S.249). Photographed from the middle of the yard, dated Oct. 1962.  Original 3.5 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Charles L. Manson.  3.5 x 5. 1526.05.0207
1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the Northwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Work is still taking place on the exterior. Tower is still under construction. Roads are in place but unpaved. Parking retaining walls on the right are in place and ground has been leveled. Stamped on face: "Dandelet." Stamped on verso: "Dandelet. Marin County, California." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.21.0217
 1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the North. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Work is still taking place on the exterior. Tower is still under construction. Stamped on face: "Dandelet." Stamped on verso: "Dandelet. Marin County, California." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.22.0217
 1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the Northwest. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Work is near completion on the exterior. Work is still taking place on the tower, but it also is near completion. Curbs and sidewalks have been installed. Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs. 126 Redwood Road - San Anselmo, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.23.0217
 1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the West. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Work appears to be very near completion on the exterior, but scaffolding can still be seen around the tower. Only one to two vehicles appear in the parking area. Stamped on face: "(C) Dandelet." Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs. 126 Redwood Road - San Anselmo, Calif." Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1526.24.0217
 1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the West. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. Work appears to be very near completion on the exterior, but scaffolding can still be seen around the tower. Only one to two vehicles appear in the parking area. Stamped on face: "(C) Dandelet." Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs. 126 Redwood Road - San Anselmo, Calif." Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1526.25.0217
 1962
Marin County Civic Center Administration Building Under Construction Near Completion Circa 1962 (S.416 - 1957). Viewed from the street below up through the floors to the skylight above. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on February 15, 1960. The Administration Building (phase one) was completed and dedicated October 13, 1962. It almost appears to have scaffolding seen at the bottom right. Similar view (1962) published in "Frank Lloyd Wright Marin County Civic Center," 1962, page 3. Similar view (1962) also published on the cover of "Frank Lloyd Wright Architect," Riley,1994. Stamped on face: "Dandelet." Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs. 126 Redwood Road - San Anselmo, Calif." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.26.0217
1962
Marin County Civic Center Model (S.416-417 - 1957). Label pasted on face: "10/13/62 – San Rafael, Calif.: A little north of here, in hills of Marin County, one of the last works of the late architectural genius Frank Lloyd Wright was dedicated 10/13. The Marin County Civic Center, which Wright said ‘will be a cornerstone in the culture of the nation,’ was called everything from another Taj Mahal to a glorified Hollywood diner, long before ground was broken for project in 1/61. Artist’s conception of Civic Center is shown in 6/21/61 file. UPI Dispatch on Marin County Civic Center By Wiley Maloney." Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune. Original 9 x 7 B&W photograph. 1526.12.0811
1962
Marin County Civic Center 1962 (S.416-417 - 1957). Photographed upon completion of the Administration Building. Frank Lloyd Wright began designing the Marin County Civic Center in 1957. He presented plans in March, 1958. Ground was broken on February 15, 1960 for the first section of the building, the Administration building. The Administration Building was completed and dedicated on October 13, 1962. The Northeast corner of the southern wing, viewed from the east where the southern wing intersects the center circular section. Published in "An Architecture for Democracy," Green, 1990, p.35. Stamped on verso: "Photographed by Karl H, Riek Studio." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1526.19.0215
1962
Marin County Civic Center 1962 (S.416-417 - 1957). Photographed upon completion of the Administration Building, prior to landscaping. Frank Lloyd Wright began designing the Marin County Civic Center in 1957. He presented plans in March, 1958. Ground was broken on February 15, 1960 for the first section of the building, the Administration building. The Administration Building was completed and dedicated on October 13, 1962. View of the south end of the southern wing. Stamped on verso: "Associated Press Photo." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.20.0215
1962


S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1962. Two views from the Northeast. The Research Tower complex is in the foreground, the Tower is in the background. Similar view in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building," Lipman, 1986, page 172. The second and third floor addition over the east wing of the Research Tower courtyard was designed by Taliesin Associated Architects in 1961. SC Johnson substituted Pyrex tubing for Plexiglas sheeting. The car to the right appears to be a 1960 Ford Falcon. There is a 1961 Thunderbird just past the VW in the foreground. Clouds vary in the two original 10 x 8 B&W photographs. 1526.16.1114 1526.17.1114
C 1962
S.C. Johnson Headquarters Circa 1962 (1936 - S.237). View of the inner courtyard from the Northwest. The Research Tower is just to the right. From the automobiles in the photographs dates circa 1962. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20th Century - United States. Wright, F.L.. Johnson’s Wax Bldg. 1936-9. Racine, Wisconsin. Parking area. Neg.19256-3. Department of Architecture." Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9 x 7 B&W photograph. 1526.32.1218
1962
Taliesin, Spring Green Living Room (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218) 1962. Portrait of Wright’s mother is about the fireplace. Label pasted on verso: "Chicago’s American. Date: Aug 15, 62. Photographer Howard Borvig. Subject & Location: Taliesin – Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation - Spring Green, Wisc. Caption: Views in the living room of Taliesin." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.15.0212
1962
Taliesin, Spring Green Grave site 1962. Grave site of Frank Lloyd Wright, Unity Chapel. Label pasted to verso: "Chicago’s American. Date: Aug. 15, 62. Photographer: Howard Borvig. Subject & Location: Taliesin – The Lloyd Wright Foundation. Spring Green, Wisconsin. Caption: The final resting place of the late Frank Lloyd Wright." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1526.10.0811
1962
Taliesin West 1962 (1937 - S.241). View of the Drafting Studio and Office Annex from the West. It appears much the same in 2014 as it did in 1962. The drafting Studio is on the left, the Office Annex is on the right. The Guest Quarters seen in the center background, were added to the second floor above the kitchen and dining areas in 1941. An Indian Rock is mounted at the top of the stairs. The slide is stamped "Mar 62." Original 35mm Color Kodachrome II Transparency slide. 10 x 7 Color Print. 1526.29.0917
1962
Taliesin West 1962 (1937 - S.241). View of the Drafting Studio and Office Annex from the Southwest. It appears much the same in 2014 as it did in 1962. The drafting Studio is on the left, the Office Annex in the center, Apartments are to the right. The Guest Quarters seen in the background on the right, were added to the second floor above the kitchen and dining areas in 1941. An Indian Rock is mounted at the top of the stairs on the left. One of the twelve ceramic Chinese Theaters is embedded in desert masonry at the front of the Annex Office. The slide is stamped "Mar 62." Original 35mm Color Kodachrome II Transparency slide. 10 x 7 Color Print. 1526.30.0917
1962
Taliesin West Circa 1962 (1937 - S.241). View of the Office Annex from the Southwest. The drafting Studio is on the left, the Office Annex in the center, Apartments are to the right. An Indian Rock is mounted at the top of the stairs on the left. One of the twelve ceramic Chinese Theaters is embedded in desert masonry at the front of the Annex Office. The Guest Quarters seen in the background on the right, were added to the second floor above the kitchen and dining areas in 1941. For dating see (1526.30), landscaping is very similar. Printed on a very thick and stiff photographic stock. Verso is blank. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1526.31.0418
1962
Sculptor of Mrs. Wright. Taliesin 1962. Heloise Fichter at Taliesin. Heloise Fichter joined Taliesin as an Apprentice in 1948-1949. Clipping pasted to verso: "Woman Sculptor, student in Taliesin, works on a head of Mrs. Wright that she is modeling from clay." Stamped on verso: "1962 Aug 24". Original10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1526.11.0811
1962
Wright at 88. 1955. Press photograph for "Architecture: Man in Possession of His Earth". Includes three images. 1) V. C. Morris Gift Shop (S.310 - 1948). Caption on face below image; "Interior of Morris store, San Francisco (Maynard L. Parker)." Originally photographed in 1948. 2) Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright in a horse draw carriage, 1955. Caption on face below image; "Mr. And Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright (John Engstead). Photographed by John Engstead, it appears that Wright is wearing the same suit, tie and handkerchief as he did when he was photographed on June 8, 1955 for his 88th birthday. She has changed her outfit. On June 8th, Engstead photographed images for the November 1955 issue of House Beautiful, published on page 243, bottom left.  3) Rendering of the Pilgrim Congregational Church (Project 1958). Caption on face below image; "Architect’s rendering of Pilgrim Congregational Church – Redding, California." Caption pasted on verso; "Memoir from a Master Builder. Frank Lloyd Wright’s last book, "Architecture: Man in Possession of His Earth," explains architecture in terms of building materials (Doubleday, $5.95). Prefaced by a biography of the late architect by his daughter, Iovanna Lloyd Wright, the volume is illustrated throughout with sketches, renderings, and photographs... Continue... 1496.03.1210
1963
 
 
Arizona 1963 - Set of twelve 2.25 x 2.25 Transparencies including digital images. Each transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Unknown photographer.  It is Interesting to compare these 1963 images to the corresponding images from 2004.  
1963
1) Benjamin Adelman Residence.  Built in 1951. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #344.  2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.04.0606
1963
2) Jorgine Boomer Residence. Built in 1953. Viewed from the Northeast. Nine years after the home was completed, the existing foliage has grown, but still remains sparse like the original 1954 images. Living room curtains have been replaced. Arizona Biltmore can be seen in the background on the right. The south end of the upper level has been greatly expanded. The walls are constructed of natural red desert stone set in concrete.  Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #361. 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.05.0606
1963
3) Gammage Memorial Auditorium.  Designed in 1959, built in 1962-64. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #432.  2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.06.0606
1963
4) Gammage Memorial Auditorium.  Designed in 1959, built in 1962-64. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #432.  2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.07.0606
1963
5) Pauson Residence (Ruin).  Built in 1939.  Storrer #250.  Constructed in 1939, destroyed by fire in 1942. “Desert Rubblestone” construction.  For nearly 40 years the concrete foundation, walls and fireplace remained in ghostly ruins. These were destroyed in 1980 to make way for an extension of 32nd Street.  Architect Edward M. Jones salvaged the 70 ton fireplace chimney mass and relocated it 200 yards to the south and incorporated it in the entrance to Alta Vista Park Estates where the Boomer and Benjamin Adelman residences are located.  Chimney mass measures 9 x 11' at the base and is 26' tall. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.08.0606
1963
6) Pauson Residence (Ruin).  Built in 1939.  Storrer #250.  Constructed in 1939, destroyed by fire in 1942. “Desert Rubblestone” construction.  For nearly 40 years the concrete foundation, walls and fireplace remained in ghostly ruins.  These were destroyed in 1980 to make way for an extension of 32nd Street.   Architect Edward M. Jones salvaged the 70 ton fireplace chimney mass and relocated it 200 yards to the south and incorporated it in the entrance to Alta Vista Park Estates where the Boomer and Benjamin Adelman residences are located.  Chimney mass measures 9 x 11' at the base and is 26' tall. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.09.0606
1963
7) Harold Price, Sr., Residence.  Built in 1954. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #378.  2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.10.0606
1963
8) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.11.0606
1963
9) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.12.0606
1963
10) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.13.0606
1963
11) Taliesin West.  Built in 1937.  Storrer #241. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." 2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.14.0606
1963
 
 
12) David Wright Residence.  Built in 1950. Transparency is time stamped "Sept 63." Storrer #322.  2.25 x 2.25 transparency. 1565.15.0606
1963
Beth Sholom Synagogue, Elkins Park, PA, Circa 1963 (1954 - S.373). The new Synagogue was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954, dedicated on September 20, 1959. Viewed from the Northwest, the entrance is to the right. Designed as a hexagon, the main glass walls of the sanctuary are suspended from a steel tripod and are composed of 21,000 corrugated wire-glass sheets, giving the whole sanctuary a translucent appearance. Landscaping has matured since building was completed. Stamped on verso: "Jules Schick Photography. Philadelphia." Photographed by Jules Schick. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 1565.48.0216
1963
Beth Sholom Synagogue, Elkins Park, PA, Circa 1963 (1954 - S.373). The new Synagogue was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954, dedicated on September 20, 1959. Viewed from the North, the entrance is on the far right. Designed as a hexagon, the main glass walls of the sanctuary are suspended from a steel tripod and are composed of 21,000 corrugated wire-glass sheets, giving the whole sanctuary a translucent appearance. Landscaping has matured since building was completed. Stamped on verso: "Jules Schick Photography. Philadelphia." Photographed by Jules Schick. Original 10 x 8 Color photograph. 1565.49.0216
1963
Broadacre City, City Dweller’s Unit, Broadacre City Model, 1963. Caption pasted to verso: "City Dweller’s Unit, Broadacre City Model from 'The Future of Architecture' by Frank Lloyd Wright. A Mentor paperback. March 1963, Credit Roy E. Peterson." Published in "The Future of Architecture" Wright, 1953, p270. Photographed by Roy E. Peterson. Original 4 x 6.2 B&W photograph. 1565.24.0111
1963
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1963. Viewed from the Northwest. Photographed by Cervin Robinson during August 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1565.26.1011
1963
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1963. The Entrance, front facade and Balcony detail viewed from the West. Photographed by Cervin Robinson during August 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 8 x 10 B&W Print. 1565.27.1011
1963
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1963. Detail of the first floor fireplace mantel in the north room. Photographed by Cervin Robinson during August 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 7 B&W Print. 1565.28.1011
1963
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1963. Detail of the Dining Room fireplace mantel. Photographed by Cervin Robinson during August 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1565.29.1011
1963
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1963. Detail of the stairwell woodwork. Photographed by Cervin Robinson during August 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 7.75 x 10 B&W Print. 1565.30.1011
1963
Fallingwater.  View from stream bed below first falls.  In 1963, Stoller was commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art (New York) to photograph Fallingwater, becoming icons in their own right, illustrating the building's integral connection to the landscape and its striking modern form.  Verso signed “Ezra Stoller 222 Valley Place Mamaroneck N.Y.”  Similar B&W view published in “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater” Stoller 1999, page 23.   Mounted to metal backing.  35 x 43.5. 1565.18.0807
1963
Fallingwater.  View of the Facade from the southeast.  In 1963 Stoller was commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art (New York) in 1963 to photograph Fallingwater, becoming icons in their own right, illustrating the building's integral connection to the landscape and its striking modern form.  Verso stamped “Ezra Stoller”. Published in “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater” Stoller 1999, page 30-31. 8 x 10. 1565.19.0807
1963
Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium (1959 - S.432), circa 1963. Viewed from the Northeast, the auditorium is on the left, stage on the right. Steel framework is in progress. After Wright’s death in April 1959, the Universities’ Board of Regency voted on April 30, 1960 to retain the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, under the direction of William Wesley Peters. After the final plans and specifications were approved, the Regents called for bids and awarded the construction contract on May 19, 1962. It took 25 months to complete at a cost of $2.46 million. ASU celebrated its grand opening on September 18, 1964. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1565.41.0714
1963
Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium (1959 - S.432), circa 1963. Viewed from the auditorium looking down the ramp toward the East. Steel framework is in progress. The ramp splits and services the second and third levels. The arched ramp light poles intersect and support the ramp. After the final plans and specifications were approved, the Regents called for bids and awarded the construction contract on May 19, 1962. It took 25 months to complete at a cost of $2.46 million. ASU celebrated its grand opening on September 18, 1964. 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1565.42.0714
1963
Charles E. Roberts Residence Remodeling 1963 (1896 - S.040). View from the street. The original home was designed by Daniel H Burnham of Burnham and Root (Rookery Building) in 1879. He was a member of Unity Temple (1904 - S.096). Frank Lloyd Wright made changes to the interior and exterior. Exterior changes were to the roof and veranda. The veranda is missing in this image, but was restored in 1990 to Wright’s design. The veranda extended across the front, was covered, and was circular on either end. Plans are published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1887-1901, Pfeiffer, 1986/1991, p.93. Hand written on verso: "321 N. Euclid. 1963." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1565.55.0219
1963
Charles E. Roberts Stable 1963 (1900 - S.041). View from Euclid Street. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the stable in 1900. It is located at the back of the property on the alley, with access to Euclid Street by a sidewalk that runs along the side of the Roberts house. It was later converted to a garage, then into a home. Hand written on verso: "317 N. Euclid. 1963." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1565.56.0219
1963
Robie House (1906 S.127) 1963. Caption on verso: "A Pioneer in Architecture. This is Robie House, one of Frank Lloyd Wright‘s earliest, and regarded by many as his greatest architectural achievement. The granddaddy of today’s split-level ranch type house stands on a corner lot on Chicago’s South Side. It incorporates dozens of daring innovations which have become standard practice in present-day design. The pioneer concept was completed in 1909. It has just been presented to the University of Chicago which plans to restore it at an estimated $250,000 cost. Associated Press photo. 2/6/63" Stamped on Verso: "Daily News, Feb 14 1975." Original 9 x 7 silver gelatin photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1565.23.0310
1963
Robie House Main Entrance 1963 (1906 - S.127). Caption included: "Gene Pesek – Monday July 29, 1963. Robie House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1909." Like many of Frank Lloyd Wright designed homes, the entrance is hidden from the street. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative and 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1565.25.0811
1963
Robie House Balcony on second (main) floor 1963 (1906 - S.127). View from the West, the Living Room is in the foreground on the left, the Dining Room it to it’s right. Above the Dining Room is the Master Bedroom on the third floor. Stamped on verso: "Jul 30 1963." Robie House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1909." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1565.47.0315
1963
Robie House interior light fixture 1963 (1906 - S.127). Detail of the Living and Dining Room Light Fixture. Completed in 1909, the Robie House was nearly destroyed in 1957. Acquired by the University of Chicago in 1963. Photographed by Cervin Robinson on August 20, 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1565.31.1211
1963
Robie House interior window detail 1963 (1906 - S.127). Detail of the Living and Dining Room Window detail. The windowed alcove is mirrored on either end of the Living and Dining Rooms. Completed in 1909, the Robie House was nearly destroyed in 1957. Acquired by the University of Chicago in 1963. Photographed by Cervin Robinson on August 20, 1963. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1565.32.1211
1963
Roloson Rowhouses (1894 S.026) 1963. Stamped on verso: "Sun Times. May 12, 1963." Clipping pasted on verso: "This love of music was an early sign that Chicago had a soul." - Frank Lloyd Wright. On the South Side along Calumet Av., their backs facing the steel-and-glass high-rise apartment of Prairie Shores, sit our unimposing row houses. Of an English Tudor design, they appear to be little different from many of their neighbors that have gone the way of the wrecking ball. But different hey are. In fact, they are historically and architecturally unique. Located at 3213-15-17-19, they are the Roloson Houses, an early creation of the most famous and influential architect of the last half-century - Frank Lloyd Wright. Little is known about the houses. They - unlike almost all of the other Wright structures - have received almost no public notice. Now they may be swept away by the mighty bulldozer of urban renewal. No plans for their destruction have been made by the urban renewal people. But they’re not making any promises, and as o the future, well... What exactly is the importance of the row houses? Today is the sum total of the past. Let us take a look. In 1894, Wright, an aggressive architect in his early 20s, received a commission by one Robert Roloson to build some income-producing buildings on he South Side. Wright apparently wasn’t overenthusiastic because, once completed, he virtually erased the memory of the houses from his mind. Article by Alver Carlson. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8 x 9 B&W print. 1565.33.0312
1963
Roloson Rowhouses (1894 S.026) 1963. Stamped on verso: "Sun Times. May 12, 1963." Caption pasted on verso: "This picture shows a portion of the only remaining balustrade left in front of the homes. Wright also used a series-of-balls pattern in an Oak Park home balustrade." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun Times. Original 8.25 x 9 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Robert W. Roloson Rowhouses. 1565.22.0310
1963
Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1963. View of the Lobby looking toward the stairs. The Rookery Building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures. Photographed in July 1963 by Cervin Robinson. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1565.37.0512
1963
Rookery Building Entryway and Lobby Remodeling (1905 - S.113) 1963. View of the Lobby looking toward the stairs, The Rookery Building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Wright removed most of Root’s original iron ornamentation and simplified it with geometric designs. He also encased much of Root's elaborate wrought iron finishes with white carved and gilded Carrara marble. He simplified the ironwork design, added large prairie styled urns and designed hanging light fixtures.  from the balcony. Photographed in July 1963 by Cervin Robinson. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 8 x 9.8 B&W photograph. 1565.38.0512
1963
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) 1963. Photographed just months before its destruction to make room for an apartment complex. The King’s Arms Restaurant, which occupied the facility for the past 30 years, has vacated the premises. Viewed from the Southwest, standing in the parking lot, which used to be the front yard. The covered Porch, now enclosed, is on the left, the Living Room in the center and Dining Room on the far right. The Entrance is to the right of the Living Room. The front yard has been paved. The exterior walls have been covered with asbestos shingles. Storm windows cover the Porch and Living Room windows. Wood beams can be seen above the Living Room Bay which were added to support the large restaurant sign that existed for 30 years. An apartment building on Eastlake Terrace can be seen in the background on the far right. Photographed on January 1, 1963 by Hedrich Blessing. Original 6.5 x 5.25 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 1565.34.0512
1963
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) 1963. Photographed just months before its destruction to make room for an apartment complex. The King’s Arms Restaurant, which occupied the facility for the past 30 years, has vacated the premises. Viewed from the Southwest, standing in the parking lot, which used to be the front yard. The Living Room is on the left, The enclosed Entrance was extended thirty years ago when the home was converted to a restaurant. The Dining Room is on the right. The upper level can be seen above the Entrance and Dining Room. The exterior walls have been covered with asbestos shingles. Storm windows cover Living Room and Dining Room windows. Wood beams can be seen above the Living Room Bay which were added to support the large restaurant sign that existed for 30 years. Photographed on January 1, 1963 by Hedrich Blessing. Original 9.75 x 8 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 1565.35.0512
1963
Oscar Steffens Residence (1909 - S.153) 1963. Photographed just months before its destruction to make room for an apartment complex. The King’s Arms Restaurant, which occupied the facility for the past 30 years, has vacated the premises. Viewed from the South, standing in the parking lot, which used to be the side yard. The Living Room is on the left, The enclosed Entrance was extended thirty years ago when the home was converted to a restaurant. The Dining Room is on the right. A storage room, added by the restaurant, is visible just to the right of the third Dining Room window of the south wall. It extends out 4-5 feet and is about eight to nine feet long. The upper level can be seen above the Entrance and Dining Room. The exterior walls have been covered with asbestos shingles. Storm windows cover Living Room and Dining Room windows. Photographed on January 1, 1963 by Hedrich Blessing. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. For more information see our Wright Study on the Oscar Steffens Residence. 1565.36.0512
1963
Taliesin West Music Pavilion Burns (1956 - S.244) 1963. Music Building at Taliesin West smoldering. Printed on face: "Scottsdale, Ariz., Sept 27 – This 5-year-old auditorium at Taliesin West, the architectural school founded by the late Frank Lloyd Wright, was destroyed by fire today. Cause of the blaze wasn’t known, although it was believed to have started among some drapes being stored in the structure. Firemen prevented the flames from spreading to other structures at the school, located 26 miles northeast of Phoenix. (AP Wirephoto). ‘63." Stamped on verso: "Sep 30 1963." Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1565.43.0814
C 1963
Unity Temple Sanctuary, Oak Park, Circa 1963 (1904 - S.096). View of the Unity Temple Sanctuary from the North, toward the Pulpit. Three levels of seating are to the left and right sides. Rows of clerestory windows on each side allows soft light to enter the sanctuary. This photograph was included with a brochure for an exhibition at Unity Temple in 1963. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1565.53.0817
C 1963
Unity Temple Sanctuary, Oak Park, Circa 1963 (1904 - S.096). View of the Unity Temple Sanctuary from the Pulpit, looking Northeast. Two levels of seating are at the back, three to the left and right sides. Rows of clerestory windows on each side allows soft light to enter the sanctuary. This photograph was included with a brochure for an exhibition at Unity Temple in 1963. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1565.54.0817
1964
1964
James Charnley Residence (1890 - S.009) 1964. Viewed from the West. Photographed by Harold Allen during April 1964. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1596.22.1011
1964
Fallingwater 1964 (1938 - S.231). Set of 115 - 35mm Slides photographed between September 1964 through April 1966. Designed in 1938 by Frank Lloyd Wright, the main house was completed in 1938, and the guest house was completed the following year. In 1963, twenty five years after the home was built, and four years after Wright’s death, Edgar Kaufmann Jr. donated the property to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In 1964 Fallingwater was opened to the public through guided tours, These photographs were taken the first year the public was given a glimpse of Fallingwater. 1-A1) View of the landscape around Fallingwater, which sits within 1,500 acres. The stonework of Fallingwater mimics the natural stonework on the property. Stamped on face: "1 Sep 64R." 35mm Kodachrome slide and 11.5 x 8 high res color digital photograph.
1596.67.0817 (1-21)
C 1964
Florida Southern College Aerial view circa 1964. Viewed from the East. Frank Lloyd Wright buildings include the: Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251); E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252); Seminars Buildings (3): Cora Carter, Isabel Walbridge, Charles W. Hawkins (1941 - S.253.1 -.3); Ordway Industrial Arts Building (1950 - S.254); Administration Buildings (1946 - S.255): Emile E. Watson, Benjamin Fine; Edgar Wall Water Dome; Polk County Science Building (1953 - S.256) (Cosmography Building & Planetarium); The Esplanades (1946 - S.257), various completion times; William H. Danforth Minor Chapel (1954 - S.258). Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.45.0514
C 1964
Florida Southern College Aerial view circa 1964. Viewed from the South. Frank Lloyd Wright buildings include the: Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251); E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252); Seminars Buildings (3): Cora Carter, Isabel Walbridge, Charles W. Hawkins (1941 - S.253.1 -.3); Ordway Industrial Arts Building (1950 - S.254); Administration Buildings (1946 - S.255): Emile E. Watson, Benjamin Fine; Edgar Wall Water Dome; Polk County Science Building (1953 - S.256) (Cosmography Building & Planetarium); The Esplanades (1946 - S.257), various completion times; William H. Danforth Minor Chapel (1954 - S.258). Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.46.0514
C 1964
Florida Southern College Aerial view circa 1964. Viewed from the Northwest. Frank Lloyd Wright buildings include the: Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251); E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252); Seminars Buildings (3): Cora Carter, Isabel Walbridge, Charles W. Hawkins (1941 - S.253.1 -.3); Ordway Industrial Arts Building (1950 - S.254); Administration Buildings (1946 - S.255): Emile E. Watson, Benjamin Fine; Edgar Wall Water Dome; Polk County Science Building (1953 - S.256) (Cosmography Building & Planetarium); The Esplanades (1946 - S.257), various completion times; William H. Danforth Minor Chapel (1954 - S.258). Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.47.0514
1964
Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium (1959 - S.432), 1964. Mrs. Wright seated in the auditorium. After Wright’s death in April 1959, the Universities’ Board of Regency voted on April 30, 1960 to retain the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, under the direction of William Wesley Peters. On April 20, 1961, the contract was signed. Construction began on May 23, 1962. It took 25 months to complete at a cost of $2.46 million. ASU celebrated its grand opening on September 18, 1964. It measures 300 by 250 feet by 80 feet high. The auditorium seats just over 3,000 people. Photographed during the opening ceremonies in September 1964. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1596.44.0716
1964
Huntington Hartford Gallery of Modern Art, New York, C 1964. Huntington Hartford hired architect Edward Durell Stone to design a museum in New York City at two Columbia Circle, for his art collection. He named it the Gallery of Modern Art. Salvador Dalí attended the grand opening held on March 16, 1964. Reception for the gallery was mixed. Writing for The New York Times after the gallery's opening in 1964, Ada Louise Huxtable dismissed the exterior as "a die-cast Venetian palazzo on lollipops." She did praised the interior spaces as a "conspicuous success … an achievement to command considerable admiration." Although many major exhibitions took place at the museum, it was never able to sustain itself, Hartford closed the museum in 1969 and donated the building to the Fairleigh Dickinson University. Photographed by Ezra Stoller, circa 1964. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Hartford Resort Project. 1596.51.0515
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, HABS Measured Drawings, First and Second Floor Plan, 1964 (1896 - S.038). "The Isidore Heller House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for a narrow city lot in the Hyde Park district of Chicago. It belongs to a stylistic category of Wright’s work that has been termed ‘Monitor’ referring to the third story which is raised above the main eaves and capped by a smaller hip roof. The arcade and frieze of this story contains elaborate Sullivanesque ornament and sculptural figures, the latter executed by Richard Bock... Recorded by the National Park Service... Measured and drawn during the summer of 1964 under the direction of James C. Massey. Drawn by: J Rex Poggenpohl." Historic American Building Survey, Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.40.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, HABS Measured Drawings, South and East Elevations, 1964 (1896 - S.038). "The Isidore Heller House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for a narrow city lot in the Hyde Park district of Chicago. It belongs to a stylistic category of Wright’s work that has been termed ‘Monitor’ referring to the third story which is raised above the main eaves and capped by a smaller hip roof. The arcade and frieze of this story contains elaborate Sullivanesque ornament and sculptural figures, the latter executed by Richard Bock... Recorded by the National Park Service... Measured and drawn during the summer of 1964 under the direction of James C. Massey. Drawn by: J Rex Poggenpohl." Historic American Building Survey, Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.41.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, HABS Measured Drawings, Detail of Staircase Window, 1964 (1896 - S.038). "The Isidore Heller House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for a narrow city lot in the Hyde Park district of Chicago. It belongs to a stylistic category of Wright’s work that has been termed ‘Monitor’ referring to the third story which is raised above the main eaves and capped by a smaller hip roof. The arcade and frieze of this story contains elaborate Sullivanesque ornament and sculptural figures, the latter executed by Richard Bock... Recorded by the National Park Service... Measured and drawn during the summer of 1964 under the direction of James C. Massey. Drawn by: J Rex Poggenpohl." Historic American Building Survey, Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.42.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Street view,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. Ivy has begun to grow again. A wooden fence has been added to the right side. The Living Room is on the first floor, the side entrance on the North side can be seen on the far right. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. The east bedroom opens to a balcony. The windows just to the right of the chimney is one of two bathrooms on the second floor. The large brick tower just behind the side entrance, houses an elevator that services the basement and all three floors. The Playroom is on the third floor. The Roman brick on the first floor is buff, the second and third floors, above the horizontal stone trim alternates buff and gray bricks. The Living Room windows are bordered with horizontal stone. The square panels below the Living Room windows match the billet molding framing the main entrance. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.28.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Living Room window detail,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. Ivy has begun to grow again. The Living Room is on the first floor. The Roman brick on the first floor is buff. The Living Room windows are bordered with horizontal stone. The square panels below the Living Room windows match the billet molding framing the main entrance. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.29.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Detail of the third floor,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. Three arches are set between plaster Sullivanesque panels with high relief winged maidens. Pairs of colonettes are topped with large, spreading ornamental Sullivanesque plaster capitals. Both the plaster maidens and capitals show deterioration. The Roman brick on the second and third floors alternates buff and gray bricks. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.30.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Detail of the third floor capitals,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. Pairs of colonettes are topped with large, spreading ornamental Sullivanesque plaster capitals. Plaster capitals show deterioration. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.31.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, North side,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. Remnants of ivy can be seen at the top left. The art glass windows follow the stairs that lead to the second floor. The window sills are limestone, as is the horizontal trim that runs the length of the home. The North (back) entrance sets on a thick limestone foundation, very similar to the foundation of the Husser Residence (1899). The art glass windows, different than those of the stairway, repeats the design element in the upper Sullivanesque panels, seen between the winged maidens. The large brick tower just behind the side entrance, houses an elevator that services the basement and all three floors. The Pantry and Kitchen are just beyond the that. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.32.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Detail of the North side windows,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. The art glass windows follow the stairs that lead to the second floor. The window sills are limestone, as is the horizontal trim that runs the length of the home. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.33.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Detail of the North side back entrance,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. The North (back) entrance sets on a thick limestone foundation, very similar to the foundation of the Husser Residence (1899). The art glass windows, different than those of the stairway, repeats the design element in the upper Sullivanesque panels, seen between the winged maidens. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.34.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, Detail of the North side back entrance art glass ,1964 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Northeast. The art glass windows, different than those of the stairway, repeats the design element in the upper Sullivanesque panels, seen between the winged maidens. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.35.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance, Chicago, 1964 (1896 - S.038). View from the Southeast. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels with a quatrefoil design. The light fixture has been replaced with one more consistent with the design of the home. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. The Dining Room is seen on the far left. The Lining Room is to the right of the Entrance. Five bedrooms are on the second floor. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.36.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance detail, Chicago, 1964 (1896 - S.038). View from the Southeast. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels with a quatrefoil design. The light fixture has been replaced with one more consistent with the design of the home. The entrance is framed with a billet molding. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.37.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance detail, Chicago, 1964 (1896 - S.038). View from the Southeast. The large limestone columns on either side of the entrance are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. The columns support three square frieze panels with a quatrefoil design. The light fixture has been replaced with one more consistent with the design of the home. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.38.0514
1964
Isidore Heller Residence Entrance detail, Chicago, 1964 (1896 - S.038). View from the Southeast. The large limestone columns are octagonal in shape, with ornamental Sullivanesque capitals. Photographed by Harold Allen on June 15, 1964. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1596.39.0514
1964
Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium 1964 (1959 - S.432). View of the Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium from the South. Label pasted to verso: "The outer roof off of the newly dedicated Grady Gammage Memorial auditorium at Tempe, Ariz., Is supported by 50 precast concrete columns, each 55 feet high. Two pedestrian bridges (only one is visible) are linked to the main building. Each bridge has gold arcs and circles which house light fixtures. – Arizona Photographic Association, Inc." Stamped on clipping: "Oct 18 1964." Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright – Bldgs designed by him." Stamped on verso: Please credit: Photos By Herb & Dorothy McLaughlin. Arizona Photographic Association, Inc." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.68.0218
1964
Herbert F. Johnson Wingspread (1937 - S.239) 1960. Aerial view. Clipping pasted to verso: "Wingspread, Frank Lloyd Wright designed conference center of The Johnson Foundation, where the Planning Conference for the International Convocation based on Pope John Twenty-Third’s Encyclical, Peace on Earth, will take place May 17-19, 1964." Original 7 x 5 B&W photograph. 1596.26.1013
1964
William Wesley Peters in the Drafting Room at Taliesin, Spring Green, 1964. The drafting room trusses are seen in the background. Hand written on verso: "(William Wesley Peters) Son-in law of Frank L. Wright. Filed 1964 - Oct. 11." Stamped on verso: "Ronald W. Nusbaum." Nusbaum was a photographer for the Milwaukee Sentinel. Stamped on a clipping taped to verso: "Apr 8 1970. Sentinel." Text on clipping: "William Wesley Peters. Sentinel." Text on second clipping: "Madison, Wisconsin. – William Wesley Peters, a close associate of Frank Lloyd Wright for 27 years and the nationally known architect in his own right, died early Wednesday at a Madison hospital after suffering a succession of strokes. He was 71. Intimately involved with public buildings and residences designed by Wright between 1930 to 1959, Peters was married to Wright’s..." Photographed by Ronald W. Nusbaum. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.65.1117
1964
William Wesley Peters standing in the Drafting Room at Taliesin Spring Green, 1964. The drafting room trusses are seen in the background. Clipping pasted to verso: "Heading the group of architects and other specialists who are carrying on the architectural practice of the late Frank Lloyd Wright, is William Wesley Peters, Wright's son-in-law, shown in the drafting room at the Hillside Home school at Taliesin." Of interest is the model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Nakomis sculpture, designed for the Nakoma Memorial Gateway, 1924, an unrealized project, but realized in 1976 at the SC Johnson headquarters in Racine Wisconsin. The Taliesin Architects attempted to resurrect the Nakoma Clubhouse in 1967. The project was finally resurrected and completed in 2001. The Nakoma model could possibly be close to his drawing board for the 1967 attempt. Photographed by Ronald W. Nusbaum. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.66.1217
1964
Pope-Leighey House 1964. Set of nine drawings by the National Park Service for the Historic American Building Survey (HABS). Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. An example of Wright's "Usonian House," the structure, in danger of demolition in 1965 for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County, was saved, moved and restored by Mrs. Robert A. Leighey, The National Trust for Historic Preservation and The National Park Service. This important American Architectural Monument was relocated at Woodlawn Plantation, near Mount Vernon. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House.
1596.52.0730 1-9
1964
Pope-Leighey House 1964. Set of fifteen photographs. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. Mr. And Mrs. Robert A. Leighey purchased the home in 1946. In December 1963 Mrs. Leighey was notified that her home was in danger of demolition for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County. In July 1964, she signed an agreement with the National Trust to save the home. Dismantling of the home began in the fall... For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House.





1596.53.0715 1-15
1964
Robie House (1906 - S.127) 1964. Viewed from the Northwest. Clipping pasted on verso: "Robie House, product of the genius of Frank Lloyd Wright, and candidate for permanent memorial to the great architect, has been declared a national historic landmark by Secretary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall. A committee is seeking funds to restore it." Stamped on clipping: "Feb 2 1964". Hand written on verso: "1-29-1964". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1596.24.0212
1964
Robie House (1906 - S.127) 1964. Caption pasted on verso: "Robie House, at 5757 S. Woodlawn, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is officially designated a national historic landmark, (Sun-Times Photo). Label pasted o verso: "Chicago Sun-Times. Date: April 1, 1964. Photographer: Ralph Walters. Title: Dedicate Robie House. Address: 5757 South Woodlawn Avenue. Caption: Across the street view, of the assembled during the dedication of Robie House." Stamped on verso: "Sun-Times. Apr 2 1964". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 8 x 10 B&W print. 1596.18.0311
1964
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building 1964 (1936 - S.237). View of the Lobby from the West. Monolithic dendriform columns have a diameter of 9 inches at the base and gradually widen to 2 feet 10 inches at the top, then spread out to a diameter of 18 feet 6 inches. The tallest columns are in the lobby at 31 feet tall, and the great room which are 21 feet 7.5 inches high. "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings," Lipman, 1986, p.50. Clipping pasted to verso: "The rhythmic geometry of Frank Lloyd Wright's architecture is dramatically demonstrated in the reception area of the administration building. The curved balconies are part of the mezzanine and penthouse office areas." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 13 1964." Earlier image in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Building", Lipman, 1986, p.101. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1596.61.0917
1964
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building 1964 (1936 - S.237). View of the spiral stairway in the Great Workroom. Stairway leads to women’s lounge. Designed in 1936, the official opening of the SC Johnson Administration Building spanned three days, April 22-24, 1939. Ken Burns considered the Johnson Wax Headquarters Great Workroom as "the greatest room in the United States today." Architects have called it the greatest contribution to business housing since the advent of the skyscraper. It is built without windows and doors (other than the main opening) and is heated through the floor and supported by ‘golf-tee’ columns, modeled on the structure of a flower." Clipping pasted to verso: "Lighted, winding stair wells, like this one, provide access to women's lounges. The building's architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, also designed the desks and other furnishings in the building. S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 13 1964." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1596.62.0917
1964
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building Penthouse 1964 (1936 - S.237). View of Administration building Penthouse. Herbert Johnson’s office on the right. Monolithic dendriform columns have a metal base embedded in the floor. Golf tee in shape, the base has a diameter of 9 inches, gradually widening to 2 feet 10 inches at the top, then spreading out to a diameter of 18 feet 6 inches. The tallest columns are in the lobby at 31 feet tall. Clipping pasted to verso: "Tapered columns rise the full three levels of the 25 year old administration building of S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Racine. The lobby and mezzanine or partly visible from the top level executive offices shown above." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 13 1964." Stamped on verso: "650457." A similar view is published in "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings" Lipman, p.113. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.63.0917
1964
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1964. Viewed from Northwest, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, and the Entrance is in the center. Lake Street is on the left, North Kenilworth Avenue in the foreground. Caption on Verso: "Unitarian Universalist Church (Unity Temple), Oak Park." Stamped on verso: "Feb 28, 1964". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1596.23.0112
1964
Olgivanna Wright, 1964. Olgivanna Wright celebrate the anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birth with Adlai Stevenson. Clipping pasted to verso: "Friends of the late Frank Lloyd Wright paid tribute to the architect on the anniversary of his birth at Spring Green, Wis. Mrs. Wright chatted with Adlai Stevenson, twice Democratic candidate for president. Wright died Apr. 8 at 89." Stamped on clipping: "We Jun 10 1959." Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. (S#1377.101) 1377.101.0619
1964
Olgivanna Wright, 1964. Olgivanna Wright, facing forward and a little to the left of camera, seated at a table giving an interview. Possibly photographed in Cleveland in April 1964. Hand written on verso: "Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "The Plain Dealer Library, Apr 24 1964." Also stamped on verso: "Karl J. Rauschkall Staff Photographer, Cleveland Plain Dealer." Photographed by Karl J. Rauschkall. Acquired from the archives of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1596.64.0917
1965
1965
Aline Barnsdall Hollyhock House (1917 - S.208) 1965. View of the Southwest corner. In 1927, Aline Barnsdall gave Hollyhock House and eleven surrounding acres to the city of Los Angeles for use as a public art park in memory of her father, Theodore Barnsdall. For the next fifteen years the house was home to the California Art Club, which made full use of its dramatic design to stage plays and display artwork. The house was leased again in the 1940s and 1950s by Dorothy Clune Murray’s Olive Hill Foundation. Photographed by Marvin Rand. Acquired from the Library of Congress. Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1628.24.0413
1965
Aline Barnsdall Residence A 1965 (1917 - S.208). Viewed from the Southwest. The Dining Room and main entrance is on the far left, the Kitchen is in the center, Bedrooms on the right. West (left) and South (right) elevations. Residence A is one of two surviving structures on Olive Hill designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Aline Barnsdall. It was completed in 1920. By 1965, changes were made to Residence A by the city of Los Angeles. The original Living Room’s North balcony was removed and replaced with a wooden one. Exterior stairs and a doorway were added, leading to the second floor, on the Southwest corner. The road, sidewalk and retaining wall in the foreground were also a recent addition. The sidewalk and retaining wall has since been removed. Photographed in September, 1965 by Marvin Rand. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 7 B&W photograph.
1628.50.1115 1-6
1965
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church Chancel and Alter 1965 (1956 - S.399). View of the Alter, set near the rear of the Chancel (the area at the front of a church near the altar, reserved for the clergy and choir, and typically separated from the auditorium by a screen). The church, including the alter was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1956. Stamped on verso: "1965 Aug 10." Hand Written on verso: "Young America, Annunciation Greek. (Milw. Sentinel - Young America Week.) Clipping pasted to verso: "Father Emanuel N. Vergis explains features of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox church to tour guides of the Senior Greek Orthodox Youth Association. Left to right they are: Peter Petroll, jr, of Waukesha; Zoe Niklos; Mrs. Petroll; Kelly Lenardos, of 9020 West Grantosa drive, Wauwatosa, and Nick Koremenos, of 3656 West Menomonee River parkway, Wauwatosa. The church was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. – Sentinel Photo." Stamped on clipping: "Aug 28 1965. Sentinel." Original 10 x 7.5 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. 1628.56.0617
C 1965-75
Arizona Biltmore Lobby and Entrance Circa 1965-1975 (S.221 - 1927). Caption on face: "NYT Pictures /Tom Story. Phoenix: Top: Frank Lloyd Wright’s gift for drama is exemplified in the Arizona Biltmore Hotel’s immense but comfortable main lobby; below, facade of concrete blocks with textured geometric patterns. (Note: for dating, there is a 1965 Cadillac in the bottom left hand corner of the entrance.) Original 8.5 x 10.5 B&W Photograph. 1628.22.0811
1965
Fallingwater 1965 (1938 - S.231). Set of 115 - 35mm Slides photographed between September 1964 through April 1966. Designed in 1938 by Frank Lloyd Wright, the main house was completed in 1938, and the guest house was completed the following year. In 1963, twenty five years after the home was built, and four years after Wright’s death, Edgar Kaufmann Jr. donated the property to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In 1964 Fallingwater was opened to the public through guided tours, These photographs were taken the second year the public was given a glimpse of Fallingwater. 22-B3) View of Fallingwater, taken on the drive approaching Fallingwater from the Southwest. The Guest House is on the left, Fallingwater is to the right. Bear Run (stream) is on the far right. Stamped on face: "3 Jun 65R12." 35mm Kodachrome slide and 11.5 x 8 high res color digital photograph.
1628.59.0817 (1-17)
1965
Fallingwater 1965 (1938 - S.231). Set of 115 - 35mm Slides photographed between September 1964 through April 1966. Designed in 1938 by Frank Lloyd Wright, the main house was completed in 1938, and the guest house was completed the following year. In 1963, twenty five years after the home was built, and four years after Wright’s death, Edgar Kaufmann Jr. donated the property to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In 1964 Fallingwater was opened to the public through guided tours, These photographs were taken the second year the public was given a glimpse of Fallingwater. 39-C2) View of Fallingwater, taken from across the stream. One of the tour guides discussing Fallingwater with visitors. Stamped on face: "2 Aug 65R7." 35mm Kodachrome slide and 11.5 x 8 high res color digital photograph.
1628.60.0817 (1-25)
1965
Fallingwater 1965 (1938 - S.231). Set of 115 - 35mm Slides photographed between September 1964 through April 1966... 64-D2) View of the Guest House Bedroom which looks out on the Terrace and Pool. The large painting above the bed, "Mexican Landscape: Jalapa, Mexico" by José María Velasco Gómez, 1877, Oil on canvas. Purchased by the Kaufmanns in 1937, was displayed in Kaufmann’s Department Store as part of their Below the Rio Grande exhibition, then in the family’s Pittsburgh home until it was moved to Fallingwater’s guest house bedroom in 1960. The Japanese print to the right is "Night Snow at Kambara" by Ando Hiroshige, 1834, Woodblock print on rice paper. Presented to the Kaufmanns by Frank Lloyd Wright in December, it was signed by Wright as a gift to his clients. Stamped on face: "2 Aug 65R7." 35mm Kodachrome slide and 11.5 x 8 high res color digital photograph.
1628.61.0817 (1-22)
C 1965

Fallingwater C1965 (1938 - S.231). Set of 7 - 127 transparency slide (2" x 2"). Designed in 1938 by FLW, the main house was completed in 1938, and the guest house was completed the following year. In 1963, twenty five years after the home was built, and four years after Wright’s death, Edgar Kaufmann Jr. donated the property to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In 1964 Fallingwater was opened to the public through guided tours, These photographs were taken approximately one year after the public was given a glimpse of Fallingwater, which sits within 1,500 acres.
1) Fallingwater C1965 (1938 - S.231). Set of 7 - 127 transparency slide (2" x 2"). View of Fallingwater, taken from across the stream. The bridge is to the right. The stonework of Fallingwater mimics the natural stonework on the property. Printed on verso of sleeve: "Ektachrome." 127 transparency slide and 10 x 10 high res color digital image.

1628.62.0918 (1-7)
1965
Francis Apartments (1965). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Photographed from the Northeast by Harold Allen, June 17, 1965. HABS Ill,16-Chig,74-4. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.16.0711
1965
Francis Apartments (1965). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Photographed from the East by Harold Allen, June 17, 1965. HABS Ill,16-Chig,74-5. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.17.0711
1965
Francis Apartments (1965). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Detail of iron grille and geometric patterned terra-cotta facing on the South side, looking Northeast. Photograph by Harold Allen, June 17, 1965. HABS Ill,16-Chig,74-1. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.18.0711
1965
Francis Apartments (1965). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Photograph of entryway on the Northwest corner of the courtyard by Harold Allen, June 17, 1965. HABS Ill,16-Chig,74-2. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.19.0711
1965
Francis Apartments (1965). Francis Apartments, Chicago (1895 - S.032). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1895, for the Terre Haute Trust Company, Chicago. Demolished in 1971. Detail of the geometric patterned terra-cotta facing. Photographed by Harold Allen, June 17, 1965. HABS Ill,16-Chig,74-3. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.20.0711
1965
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, view of third floor frieze, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Detail of the plaster frieze of the Southeast corner of the third floor. Viewed from the South. Under the copper gutters are decorative plaster soffits. Plaster panels include high relief winged maidens, set within a low relief Sullivanesque design. Relief is showing extreme deterioration. Corners are trimmed with a large based octagonal column. The Roman brick on the second and third floors alternates buff and gray bricks. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.25.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, detail of third floor frieze, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Detail of the plaster frieze of the Southeast corner of the third floor. Viewed from the South. Plaster panels include high relief winged maidens, set within a low relief Sullivanesque design. The design element between the maidens is similar to the art glass in the back entrance to the home, and elements in the title page for "The Eve of St. Agnes", designed by Wright and published in 1896, and "House Beautiful", designed by Wright and published in 1897. Relief is showing extreme deterioration. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.26.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, detail of third floor frieze, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Detail of the plaster frieze of the Southeast corner of the third floor. Viewed from the South. Plaster panels include high relief winged maidens, set within a low relief Sullivanesque design. The design element between the maidens is similar to the art glass in the back entrance to the home, and elements in the title page for "The Eve of St. Agnes", designed by Wright and published in 1896, and "House Beautiful", designed by Wright and published in 1897. Relief is showing extreme deterioration. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.27.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence, Chicago, detail of third floor frieze, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Detail of the plaster frieze of the Southeast corner of the third floor. Viewed from the South. Relief is showing extreme deterioration. Corners are trimmed with a large based octagonal column. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.28.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the West, looking toward the Living Room. The front door leads into the entry vestibule. It originally opened up into the reception hall, which has been blocked by a built-in bookcase. A set of doors open inward and lead to the main hall. Oak woodwork frames the ceiling and wall spaces. Walls are trimmed with large oak baseboards. The stairway on the left leads to the second level. The large square newel post is decorated at the top with a Sullivanesque filigree trim. Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway. Opposite the stairway is the reception room. Octagonal oak columns set atop square oak pedestals, both decorated at the top with matching Sullivanesque filigree trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.34.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Details of vestibule doors, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The front door leads into the entry vestibule. A set of doors open inward and lead to the main hall. Oak woodwork frames the ceiling and wall spaces. Walls are trimmed with large oak baseboards. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.35.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Detail of stairway, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Oak woodwork frames the ceiling and wall spaces. Walls are trimmed with large oak baseboards. The stairway leads to the second level. The large square newel post is decorated at the top with a Sullivanesque filigree trim. Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.36.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Detail of Reception Room entrance, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The front door leads into the entry vestibule. It originally opened up into the reception hall, which has been blocked by a built-in bookcase. A set of doors open inward and lead to the main hall. Oak woodwork frames the ceiling and wall spaces. Walls are trimmed with large oak baseboards. Octagonal oak columns set atop square oak pedestals, both decorated at the top with matching Sullivanesque filigree trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.37.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Detail of Reception Room entrance, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The entry vestibule originally opened up into the reception hall, which has been blocked by a built-in bookcase. Octagonal oak columns set atop square oak pedestals, both decorated at the top with matching Sullivanesque filigree trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.38.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Detail of Reception Room column, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Octagonal oak columns set atop square oak pedestals, both decorated at the top with matching Sullivanesque filigree trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.39.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Hall, Baseboard detail, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Walls are trimmed with large oak baseboards. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.40.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Living Room, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the Southwest. One of Wright’s hallmark’s was to vary ceiling heights. Raising it in some areas, lowering it in other areas in the same room. Creating a room within a room. This creates the illusion that the ceiling is higher than it actually is. Wright described the room in the June 1900 issue of Architectural Review, "Interior walls of rough sand finish. Trimmed in quartered and waxed white oak. Plaster saturated with pure color. Floor finish and furniture of one wood and color throughout. Lighting fixtures in main rooms wooden standards with globes worked in brass and opalescent glass. Interior color scheme bronze and dull green." The living room brick fireplace is framed in oak. Built-in bookcases balance each side of the fireplace area. The fireplace and bookcase ends are faced with delicate filigree panels. The Living Room’s brass light standards were removed, but outlines of the standard’s bases remain on the floor in the living room. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.29.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Living Room, Detail of fireplace trim, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Wright described the room in the June 1900 issue of Architectural Review, "Interior walls of rough sand finish. Trimmed in quartered and waxed white oak. Plaster saturated with pure color. Floor finish and furniture of one wood and color throughout. Lighting fixtures in main rooms wooden standards with globes worked in brass and opalescent glass. Interior color scheme bronze and dull green." The living room brick fireplace is framed in oak. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.30.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Living Room, Detail of the filigree panels, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The living room brick fireplace is framed in oak. Built-in bookcases balance each side of the fireplace area. The fireplace and bookcase ends are faced with delicate filigree panels. The filigree panel on the left is on the side of the bookcase, the filigree panel on the right is built into the fireplace trim. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.31.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Living Room, Fireplace detail. Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The living room brick fireplace is framed in oak. The fireplace ends are faced with delicate filigree panels on the inside and front. At the base of the front panel is a short built-in octagonal column, repeating the shape of the column outside the entrance of the home. It is topped with a pointed octagonal capital. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.32.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Living Room, Bookcase detail, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). The living room brick fireplace is framed in oak. Built-in bookcases balance each side of the fireplace area. The bookcase ends are faced with delicate filigree panels. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.33.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Stairway, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Viewed from the East, looking toward the Second level. Oak woodwork frames the stairway, ceiling and wall spaces. Although the newel post on the first floor was square, this newel post on the landing between the first and second floors is octagonal in shape and matches the upper column in the reception room, and is decorated at the top with the Sullivanesque filigree trim. Three upper posts are square and without the filigree trim. Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway from the reception hall. Eleven art glass windows follow the stairs that lead to the second floor. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.41.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Stairway detail, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Oak woodwork frames the stairway. Although the newel post on the first floor was square, this newel post on the landing between the first and second floors is octagonal in shape and matches the upper column in the reception room, and is decorated at the top with the Sullivanesque filigree trim. Three upper posts are square and without the filigree trim. Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway from the reception hall. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.42.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Stairway detail, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Oak woodwork frames the stairway. Although the newel post on the first floor was square, this newel post on the landing between the first and second floors is octagonal in shape and matches the upper column in the reception room, and is decorated at the top with the Sullivanesque filigree trim. Upper posts are square and without the filigree trim. Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway from the reception hall. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 10 x 8 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.43.0514
1965
Isidore Heller Residence Stairway detail, Chicago, 1965 (1896 - S.038). Tightly packed spindles form screens, partially hiding the stairway from the reception hall. Photographed by Richard Nickel in 1965. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 8 x 10 B&W photograph. See our Wright Study on the Heller Residence. 1628.44.0514
C 1965
Kenneth & Phyllis Laurent Residence Exterior Circa 1965 (1949 - S.319). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1949, it was the third "hemicycle" designed by Wright. The first was the Jacobs II (1944). He also designed the Meyer (1948), Laurent (1949), Pearce (1950), Lewis (1952), Marden (1952), Llewellyn Wright (1953), Cooke (1953), Rayward (1955) and the Spencer (1956). Kenneth Laurent was a paraplegic, so the home was designed with ease of accessibility for a wheelchair. Photographed by Wayne Andrews circa 1965. Label pasted to face: "University of California, Berkeley. 20c US. Wright, F.L.. Laurent House, 1951. Rockford, Illinois. Andrews 2825. Department of Architecture." Published in "Architecture in Chicago & Mid-America," Andrews, 1968/1973, p.129. Acquired from the archives of the University of California, Berkeley. Mounted to 14 x 11 gray board. Original 9.5 x 7.5 B&W photograph. 1628.64.1218
1965
Meyer S. May Residence 1965 (1908 - S.148). Viewed from the Southwest. Wright mixed wood, brick, glass and copper sheathing to form and extraordinary design. The Living Room is on the left, the Entrance is in the center, the original veranda is to the right. There are three large built in planters on the lower level. On the left, on the end of the Living Room, in the foreground on the end of the half-wall, and on the far right, on the end of the Veranda. The driveway runs alone the far side of the house, yet when Frank Lloyd Wright visited the home on May 24, 1949, the front yard was already partially covered in concrete. But between then and the taking of the photograph, the area to the left of the Terrace and Living Room were also covered in concrete. On the second floor, a bedroom cantilevers out to the left. By 1919 (The Meyer May House, Steelcase, 1987, p.3) the Balcony to the upper right had already been enclosed by glass. Photographed by Allen Stross in 1965. Original 4 x 5 B&W negative and 810 x 8 B&W photograph. 1628.57.0917
1965
Meyer S. May Residence 1965 (1908 - S.148). Viewed from the Southeast of the exterior Living Room window detail. Wright mixed wood, brick, glass and copper sheathing to form and extraordinary design. Meyer S. May was married to Sophie Amberg. She past away on December 10, 1917 at the age of 38. He was a prominent clothier in Grand Rapids with A. Meyer & Sons, becoming president in 1906 of the clothing store started by his father, Abraham Meyer. He was also President of the Michigan Retail Clothiers’ Association, and involved in the National Association. He was also an original officer of the Pantlind Hotel in Grand Rapids, "one of the finest to be found in the Mid West". He was a Vice President of the Grand Rapids Anti-Tuberculosis Society. Meyer S. May past away on November 7, 1936 at the age of 65. Photographed by Allen Stross in 1965. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. 1628.23.0612
1965
Pope-Leighey House 1965 (S.268 - 1939). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939 for Loren B. Pope, it was completed in 1940. In 1946, the home was purchased by Mr. And Mrs. Robert A. Leighey. In December 1963 Mrs. Leighey was notified that her home was in danger of demolition for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County. In July 1964, she signed an agreement with the National Trust to save the home. Dismantling of the home began in the fall of 1964, reconstruction was completed in June 1965. She resumed residency of the home in July 1969. Photographed after the completion of the move, but before Mrs. Leighey moved back in. Most likely Mrs. Leighey in the photograph. Caption on verso: "Completed exterior as viewed from entrance road seems a natural outgrowth of surrounding countryside." Stamped on Verso: "Oct 3 1965." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. (S#1628.55) 1628.55.0517
1965
Robie House Dining Room 1965. Verso: "The Robie House at 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave. on the U of C campus. A campaign is underway to raise funds to restore the famed structure. Ira Bach, chairman of the Robie House Committee." Photographed by Luigi on February 18, 1965. Note: The Robie House Committee (later the Committee for the Preservation of Robie House), chaired by Ira J. Bach, Chicago City Planning Commissioner, was organized in late 1962 and included a long list of notable Chicagoans and influential international architects and academics such as: Sigfried Giedion, Bertrand Goldberg, Walter Gropius, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., Lewis Mumford, Mies van der Rohe, and William Wurster. Original B&W photograph. 8 x 9.4. 1628.12.1209
1965
Robie House exterior 1965. View of the Drive from the East. The Playroom is on the left, Garage on the right. Looking at the second (main) floor, the Dining Room is on the left, the Servants rooms are on the right above the garage. Bedrooms are on the third floor. Leaded glass windows have been covered to preserve them. Label pasted to verso: Date: Feb 18, 1965. Photographer: Luigi. Caption: The Robie House at 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave. on the U of C campus. A campaign is underway to raise funds to restore the famed structure." Photographed by Luigi on February 18, 1965. Stamped on verso: "Mar 8 - 1965." Note: The Robie House Committee (later the Committee for the Preservation of Robie House), chaired by Ira J. Bach, Chicago City Planning Commissioner, was organized in late 1962 and included a long list of notable Chicagoans and influential international architects and academics such as: Sigfried Giedion, Bertrand Goldberg, Walter Gropius, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., Lewis Mumford, Mies van der Rohe, and William Wurster. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 X 8.5 B&W photograph. 1628.47.0315
1965
Robie House Living Room Fireplace 1965. Viewed from the West. The hearth is lowered, the space above the fireplace is open. Label pasted to verso: Date: Feb 18, 1965. Photographer: Luigi. Caption: The Robie House at 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave. on the U of C campus. A campaign is underway to raise funds to restore the famed structure." Photographed by Luigi on February 18, 1965. Stamped on verso: "Mar 14 - 1965." Note: The Robie House Committee (later the Committee for the Preservation of Robie House), chaired by Ira J. Bach, Chicago City Planning Commissioner, was organized in late 1962 and included a long list of notable Chicagoans and influential international architects and academics such as: Sigfried Giedion, Bertrand Goldberg, Walter Gropius, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., Lewis Mumford, Mies van der Rohe, and William Wurster. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 8.25 10 B&W photograph. 1628.48.0315
1965
Robie House Entrance (1906 S.127) 1965. Caption on verso: "Plan Restoration of Frank Lloyd Wright House. Chicago: Robie House, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, and thought by many as one of the two outstanding housed of the century in this country is shown in this recent photo. The 57-year-old building has been given a new lease on life by the efforts of a citizens committee formed to raise money for the structure’s restoration. Current plans call for the restored Robie House to be presented to the University of Chicago for display and conference purposes. Credit (UPI Photo). 4/17/65. (gwg)" Stamped on Verso: "Apr 1965. Field Enterprises, Inc." Original 9 x 7 silver gelatin photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1628.13.0310
1965
S.C. Johnson Golden Rondelle Theater 1965. The Golden Rondelle Theater was originally designed by Lippincott and Margulies as the SC Johnson Pavilion for the New York World’s Fair in 1964-65. After the Worlds Fair the Golden Rondelle was dismantled and reassembled on the SC Johnson campus. It was then re-designed in 1967 by Taliesin Associated Architects as a permanent structure for the SC Johnson campus where it continues to function as a theater for both company and public events. Stamped on verso: "Johnson Wax Photo. Neg. #21272-86. S. C. Johnson & Son Inc., Racine, Wisconsin." Stamped on clipping pasted to verso: "Jan 14 1966." Hand Written on verso: "The Johnson Wax Golden Rondelle Theater, a landmark at the New York World Fair with its six 90 foot petal top columns will be reconstructed in Racine in the Spring minus the column. It will be flanked by auxiliary buildings designed by Taliesin Associates, Inc. to blend with administration and research center of the (S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.), a block to the south, designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1628.58.1117
C 1965
Hillside Home School, Taliesin Fellowship Complex Circa 1965 (1932- - S.228). View from the Southwest. When FL Wright began the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, he began restoring and remodeling the dilapidated Hillside Home School building. The building was constructed of light rose colored sandstone, heavy oak beams and red roof tiles. In the Spring of 1952, a fire devastated the Theater on the west end (left) of the facility and the two story section in the center of the complex. Wright took the opportunity to make changes. He completely changed the Theatre that was destroyed, retaining the masonry walls, but lowering the height of the roof. He lowered the center section, lowering it to a single story. He also extended the lower level of the assembly hall to the south. Courtesy of Library of Congress. 10 x 8 Color photograph. (See progression of the Hillside Home School / Taliesin Complex) 1628.46.0215
1965
Unity Temple, Oak Park 1965 (1904 - S.096). View of the interior from Northeast. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1904. Clipping pasted to verso: "December 12, 1965. 7D. Wright’s Golden Years. An Early Church by Wright, the old Unity Temple of 1906 in Oak Park, Ill., was what he considered one of his crucial conceptions, realizing a new feeling for interior space..." Stamped on clipping: "Dec 12 1965." Original 9 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1628.63.0918
1965
Olgivanna Wright, 1965. Smiling, looking at the camera. She is wearing a flowered blouse. Caption pasted to verso: "Music for the production was written by Mrs. Olgivanna Wright, widow of the architect." Stamped on clipping: "May 9 1965." Stamped on verso: "1965 Apr 30." Hand written on verso: "Photo by Michael Roberts." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1628.65.0619
1965
Olgivanna Wright, 1965. Smiling, looking to her left. Caption at bottom: "(Advance for use in PMS of Friday, June 25, with AP special report by Maggie Savoy) (NY9 - June 22)) Heads Taliesin – Olgivanna Wright, widow of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, directs the Frank Lloyd Foundation since his death six years ago. It continues today much more comfortably both physically and financially and with the same spirit with which it began. (AP Wirephoto) (See AP Newsfeature Story) 65". Original 4 x 7.6 and 8 x 10 B&W Photograph. 1628.15.1110 1628.66.0619
1966
1966
E-86) Fallingwater 1966 (1938 - S.231). Set of 115 - 35mm Slides photographed between September 1964 through April 1966. Designed in 1938 by Frank Lloyd Wright, the main house was completed in 1938, and the guest house was completed the following year. In 1963, twenty five years after the home was built, and four years after Wright’s death, Edgar Kaufmann Jr. donated the property to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In 1964 Fallingwater was opened to the public through guided tours, These photographs were taken the second year the public was given a glimpse of Fallingwater. 86-E1) View of the Living Room looking Northeast. The Entrance is on the left. The hatchway in the center, opens to a suspended stairway that leads to the steam bed below. Glass corners are mitered. The doors on the right lead out to the Eastern Terrace... Stamped on face: "1 APR 66R5." 35mm Kodachrome slide and 11.5 x 8 high res color digital photograph.
1679.20.0817 (1-30)
1966
Ellis & Alice Feiman Residence 1966, Canton, Ohio (1954 - S.371). View of Alice Feiman in the Dining area and Kitchen (right) viewed from the North. The Feiman Residence is considered the first Usonian house built, based on Frank Lloyd Wright's design for the New York exhibition house. The second being the Trier Residence (1956 - S.398). While the New York exhibition house was based on the 3 foot square module, and utilized brick and oak plywood, the Feiman house is based on the four foot module and constructed of brick and Philippine mahogany. Wright also added a carport which is set at a 90 degree angle to the front of the house, and covers the entrance. Alice graduated from high school at age 16 and accepted a full four-year scholarship in piano performance at the Cleveland Institute of Music, receiving a Bachelors degrees in Music, '32 and Masters in '36... In 1937 she married Ellis A. Feiman whom she had known since childhood. Ellis was 62 years old when he past away on October 13, 1970. She continued to live in their Wright home until 1983 when she moved away from Canton. She past away on July 15, 2006 in Baltimore, Maryland. Hand written on verso: Mrs. Ellis A Feiman, 452 Santa Clara Dr. NW Canton. House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on... Continue... 1679.17.0817
1966
Ellis & Alice Feiman Residence 1966, Canton, Ohio (1954 - S.371). View of Terrace from the Dining Room. The Feiman Residence is considered the first Usonian house built, based on FL Wright's design for the New York exhibition house. The second being the Trier Residence (1956 - S.398). While the New York exhibition house was based on the 3 foot square module, and utilized brick and oak plywood, the Feiman house is based on the four foot module and constructed of brick and Philippine mahogany. Wright also added a carport which is set at a 90 degree angle to the front of the house, and covers the entrance. Alice graduated from high school at age 16 and accepted a full four-year scholarship in piano performance at the Cleveland Institute of Music, receiving a Bachelors degrees in Music, '32 and Masters in '36... In 1937 she married Ellis A. Feiman whom she had known since childhood. Ellis was 62 years old when he past away on October 13, 1970. She continued to live in their Wright home until 1983 when she moved away from Canton. She past away on July 15, 2006 in Baltimore, Maryland. Hand written on verso: "Home of Ellis A Feiman, 452 Santa Clara Dr. NW Canton. House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright." Stamped on verso: "Jan 18 1966. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. Photo... Continue... 1679.18.1117
1966
Hotel Geneva, Lake Geneva, Wisc. 1966 (1911 - S.171). View of the Hotel from the Southwest. Caption pasted to verso: "The Geneva Inn, a resort hotel at Lake Geneva designed by the lake Frank Lloyd Wright, reportedly is being purchased by Assemblyman George M. Borg (R - Delavan) at a price of more than $200,000. The two-story building, one of Wright’s early examples of horizontal prairie architecture, was constructed in 1912 at a cost of $100,000. It has 70 guest rooms and extends along the lake shore. The Lake Geneva landmark has had several owners over the years. In 1939, it was sold to a Milwaukee firm at the sheriff’s sale for $10,407 plus about $10,000 in unpaid taxes, and has changed hands several times since. Borg said his offer to purchase has been excepted by Hobart and Inar Hermanson, also owners of the Lake Como hotel, and that he hoped to take occupancy by Oct. 1. However he declined to comment on plans for the building or future use of the site. – Journal Photo." Stamped on clipping: "Sep 11 1966." Ownership continued to change over the years, the building deteriorated, it became vacant and in January 1970 after a fire, it was demolished. Note: name on the front of the building is now "Geneva Inn." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Journal. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1679.22.0619
1966
Louis & Pauline Penfield Residence Living Room fireplace 1966 (1953 - S.365). View of the interior fireplace. A bust of Frank Lloyd Wright is to the left, possibly Pauline or their daughter Tisa Penfield is seated to the right. Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright designed home, 2203 River Rd, Willoughby Hills. Home of Mr. & Mrs. Louis Penfield, 2203 River Rd, Willoughby Hills. At left is a portrait bust of Frank Lloyd Wright done by the artist in clay & painted. Note, Louis Penfield was an art teacher. Tisa Penfield." Stamped on verso: The Plain Dealer, Jan 26 1966." "Richard J. Misch. Staff Photogh. Cleveland Plain Dealer." Acquired from the archives of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Original 7 x 9 B&W photograph. 1679.16.0717
1966
Nathan Rubin Residence Interior and Furniture 1966 (1951 - S.343). One of three Wright homes built in Canton Ohio, home of the Football Hall of Fame. A Usonian house constructed of brick and horizontal redwood siding. The design is laid out utilizing a 2 foot by 4 foot module. Origami Armchair: In 1946, Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Origami Armchair for Taliesin West. The Rubin armchair is a close adaptation with the addition if a carved design. Variations of this design can be found at the Sturges Residence (1939) later addition, Teater Studio (1952) added around 1987, Christian Residence "Samara" (1954) and the Stromquist Residence (1958) constructed by Geoffrey Fitzwilliam. Triangle side table: Two triangle side tables are very similar to the triangle tables Frank Lloyd Wright designed as part of the Heritage Henredon line of furniture, minus the decorative design carved along the edges and legs of the table. Stamped on verso: "Jan 18 1966; Photo by William A Wynne, Cleveland Plain Dealer; The Plain Dealer Library, Jan 24 1966." Hand written on verso: "Chairs & stool designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Home of Dr. Nathan A. Rubin, 518 44th St. N.W. , Canton, Ohio." Photographed by William A Wynne. Acquired from the archives of the Plain Dealer. Original 9 x 7 B&W photograph. 1679.15.0717
1966
Staley Residence viewed from the Southeast 1966 (1950 - S.335). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950. Constructed of stone, the home parallels the shore of Lake Erie. An in-line Usonian design. Stamped on verso: "Ray Matjasic, Chief Photographer, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio." Hand-written on verso: "Home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. 6363 N. Lake Road, North Madison, Ohio." Stamped on verso: "Jan 26 1966." Photographed by Ray Matjasic. Acquired from the archives of The Plain Dealer. Original 9 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 1679.14.0717
1966
S.C. Johnson Golden Rondelle Theater 1966. The Golden Rondelle Theater was originally designed by Lippincott and Margulies as the SC Johnson Pavilion for the New York World’s Fair in 1964-65. After the Worlds Fair the Golden Rondelle was dismantled and reassembled on the SC Johnson campus. It was then re-designed in 1967 by Taliesin Associated Architects as a permanent structure for the SC Johnson campus where it continues to function as a theater for both company and public events. 7.5 x 6 B&W photograph. 1679.19.1117
1966
Wright’s Oak Park Studio (1897 S.004) 1966. Clipping on verso: " By Patricia Dalton. The Clyde W. Nookers of Oak Park are not going to fight it any more. ¶ For 20 years, the Nookers have lived in the house at 951 Chicago Av., Oak Park, that Frank Lloyd Wright built in 1895 for his own family. ¶ During that time, they say, the doorbell and telephone almost never have stopped ringing. People wanted to see the inside of the house where the master himself once lived. ¶ Most of these requests were... ¶ ...saw what the former tenants had done to the house. There were layers of paint on the beautiful woods, the window frames in his former drafting room were painted a garish red, some of the walls had flowered wallpaper on them. ¶ Wright said, ‘I hope you’ll keep the old place from falling apart.’ ¶ Mr. Nooker told him that she thought the house should be preserved. ¶ ‘In Europe, it would be.’ Wright replied." Stamped "Daily News, July 5, 1966." Caption under photo on clipping "The Frank Lloyd Wright house at 951 Chicago, Oak Park". Original 10.6 x 8.6 B&W Print. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1679.04.0310
1966
Wright’s Oak Park Home Playroom (1895 - S.003) 1966. Clipping on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright added this two-story playroom for his children to his Oak Park home in 1895. The mural, painted by a commissioned artist following Wright’s design, shows the genie and fisherman from a story ‘Thousand and One Nights’. " Stamped on verso: "Aug 14 1966". Photographed before restoration. Shelves on either side of the fireplace are missing the original glass doors. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1679.05.0112
1966
Wright’s Oak Park Home & Studio Fireplace (1895 - S.003) 1966. View of Living Room inglenook fireplace. Caption on verso: "Wright Fireplace - This fireplace greets visitors as they enter the first Frank Lloyd Wright home, built more than 70 years ago. The inscription reads, ‘Truth is Life.’ The brick arrangement was later used in the frontage of another Wright house." Clipping on verso: "Welcome - This fireplace greets visitors as they enter the first Frank Lloyd Wright home, built more than 70 years ago. The inscription reads, ‘Truth is Life.’ The pattern of the arrangement was later used in the frontage of another Wright home in Oak Park. Wright also designed the modernistic chair with its striking use of vertical lines. These lines contract with the horizontal woodwork design on the wall, and similar linear contrast are used thruout the home." Stamped on verso: "Aug 14 1966". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 8 B&W Print. 1679.06.0512
1966 
United States Post Office Publicity Photograph #1280 - 2c Frank Lloyd Wright stamp.  “This photograph may be reproduced for philatelic, educational, historical and newsworthy purposes, in black and white, in any size. It may not be used for advertising purposes, except philatelic advertising.”  Glossy 3 x 4.  (Two copies) 1280.55.0701
1280.56.0406
1967
1967
Emil Bach Residence, Chicago (1915 - S.193) 1967. Viewed from the street. Stamped on verso: "Photo by Edmund Jarecki", and "Apr 4 1967." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1720.12.0311
1967
Hotel Geneva 1967. Photograph published in the Milwaukee Journal, Sunday Picture Journal, December 10, 1967, page 20. "Later owners have added such un-Wrightian touches as Polynesian decorations inside an a swimming pool at the entrance. Like Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, built a few years later, it may be doomed. The present owner, former State Sen. George Borg, is considering whether to tear it down or to remodel it. Wright students hope to save it." Note: Name has been changed to "Geneva Inn". Photograph by Donald Nusbaum. 9 x 3 B&W Print, High Res image. (Additional information about the Hotel Geneva.) 1720.08.0410
1967 
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1967. Typed on face: "Advance for AMS Friday, 6 March 1970. To go with UPI dispatch by Leon Daniel. On 3/10 the new Imperial Hotel will be opened officially here. It stands on the site of the former Imperial Hotel (shown in this ‘67 photo) - which survived the great earthquake of 1928 and World War II - designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright." The doors to the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Imperial Hotel were closed on November 15, 1967. Demolition began shortly thereafter. Original 10 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1720.23.1012
1967 
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1967. The doors to the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Imperial Hotel were closed on November 15, 1967. Demolition began shortly thereafter. Label pasted to verso: "Demolition of Old Imperial Hotel. (Keystone Tokyo) The demolition of the Imperial Hotel’s old building, designed by the late American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, began in peeling the bronze roof tiles off the south wing of the building. The old Imperial was built in 1922 and one of the few buildings to survive the Great Earthquake in 1923. Management plans to complete the demolition before January 15 and to build a new 17-story hotel building in time for Expo ‘70. As a result of the ‘Save the Imperial’ campaign, at least the main lobby section may be moved to a new location for reconstruction. Photo Shows: The front gate of the Imperial Hotel’s old building." Stamped on verso: "Keystone Tokyo". "Keystone Press, New York". Original 8.5 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 1720.25.0413
1967
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1967. View of main entrance. Stamped on verso: "Tokyo, Japan: Imperial Hotel. 377-247." "Nov 5 1967." Clipping pasted to verso: "A view of the entrance of Tokyo’s famed and now to old Imperial Hotel." Acquired from the archives of the Baltimore Sun. Original 7 x 5 7 B&W photograph. 1720.28.0913
1967
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1967. View of Main Lobby. Entrance Lobby is to the left (out of picture), Dining Room is to the right past the curtain. Label taped to verso: "Demolition of Old Imperial Hotel: The demolition of the Imperial Hotel's old building, designed by the late American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, began in peeling the bronze roof tiles off the south wing of the building. The old Imperial was built in 1922 and one of the few buildings to survive in 1922 and one of the few buildings to survive the Great Earthquake in 1923. Management plans to complete the demolition before January 15 and to build a new 17-story hotel building in time for Expo ‘70. As a result of the "Save the Imperial" campaign, at least the main lobby section may be moved to a new location for reconstruction. Photo shows: The main lobby which will almost certainly be moved to Meiji Village in Nagoya where the historical building from the Meiji era are being relocated and preserved." Stamped on verso: "Keystone Tokyo". "Keystone Press, New York". Original 8.5 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 1720.27.1013
1967

Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1967. Olgivanna Lloyd Wright in front of the entrance to the Imperial Hotel, October 22, 1967. Reflecting pool is to her right. Text on face: "10/22/67 - Tokyo: The widow of architect Frank Lloyd Wright looks over Tokyo’s Imperial Hotel, designed by her husband, after she arrived in Tokyo 10/22 in an effort to save the 44-year-old structure from demolition. The owners plan to start razing the hotel this year to make way for a modern skyscraper hotel. Although she had never seen the hotel before, she was familiar with it through drawings and old photographs and immediately noticed that ‘there are some parts missing.’ " Original 9.75 x 8.25 B&W photograph.

1720.31.0414
1967 
Imperial Hotel Demolition (1915 - S.194) 1967. The doors to the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Imperial Hotel were closed on November 15, 1967. Demolition began shortly thereafter. Label pasted to verso: "Demolition on Imperial Hotel. (Keystone Tokyo) After they began their demolition on the Imperial Hotel’s old building, an American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright’s controversial masterpiece, on December 1st, the works are all going well. Only the main lobby section is still kept untouched for the further replacement to the other place for preservation. Photo shows: The Imperial Hotel’s old building now under the demolition." Stamped on verso: "Keystone Tokyo". "Keystone Press, New York". Original 8.5 x 5.75 B&W photograph. 1720.26.0313
1967 
Imperial Hotel Demolition (1915 - S.194) 1967. The doors to the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Imperial Hotel were closed on November 15, 1967. Demolition began shortly thereafter. Label pasted to verso: "Demolition on Imperial Hotel. (Keystone Tokyo) After they began their demolition on the Imperial Hotel’s old building, and American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright’s controversial masterpiece, on December 1st, the works are all going well. Only the main lobby section is still kept untouched for the further replacement to the other place for preservation. Photo shows: The Imperial Hotel’s old building now under the demolition." Stamped on verso: "Keystone Tokyo". "Keystone Press, New York". Original 5.75 x 8.25 B&W photograph. 1720.22.1212
1967
Imperial Hotel Demolition (1915 - S.194) 1967. View during the demolition of the Imperial Hotel. Label taped to verso: "Hotel Demolished. Tokyo: The famed Imperial Hotel, the 45-year-old landmark designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright, is 70 per cent demolished in this Dec. 27 photo. Demolition began Dec 22 and is expected to be completed by mid-January. 12/27/67." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.29.0214
1967
Imperial Hotel Demolition (1915 - S.194) 1967. View during the demolition of the Imperial Hotel. Label taped to verso: "End of a Landmark. Tokyo: A huge derrick goes to work on the famed Imperial Hotel which is more than 70 per cent demolished. The 45-year-old landmark designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright, is being razed to make room for a new 17-story hotel building. 1/5/68." Wrecking ball is being swung into building. Photographed on December 27, 1967. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.30.0214
1967
Herbert & Katherine Jacobs Residence I, Madison, Wisconsin 1967 (1936 - S.234). View of the Jacobs Residence and Living Room from the Southwest, view from the sidewalk. The Carport is to the left. Designed in 1936, this was the first home Frank Lloyd Wright designed for the Jacobs Family, and is considered Wright’s first Usonian House. Other than a row of horizontal windows that runs just below the roof line, there are no windows with a view of the street. However, light floods the interior of the home with floor to ceiling windows and doors which open to the back yard. Stamped on verso: "Filed Dec 19 1967." Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright - Homes designed by him. Jacobs I, Madison. Looking... toward car port." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.45.0219
1967
Margaret and Patrick Kinney Residence, Lancaster, Wisconsin 1967 (1951 - S.342). View of the interior of the hexagon shaped living room. Designed in 1951, Patrick Kinney coordinated the construction of the home. The main living portion of the house is a hexagon with a bedroom wing on the south side. Constructed of limestone on the interior and exterior that Kinney quarried himself. When Margaret was in college she worked for Wright’s sister, Jane Porter (1907 - S.134). Margaret’s uncle was Robert Moses. In 1942, Moses was appointed to the New York City Planning Commission. When Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design the Guggenheim Museum, he was also tasked with finding the location. Wright sought the help of his second cousin, Robert Moses. "Public Works" Moses, 1970. Hand written on verso: "Triangular. Kinney/Lancaster. (Frank Lloyd Wright - Homes Designed by Him.) Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.49.0619
1967
Margaret and Patrick Kinney Residence, Lancaster, Wisconsin 1967 (1951 - S.342). View from the Entryway toward the hexagon shaped living room. Designed in 1951, Patrick Kinney coordinated the construction of the home. The main living portion of the house is a hexagon with a bedroom wing on the south side, to the left. Constructed of limestone on the interior and exterior that Kinney quarried himself. When Margaret was in college she worked for Wright’s sister, Jane Porter (1907 - S.134). Margaret’s uncle was Robert Moses. In 1942, Moses was appointed to the New York City Planning Commission. When Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design the Guggenheim Museum, he was also tasked with finding the location. Wright sought the help of his second cousin, Robert Moses. "Public Works" Moses, 1970. Hand written on verso: "Kinney/Lancaster. (Frank Lloyd Wright - Homes Designed by Him.) Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.52.0619
1967 
William Everett Martin Residence (1902 - S.061), 1967, viewed from East Avenue. William Everett Martin was born in Bouckville, New York in 1863. He moved to Chicago in 1882 and formed Martin & Barton with his brother-in-law George F. Barton (1903 - S.103) which manufactured stove polish. He eventually established a partnership with his brother Darwin D. and formed the Martin & Martin, Inc. They manufactured polish under the brand E-Z polish for both stoves and shoes. William Martin first met Frank Lloyd Wright in late 1902 when he was searching for an architect to build his home in Oak Park, Illinois. Darwin D. Martin was so impressed with Wright and his brother's home that he commissioned Wright to the design the Larkin Company Administration Building (1903 - S.093) and his own home (1904 - S.100). William Martin would commission Wright again in 1909 to design a Pergola. Clipping pasted to verso: "This tree-shaded home at 636 N. East Av. Is one of 25 buildings in the village designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, who lived and worked there for many years." Stamped on verso: "Daily News, May 4 1967". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10.75 x 8.25 B&W photograph. 1720.24.0113
1967
Nathan G. Moore Residence Stairway and balcony (1895/1923 - S.034) 1967. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Wright in 1923. View of stairway and balcony. Clipping pasted to verso: "A 3-Story-High stairwell rises from what Wright called the ‘great hall’ of the house. An open mezzanine library and a third-floor balcony overlook the cathedral-like structure." Stamped on clipping: "Apr 9, 1967". See Monogram 4, pages 248-256, for additional views. Original 8.75 x 11.25 B&W photograph. 1720.13.0811
1967
Nathan G. Moore Residence Fireplace (1895/1923 - S.034) 1967. Originally designed in 1895, the home was destroyed by fire in 1922. It was redesigned by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1923. View of stairway and balcony. Clipping pasted to verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s distinctive architectural signature is apparent in the design of the fireplace in the front living room. There are 8 fireplaces in the 22-room house, ranging in design from early American to English gothic.." Stamped on clipping: "Apr 9, 1967". See Monogram 4, pages 248-256, for additional views. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10.25 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1720.19.0312
1967
Andrew Porter Residence Tanyderi 1967 (1907 - S.134). Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1907 for his sister and brother-in-law Jane and Andrew T. Porter. They moved to Taliesin when he became headmaster of Hillside Home School. Wright called it Tanyderi, meaning "Under the Oaks" in Welch. Stamped on verso: "Filed Dec 19 1967." Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright - Homes Designed By Him.) Tany-Deri House. Porter House 1907 Taliesin." Original 10 x 8 B&W Photograph. 1720.46.0319
1967
Riverview Terrace Restaurant 1967 (1953 - S.367). Six sided gift shop under construction. The River Terrace Restaurant was the only restaurant (not including those in the Imperial Hotel, Midway gardens, etc.) designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Originally designed in 1943, modified in 1953, construction began in 1957, but was halted upon Mr. Wright’s death. It was resurrected again in 1967 as part of The Spring Green Resort complex, modified and completed by the Taliesin Associated Architects, headed by William Wesley Peters. Plans even included resurrecting the original Nakoma Clubhouse, which never came to fruition. Attached, but raised above the main level is this hexagonal room, which was used as a gift shop for the restaurant. Clipping taped to verso: "The restaurant gift shop will be installed in this six sided sheltered terrace, a part of the restaurant building." Stamped on clipping: "Sentinel." Stamped on verso: "John W. Ahlhauser" and "1967 Sep 6." The restaurant opened in October 1967. Photographed by John W. Ahlhauser. Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.48.0619
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Riverview Terrace Restaurant Circa 1967 (1953 - S.367). The River Terrace Restaurant was the only restaurant (not including those in the Imperial Hotel, Midway gardens, etc.) designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Originally designed in 1943, modified in 1953, construction began in 1957, but was halted upon Mr. Wright’s death. It was resurrected again in 1967 as part of The Spring Green Resort complex, Modified and completed by the Taliesin Associated Architects, headed by William Wesley Peters. Plans even included resurrecting the original Nakoma Clubhouse, which never came to fruition. To support the restaurant’s 300 foot length, steel trusses were salvaged from the flight deck of the Ranger aircraft carrier training ship which was used on the Great Lakes during WWII. The restaurant opened in October 1967. Published in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 1951-1959. Courtesy of The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Copy 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.37.0617
1967
Robie House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1906 S.127) 1967. Stamped on Verso: "Oct 1967. Field Enterprises, Inc." Original 10 x 7.75 B&W photograph. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. 1720.06.0310
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Robie House, circa 1967 (1906 - S.127). Viewed from the Southeast. Restoration of the Robie House took place between 1965 and 1967. A new tile roof, heating system, electrical wiring, painting, and exterior window frames. Windows have been restored and uncovered. Similar view on the cover of "The Prairie School Review," 4th Quarter, 1967. Hand written on verso: "View of South side of house." Original 11 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1720.33.0216
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Robie House, circa 1967 (1906 - S.127). Viewed of the Entrance Court from the Northwest. Restoration of the Robie House took place between 1965 and 1967. A new tile roof, heating system, electrical wiring, painting, and exterior window frames. Windows have been restored and uncovered. Hand written on verso: "View of North main Entrance - showing guest bedroom balcony and flower urn." Original 11 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1720.34.0216
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Robie House, Living Room circa 1967 (1906 - S.127). Viewed from the West, looking toward the fireplace. Restoration of the Robie House took place between 1965 and 1967. A new tile roof, heating system, electrical wiring, painting, and exterior window frames. Windows have been restored and uncovered. (See similar view S#1757.09). Hand written on verso: "View of main living room - view towards fireplace from Prow." Original 11 x 8.5 B&W photograph. 1720.35.0216
1967
Rookery Building Interior Stair Tower 1967 (1905 - S.113). The Rookery building was designed by Burnham and Root in 1888. Edward C. Waller, a client of Wright’s, managed the Rookery Building in 1905 and retained Wright in 1905 to remodel the Entryway and Lobby. Wright’s offices were located in the building from 1898-1899. Photographed in the Summer, 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.42.0219
1967
Bernard Schwartz Residence, Two Rivers, Wisconsin 1967 (1939 - S.271). View of the Schwartz Residence from the Southeast. Life Magazine published Frank Lloyd Wrights design "For a Family of $5000-$6000 Income" in the September 26, 1938 issue. "We call the style Usonian meaning 'of these United States'. If the house seems a little open for your Northwest, that openness has been taken care of by building the house upon a paved concrete mat itself heated by steam pipes laid under it in the gravel filling beneath. This insures comfort no matter how cold outside and there are no radiators in sight. What looks like them in the drawings are really the folding screens between the several paces opening into the central or general space -- a kind of enclosed patio..." Frank Lloyd Wright, Life Magazine, p.60-61. One year later, the home was built for Bernard Schwartz . Wright designed a Dining Room and Workspace (kitchen), but named the Living Room the "Recreation Room." Hand written on face: "Schwarz / Two Rivers." Hand Written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright - homes Designed By Him." Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.51.0619
1967
S.C. Johnson Golden Rondelle Theater 1967. Viewed from the North, the Research Tower is in the background. The Golden Rondelle Theater was originally designed by Lippincott and Margulies as the SC Johnson Pavilion for the New York World’s Fair in 1964-65. After the Worlds Fair the Golden Rondelle was dismantled and reassembled on the SC Johnson campus. It was then re-designed in 1967 by Taliesin Associated Architects as a permanent structure for the SC Johnson campus where it continues to function as a theater for both company and public events. Clipping pasted to verso: "The new Johnson Wax Golden Rondelle theater at Racine will be dedicated Thursday. Stamped on clipping: "Jul 22 1967." Original 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1720.41.1117
1967
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building 1967 (1944 - S.238). View of the West side of the Administration Building 1939 from the Northeast. Exterior of the great workroom. Designed in 1936, the official opening of the SC Johnson Administration Building spanned three days, April 22-24, 1939. It has been called the greatest contribution to business housing since the design of the skyscraper. Stamped on verso: "Neg 3838." "Dec 19 1967." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.40.0917
1967
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Greenhouse, Exhibition Dwelling and Advertising Department 1967 (1944 - S.238). On the second floor, the Greenhouse is on the left, the Exhibition Dwelling is to the right. In the foreground, out of view is the Formal garden over the Research Tower carport. Caption, "Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings," Lipman, 1986, page 172, figure 150: "Wright designed this small formal garden with a stone surface and a shallow pool. A greenhouse is at the left and the advertising department is located above the exhibition dwelling." The Advertising department is on the third floor. The ornate dome of glass tubing is above the reception area. Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.39.0917
1967
S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Pilot Laboratory 1967 (1944 - S.238). The Research Tower and the addition surrounding it was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1944, construction began in 1947 and the opening ceremony was held on November 17, 1950. The Pilot Laboratory is in the Southwest corner of the ground floor of the new section. Additional view is published in Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings, Lipman, 1986, p.168. Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1720.38.0717
1967
Taliesin, Spring Green, Midway Barns 1967 (1938 - S.246). Exterior view of the Midway Barns. Caption taped to verso: "A Blend with Nature. Spring Green, Wisc: No farm on earth looks like the farmstead designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, who believed in wedding architecture to its surroundings. This artistic result can be seen at the late famed architect’s longtime home ‘Taliesin’ located near Spring Green, Wisconsin. 2/3/67." 10 x 6.5 B&W photograph. 1720.32.0115
1967
Taliesin, Spring Green 1967 (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218). View of the Garden Room and pool from the Northwest. Stamped on verso: "Dec 19 1967." Clipping pasted to verso: "Taliesin, Which Frank Lloyd Wright designed for himself, will be open to visitors this season." Stamped on clipping: "Su May 3 - 1992." Clipping pasted to verso: "A special compound: This is a courtyard view of Taliesin taken in 1967. The home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright is to be named one of America's most endangered historic places." Stamped on clipping: "We Jun 15 1994." Acquired from the archives of the Milwaukee Sentinel. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.50.0619
1967
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1967. Viewed from Southwest, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, the Entrance is not visible in this image. Photographed in June 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 8 x10 B&W photograph. 1720.14.0112
1967
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1967. Viewed from West, Unity Temple is on the left, Unity House is on the right, the Entrance is in the center. Lake Street is on the left, North Kenilworth Avenue in the foreground. Photographed in June 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 8 x10 B&W photograph. 1720.15.0112
1967
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1967. Viewed from North, the exterior of Unity Temple’s main sanctuary. Lake Street is in he foreground, North Kenilworth Avenue is on the right. Reader board reads: "Unitarian Universalist Church. Sunday Service June 18, Sermon, Man’s vision of Nature and Himself. Robert M. Rice, Minister." Photographed in June 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 8 x10 B&W photograph. 1720.16.0112
1967
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1967. View of the interior of Unity Temple’s sanctuary. Both Unity Temple and Unity House are lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. A band of horizontal windows, just beneath the ceiling adds additional light to the Temple. The lower portion of the Temple is unbroken by doors and windows. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. Photographed in June 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.17.0112
1967
Unity Temple (1904 - S.096), Oak Park 1967. View of the interior of Unity House. Unity House consisted of meeting and class rooms. Both Unity Temple and Unity House are lit mainly from the top through large skylights, filtered through art glass. The walls are poured concrete, Wright’s first use of the material. Of note are the six chairs in this photograph. Four matching chairs in the center, two matching chairs on the left and right. Variations of the slant back chair appeared in buildings during this time period. Unity Temple, the Larkin Building, 1903 (Quinan, p83), Wright’s Home (Circa 1904, Hanks, p38), and Robie House in 1916 (Hoffman p81). The two matching chairs, left and right, originated with the Browne’s Bookstore. Designed by Wright for Browne’s Bookstore in 1907, they moved from the seventh floor to the first floor in September 1911, and were donated to Unity Temple shortly after that. Photographed in June 1967 by Philip Turner. Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1720.18.0112
1967
Design for the Vigo Sundt House (Project 1941). Caption on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright used the Hexagon in his design of the Vigo Sundt House in Madison, Wis. This utilization of geometry in 1941 was because Wright believed 60-degree angles were 'more suited' to humans." Stamped n Verso: "Sep 24 1967." The first home Wright designed and built utilizing the hexagonal "honeycomb" design was the Hanna Residence (S.235 1936). This was a year after Fallingwater, the same year Wright designed the Herbert Jacobs Residence, his first Usonian home, and the S.C. Johnson & Son Administration Building. Other homes utilizing the hexagon design included the Sidney Bazett Residence (S.259 1939), the Stevens Residence (Auldbrass, S.256 1940), and the Stuart Richardson Residence (S.282 1940). Others were designed, but were never completed. This home is very similar to the Richardson Residence. Obtained from the archives of the Chicago Sun-Times. Original B&W 8 x 10 print. 1720.09.0510
1968
C 1968
1) Benjamin Adelman Residence viewed from the North, circa 1968 (1951 - S.344). Benjamin Adelman Residence viewed from the North, circa 1968. The landscaping is very mature, 17 years old. The large trees on the left are overtaking the Living Room. The Living Room is on the far left. The Dining area is to the left and behind the bush next to the small pool. The tall Workspace is seen in the center background. The covered walkway runs from the Dining area glass doors on the left, to the Guest House on the right. The Walkway has not yet been enclosed. The perforated block wall on the right side of the walkway is left unglazed with glass. The Master Bath that was enlarged in the 1957 remodel can be seen threw the perforated blocks as can the carport to its right. The Terrace, which used to end at the middle of the small pool (Parker 1953 #6), has been enlarged to the North approximately 20 feet. A sculpture on a pedestal has been added. The Guest Wing is on the right. The perforated blocks of the Gallery are glazed. The sitting room, which was used as a bedroom is on the far right. Two planter boxes on the left side of the covered walkway are still there. Photographed by William Storrer, Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright study. 1757.14-0415 1
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2) Benjamin Adelman Residence Fireplace and Dining Area, circa 1968 (1951 - S.344). Benjamin Adelman Residence Fireplace and Dining area, circa 1968. The Living Room fireplace was designed by Eugene Masselink. The original coffered block ceiling, with 1 foot x 2 foot embedded blocks, has been covered with mahogany plywood. The trim follows a two foot square pattern. The Dining table appears to be designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The chair seats and backs are a red vinyl. A note written on the plans for the 1957 remodel read: "Note: Cover all inside faces of all exterior walls and ceilings with 3/8" waterproof finish plywood, veneered on exposed face with ribbor-striped Philippine mahogany..." Storrer indicated that furniture and the Wright designed chandelier was sold in the late 1980s. Photographed by William Storrer, Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright study. 1757.14-0415 2
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3) Benjamin Adelman Residence Workspace, circa 1968 (1951 - S.344). View of the Workspace, from the South, circa 1968. Lower mahogany cabinets appear to be recovered with a laminate. Upper cabinets have been added. Glazed perforated blocks offer an abundance of light to the workspace. The dining Room and Terrace are through the doorway in the background on the right. Photographed by William Storrer, Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 10 x 6 B&W photograph. For more information on the Adelman Residence see our Wright study. 1757.14-0415 3
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Florida Southern College Aerial view circa 1968. Viewed from the West. Frank Lloyd Wright buildings include the: Annie Pfeiffer Chapel (1938 - S.251); E. T. Roux Library (1941 - S.252); Seminars Buildings (3): Cora Carter, Isabel Walbridge, Charles W. Hawkins (1941 - S.253.1 -.3); Ordway Industrial Arts Building (1950 - S.254); Administration Buildings (1946 - S.255): Emile E. Watson, Benjamin Fine; Edgar Wall Water Dome; Polk County Science Building (1953 - S.256) (Cosmography Building & Planetarium); The Esplanades (1946 - S.257), various completion times; William H. Danforth Minor Chapel (1954 - S.258). Also included is the new Roux Library Building, far left. Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1757.13.0514
1968
Imperial Hotel (1915 - S.194) 1968. View of the Imperial Hotel during demolition. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Imperial Hotel in 1915. Portions of the Imperial Hotel were salvaged and reconstructed at the Meiji Mura Architecture Museum in Nagoya. Text stamped on sleeve: "Feb 68." Original 35mm Ektachrome slide transparency and high res 5" x 8" digital color image. 1757.23.0319
C 1968
Aime and Norman Lykes Residence Garden Court and Terrace, Circa 1968 (1959 - S.433). Lykes Residence Garden Court and Terrace viewed from the North from the exterior side of the Garden Court wall. The fountain is on the left, the Living Room is in the center, the Workspace is on the right. The Terrace is in the foreground. Photographed by William Storrer. 10 x 6.75 Color photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 1757.15.0715
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Aime and Norman Lykes Residence Living Room, Circa 1968 (1959 - S.433). Lykes Residence Living Room viewed from the South. John Rattenbury worked with Wright on the initial plans for the home. According to Rattenbury, a few days before his death, Wright sketched out the plans for the home, set them aside, but never was able to returned to them, due to his death. Rattenbury completed the working drawings and specifications in 1966. Construction took place on the home for the next two years. He designed the furniture and built-ins, adapted from the original plans created by Wright before his death. The bi-fold doors on the left leads to the workspace which is located behind the fireplace. The doors on the right leads to the Garden Court. The table and hassock/chairs are on the right. Appears to be taken before curtains were installed in the Living Room, visible in the 1970 image. Photographed by William Storrer. 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 1757.16.0715
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Aime and Norman Lykes Residence Workspace (Kitchen), Circa 1968 (1959 - S.433). Lykes Residence Workspace. John Rattenbury worked with Wright on the initial plans for the home. According to Rattenbury, a few days before his death, Wright sketched out the plans for the home, set them aside, but never was able to returned to them, due to his death. Rattenbury completed the working drawings and specifications in 1966. Construction took place on the home for the next two years. He designed the built-ins, adapted from the original plans created by Wright before his death. Cabinets are constructed of Philippine mahogany. Photographed by William Storrer. 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 1757.17.0715
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Aime and Norman Lykes Residence Master Bath, Circa 1968 (1959 - S.433). Lykes Residence Master Bath. John Rattenbury worked with Wright on the initial plans for the home. According to Rattenbury, a few days before his death, Wright sketched out the plans for the home, set them aside, but never was able to returned to them, due to his death. Rattenbury completed the working drawings and specifications in 1966. Construction took place on the home for the next two years. He designed the built-ins, adapted from the original plans created by Wright before his death. Walls are covered with, and the cabinets are constructed of, Philippine mahogany. Photographed by William Storrer. 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. Courtesy of the Oak Park Public Library. 1757.18.0715
1968
Robie House Living Room 1968. Verso: "Living room of the Robie House provides a handsome background for dinner." Black tie event held in the Robie House living room. Photographed by Bill Kelly, January 9, 1968. This photograph used and published on January 10, 1968. Original B&W photograph, 10 x 8. 1757.09.1209
1968
Taliesin, Spring Green 1968 (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218). View from the East of the garage on the Northeast side of Taliesin. One of two Chinese Foo Dogs is seen on the right. Stamped on verso: "May 16 1968." Hand written on verso: "Frank Lloyd Wright Bldgs. Taliesin." Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1757.21.0918
1969
1969
Cheney Residence 1969 (1903 - S.104). Viewed from the sidewalk, looking Northeast. The walled Terrace is in the foreground on the left. The sidewalk on the right leads past the Terrace and gardens to the Entrance on the South side of the house. Label pasted to verso: "Chicago Tribune. Date: 6/18/69. Subject: Frank Lloyd Wright Homes. Photographer: Jim Mayo. General Caption: Muskox. Story on Frank Lloyd Wright Homes by S. Wolfe. This Home, 520 N. East Ave., Oak Park." Stamped on verso: "Jun 23 1969." Photographed by Jim Mayo. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 6.75 B&W photograph. 1803.21.1116
1969
Mrs. Thomas Gale Residence (1904 S.098) 1969. Stamped on verso: "Daily News, Jun 12 1969. Article on verso: "By Susan Root. Living in a Frank Lloyd Wright house these days requires a little suffering for the sake of art. But many feel the experience is worth it. ¶ Among them is Chicago architect Howard A. Rosenwinkel, who lives with his wife and four children in a home at 6 Elizabeth Court, Oak Park, that has been called "Wright’s solution to the small house." ¶ Some of the sacrifices they are making to maintain architectural "purity" include living with sloping floors and settled window panels of lovely leaded glass that leave a quarter-inch opening for winter winds to whistle through. ¶ Then there are the radiators hidden behind grates that look attractive but five little heat in the living room, a single bathroom for a family of six and total lack of insulation. ¶ What makes it worth it is the architect’s pleasure in living in a house of such prefect scale and proportions. ¶ "The flow of space and the detailing in this house are unique." explains Mrs. Rosenwinkel. Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1803.05.0310
1969
Walter M. Gale Residence, Oak Park (1893 - S.020) 1969. Label on verso: "Date: June 17, 1969. Location: 1031 Chicago Avenue – Oak Park. Photographer: J. Mayo. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright home in Oak Park." Stamped on verso: "June 23 1969". Clipping pasted to Verso: "Frank’s places. Has the weather given you spring fever in January? If it holds out for the weekend, take advantage of it. Soak up some architecture too. Sunday at 2, there’s a walking tour of 20 Frank Lloyd Wright homes in Oak Park. Meet at Unity Church, Lake and Kenilworth Avenues. Tour 2 ½ hours. $2." Stamped on clipping: "Jan 19 1973". Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 7.5 x 10 B&W Photograph. 1803.09.0112
1969
Marin County Civic Center Hall of Justice Circa 1969 (S.417 - 1957). Viewed from the North. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on May 25, 1966. The Hall of Justice (phase two) was completed December 9, 1969. Work appears to be complete, but fresh dirt is still evident on the far right end of the building. The water feature can be seen at the far end of the lagoon. Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs" Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1803.22.0217
1969
Marin County Civic Center Hall of Justice Circa 1969 (S.417 - 1957). Viewed from the North. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, ground was broken on May 25, 1966. The Hall of Justice (phase two) was completed December 9, 1969. The water feature is in the foreground, the Marin County Hall of Justice can be seen in the background. Stamped on verso: "Dandelet Photographs" Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph. 1803.23.0217
1969
Pope-Leighey House, 1969. Set of twelve photographs of the Pope-Leighey House. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house, which was built in 1940 for Loren B. Pope. Mr. And Mrs. Robert A. Leighey purchased the home in 1946. In December 1963 Mrs. Leighey was notified that her home was in danger of demolition for a highway right-of-way in Falls Church, Fairfax County. In July 1964, she signed an agreement with the National Trust to save the home...  For more information see our Wright Study on the Pope-Leighey House.



 
1803.15.0715 (1-12)
1969
Scoville Park Fountain, Oak Park (1903 S.094) 1969. Originally constructed in 1909. In 1969 the badly deteriorated original fountain was reconstructed and the replica placed in the southeast corner of Scoville Park at the corner of Oak Park Drive and Lake Street in Oak Park. Caption reads "World Horizons - Advance for AMS Sunday, 8/17/69. To go with UPI Dispatch by Barney Seibert. 8/16/69 - Oak Park, ILL.: This is the reconditioned horse trough made into a fountain and dedicated on 6/8 in honor of architect Frank Lloyd Wright on what folks in the old home own thought was the 100th anniversary of his birth. The long-delayed tribute also happened to coincide with the year of Oak Park’s centennial. But the date of his birth is subject to argument. He might have shaved two years from his age around 1920. UPI Telephoto -hgr-. 7 x 9.5 Print. High res digital image. 1803.06.0310
1969
Taliesin, Spring Green 1969 (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218). View of Mr. Wright’s Bedroom Study from the Southwest. Built-in planters are on either exterior corner of the room. The left planter is visible. The stairs lead down to a small pool on the far left hidden by the bush on the left. Hand written on verso: "Filed 69 - 12/10. Residence of Mrs. Frank Lloyd Wright. (Frank Lloyd Wright - Homes of Taliesin.)" Original 8 x 10 B&W photograph. 1803.28.0619
1969
Taliesin, Spring Green (Taliesin III 1925 - S.218) August 1969. View of the south corner of the Dining room at Taliesin. Three captions pasted to verso. 1) "Home of architect Frank Lloyd Wright at Spring Green, Wisconsin." 2) Stamped Aug 24 1969. "Taliesen (sp) East, Frank Lloyd Wright’s home in Spring Green, Wis., integrates masses of stone and wood with the natural landscape without precedent from a previous style of architecture." 3) Stamped Apr 22 1978. "Frank Lloyd Wright’s home in Spring Green Wis., sometimes referred to as Taliesen (sp) East." Original 9 x 7 B&W photograph. 1803.07.0111
1969
Taliesin West 1969 (1937 - S.241). Set of 25 color 35mm slides of Taliesin West. 1) Sign directing visitors to Taliesin West. Frank Lloyd Wright incorporated the symbol found carved into one of the rocks found in the desert at Taliesin West. Text on slide: "6. Sep 69 HII." Text on verso: "Ektachrome Transparency. Processed by Kodak." Original 35mm color slide, and 8 x 5.5 high res digital image.
1803.26.0418 (1-25)
1969
Wright Home and Studio, Oak Park (1897 - S.004), 1969. Photographed from across the street on Chicago Ave close to the corner of Forest Ave. Exterior view of the drafting room is on the far left, the Reception Hall in the center, the Library is on the right and the Home is in the background on the right. Label pasted on verso: "Date: June 3, 1969. Photographer: Mayo. Caption: Frank Lloyd Wright home, Oak Park at 951 Chicago Ave." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Tribune. Original 10 x 7 B&W photograph. 1803.10.0212
1969
William H. Winslow House (1894 - S.024) Exterior 1969. Stamped on verso: "Hedrich-Blessing, Chicago" and "Daily News, Jun 21 1969". Cation pasted on verso: "The Winslow home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, will be open to the public for the first time tomorrow on a walking tour of the architect’s work in Oak Park and River Forest." Acquired from the archives of the Chicago Daily News. Original 10 x 8 B&W print. 1803.08.0311
 
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