ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
WISCONSIN
 
  ADELMAN    ANNUNCIATION CHURCH    ARNOLD    BOGK    GERMAN WAREHOUSE    GILMORE    GREENBERG    HARDY 
  
HILLSIDE HOME SCHOOL    HUNT    JACOBS I    JACOBS II    AP JOHNSON    HF JOHNSON    IBER    KAREN JOHNSON    JACKSON 
  SC JOHNSON    JONES    KINNEY    LAKE DELAVAN YACHT CLUB
    LAKE GENEVA HOTEL    LAMP    MANSON    MIDWAY BARNS 
  MITCHELL    MOLLICA    MONONA TERRACE    MONONA TERRACE BLUEPRINTS    MUNKWITZ APARTMENT    OBSERVATION PLATFORM  
  PETERSON    PEW    PORTER    RICHARDS    RICHARDS APARTMENT    RICHARDS BUNGALOW    RIVERVIEW TERRACE    ROCKY ROOST 
  ROMEO AND JULIET    ROSS    RUDIN    SMITH    SPENCER    SCHWARTZ    TALIESIN I, II & III    UNITARIAN MEETING HOUSE 
  UNITY CHAPEL    VAN TEMELEN    WALLIS    WOMEN'S BUILDING    WRIGHT    WYOMING SCHOOL 
 
  RACINE    MADISON 
 
  OTHER HOMES 
 
A. D. GERMAN WAREHOUSE (1915 - S.183)
   
Date: 1915

Title: A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Photograph of Perspective Drawing 1915 (1915 - S.183).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright’s perspective drawing of the A. D. German Warehouse gives a clear impression as to Wright’s original intent for the building’s design. With the added details, never completed: Corner flag poles with hanging light fixtures; Additional concrete lintel, faced with abstract patterns above the projecting roof over the clerestory windows that ran above the entrance; A single entrance with decorative concrete columns; And horizontal sash bars on either end of the plate glass windows. In total, these details complete the design which always appeared as incomplete.

Size: 9.5 x 8 Color photograph.

S#: 0
128.48.1216
   
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Portrait of Albert Delvino German, circa 1915.

Description: Born December 18, 1875. Frank Lloyd Wright client. Photographed by Hillman, Richland Center, Wisconsin. Courtesy of the AD German Warehouse Conservancy.

Size: 8 x 10 B&W photograph.

S#: 0128.21.0316

   
Date: Circa 1922

Title: A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1922 (1915 - S.183).

Description: Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1915 as a Brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Construction on the warehouse began in 1917, but was halted in 1921 when costs surpassed $125,000, on an estimated building cost of $30,000. The entrance and windows are boarded up. Although the building was never completed as Wright had fully designed it, and it is shown boarded up, he still chose to include it in the Wendingen Series, published in 1925. To the far right is German’s original, two-story warehouse. Text on face of building reads "Wholesale Floor and Sugar." Copy photograph of the image published in "The Life-Work of the American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright," Wendingen, 1925.

Size: 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#:
0147.10.0117
   
Date: Circa 1940

Title: A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1940 (1915 - S.183).

Description: Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1915 as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Albert Delvino German was a successful commodity wholesaler. But as costs escalated, construction was halted in 1921. German lost the building in 1932 due to unpaid taxes and bankruptcy, purchased it back in 1935, but lost it again in 1937. Published in In The Nature of Materials, Hitchcock, 1942, plate 203, caption: "Finer than the patterned blocks of the Midway Gardens are those of this Warehouse. They face the top storey which was for cold storage." Photographed by Gilman Lane. Note the two horse draw plows, lower left. There is a sign by the front door: "Richland Fruit Co. Office."

Size: Original 10 x 8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0531.57.0216

   
Date: Circa 1940

Title: A. D. German Warehouse, Richland Center, Wisconsin, Circa 1940 (1915 - S.183).

Description: Pedro Guerrero spent a year with Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Fellowship from May 1940 to May 1941, and the summer of 1940 at Taliesin. According to Picturing Wright, he visited Taliesin Spring Green again in 1947-48 and 1952-53. Judging from vehicle in the bottom left corner it would appear that image was photographed in 1940. An old-styled street lamp is visible on the far left, and a "Gas pump" is visible left of center in the foreground. Note the male peaking in the window of the warehouse. Photographed by Pedro Guerrero.

Size: 8 x 9.25 B&W photograph.

S#:
0531.66.0117
   
Date: 1975

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright German Warehouse Tour, 1975 (1915 - S.183). (Published by the Citizens of Richland county.)

Description: "Frank Lloyd Wright German Warehouse Tour Born in 1867 in Richland Center, Frank Lloyd Wright returned in 1915 to design a 4-story brick and concrete warehouse for Mr. A.D. German. Building construction spanned 5 years, during which time the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo was completed. These two buildings constituted Mr. Wright’s most important work during this period..." Tour - Sunday, August 3, 1975. Includes one illustration. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 1

S#:
1996.22.0616
   
Date: 2013

Title: The A. D. German Warehouse: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Design Process (Published in the Proceedings of the 2013 ARCC Spring Research Conference, Architectural Research Centers Consortium, University of North Carolina, Charlotte)

Author: Tucker, Lisa M.

Description: "Abstract: This research discusses a long- overlooked building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The focus is on the project as a case study exemplifying Wright’s design process. Although Wright’s work is often described as appearing fully-conceived and then drawn in a single sitting onto the paper, the archival documents, correspondence and actual physical building of the A.D. German Warehouse tell a different story. The A.D. German Warehouse was designed ca. 1914 for Richland Center, Wisconsin, and was to be the only building Wright ever designed for the town of his birth. Built for businessman Albert Dell German of Richland Center, the warehouse is also Wright’s only warehouse among his many projects..." Pages 255-263. Includes five illustrations.

Size: 8.5 x 11

Pages: Pp 9

ST#: 2013.13.0316

Date: 1984

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Warehouse in Richland Center, Wisconsin (Soft Cover, Spiral Bound) (Published by Richland County Publishers, Richland Center, Wisconsin)

Author: Scott, Margaret

Description: "The book is not written for the locality alone but for the public in general in an effort to add whatever the local people may contribute to Wrightian memorabilia. Numerous persons in the area were interviewed by Bruce Barrett, a former apprentice at the Taliesin Fellowship and at present a volunteer at the Warehouse at this time when it is being made a new source of cultural and historical concern. The book is not a resume of the thesis by Randolph Henning who approached its past and possible future from the standpoint of an architect..." p. ix. Original list price $8.00. (First Edition)

Size: 8 x 8

Pages: Pp 230

ST#:
1984.49.1216
   
Date: 2016

Title: A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183).

Description: Frank Lloyd Wright was born 26 miles from Taliesin, Spring Green, in Richland Center, Wisconsin, the location of the A. D. German Warehouse. Designed by Wright in 1915 as a Brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. In June, 2016, on a road trip from Philadelphia to Seattle with my son-in-law, We stopped in Oak Park to tour Wright’s Home and Studio. We took an hour to photograph the outside, and unable to obtain tickets to tour the inside, we called Taliesin and reserved tickets to tour Wright’s personal residence. We headed to Taliesin, Spring Green, arriving with 10 minutes to spare before the tour began. My excitement mounted. It had been 43 years since I had last visited Taliesin. After spending a few hours, immersing ourselves in every detail, overwhelmed at Wright’s genius, we hit the road. Low and behold we found... Continue...

Size: 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph.

ST#:
2016.06.1206 (1-24)
   
   
   
   
A. D. GERMAN WAREHOUSE 2016
     
A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Frank Lloyd Wright was born 26 miles from Taliesin, Spring Green, in Richland Center, Wisconsin, the location of the A. D. German Warehouse. Designed by Wright in 1915 as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor.
       In June, 2016, on a road trip from Philadelphia to Seattle with my son-in-law, We stopped in Oak Park to tour Wright’s Home and Studio. We took an hour to photograph the outside, and unable to obtain tickets to tour the inside, we called Taliesin and reserved tickets to tour Wright’s personal residence. We headed to Taliesin, Spring Green, arriving with 10 minutes to spare before the tour began. My excitement mounted. It had been 43 years since I had last visited Taliesin. After spending a few hours, immersing ourselves in every detail, overwhelmed at Wright’s genius, we hit the road. Low and behold we found ourselves in Richland Center, Wright’s birthplace.
       Albert Delvino German was a successful commodity wholesaler. While married to his first wife Grace, Albert purchased the Mitchell Hotel, located on the corner of Haseltine and Church Street. He renamed it the Hotel Badger. After his first wife died in 1909, he remarried in 1912 and also built his first warehouse, adjacent to the hotel on Haseltine Street. It still exists today, just west of the Wright Warehouse. His business was very successful and he opened up two additional warehouses in Platteville and Prairie du Chien. In 1915, Wright designed a four story warehouse to store wholesale goods, a small tea house restaurant, specialized retail shops, a wholesale outlet store, a gallery for local artists and even space for a Wright exhibit. Advanced thinking for 1915. The original perspective, published in
Wendingen, 1925, was designed as a rectangular building, but the working drawings show an additional two story Studio Annex on the South elevation. The perspective drawing gives a clear impression as to Wright’s original intent for the building’s design. With the added details,
  never completed: Corner flag poles with hanging light fixtures; Additional concrete lintel, faced with abstract patterns above the projecting roof over the clerestory windows that ran above the entrance; A single entrance with decorative concrete columns; And horizontal sash bars on either end of the plate glass windows. In total, these details complete the design which always appeared as incomplete. Even the addition of the Studio Annex seems to throw off the balance of the design. While initial designs indicate a rectangular block, the working drawings add the Studio Annex to the South Elevation. Small in size, and with it’s own entrance, Wright added many additional window to the Annex.
       The Hotel Badger was demolished, and construction on the warehouse began in 1917, but was halted in 1921 when costs surpassed $125,000, on an estimated building cost of $30,000. German was able to utilize the building to warehouse wholesale goods -- flour, sugar, groceries, feed and grain, coal and cement, etc, but other plans like the tea house and galleries never came to fruition. He lost the building in 1932 due to unpaid taxes and bankruptcy, but was able to purchased it back in 1935.
       It appears that German never blamed Wright for the cost over-runs, because in 1935, he hired Wright again to design extensive changes and alterations to the building, converting the ground floor to a café and restaurants, adding eight apartments to the fourth floor, and an apartment for himself in the unfinished annex. But sadly, those changes were never made. German lost it again in 1937, and the building was sold for $9,000. Hitchcock wrote, "Finer than the patterned blocks of the Midway Gardens are those of this Warehouse. They face the top storey which was for cold storage."
In The Nature of Materials, 1942.
       The following is a set of 24 photographs of the A. D. German Warehouse, by Douglas M. Steiner, June 10, 2016. Text and photographs by Douglas M. Steiner, Copyright 2016.
 
1) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the South. Designed by Wright in 1915 as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-1)
 
2) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the South. Designed as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor. Forms were set and concrete poured in place. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-2)
 
2B) Detail of the pattered block on the fourth floor. Forms were set and concrete poured in place.
 
3) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the South. Not shown in the original perspective, the Studio Annex in the foreground was added, with its own entrance. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-3)
 
4A) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Southeast. Small in size, and with it’s own entrance, Wright added many additional window to the Annex. Like the main entrance, Wright dropped the window lintel, intersecting the glass, creating clerestory windows. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-4)
 
4B) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Southeast. Hitchcock wrote, "Finer than the patterned blocks of the Midway Gardens are those of this Warehouse." In The Nature of Materials, 1942. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. (ST#2016.06-4)
 
5) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the South. One of the commodities that German sold was concrete. Designed as a brick and concrete building, it was capped by a pattered block on the fourth floor.  Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-5)
 
6) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Southeast. Small in size, and with it’s own entrance, Wright added many additional window to the Annex. Like the main entrance, Wright dropped the window lintel, intersecting the glass, creating clerestory windows above. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-6)
 
7) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Southeast. The concrete frieze on the fourth floor is geometric in form. The design is interrupted by thin slits inserted with glass creating thin horizontal windows. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-7)
 
7B) Detail of the decorative concrete frieze. Wright dropped the window lintel, intersecting the glass, creating clerestory windows in the Annex.
 
7C) Detail of the decorative concrete frieze. The concrete projections were designed for flag poles, with a light fixture hanging below the first projection.
 
7D) Detail of the decorative concrete frieze.
 
8) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Southeast. The perspective drawing gives a clear impression as to Wright’s original intent for the building’s design. With the added details, never completed: Corner flag poles with hanging light fixtures; Additional concrete lintel, faced with abstract patterns above the projecting roof over the clerestory windows that ran above the entrance; A single entrance with decorative concrete columns; And horizontal sash bars on either end of the plate glass windows. In total, these details complete the design which always gave the impression that the building appeared incomplete. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-8)
 
8B) Detail of the fourth floor's concrete frieze.
 
9) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Detail of a built-in planter. Although Wright added many built-in planters, it does not appear to be part of the original design. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-9)
 
10) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). According to the original plans, there were eight freestanding concrete pillars on each floor, with another sixteen embedded in the walls. They rose from floor to floor, and were 16 feet center to center. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-10)
 
11) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Detail of the concrete pillar capitals. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-11)
 
12) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Northeast. The perspective drawing gives a clear impression as to Wright’s original intent for the building’s design. With the added details, never completed: Corner flag poles with hanging light fixtures; Additional concrete lintel, faced with abstract patterns above the projecting roof over the clerestory windows that ran above the entrance; A single entrance with decorative concrete columns; And horizontal sash bars on either end of the plate glass windows. In total, these details complete the design which always gave the impression that the building appeared incomplete. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-12)
 
12B) Detail of the fourth floor's concrete frieze.
 
13) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Plaque on the Northeast corner of the German Warehouse. "A.D. German Warehouse. Frank Lloyd Wright - Architect, Has been placed in the National Register of Historic Places. By the United States department of The Interior, 1974." Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-13)
 
14) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the North. Frank Lloyd Wright rests the full weight of the front of the building on four pillars. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-14)
 
15) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the North. Wright dropped the window lintel, intersecting the glass, creating clerestory windows. Wright's designed the four story warehouse to store wholesale goods, a small tea house restaurant, specialized retail shops, a wholesale outlet store, a gallery for local artists and even space for a Wright exhibit. Advanced thinking for 1915. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-15)
 
15B) Detail of the concrete pillar capitals.
 
16) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). "Office." Not originally an entrance, this one on the Northeast corner was cut into the brick and added by the time Gilman Lane photographed the building around 1940. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-16)
 
17) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). View of the North elevation from the North. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-17)
 
18) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Detail of the brick and concrete. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-18)
 
19) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Because the majority usage for the building was storage, Wright designed the building with a minimal amount of windows on the second to the fourth floors. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-19)
 
19B) Detail of the fourth floor's concrete frieze.
 
20) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the North. The concrete projections were designed for flag poles, with a light fixture hanging below the first projection. The back entrance with stairs was added at a later date, as was the cover between the first warehouse (right) and the second (left). Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-20)
 
21) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). Viewed from the Northwest. The back entrance with stairs was added at a later date, as was the cover between the first warehouse (right) and the second (left). Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-21)
 
22) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). View of the Northwest concrete frieze on the Northwest corner. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-22)
 
22B) Detail of the fourth floor's concrete frieze.
 
23) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). View of the North elevation from the Northwest. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-23)
 
24) A. D. German Warehouse 2016 (1915 - S.183). View of the Northwest coner. Photographed on June 10, 2016 by Douglas M. Steiner. 20 x 14 high res digital color photograph. (ST#2016.06-24)
 
24B) Detail of the concrete projection designed for holding a flag pole and light fixture hanging below the first projection
   
   
   
THOMAS P. HARDY RESIDENCE, RACINE, WISCONSIN (1905 - S.115)
 
Date: 2006

Title: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hardy House (Hard Cover DJ) (Published by Pomegranate Communications, Inc., Petaluma, CA)

Author: Hertzberg, Mark; Introduction by Levine, Neil

Description: The Thomas P. Harding Residence, Racine, Wisconsin (1905 - S.115). Author and photographer Mark Hertzberg's extensive research has uncovered previously, unpublished plans and drawings for Wright's original (and unbuilt) conception of the house, along with vast amounts of correspondence between Hardy and Wright. He has documented the house in all seasons and from many different perspectives, inside and out. His virtual tour includes interviews with various people who have lived in the house or had firsthand knowledge of its history--from Hardy's grandchildren to the present owners. The result is an intricate story of an architectural marvel interlaced with remembrances by its residents. (Publisher’s description.) Original list price $19.95. (First Edition)

Size: 7.25 x 7.25

Pages: Pp 80

ST#: 2006.42.0114

   
   
   
CHARLES L. MANSON HOUSE, WAUSAU, WISCONSIN (1938 - S.249)
 
Date: Circa 1951

Title: Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938 - S.249).

Description: Photographed from the street, circa 1951.  Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Pedro Guerrero or Charles L. Manson. 

Size: 4 x 5

S#: 0857.02.0207

   
Date: Circa 1951

Title: Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938 - S.249).

Description: Photographed from the right side of the yard, circa 1951.  Original 4 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Pedro Guerrero or Charles L. Manson. 

Size: 4 x 5.

S#: 0857.03.0207

   
Date: 1962

Title: Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938 - S.249).

Description: Photographed from the right side of the yard, dated Oct. 1962.  Original 3.5 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Charles L. Manson. 

Size: 3.5 x 5.

S#: 1526.04.0207

   
Date: 1962

Title: Charles L. Manson House, Wausau, Wisconsin (1938 - S.249).

Description: Photographed from the middle of the yard, dated Oct. 1962.  Original 3.5 x 5 silver gelatin photograph. Possibly photographed by Charles L. Manson. 

Size: 3.5 x 5.

S#: 1526.05.0207

   
   
   
ROBERT M. LAMP COTTAGE, ROCKY ROOST (1893 - S.021) (Remodel 1901)
 
Date: Circa 1907

Title: “Rocky Roost, Lake Mendota, Madison, Wis.” 

Description: Robert M Lamp Cottage.  Published by "E. C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee, No 5144". Postmarked 9/5/09. See our Wright Study of Rocky Roost.

Size: 5.5 x 3.6

S#: 0080.05.0203

   
Date: Circa 1907

Title: "Rocky Roost, Lake Mendota, Madison, Wis."

Description: Published by "E. C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee, No 5144". (B&W, Red Text) See our Wright Study of Rocky Roost.

Size: 5.5 x 3.6

S#: 0080.09.0910

   
Date: Circa 1907

Title: “Rocky Roost, Lake Mendota, Madison, Wis.” (Color) 

Description: Robert M Lamp Cottage.  Possibly published by E. C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee. Postmarked 1/14/10. Two copies. See our Wright Study of Rocky Roost.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4.

S#: 0080.06.1008, 0080.08.0710

   
Date: 1909

Title: "Madison, Wis. The Rocky Roost In Lake Mendota."

Description: Back: "The Hugh C. Leighton Co., Manufacturers, Portland, ME., U.S.A. (#) 15040. Made In Germany." PM 7/29/14. Circa 1909. There seems to be a mix of different processes. The sky has a definite cyan (blue) halftone dot pattern, used in today’s printing process. But this process appears only in the sky. The rest of the postcard, including the water in the bottom half, is printed in color using a cellotype, photogravure or lithograph process, a more uneven "dot" process. Under magnification, it appears that the magenta (red), cyan (blue) and yellow plates most resemble the cellotype process. The black plate is a very fine photogravure process printed over the three other colors. Printed in Germany. The Hugh C. Leighton Co. manufactured postcards from 1906-1909. They merged with Valentine & Sons in 1909. See our Wright Study of Rocky Roost.

Size: 5.4 x 3.4

S#: 0086.03.1209

   
   
   
OBSERVATION PLATFORM FOR ISLAND WOOLEN MILLS (1912 - S.143)
 
Date: Circa 1915

Title: Observation Platform for Island Woolen Mills circa 1915 (1912 - S.143).

Description: Face: "Island Woolen Mills Dam, Baraboo, Wisc. Carla Lind Writes in "Lost Wright", 1996, that William McFetridge met Wright when he worked briefly for Sullivan during the period when Wright also worked there. When his father past away, he began working for the family business. Documentation is lacking that confirms Wright designed the Observation Deck, but Wright lived only 35 miles away. The mill closed in 1949 and was demolished in 1972. Back: Post Card. 7796. E. C. Kropp Co., Milwaukee. Stamp Box: E (interior top left corner), C (t. r. c.), K (b. l. c.), Co (b. r. c.). Interesting printing process. Plates use a four-color dot pattern, but the sunset and water use solid thin horizontal lines.

Size: 5.5 x 3.5

S#: 0128.15.0114

   
Date: 1918

Title: Observation Platform for Island Woolen Mills (Published by E.C. Kropp Co, Milwaukee, Wis.) 

Description: "Island Woolen Mills Dam, Baraboo, Wis. Postmarked June 4, 1918. Demolished in the early 1970's. 

Size: 5.5 x 3.5.

S#: 0139.01.0305

   
   
   
SETH PETERSON COTTAGE (1958 - S.430)
   
Date: 1994

Title: Seth Peterson Cottage Exterior 1994, three views (1958 - S.430).

Description: Caption on face: "Lake Delton, Wis. – June 1, 1994 – Wright-Rent – The Seth Peterson Cottage, with a view of its spectacular stone and glass-walled living and dining area, and an interior and exterior view of the cocoon-like bedroom. From the outside, it is serene and energetic, a composition that at once seems to hug the earth and blast off from it. (Morry Gash/New York Times Photos)." Photographed by Morry Gash. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 7.6 x 10 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1994.65.0811

   
Date: 1994

Title: Seth Peterson Cottage Interior 1994 (1958 - S.430).

Description: Caption on face: "Lake Delton, Wis. – June 1, 1994 – Wright-Rent – Numerous Frank Lloyd Wright houses can be visited as museums or bought, usually at a substantial price. But only one Wright house can be rented on a nightly basis: the Seth Peterson Cottage in Wisconsin. The living room of the cottage is pictured. (Morry Gash/New York Times Photos)." Photographed by Morry Gash. Acquired from the archived of the Chicago Tribune.

Size: Original 10 x 8.25 B&W photograph.

ST#: 1994.66.0811

   
   
   
JOHN PEW RESIDENCE (1938 - S.273)
   
Date: 1954

Title: Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954 (Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation project #5427).

Description: A traveling exhibition of Wright's work, consisting of models, photographs and original drawings. A Preview of the exhibition was held in Philadelphia (January 1951). The world wide tour opened in Palazzo Strozzi Florence, Italy (June 1951). In "Sixty Years" (New York), Wright notes that from Florence the Exhibition traveled to "Switzerland, France, German and Holland". The Exhibition catalogs are dated: Paris (April 1952), Zurich (End of May 1952), Munich (May 16 - June 15, 1952), and Rotterdam (dated June 1, 1952). After two years in Europe the exhibition crossed the Atlantic to Mexico City, then to New York (1953). After an exhibition in Los Angeles, June, 1954, the final exhibition took place in Chicago, October, 1956. The Los Angeles exhibition premiere was held at Barnsdall Park’s Municipal Art Center on June 1, 1954, then open to the public from June 2 to July 11, and was extended to July 25, 1954. A temporary pavilion, similar to the pavilion in New York, was attached to the line of kennels that reached from the house to the garage. Exhibition Panel #70. "Pew House, Madison, Wisc., 1939. Built on contract by the Taliesin Fellowship." Sixty Years of Living Architecture Exhibition, Los Angeles 1954. Top: Exterior view. Bottom: Interior View. Top left: Floor plan. Bottom left: Interior view. Photographed by Loch Crane in June, 1954.

Size: B&W 2.25" negative, high res scan, and 8 x 8 B&W photograph

S#:
1045.42.1116-17
   
   
   
BERNARD SCHWARTZ RESIDENCE (1939 - S.271)
 
Date: 1950

Title: Bernard Schwartz Residence, Two Rivers, Wisconsin, C 1950 (1939 - S.271).

Description: A year after Frank Lloyd Wright published his design for a family with $5,000-6,000 income in Life Magazine, the basic concept was built for Bernard Schwartz. Wright did not include a Living Room, but called it the "Recreation Room." The smaller seating area he called the "Lounge." This is the "Lounge," tucked into the corner, and includes built-in seating and shelves. Just to the left, out of frame is a fireplace. Label pasted to mounting: "Frank Lloyd Wright. Re. Bernard Schwarz (sic), Two Rivers, Wis. (1939). Living Room. Wayne Andrews #1583. Indiana University Fine Arts Department."

Size: Original 9.5 x 7.75 B&W photograph.

S#:
0831.52.1216
   
   
MINNESOTA MONTHLY
     
Date: 1994

Title: Minnesota Monthly - Oct 1994 (Published monthly by Minnesota Monthly, on behalf of Minnesota Public Radio, St. Paul, Minn.)

Author: McBride, Elizabeth

Description: "The Wright Cabin For Skiing. Cross-Country Ski and Share an Architect’s Dream at the Seth Peterson Cottage... The Seth Peterson Cottage, near Lake Delton, Wisconsin, is the only Wright house that can be rented for overnight stays. Compact (880 square feet) yet spacious, serene yet powerful, in Wright’s inimitable way, the cottage offers an extraordinary opportunity to learn what’s behind all the fuss over this architect..." Includes two photographs. Original cover price $2.50.

Size: 8 x 11

Pages: Pp 62-63

ST#: 1994.88.0715

   
   
   
RACINE, WISCONSIN
 
Date: 1982

Title: Racine: A Guide to Architectural Styles 1840 - 1940 (Published by the Racine Landmark Preservation Commission, Racine, Wisc.)

Author: Long, Robert D.

Description: A field guided that is made up of 39 architectural examples in Racine. It also includes two sections of Frank Lloyd Wright buildings. The Hardy House and the S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Administration Building and Research Tower. With one photograph of each. (First Edition)

Size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 44

S#: 1982.44.0514

   
Date: 2004

Title: Wright in Racine

Author: Hertzberg, Mark

Description: (First Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 95

ST#: 2004.05.0904

   
   
   
WISCONSIN BEAUTIFUL
     
Date: 1968

Title: Wisconsin Beautiful - 1968 Vol. 1,No. 2 (Published by Country Beautiful Foundation, Inc., Waukesha, Wisconsin)

Author: Polley, Robert L.

Description: "Frank Lloyd Wright, Native Son." A Great Architect of the Twentieth Century Was Born and Nurtured in Wisconsin. Includes six photographs. Original List Price $1.50.

Size: 9 x 12.

Pages: Pp 20-25

S#: 1757.02.0305

   
   
   
WISCONSIN NATURAL RESOURCES
 
Date: 1992

Periodical: Wisconsin Natural Resources - August 1992

Author: Visser, Kristin

Description: The Wright touch at Mirror Lake. Citizens have restored an architectural jewel beyond its original beauty. You can stay in this simple elegant cottage that lay hidden in the woods of a state park for 25 years. The Seth Peterson Cottage.

Size:

Pages: Pp 3 9-11

ST#: 1992.41.0404

   
   
   
WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL
     
Date: 1959

Title: Wisconsin State Journal - April 10, 1959 (Published by Madison Newspapers, Inc., Madison, Wisc.)

Author: 2) Matheson, Helen; 9) Prindle, John

Description: 1) “Frank Lloyd Wright, Noted Architect, Dies. Death at Age 89 Ends His Lively Career.”  2) “Wright: A Force of  Nature” 3) “Some Delay Seen on Monona Terrace Project.”  4) “Spring Green Rites  Pending; Body to Arrive on Saturday.”  5) “Apprentice School to be Continued.”  6) “No Monuments in Home Town.”  7) “Nelson Calls Wright Symbol for Nation.” 8) “Mayor Sends City’s Sympathy to Family.”  9) “Reporter Recalls a Mellower Wright, Genial Taliesin Host.”  10) “Highlights in Life of Noted Architect.”  Includes 11 photographs. Original cover price 5c.

Size: 15 x 23.5.

Pages: Pp 1-2 6 7

S#: 1377.25.0406

   
Date: 1959

Title: Wisconsin State Journal - April 13, 1959 (Published by Madison Newspapers, Inc., Madison, Wisc.)

Author: Prindle, John

Description: “Wright Comes Home to Rest. 2 Horses Draw Bier to Grave in Simple Rites.” Includes two photographs. Original cover price 5c.

Size: 15 x 23.5.

Pages: Pp 1-2

S#: 1377.26.0406

   
   
   
WISCONSIN TALES
     
Date: 1970

Title: Wisconsin Tales and Trails - Summer 1970  (Published Quarterly by Wisconsin Tales and Trails, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin)

Author: 1) Dean, Jill   2) Wells, Robert W.

Description: 1) “Beautiful Building, beautiful setting, beautiful food: The Spring Green.” History of The Spring Green restaurant design by Wright, as well as a description of the building and restaurant.  Includes two photographs.  2) “S.C. Johnson & Son. The firm that waxed great.” Text includes history of the company, and touches on Wright’s involvement. Includes seven photographs of the Wright designed building.  Original cover price $1.50.

Size: 9 x 12.

Pages: 1) Pp 10-11    2) Pp 34-40

S#: 1) 1846.02.1106   2) 1846.03.1106

   
Date: 1982

Title: Wisconsin Trails - Spring 1982 (Published quarterly by Wisconsin Tales & Trails, Inc., Middleton, WI)

Author: Dean, Jeff

Description: "Taliesin. Taliesin is a place, according to one eminent scholar, that is to be found more easily on the map of the world than on the map of Wisconsin. Located in the gently rolling hills of southern Wisconsin, it was the home, office, studio, and classroom of world-renowned architect
Frank Lloyd Wright, who lived there much of the time from 1911 until his death in 1959. Although it is often but an object of curiosity to Wisconsin’s residents, it is a global magnet for students of Wright’s architecture..." Includes eight photographs. Original cover price $3.00. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 8.3 x 11

Pages: Pp 4-10

ST#:
1982.49.0616
   
Date: 1988

Title: Wisconsin Trails - October 1988 (Published quarterly by Wisconsin Tales & Trails, Inc., Madison, WI

Author: Patau, Peter

Description: "Frank Lloyd Wright’s Madison. A major exhibit and related events pay tribute to one of Wisconsin’s most heralded native sons. ‘Architectural power grows out of the barrel of a 4B pencil, and those who can wield it reign, like monarchs, over their profession,’ writes Charles Jencks in Kings of Infinite space. In American architecture, no one ever ruled more flamboyantly, more controversially, and with more lasting impact than Wisconsin’s own Frank Lloyd Wright..." Includes one portrait and eight illustrations. Original cover price $3.50. Gift from Kathryn Smith.

Size: 8.3 x 11

Pages: Pp Cover, 18-25

ST#:
1988.90.0616
   
Date: 1996

Title: Wisconsin Trails - August 1996  (Published bimonthly by Wisconsin Tales and Trails, Inc., Madison)

Author: Rhodes, Lucy

Description: “Spring Green.  A picturesque town surrounded by hills and valleys filled with architectural treasures, artisans’ studios and country hospitality.”  Includes one photograph of Taliesin. Original cover price $3.95. 

Size: 8.2 x 10.9.

Pages: Pp 59-61

ST#: 1996.58.0607

   
   
   

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017