ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
ARIZONA BILTMORE
ARTS & CRAFTS
AUSGEFUHRTE BAUTEN
BIOGRAPHIES
BROADACRE CITY
CHAIRS
CHAPTERS ON & BY WRIGHT
CHICAGO
CHICAGO SCHOOL
CHILDREN'S
CHURCHS
CONVERSATIONS
COPPER URN
DANA-THOMAS HOUSE
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
DOMINO'S
DRAWINGS
ENNIS-BROWN
EVE OF ST. AGNES
EXHIBITIONS
FALLINGWATER
FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE
FLW FOUNDATION
FURNITURE
GA SERIES
GLASS
GUGGENHEIM
GUIDES
HERITAGE-HENREDON
HOME & STUDIO (OAK PARK)
HOMES & BLDS: GENERAL
HOMES & BLDS: SPECIFIC
HOTEL GENEVA
IANNELLI
IMPERIAL HOTEL
INTERIOR DESIGN
JAPAN
LANDSCAPE
LARKIN BUILDING
MADISON WISC
MAMAH BORTHWICK CHENEY
MARIN COUNTY
MIDWAY GARDENS
MILE HIGH
MODELS BY WRIGHT
NAKOMA
NEW THEATRE
OAK PARK HOMES
PETERS (WES)
PHOTOGRAPHERS
PICTORIAL ESSAYS
PRAIRIE SCHOOL
PRINTING PROCESS
PROJECTS
ROBIE HOUSE
ROLOSON ROWHOUSES
SCHUMACHER
SC JOHNSON
SEYMOUR, RALPH FLETCHER
SIXTY YEARS EXHIB 1951-56
STORRER
STUDIES
SULLIVAN, LOUIS
TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP
TALIESIN (SPRING GREEN)
TALIESIN WEST
UNITY TEMPLE
USONIA
USONIAN AUTOMATIC HOMES
WEED HOLDER
WENDINGEN
WRIGHT CHILDREN
WRIGHT,  FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT &
WRIGHT FURNISHINGS
WRITINGS BY WRIGHT
 

NOW AVAILABLE CLICK TO ORDER

 
WRIGHT STUDY
Browne's Bookstore, Chicago (1907 - S.141)
 
  Publications edited by Francis Fisher Browne   Books Written by Francis Fisher Browne  
  Books Published by Browne's Bookstore 1908-1912    Books Related To Francis Fisher Browne    Photographs 
 
 
Publications edited by Francis Fisher Browne
 
[1] The Western Monthly
 

L

Date: January 1869 - December 1870 (Volume 1 - 23)

Title: The Western Monthly

Editor: H. V. Reed (Jan-Mar 1869) Francis F. Browne (April 1869 - close)

Description: "...the two most credible periodicals ever produced in Chicago are The Dial and the Lakeside Monthly, And that Mr. Browne has done more for the literary interest of Chicago than any other man in the city... In 1867, Mr. Browne, then a young man of twenty-three, landed in Chicago... The second year after Mr. Browne’s advent in Chicago saw him part owner and the practical manager of a snug little ‘brand-new’ printing office on Dearborn street, just north of Madison. A few months later, disposing of his interest to his partners, he purchased an interest in the Western Monthly..." Inland Printer, Oct 1892, pages 33-35.

Vol No. Date Title Publisher Location
I 1 - 3 Jan - Mar 1869 The Western Monthly Reed & Tuttle  
  4 - 6 Apr - Jun 1869 The Western Monthly Reed, Browne & Co. No. 8 Tribune Building
II 7 - 12 Jul - Dec 1869 The Western Monthly Reed, Browne & Co. No. 8 Tribune Building
III 13 - 18 Jan - Jun 1870 The Western Monthly Reed, Browne & Co. No. 8 Tribune Building
IV 19 - 21 Jul - Sep 1870 The Western Monthly The Western Monthly Co. No. 8 Tribune Building
    Oct 1870 - A fire destroyed the magazine's printing office, with its subscription list and entire October edition. It was never printed.
  22 Nov 1870 The Western Monthly The Western Monthly Co. Tribune Building
  23 Dec 1870 The Western Monthly Lakeside Publishing & Printing Co Tribune Building
V 24 - 30 Jan - Jun 1871 The Lakeside Monthly Lakeside Publishing & Printing Co Tribune Building
      (We are missing the issues in Volume V. A note on page 180 of the February 1872 issue: "We would be glad to receive a few sets of "The Lakeside Monthly", from January to October, 1871, in exchange for "The Lakeside" for the year 1872. April issue #28 never printed due to change in proprietors.)  An additional number or issue was published that we have not been able to locate. Possibly a make-up issue from the one missed in Oct. 1870.
VI 31 - 34 Jul - Oct 1871 The Lakeside Monthly Reed, Browne & Co. Tribune Building
    October 8, 1871 - Great Chicago Fire
  35 - 36 Nov - Dec 1871 These two issues never printed due to the Great Chicago fire.
VII 37 - 42 Jan - Jun 1872 The Lakeside Monthly University Publishing Company  
VIII 43 - 45 Jul - Sep 1872 The Lakeside Monthly University Publishing Company 62 S. Canal St
  46 - 48 Oct - Dec 1872 The Lakeside Monthly J. J. Spalding & Co. 21 S. Canal St
IX 49 - 52 Jan - Apr 1873 The Lakeside Monthly J. J. Spalding & Co. 21 S. Canal St
  53 - 54 May - Jun1873 The Lakeside Monthly F. F. Browne & Co. Lakeside Building
X 55 - 59 Jul - Nov 1873 The Lakeside Monthly F. F. Browne & Co. Lakeside Building
  60 Dec 1873 issue never printed. Dec was combined with January for a double Holiday Issue.
XI 61 - 62 Jan - Feb 1874 The Lakeside Monthly F. F. Browne & Co. Lakeside Building


[2] The Lakeside Monthly

Date: January 1871 - February 1874 (Volume 24 - 62)

Title: The Lakeside Monthly

Editor: Francis F. Browne (April 1869 - close)

Description: "...the two most credible periodicals ever produced in Chicago are The Dial and the Lakeside Monthly, And that Mr. Browne has done more for the literary interest of Chicago than any other man in the city... In 1867, Mr. Browne, then a young man of twenty-three, landed in Chicago... The second year after Mr. Browne’s advent in Chicago saw him part owner and the practical manager of a snug little ‘brand-new’ printing office on Dearborn street, just north of Madison. A few months later, disposing of his interest to his partners, he purchased an interest in the Western Monthly..." Inland Printer, Oct 1892, pages 33-35.
       The Western Monthly and Lakeside Monthly survived two fires and the financial panic of 1873, but could not survive Browne's struggle with his health. He did not plan to close the Monthly. The January issue announced the "Prospectus for 1874" our "Sixth Year". Plans were made. "Many new and able writers have been secured and new features and attractions will be constantly added." At thirty years old, Francis F. Browne had attained his life long dream. But severe health issues cut his dreams short. The February 1874 issue, number 62 would be the last. He closed the doors, left Chicago and fought to regain his health.

0000.02.0411

   
   
   
[3] The Alliance
   
  Date: 1878 - 1879

Title: The Alliance

Editor: Literary: Francis F. Browne

Description: While gaining his health, Mr. Browne served as literary editor of "The Alliance", a prominent and influential weekly journal,

   
   
   
[4] The Dial
   
Date: 1880 - 1913 (Although it continued after Browne's death)

Title: The Dial

Editor: Francis F. Browne

Description: Gaining his strength, Browne partnered with Jansen, McClurge & Co., and founded "The Dial" in 1880. Under Browne's leadership as founder and editor of the "The Dial", it became the premier literary magazine in the nation. In 1892 full ownership was transferred to Browne.
       "...the two most credible periodicals ever produced in Chicago are The Dial and the Lakeside Monthly, And that Mr. Browne has done more for the literary interest of Chicago than any other man in the city... " Inland Printer, Oct 1892, pages 33-35.
       Browne was the editor from the first issue until his death.

   
Date: July 15, 1898

Title: The Chap-Book / The Dial

Description: The Dial Purchases The Chap-Book.

The final issue of The Chap-Book, July 15, 1898 consisted of a two page notice: "Instead of the July 15th issue of The Chap-Book the subscribers to that magazine will receive the issue of The Dial for the same date. To this latter journal, upon an offer from its proprietors, have been transferred the subscription list, the right
to the name, and the good will of The Chap-Book. It has been consistently maintained by The Chap-Book that The Dial is in many ways the best purely critical journal in America, and it is hoped that subscribers will be pleased that their subscriptions are to be filled out in this manner. The proprietors and editors of The Chap-Book feel proud of its past and there would have been a certain satisfaction in continuing its publication.
But it became evident that the large amount of time and energy which went to its editing could be employed
to greater advantage, from a business point of view, in the book-publishing department of the house, and The Dial's offer was therefore accepted..."

The July 16, 1898 issue of The Dial Announced: "By arrangement with Messrs. Herbert S. Stone & Co., the owners of "The Chap-Book", the subscription list, the name, and the good-will of that publication have been purchased by The Dial, which will fill out all subscriptions. The last issue of " The Chap-Book " was that of July 1. By this accession The Dial gains a new and important constituency, which it will of course seek to make permanently its own."

   
   
   
Books Written by Francis Fisher Browne
  Golden Poems (1881)    Golden Treasury (1883)    Bugle-Echoes: Poems of the Civil War (1886)    Every-Day Life of Lincoln (1886)  
  Laurel Crowned Verse (1891-92)    Volunteer Grain (1895)    Paul & Virginia of a Northern Zone (1895)    Nanna (1901) 
 
[5] "Golden Poems By British And American Authors" by Francis Fisher Browne, First published in 1881
   
Date: 1881 (1891)

Title: Golden Poems By British and American Authors (Hard Cover) (First published in 1881 by Jensen, McClurg & Co. This Edition published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago.)

Author: Edited by Browne, Francis Fisher

Description: The Dial was founded May 1, 1880, by Francis F. Browne, in connection with the publishing house of Jansen, McClurg & Co. In 1881 they published the first edition of "Golden Poems By British and American Authors". In this volume of "Golden Poems", Browne compiled 550 selected poems by 300 different British and American poets. It reads like a who's who of poetry. "Golden Poems" is a fireside volume for the thousands of families who love poetry. It is meant for those who cannot afford all the collected works of their favorite poets - it offers the poems they like best, all in one volume. 5 x 8. (Does not indicate Edition)

Size:

Pages: Pp 464

0011.08.0511

   
Date: 1881 (1906)

Title: Golden Poems By British and American Authors. (First published in 1881 by Jensen, McClurg & Co. This Ninth New Revised Edition was published in 1906 by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago. Printed by The Lakeside Press, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, Chicago)

Author: Edited by Francis Fisher Browne

Description: The Dial was founded May 1, 1880, by Francis F. Browne, in connection with the publishing house of Jansen, McClurg & Co. In 1881 they published the first edition of "Golden Poems By British and American Authors". In this volume of "Golden Poems", Browne compiled 550 selected poems by 300 different British and American poets. It reads like a who's who of poetry. From an ad in the November 1, 1907 issue of The Dial, "Golden Poems" is a fireside volume for the thousands of families who love poetry. It is meant for those who cannot afford all the collected works of their favorite poets - it offers the poems they like best, all in one volume. List price in 1907 was $1.50. Digital version.

Size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 526

0064.04.0311

Courtesy of The Library of Congress. Images enhanced by Douglas M. Steiner  
   
   
   
[6] The Golden Treasury of Poetry and Prose (1883)
   
Date: 1883

Title: The Golden Treasury of Poetry and Prose. Choice selections from the works of leading British and American Authors, For a period of Five Hundred Years; Covering the entire field of English Literature, And presenting a rich and varied collection of the Literary Gems of the Language. (Published by N. D. Thompson & Co., Publishers, New York and St. Louis)

Author: Edited by Browne, Francis F.; With an Introduction by Stoddard, Richard Henry

Description: With over Four Hundred Appropriate Engravers. Includes portrait of Francis F. Brown (circa 1869), engraved by J. Karst. According to Eve Brodlique, "Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly", November 1892, "...he was nominally assisted by Mr. Stoddard, though the veteran Eastern author wrote only the introduction of this book - a five-dollar publication. Over 100,000 copies were sold." (p518). Of interest is that Stoddard's name appears first on the cover, and Stoddard’s portrait appears on the left side of the page, Browne’s on the right. Browne’s name does appear first on the title page, indicating only the introduction by Stoddard. (First Edition.)

Size: 7.75 x 10.6

Pages: Pp 906

S#: 0000.05.0312

   
   
   

[7] "Bugle-Echoes; a Collection of Poems of the Civil War, Northern and Southern"

 by Francis Fisher Browne, First published in 1886

 

Date: (March) 1886

Title: Bugle-Echoes: A Collection of Poems of the Civil War, Northern and Southern (Published by White, Stokes & Allen, New York)

Author: Edited by Francis F. Browne

Description: In the October 1885 issue of The Dial, page 152, it was announced, "A volume of the more notable poems of the Civil War is announced by White, Stokes & Allen, new York. It is intended that the collection, although restricted in size, shall be truly representative of both North and south. interesting details of authors and pieces will be given in notes accompanying the poems."Title Page: Bugle-Echoes; A Collection of Poems of the Civil War, Northern and Southern. Edited by Francis F. Browne. New York, White, Stokes & Allen, 1886. Copyright 1886, White, Stokes & Allen.
       Preface: This collection of Poetry of the Civil War, begun several years ago for the compiler's personal satisfaction, has grown in extent and interest, until its publication is thought to be justified by the demand for books relating to the war, and by the literary and historical value of the material... Chicago, March 1886.
       It is a collection of nearly 150 poems, by approximately 90 poets, well known, obscure and anonymous.
       Included is the poem "Vanquished", (General U. S. Grant, died July 23, 1885).

                      I.
       NOT by the ball or brand
       Sped by a mortal hand,
       Not by the lightning-stroke
       When fiery tempests broke,--
       Not mid the ranks of war
       Fell the great Conqueror.

                      II.
       Unmoved, undismayed,
       In the crash and carnage of the cannonade,--
       Eye that dimmed not, hand that failed not,
       Brain that swerved not, heart that quailed not,
       Steel nerve, iron form,--
       The dauntless spirit that o'erruled the storm.

                      III.
       While the Hero peaceful slept
       A foeman to his chamber crept,
       Lightly to the slumberer came,
       Touched his brow and breathed his name :
       O'er the stricken form there passed
       Suddenly an icy blast.

                      IV.
       The Hero woke: rose undismayed:
       Saluted Death--and sheathed his blade.

                      V.
       The Conqueror of a hundred fields
       To a mightier Conqueror yields;
       No mortal foeman's blow
       Laid the great Soldier low;
       Victor in his latest breath--
       Vanquished but by Death.

                      Francis F. Browne.

       Of note, it includes "Oh Captain, My Captain", made famous in "The Dead Poets Society", 1989, with Robin Williams. He tells the students that they may call him "O Captain! My Captain!", which was written by Walt Whitman in 1865, concerning the death of Abraham Lincoln.

Size: 4.8 x 7.5

Pages: Pp 336

0001.63.0311

   
   
   
[8] "The Every-Day Life of Abraham Lincoln" by Francis F. Browne, 1886
   

Courtesy of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Images enhanced by Douglas M. Steiner

Date: 1886

Title: The Every-Day Life of Abraham Lincoln (Published by N. D. Thompson Publishing Co., New York and St. Louis)

Author: Francis F. Browne

Description: Francis F. Browne began this extensive work on the life of Abraham Lincoln just twenty years after his death.
       Title Page: A Biography of the great American President from an entirely new standpoint, with fresh and invaluable material. Lincoln's life and character portrayed by those who knew him. A complete personal description and biography of him who was the humblest and greatest of American citizens, the truest and most loyal of men, and a central figure in the world's history. With nearly 100 original illustrations. Prepared and arranged by Francis F. Browne, Compiler of "The Golden Treasury of Poetry and Prose", "Poems of the Civil War", etc. Copyright 1896, by F. F. Browne.
       Preface: This book aims to give a view, clearer and completer than has been or could be given before, of the personality of Abraham Lincoln. A life so full of incident, and a character so many-sided as his, can be understood only with the lapse of time. a sense of the exhaustless interest of that life and character, and the inadequacy of ordinary-constructed biographies to portray his many-sidedness, suggested the preparation of a work upon the novel plan her represented. Begun several years ago, the undertaking proved of such unexpected magnitude that its completion has been delayed beyond the anticipated time...  Other characters are brought into prominence only as they are associated with the chief actor in the great drama. Many of them are disappearing - fading into the smoky and lurid background; but that colossal central figure, playing one of the grandest roles ever set upon the stage of human life, becomes more impressive as the scenes recede.

Size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 747

0001.64.0311

   
   
   
[9-15] "Laurel-Crowned Verse" Edited by Francis F. Browne, 1891-2
   
  Date: 1891-92

Title: Laurel Crowned Verse.

Author: Edited by Francis F. Browne

Description: This seven volume set included:
       [9] The Lady of the Lake. By Sir Walter Scott.
       [10] Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. A Romaunt. By Lord Byron.
       [11] Lalla Rookh. An Oriental Romance. By Thomas Moore.
       [12] Idylls of the King. By Alfred, Lord Tennyson.
       [13] Paradise Lost. By John Milton.
       [14-15] The Iliad of Homer. Translated by Alexander Pope. 2 Vols.
All the volumes of this series were from a specially prepared and corrected text, based upon a careful collation of authentic editions.
       "The special merit of these editions, aside from the graceful form of the books, lies in the editor's reserve. Whenever the author has provided a preface or notes, this apparatus is given, and thus some interesting matter is revived; but the editor himself refrains from loading the books with his own writing." The Atlantic Monthly.
       "These volumes are models of good taste in covers, typography, dimensions, and presswork. They present the most perfect texts of these works in existence, even Tennyson being an improvement upon the best standard edition." The Journal, Chicago.
       "For this series the publishers are entitled to the gratitude of lovers of classical English." The School Journal, New York.
       "Those who wish either or all of these volumes for their own libraries or gifts to others, will be charmed by them; and possession of them will be more precious because of the attractive dress in which they are presented." The Times, Boston.
       Each volume is finely printed and bound. Price per volume, $1.00; in half calf or half morocco, per vol., $3.75.

   
[10] "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage" by Lord Byron, Edited by Francis F. Browne, 1891
   
Date: 1891

Title: Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. A Romaunt. New American Edition (Published by A. C. McClug and Company, Chicago. Printed on cream laid paper.)

Author: Byron, Lord; Edited by Francis F. Browne

Description: "Author’s Preface. [Written in 1812, and prefixed to the First and Second Cantos.] The following poem was written, for the most part, amidst the scenes which it attempts to describe..." The second book in the Laurel-Crowned Verse Series, consisting of seven volumes. All the volumes of this series were from a specially prepared and corrected text, based upon a careful collation of authentic editions. "The special merit of these editions, aside from the graceful form of the books, lies in the editor's reserve. Whenever the author has provided a preface or notes, this apparatus is given, and thus some interesting matter is revived; but the editor himself refrains from loading the books with his own writing." The Atlantic Monthly. Includes twenty-nine pages of the author’s notes. Original list price $1.00. Also available in half-calf or half morocco $2.75. (First Edition)

Size: 4.5 x 7.2

Pages: Pp 272

0011.06.0411

   
   
[11] "Lalla Rookh" by Thomas Moore, Edited by Francis F. Browne, 1891
   

Date: 1891

Title: Lalla Rookh, An Oriental Romance. New American Edition (Hard cover) (Published by A. C. McClurg and Company, Chicago. Printed on cream laid paper.)

Author: Moore, Thomas; Edited by Francis F. Browne

Description: The third book in the Laurel-Crowned Verse Series, consisting of seven volumes. All the volumes of this series were from a specially prepared and corrected text, based upon a careful collation of authentic editions. "The special merit of these editions, aside from the graceful form of the books, lies in the editor's reserve. Whenever the author has provided a preface or notes, this apparatus is given, and thus some interesting matter is revived; but the editor himself refrains from loading the books with his own writing." The Atlantic Monthly. Includes fifty-five pages of the author’s notes. Original list price $1.00. (First Edition)

Size: 4.5 x 7.2

Pages: Pp 328

0011.04.0411

   
(Note: Covers we have found to date are white, dark olive green and dark red, plus half calf and half morocco.)

Date: 1891

Title: Lalla Rookh, An Oriental Romance. New American Edition (Dark Olive Hard cover) (Published by A. C. McClurg and Company, Chicago. Printed on cream laid paper. The only difference between the dark green and dark red,  and the white cover (above) is the color of the cover cloth and the lack of the additional floral gilt on the cover. The rest of the volume is exactly the same. Note: Ads run by McClurg in The Dial, Publishers Weekly, Book Buyer, Harper’s Magazine and their catalogs published in the back of other books published during 1891-1892 do not indicate a difference in color. Also produced in dark red.)

Author: Moore, Thomas; Edited by Francis F. Browne

Description: The third book in the Laurel-Crowned Verse Series, consisting of seven volumes. All the volumes of this series were from a specially prepared and corrected text, based upon a careful collation of authentic editions. "The special merit of these editions, aside from the graceful form of the books, lies in the editor's reserve. Whenever the author has provided a preface or notes, this apparatus is given, and thus some interesting matter is revived; but the editor himself refrains from loading the books with his own writing." The Atlantic Monthly. Includes fifty-five pages of the author’s notes. Original list price $1.00. Also available in half-calf or half morocco $2.75. 4.5 x 7.2. (First Edition)

Size: 4.5 x 7.2

Pages: Pp 328

0011.05.0411 (Dark Green), 0011.07.0511 (Dark Red)

   
   
   
[16] "Volunteer Grain" by Francis F. Browne, 1895
   
Date: 1895

Title: Volunteer Grain (Published by Way & Williams, Chicago. One hundred and sixty copies printed from type, of which one hundred and fifty were for sale. Printed by John Wilson and Son on Laid paper with "Van Gelder Zonen and a "crowned fleur-de-lis symbol" watermark. Top edge gilt, others uncut.)

Author: Browne, Francis Fisher

Description:
       A field of wavering grain
Wild grown on some unplanned, unplanted space,
       Owning no fostering grace
Of husbandry save the free air and rain..
.
        (First stanza, "Volunteer Grain")
"Volunteer Grain"
includes a compilation of 22 additional poems written by Francis F. Browne. In an advertisement for this book, Browne wrote,
       "If it be true, as people say,
       Where there's a Will there is a Way.
       With equal truth it follows still 
       That where a Way is there's a Will; 
       How fitly, then, the two combine 
       In Way and Williams' classic sign!" 

One hundred and sixty copies were printed, of which one hundred and fifty were for sale. Printed on hand-made paper. (Critic 1895, p94). According to The Publishers' Weekly, April 25, 1896, p716, the list price was net $2.25. Chauncey L. Williams (1895 - S.033), a client of Wright's, partnered with Washington Irving Way in 1895 to form Way & Williams, Publishers, Importers and Booksellers of Fine Books. In December 1986 Williams became the sole owner. The firm only lasted for three years until 1898. In all they published over 65 different volumes. Their first published project was the "Volunteer Grain", the first work written solely by Francis F. Browne. Williams also collaborated with Wright and another of Wright's clients William H. Winslow (1894 - S.024) in publishing "The Eve of St. Agnes". One copy signed on the front endpaper by Canadian poet Charles G. D. Roberts (1860 - 1943), dated December 25, 1895. Two copies. (First Edition)

Size: 5.4 x 7.9.

Pages: Pp 70

0018.16.0411, 0018.29.1013

   
   
   
[17] "Paul & Virginia of a Northern Zone" Re-written by Francis F. Browne, 1895
   
Date: 1895 (September)

Title: Paul & Virginia of a Northern Zone (Poul og Virginie under nordlig Bredde) From the Danish of Holger Drachmann. (Translated by Francis F. Browne. (Hard Cover) (Published by Way & Williams, Chicago. Printed for Way and Williams by R. R. Donnelley and Sons Co at the Lakeside Press, Chicago, from Plates made by The Dial Press: 1895) Printed on a very fine light beige laid paper with "Way and Williams" watermark. (Republished in 1901 as "Nanna, Story of Danish Love".)

Author: Drachmann, Holger; Re-written in English by Browne, Francis F.

Description: "Introductory Note. Some years ago my excellent Danish friend, the lamented Thorkild A. Schoovelin, spoke to me in admiration of the works of his countryman Holger Drachmann, and suggested the project of making an English translation... and at his request I aided in the not easy task of giving to this charming Northern Idyll an adequate English setting. In revising the work for publication in book form, I am conscious of the shortcomings which, had my friend lived, he might have done much to aid in remedying. Yet I trust enough of the beauty and distinctiveness of the original has been transferred to these pages, not only to afford a rare pleasure to the English reader, but to justify in his view the naming of the little tale after the French classic which, in spite of an unlikeness in style and treatment answering to that of the races from which the works are sprung, it still in a way suggests. Francis F. Browne. Chicago, September 1895."  (First Edition)

Chauncey L. Williams (1895 - S.033), a client of Wright's, partnered with Washington Irving Way in 1895 to form Way & Williams, Publishers, Importers and Booksellers of Fine Books. In December 1986 Williams became the sole owner. The firm only lasted for three years until 1898. In all they published over 65 different volumes. Their first published project was the "Volunteer Grain", Francis F. Browne's first work. Williams also collaborated with Wright and another of Wright's clients William H. Winslow (1894 - S.024) in publishing "The Eve of St. Agnes".

Size: 4.6 x 7

Pages: Pp 208

0018.17.0311

   
   
   
[18] "Nanna, A Story of Danish Love" Re-written by Francis F. Browne, 1901 1895 (1895 Original)
   
Date: 1901 (October)

Title: Nanna, A Story of Danish Love. (Poul og Virginie under nordlig Bredde) From the Danish of Holger Drachmann. Re-written in English by Francis F. Browne. (Originally published in 1895 by Way & Williams, Chicago, as "Paul & Virginia of a Northern Zone".) (Hard Cover) (This 1901 edition published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago, and printed on a very fine light beige laid paper.)

Author: Drachmann, Holger; Re-written in English by Browne, Francis F.

Description: "Introductory Note. Some years ago my excellent Danish friend, the lamented Thorkild A. Schoovelin, spoke to me in admiration of the works of his countryman Holger Drachmann, and suggested the project of making an English translation... and at his request I aided in the not easy task of giving to this charming Northern Idyll an adequate English setting. In revising the work for publication under a new title, taken from its heroine in accordance with the usage of the popular series of love-tales of which it now forms a part, I am conscious of the shortcomings which, had my friend lived, he might have done much to aid in remedying. Yet I trust enough of the beauty and distinctiveness of the original has been transferred to these pages, not only to afford a rare pleasure to the English reader, but to justify in his view the author’s naming of his little tale after the French classic which, in spite of an unlikeness in style and treatment answering to that of the races from which the works are sprung, it still in a way suggests. Francis F. Browne. Chicago, October 1901." (First Edition)

Size: 4.4 x 6.6

Pages: Pp 208

0048.02.0311

   
   
   
Books Published by Browne's Bookstore 1908 - 1912
   
Browne's Bookstore opened for business near the end of 1907. In the November issue of The Dial, it was announced that "Browne's Bookstore, in the Fine Arts Building on Michigan Boulevard, is now open..." The first book to be published in 1908 was about their own bookstore, "A Notable Bookstore". The Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones, Frank Lloyd Wright's Uncle, had published an article about the Browne's in Unity Magazine. Elia W. Peattie had also published an article about Browne's in the New York Post. Portions of both articles were included. (In 1911 Peattie published an article about the Fine Arts Building in The International Studio, April 1911, which was later published in "The Book of The Fine Arts Building".) (See Eve of St. Agnes, No. 24, given to Peattie by Winslow, Williams and Wright.)         They published a number of other books including: "Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey" (1910, 1911 and 1912); "Twenty Years at Hull-House" (Published in 1910 for Browne's Bookstore by The MacMillan Company, New York.); "Joy of The Road. A Little Anthology in Praise of Walking" (1911); "On The Art of The Theatre" (1911); "The Ballad of Reading Gaol" (1911); "The Charm of Childhood: Being a Little book on the Modern Child" (1911); "Sonnets, John Keats" (1911) and "Dear Sir, Having Recently Been Appointed American Agents" (1912). Many are still being published today.
      In April 1912 the directors decided to close Browne's Bookstore.
   
[19] "A Notable Bookstore" by Lloyd; Peattie, 1908
   

We want to thank William Scott for sending us copies of the inside for our research of "A notable Bookstore".

Date: 1908

Title: A Notable Bookstore (Published by The Browne's Bookstore)

Author: Jones, Rev. Jenkin Lloyd; Peattie, Elia W.

Description: Includes a description and images on the interior of the Browne's Bookstore. "The firm has prepared an attractive booklet describing its shop in detail with illustrations of its more prominent features, which will be sent free to all who may be interested. We advise every bookseller to avail himself of the opportunity of securing one." The Published Weekly, August 15, 1908, Page 353.
      Excerpts: Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones in "Unity". ...Chicago has but one Francis Fisher Browne, but one "Dial," and now it boasts of its one "Browne’s Bookstore. It is unlike any other bookstore that ever was. And perhaps even Browne could never have come to his Bookstore if he had not been able to add to his delicate appreciation of good literature, his diligent pursuit of the same, his long and patient work in building up "The Dial," which for over twenty-five years has steadily worked up to its right to the title of "leading literary journal of America,"... (pages 1-5).
      Elia W. Peattie in New York "Post". ...It is called "Browne’s Bookstore," and it has at its head Francis F. Browne, the editor of "The Dial." Most editors and writers make compromise with mammon nowadays, but Mr. Browne has not been one of these. "The Dial" has been devoted consistently to the cause of high criticism, and it has a corps of discriminating writers who, many of them, write almost exclusively for its pages, finding in this an intellectual divertisement. Associated with Mr. Browne in the enterprise of the unique Book Shop are a number of other interesting persons, who remain somewhat in the background. That is to say, everyone knows they are "in it," but everyone equally knows that their being so is a secret... Certain afternoons tea is served by clever women. Folk drink and talk, buy books and incite others to do the same... (pages 8-12).
      From The Chicago "Daily Tribune". Book Hunters who enter Browne’s Bookstore in the Fine Arts Building find something quite different from the usual place of the kind... There are, too, many accommodations for visitors not usually in evidence elsewhere. One of these is a cozy reception room with fireplace, where tea is served and where some attention is paid to the social amenities. In no other American city is there a shop of this sort. (page 12).

Size: 5 x 6.25

Pages: Pp 12

   
   
   
[20] "Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey" by J. M. Barrie, 1910
   

Note: a previous owner pasted a second label near the bottom of this cover. We removed it with Photoshop. Image enhanced by Douglas M. Steiner

Date: 1910

Title: Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey (Soft cover) (Published by Brown’s Bookstore, Chicago. 1910. Note: also published in 1911 and in 1912 by Browne's Bookstore)

(This 1910 edition: Greenish blue paper cover with paper label on outside front cover. Silk stitched to inside pages, which were printed on hand-made Strathmore laid paper, with watermarks "The P M Co, Quality, Hand-made in Italy." 1912 edition Light yellowish brown paper cover. Includes Hardy's poem, "G.M. 1828 - 1909", on non-numbered page 15. Note: We have also seen a 1911 version printed at Hillacre. Sewn greenish dark olive paper cover with paper label similar to Browne’s 1910 edition. 300 copies were printed for the Hillacre Bookhouse.)

Author: Barrie, J. M.; Hardy, Thomas (James Matthew Barrie, 1860 – 1937, a Scottish author, is best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. First introduced in 1902, then as a play in 1904.)

Description: "Of the many tributes to George Meredith called forth by his death last May, probably the most appropriate and beautiful was that contributed by Mr. J. M. Barrie to '' The Westminster Gazette" of London, under the title "Neither Dorking nor the Abbey." That this brilliant little essay may not be lost to the many who love both Meredith and Barrie, we have issued it in attractive booklet form, printed on handmade paper and silk-stitched in blue handmade paper wrappers with printed title-label. There is a brief prefatory note, and appended are Thomas Hardy's fine verses on the death of Meredith. As the edition is limited, orders should be sent at once. Price, 50 cents, postpaid." From an ad in The Dial, July 1, 1910, page 22, but doe not indicate which 1910 edition is at this price. Hand written on first title page (page 1) "K Eith June 15th 1910". "Note. In England recently there died a great man – the greatest of his day. Immediately there arose much vain contention as to whether or no his dust should be given resting place among that of his peers in Westminster Abbey. Finally come the decision that Westminster was not to be so honored; and the urn containing all of him that had outlived the fire was place in the sunny graveyard of Dorking village..." (page 5-6) (First Edition)

Size: 5 x 6.75.

Pages: Pp 14

0094.08.0311

   
   
   
[20a] "Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey" by J. M. Barrie, 1910 [17 - 1911]
   

Note: Also published in 1911. Tan paper cover with tan  cord. "Chicago, Browne's Bookstore, 1911."

Date: 1910

Title: Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey (Soft cover) (Published by Brown’s Bookstore, Chicago. 1910)

(This 1910 edition: Tan colored laid paper cover with "Fabriano Italy" watermark. The title is printed on cover. Silk stitched to inside pages, which were printed on Strathmore paper, with "Strathmore" and "USA" watermarks. Includes Hardy's poem, "G.M. 1828 - 1909", on non-numbered page 15.) (Reprinted again in 1911 and 1912.)

Author: Barrie, J. M.; Hardy, Thomas Barrie, J. M.; Hardy, Thomas (James Matthew Barrie, 1860 – 1937, a Scottish author, is best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. First introduced in 1902, then as a play in 1904.)

Description: "Of the many tributes to George Meredith called forth by his death last May, probably the most appropriate and beautiful was that contributed by Mr. J. M. Barrie to '' The Westminster Gazette" of London, under the title "Neither Dorking nor the Abbey." That this brilliant little essay may not be lost to the many who love both Meredith and Barrie, we have issued it in attractive booklet form, printed on handmade paper and silk-stitched in blue handmade paper wrappers with printed title-label. There is a brief prefatory note, and appended are Thomas Hardy's fine verses on the death of Meredith. As the edition is limited, orders should be sent at once. Price, 50 cents, postpaid. " From an ad in The Dial, July 1, 1910, page 22, but doe not indicate which 1910 edition is at this price. "Note. In England recently there died a great man – the greatest of his day. Immediately there arose much vain contention as to whether or no his dust should be given resting place among that of his peers in Westminster Abbey. Finally come the decision that Westminster was not to be so honored; and the urn containing all of him that had outlived the fire was place in the sunny graveyard of Dorking village..." (page 5-6) (First Edition)

Size: 4.75 x 6.25

Pages: Pp 14

0094.14.0311

   
   
   
[21] "Twenty Years at Hull-House" by Jane Addams, 1910
   
Note: This is the cover to the third edition published by Macmillan. Small inset is example of Browne's Bookstore edition. Date: 1910

Title: Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes. (Published by The MacMillan Company, New York, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, San Francisco. MacMillan & Co., Limited, London, Bombay, Calcutta, Melbourne. The MacMillan Co. of Canada, Ltd. Toronto.)

Author: Jane Addams

Description: The Browne’s Bookstore edition was published by Macmillan, New York, in 1910. 6 1/4 x 9 3/4". 462 pages including index. Two hundred ten numbered copies were signed by the author, and "Printed especially for Browne's Bookstore, Chicago". It was produced in brown cloth boards, vellum spine with bright gilt titles. This third edition was first published in November 1910, reprinted November and December 1910 by Norwood Press, J. S. Cushing Co. - Berwick & Smith Co., Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.. The first November 1910 publishing could have been for Browne’s, with the second November 1910 directly for MacMillan. This edition produced with reddish brown cloth, gilt lettering and border. Includes three photographic and nine illustrated plates printed on glossy cream stock, printed singled sided. The nine illustrations, plus an additional 51 illustrations included within the text, by Norah Hamilton, Hull-House. Edges are cut, the top edge gilt. (Third Edition)

Size: 5.25 x 8

Pages: Pp 462

0094.15.0411

   
   
   
[22] "Selected Poems of Matthew Arnold" by Matthew Arnold, 1910 (Imported)
   
Date: 1910

Title: Selected Poems of Matthew Arnold (Leather Bound Hard Cover) (Published by Macmillan and Co., Limited, London. Printed by R. & R. Clark, Limited,, Edinburgh. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore". Edges trimmed and gilt.)

Author: Arnold, Matthew

Description: First published in June and October, 1878. Golden Treasury Series. Macmillan and Co. Launched the ‘Golden Treasury’ series, one of the most successful series ever issued by the firm. "This series was inspired by Francis Palgrave’s Golden Treasury of English Songs and Lyrics (1861), which had appeared under the Macmillan and Co. imprint. By 1889, the Golden Treasury series numbered 44 titles." (The Book Beautiful: Walter Pater and the House of Macmillan, Seiler, 1999/2013.) (Twenty-sixth Edition)

Size: 4 x 6.25.

Pages: Pp 235

S#: 0094.38.1113

   
   
   
[23] "Joy of The Road" compiled by Waldo Ralph Browne, 1911
   
Date: 1911

Title: Joy of The Road. A Little Anthology in Praise of Walking (Hard Cover) (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago. Note: have seen a copy with "Printed by The Merrymount Press, Boston". This copy does not include that text. No other changes.)

Author: Compiled by Browne, Waldo Ralph

Description: A compilation of nine poems and short stories by the son of Francis Fisher Browne, which include: "The Joys of the Road", by Bliss Carman; "On Going A Journey", by William Hazlitt; "The Vagabond" by Robert Louis Stevenson; "Walking Tour", by Robert Louis Stevenson; "Afoot", by C. Fox Smith; "Walking" by Henry David Thoreau; "On the Roads" by Arthur Symons; "The Exhilarations of the Road" by John Burroughs; "Night and the Inn" by William Morris. Original list price $1.00 net. (First Edition)

Size: 4.25 x 6.5

Pages: Pp 104

0104.09.0311
   
   
   
[24] "On The Art of The Theatre" by Edward Gordon Craig, 1911
   
Date: 1911

Title: On The Art of The Theatre (Hard Cover) (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago. Printed on cream laid paper in England by Richard Clay & Sons, Limited, London and Bungay. Top edge cut, others uncut.)

Author: Craig, Edward Gordon

Description: Actor, director, designer and pioneering theorist, Edward Gordon Craig was one of twentieth century theatre’s great modernizers. This volume stands as one of the most influential books on theatre of the twentieth century. Loose tissue protects title page. Preface dated August 16, 1911, London, E. G. C. Introduction by Dr. Alexander Hevesi, Dramaturg-Regisseur of the State Theatre, Budapest. July 10, 1911. Sixteen illustrations by Edward Gordon Craig, selected from his collection of designs for stage scenes and costumes. Illustrations printed on cream gloss stock, single sided and bound with protective tissue. Tissue printed with description of scene. Original list price $2.00 net.(First Edition)

Size: 6.25 x 8.5.

Pages: Pp 296

0104.10.0411

   
   
   
[25] "Rabbi Ben Ezra" by Robert Browning, 1911
   
Title Page
 
White Box
Date: 1911

Title: Rabbi Ben Ezra (Soft Cover) (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago. The cover is printed with two embossed inks, pink and green. The circle and text is printed with a raised gold flecked ink. Two gold ribbons are used to tied the covers shut (lower missing). Each stanza begins with a decorative two-color capital letter. Printed on laid paper, with a watermark that includes the text 1590 and an illustrated windmill. Top is trimmed and gilt. Others uncut. Includes white box with printed pasted label.)

Author: Browning, Robert

Description: A 32 stanza poem by Robert Browning. "Rabbi Ben Ezra" was first published as the seventh poem in Dramatis Personse, 1864. "Abraham Ben Meir Ben Ezra was born at Toledo, Spain about 1119 and probably died in 1168. He left Spain for Rome about 1140 lived at Mantua in 1145, at Rhodes in 1155 through 1166 and was in England in 1159. He wrote a great series of Commentaries on the Old Testament which have nearly all been printed in the great Rabbinic Bibles. He was the first who raised biblical exegesis to the rank of a science. He wrote several treatises on astronomy or astrology and on grammatical subjects." (Condensed from: Notes to Browning's Collected Works, London 1894.) (First Edition)
    Grow old along with me!
    The best is yet to be,
    The last of life, for which the first was made:
    Our times are in His hand
    Who saith "A whole I planned,
    Youth shows but half; trust God:
    see all, nor be afraid!''

Size: 4.25 x 5.24

Pages: Pp 32

S#: 0104.18.0714

   
   
   
[26] "The Ballad of Reading Gaol" by Oscar Wilds, 1911
   

 

Date: 1911

Title: The Ballad of Reading Gaol (Hard Cover) (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago. Printed on cream, laid Abbey Mills Greenfield paper, with "Crown (symbol) Abbey Mills, Greenfield" watermark. Printed by T. and A. Constable, Printers to His Majesty at the Edinburgh University Press.)

Author: Wilde, Oscar

Description: "In Memoriam, C.T.W., Sometime Trooper of the Royal Horse Guards, Obiit (sp) H.M. Prison, Reading, Berkshire, July 7th, 1896." Charles Thomas Wooldridge was a trooper in the Royal Horse Guards. He was convicted of the murder of his wife. He was executed at Reading Gaol (Redding Jail). Wilde was a fellow inmate at the time. "Note. At the end of the completed text, in this new popular edition, will be found a shorter version based on the original draft of the poem. This included for the benefit of reciters and their audiences who have found the entire poem too long for declaration... Which represents the author’s first scheme for a poem - never intended of course for recitation. Robert Ross, Reform Club, 25 May, 1910." Original list price 50c. (First Edition)

                      (First stanza)
       He did not wear his scarlet coat,
          For blood and wine are red,
       And blood and wine were on his hands
          When they found him with the dead,
       The poor dead woman whom he loved,
          And murdered in her bed.
                      (Last stanza)
          And all men kill the thing they love,
          By all let this be heard,
       Some do it with a bitter look,
          Some with a flattering word,
       The coward does it with a kiss,
          The brave man with a sword!
   
                      (Second stanza)
          He walked amongst the Trial Men
          In a suit of shabby grey;
       A cricket cap was on his head,
          And his step seemed light and gay;
       But I never saw a man who looked
          So wistfully at the day.
 

Size: 4.4 x 6.8

Pages: Pp 86

0104.11.0311

   
   
   
[27] "The Charm of Childhood" compiled by Hervey Elwes, 1911
   
Date: 1911

Title: The Charm of Childhood, Being A Little Book On The Modern Child (Dust jacket over stick cover) (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago. Title and end pages printed on cream, laid Abbey Mills Greenfield paper, with "Crown (symbol) Abbey Mills, Greenfield" watermark. Balance of pages printed on cream stock. Lettering on cover embossed and gild. Circular illustration printed in four-color with circular dotted border, embossed and gild. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Only fragments left of ribbon that wraps through cover and around ends. Printed by Neill and Co., Ltd. Edinburgh.)

Author: Compiled by: Elwes, Hervey; With a Foreword by: Harker, L. Allen

Description: "Foreword: In nothing is changed during the last fifty years more marked than in the mental attitude of the English-speaking races towards children. It seems almost impossible to those born within that fifty years that such places as ‘Dotheboys Hall,’ described by Charles Dickens in Nicholas Nickleby, could ever have existed... We have travelled a considerable distance along the road of humane and kindly dealing since 1867... since the Reverend Arthur Waugh founded his trice excellent ‘Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children... To the gentle-hearted therefore, I commend this book, made by one who loves children for such as love children..." A compilation of over two-hundred poems and short stories by different authors. (First Edition)

Size: 4.5 x 6.9

Pages: Pp 246

0104.12.0411

   
   
   
[28] "Gleams from Goethe" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1911
   
  Title: Gleams from Goethe (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

Description: Chosen and translated, with an introduction by H. Attwell. Part of the Pensees Series. Paper 60c.

Pages: Pp 191

   
   
   
[29] "Rembrandt" (Circa 1907/1912)
   
Date: Circa 1907/1912

Title: Rembrandt. Illustrated with Eight Reproductions in Colour (Published by T. C. & E. C. Jack, London, Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Color plates printed by Bemrose Dalziel, Ltd., Watford. Text printed by the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore". Top edge trimmed and gilt.)

Author: Israels, Josef

Description: Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669), Dutch painter and etcher. First published circa 1907 by Jack in London and Stokes in New York as part of the "Masterpieces in Colour" Series, each volume highlighting a different artist. 43 volumes were produced between 1907 and 1910, with "others in preparation. According to "News Notes of California Libraries" 1909, it was first published in 1907. To date we have located five volumes bound for Browne’s Bookstore in their own covers. Jack’s original series included the artist name, color plate and the text "Masterpieces in Colour" on the cover. Browne’s versions were elegantly bound in buckram overlapping the spine with a gold hairline inlaid between it and grey boards. The artist’s name was printed on the spine in gilt letters. The plates of both versions were printed in four-color on a "canvas textured" off-white stock. We can only speculate as to why Browne’s version had a different cover. Like Wright’s "Disappearing City", the publishers may have printed more copies then they first bound. Or, Browne’s may have made arrangements with the publishers and ordered a large enough quantity to warranted a reprint and allowed him the cover variation, but title page does not change. Eight plates. One from the Wallace Collection. One from the Brera, Milan. Two from the Royal Museum in Amsterdam. Two from the Pitti Palce, Florence. One from the National Gallery, London, and one from the Louvre.

Size:  6 x 7.8

Pages: Pp 80

S#: 0080.16.0413

   
   
   
[30] "Turner, Five Letters and A Postscript" (Circa 1907/1912)
   
Date: (Circa 1907/1912 - Browne's Edition Not Dated)

Title: Turner, Five Letters and A Postscript. Illustrated with Eight Reproductions in Colour (Published by T. C. & E. C. Jack, London, Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Color plates printed by Bemrose Dalziel, Ltd., Watford. Text printed by the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore".)

Author: Hind, C. Lewis

Description: William Turner (1775-1851), fine artist. First published circa 1907 by Jack in London and Stokes in New York as part of the "Masterpieces in Colour" Series, each volume highlighting a different artist. The International Studio, February, 1908 reported that "Eight volumes have come to hand of this series", 1s, 6d. net each. Eventually, at least 43 volumes were produced between 1907 and 1910, with "others in preparation. To date we have located five volumes bound by Browne’s Bookstore in their own covers, "Titian". Jack’s original series included the artist name, color plate and the text "Masterpieces in Colour" on the cover. Browne’s versions were elegantly bound in buckram overlapping the spine with a gold hairline inlaid between it and grey boards. The artist’s name was printed on the spine in gilt letters. The plates of both versions were printed in four-color on a "canvas textured" off-white stock. We can only speculate as to why Browne’s version had a different cover. Like Wright’s "Disappearing City", the publishers may have printed more copies then they first bound. Or, Browne’s may have made arrangements with the publishers and ordered a large enough volume that warranted a reprint and allowed him the cover variation. Eight plates. Four from paintings at the Tate Gallery and four from the National Gallery.

Size: 6 x 7.8

Pages: Pp 78

S#: 0080.15.0313

   
Side Note: Skyfall. Scene 10. Bond entered the National Art Gallery, London, to meet the new Q for the first time. He sat in Room 34, on a bench, studying a painting by Joseph Mallord William (J. M. W.) Turner, RA. "The Fighting Temeraire Tugged To Her Last Berth, To Be Broken Up", 1838. It has been considered one of England's greatest paintings. It depicts one of Britain's last tall ships which played a distinguished role in the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. The 98-gun ship, is being towed towards its final berth in East London to be broken up for scrap. Turner symbolized the demise of heroic strength, the "old" Age of Sail giving way to the Age of Steam and industrialism. Like the theme in Skyfall, the tall ship has performed great service for its country but is now being slated for scrap. As Turner contemplated his own mortality, so does Bond. M is also being forced into retirement.
   
   
   
[31] "Velazquez" (Circa 1907/1912)
   
Date: Circa 1907/1912

Title: Velazquez. Illustrated with Eight Reproductions in Colour (Published by T. C. & E. C. Jack, London, Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Color plates printed by Bemrose Dalziel, Ltd., Watford. Text printed by the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh, Ballantyne, Hanson & Co., Edinburgh & London. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore". Top edge trimmed and gilt.)

Author: Bensusan, S. L.

Description: Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), Spanish painter who was the leading artist in the court of King Philip IV. First published circa 1907 by Jack in London and Stokes in New York as part of the "Masterpieces in Colour" Series, each volume highlighting a different artist. 43 volumes were produced between 1907 and 1910, with "others in preparation. According to "News Notes of California Libraries" 1909, it was first published in 1907. To date we have located five volumes bound for Browne’s Bookstore in their own covers. Jack’s original series included the artist name, color plate and the text "Masterpieces in Colour" on the cover. Browne’s versions were elegantly bound in buckram overlapping the spine with a gold hairline inlaid between it and grey boards. The artist’s name was printed on the spine in gilt letters. The plates of both versions were printed in four-color on a "canvas textured" off-white stock. We can only speculate as to why Browne’s version had a different cover. Like Wright’s "Disappearing City", the publishers may have printed more copies then they first bound. Or, Browne’s may have made arrangements with the publishers and ordered a large enough quantity to warranted a reprint and allowed him the cover variation, but title page does not change.

Size: 6 x 7.8

Pages: Pp 77

S#: 0080.17.0413

   
   
   
[32] "Holbein" (Circa 1909/1912)
   
Date: Circa 1909/1912 

Title: Holbein (Illustrated with Eight Reproductions in Colour (Published by T. C. & E. C. Jack, London, Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Color plates printed by Bemrose & Sons, Ltd., Derby and London. Text printed by the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore". Top edge trimmed and gilt.)

Author: Bensusan, S. L.

Description: Hans Holbein the Younger (1497-1543). German artist and printmaker. First published circa 1909 by Jack in London and Stokes in New York as part of the "Masterpieces in Colour" Series, each volume highlighting a different artist. To date we have located five volumes bound for Browne’s Bookstore in their own covers. Jack’s original series included the artist name, color plate and the text "Masterpieces in Colour" on the cover. Browne’s versions were elegantly bound in buckram overlapping the spine with a gold hairline inlaid between it and grey boards. The artist’s name was printed on the spine in gilt letters. The plates of both versions were printed in four-color on a "canvas textured" off-white stock. We can only speculate as to why Browne’s version had a different cover. Like Wright’s "Disappearing City", the publishers may have printed more copies then they first bound. Or, Browne’s may have made arrangements with the publishers and ordered a large enough quantity to warranted a reprint and allowed him the cover variation, but title page does not change. Eight plates. One from the Royal Museum, Berlin, one from the National Gallery, London, two from the Imperial Gallery, Vienna, three from the Louvre and one from Uffizi Gallery, Florence.

Size: 6 x 7.8

Pages: Pp 80

S#: 0086.10.0313

   
   
   
[33] "Titian" (Circa 1909/1912)
   
Date: Circa 1909/1912

Title: Titian. Illustrated with Eight Reproductions in Colour (Published by T. C. & E. C. Jack, London, Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York. Color plates printed by Bemrose Dalziel, Ltd., Watford. Text printed by the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh. This volume "Bound by Riviere & Son of London for Browne’s Bookstore". Top edge trimmed and gilt.)

Author: Bensusan, S. L.

Description: Titian Vecelli (1488-1576), fine artist. First published circa 1909 by Jack in London and Stokes in New York as part of the "Masterpieces in Colour" Series, each volume highlighting a different artist. The International Studio, February, 1908 reported that "Eight volumes have come to hand of this series", 1s, 6d. net each. This volume was not included. Eventually, at least 43 volumes were produced between 1907 and 1910, with "others in preparation. To date we have located five volumes bound by Browne’s Bookstore in their own covers, "Turner". Jack’s original series included the artist name, color plate and the text "Masterpieces in Colour" on the cover. Browne’s versions were elegantly bound in buckram overlapping the spine with a gold hairline inlaid between it and grey boards. The artist’s name was printed on the spine in gilt letters. The plates of both versions were printed in four-color on a "canvas textured" off-white stock. We can only speculate as to why Browne’s version had a different cover. Like Wright’s "Disappearing City", the publishers may have printed more copies then they first bound. Or, Browne’s may have made arrangements with the publishers and ordered a large enough quantity to warranted a reprint and allowed him the cover variation, but title page does not change. Eight plates. Three from paintings at the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, three from the Pitti Palce, Florence and two from the Borghese Palace, Rome.

Size: 6 x 7.8

Pages: Pp 78

S#: 0086.09.0313

 
 
 
[34] "Pansies from French Gardens" 1912
   
  Title: "Pansies from French gardens from the works of Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, and Vauvenargues". (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Henry Attwell, compiler and translated.

Description: Paper 60c  (Pensees Series)

   
   
   
[35] "Pensees of Joubert" by Joseph Joubert, 1912
   
  Title: "Pensees of Joubert" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Joseph Joubert

Description: Selected and translated with a biographical note by Henry Attwetl. (Pensees Series) 60c

Pages: Pp 135

   
   
   
[36] "Symposium on Friendship" 1912
   
  Title: "Symposium on Friendship" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Selected from various authors and arranged by Mary Donald with preface by S.R. Crockett.

Description: (Pensees Series) Paper 40c & 60c

   
   
   
[37] "Sonnets From the Portuguese" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 1912
   
  Title: "Sonnets From the Portuguese" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Description: (Heddon Booklets.) Boxed, parchment 50c.

   
   
   
[38] "Sonnets" by John Keats, 1912
   
  Title: "Sonnets" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Keats, John

Description: (Heddon Booklets.) Boxed, parchment 50c.

Pages: Pp 72

   
   
   
[39] "Happy Thoughts from Robert Louis Stevenson" 1912
   
  Title: "Happy thoughts from Robert Louis Stevenson" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Description: (Bluebird Booklets.) 40c.

   
   
   
[40] "Inner Beauty" by Maurice Maeterlinck, 1912
   
  Title: "Inner Beauty" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Maurice Maeterlinck

Description: (Bluebird Booklets.) 40c

   
   
   
[41] "Little Book of Happiness" 1912
   
  Title: "Little book of Happiness" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Selections from various writers.

Description: (Bluebird Booklets.) 40c.

   
   
   
[42] "Lyrics of Joy" 1912
   
  Title: "Lyrics of Joy" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: William Ernest Henley

Description: (Bluebird Booklets.)

Pages: Pp 24

   
   
   
[43] "Joy of Friendship" 1912
   
  Title: "Joy of Friendship" (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Author: Selections from various writers.

Description: 40c.

   
   
   
[44] "Christmas Happiness..." 1912
   
  Title: "Christmas Happiness..." (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)

Pages: Pp 29

   
   
   
[45] "Dear Sir, Having Recently Been Appointed American Agents" 1912
   
  Title: Dear Sir, Having Recently Been Appointed American Agents (Published by Browne’s Bookstore, Chicago)
   
   
   
[46] "Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey" by J. M. Barrie, 1912
   
Date: 1912

Title: Neither Dorking Nor The Abbey (Soft cover) (Published by Brown’s Bookstore, Chicago. 1912) Tan colored laid paper cover with "Fabriano Italy" watermark. The title is printed on cover. Silk stitched to inside pages, which were printed on Strathmore paper, with "Strathmore" and "USA" watermarks. Accompanied by Hardy's poem, "G.M. 1828 - 1909." (Note: Other than the edition date, it is an exact match to the tan 1910 version.)

Author: Barrie, J. M.; Hardy, Thomas

Description: "Of the many tributes to George Meredith called forth by his death last May, probably the most appropriate and beautiful was that contributed by Mr. J. M. Barrie to '' The Westminster Gazette" of London, under the title "Neither Dorking nor the Abbey." That this brilliant little essay may not be lost to the many who love both Meredith and Barrie, we have issued it in attractive booklet form, printed on handmade paper and silk-stitched in blue handmade paper wrappers with printed title-label. There is a brief prefatory note, and appended are Thomas Hardy's fine verses on the death of Meredith. As the edition is limited, orders should be sent at once. Price, 50 cents, postpaid. " From an ad in The Dial, July 1, 1910, page 22. "Note. In England recently there died a great man – the greatest of his day. Immediately there arose much vain contention as to whether or no his dust should be given resting place among that of his peers in Westminster Abbey. Finally come the decision that Westminister was not to be so honored; and the urn containing all of him that had outlived the fire was place in the sunny graveyard of Dorking village..." (page 5-6) (Third Edition)

Size: 4.75 x 6.25

Pages: Pp 14

0114.05.0311

   
   
Note:  If you have any further information concerning additional books published by Browne's Bookstore, please contact us.
 
 
 
Books Related To Francis Fisher Browne
   
   
Date: 1878

Publication: New York Times - May 2, 1878 (Published by The New York Times)

Author: Anonymous

Description: "Bankruptcy Petitions in Chicago and Elsewhere - Savings Banks. Chicago, May 1. -- There was somewhat of a falling off in the bankruptcy petitions today, only 18 being filed. Among the Chicago petitioners were... Francis F. Browne, $15,000, unsecured." Digital and printed version.

Size: 4 x 10

Pages: Pp --

0000.01.0311

   
Date: 1900

Publication: The Book Buyer, A Review and Record of Current Literature - May 1900 (Published monthly by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York)

Author: Cheney, John Vance

Description: "Francis Fisher Browne. While most readers of our distinctively critical periodicals are familiar with the Dial, few, perhaps, know more than the name of the man that founded it, the present editor and proprietor; and as the Dial celebrates, this month, its twentieth anniversary, it is fitting that some one should do for its editor, Mr. Francis Fisher Browne, the last thing he could be induced to do for himself; namely give some account of him and his work..." Includes additional biographical information and one portrait. Digital and printed version.

Size: 6.8 x 9.

Pages: Pp 301-303

0041.03.0311

   
Date: 1904

Title: Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Volume II (Digital Edition) (Published by The Biographical Society, Boston. Printed by Blimpton Press, Norwood, Mass.)

Author: Johnson, Rossiter; Brown, John Howard

Description: "Browne, Francis Fisher, editor and author... son of William Goldsmith Browne, a well-known poet and editor. He learned the printer’s trade in his father’s office in Chicopee, Mass. In the summer of 1862 he enlisted in the 46th Mass. Regiment, in North Carolina and in the Army of the Potomac. In 1866 he entered the law department of the University of Michigan. In 1867 he removed to Chicago, Ill... He was editor of ‘The Western Monthly’ and ‘The Lakeside Monthly’ from 1869 to 1874; afterward was literary editor of ‘The Alliance’, and in 1880 founded ‘The Dial’ which he edited... Besides his critical writings, he wrote many short poems, some of which have found a place in standard literary anthologies. His books include: "The Every-Day Life of Abraham Lincoln", "Bugle Echoes, a collection of Poems of the Civil War, Northern and Southern", "Golden Poems by British and American Authors", and "The Golden Treasures of Poetry and Prose". He also edited an extended series of popular poems." (Page 17). Digital and printed version.

Size: 7 x 10

Pages: Pp 440

0055.03.0311

   
Date: 1910

Title: Bygone Days in Chicago, Recollections of the "Garden City" of The Sixties (Digital Edition) (Published by A. C. McClurg & Co., Chicago. April 9, 1910. Printed by The Lakeside Press, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, Chicago)

Author: Cook, Frederick Francis

Description: "Francis F. Browne and ‘The Lakeside’. Along with the many changes in the social order that marked the close of the war, there was awakened a literary consciousness, seeking to come into touch with the spirit of older communities... and the new spirit found expression in the pages of The Lakeside Monthly, under the stimulating editorship of Francis F. Browne. The founding of this high class publication marked the first step in the local literary output inviting critical comparison with what was doing in the world at large; and as such received flattering recognition both at home and abroad. It set up a standard whose influence on the character of local production, even if not always recognized, was almost immediate, and most salutary... and the work thus begun, and still carried forward under the same inspiriting leadership in the pages of the present Dial a critical force surpassed, perhaps, by none in America has its due reward in a germinating soil and literary fruition that has not only made a distinct place for itself, but is receiving an ever larger recognition as a formative influence in American literature. (Pages 239-240.) Includes portrait of Browne. Digital and printed version.

Size: 4.5 x 7.5

Pages: Pp 400

0094.07.0311

   
Date: 1913

Publication: The Dial - June 1, 1913 (Published on the 1st and 16th of each month by The Dial Company, Chicago)

Author: Anonymous

Description: Francis Fisher Browne. 1843-1913. "Something less than three weeks ago there died in California the man who conceived, projected, and for nearly a third of a century conducted this journal... When the regiment was discharged, in 1863, he decided to take up the study of law... and a year or two later began a brief course in the law department of the University of Michigan. He was unable to continue in college, however, and returned to Rochester to follow his trade. Here, in 1867, he was married to Susan Seaman Brooks... and immediately after his marriage he came to Chicago with the definite intention of engaging in literary work... With the fuller establishment of his control he rechristened the magazine, the word "Lakeside," now so familiar and widely-used in Chicago, being first employed in the new title, "The Lakeside Monthly"... In 1870 a fire destroyed the magazine's printing-office, with its subscription list and entire current edition... Then a year later came the historic fire of 1871, in which the whole of Chicago's business section was consumed, and with it every visible asset of the magazine. But the intellectual force behind it was unsubdued; and after a brief delay the magazine once more arose from the ashes. The financial panic of two years later, which swept out of existence so many enterprises far more firmly based, was weathered by the indomitable resolution of a man determined upon success... Without means himself, even for a comfortable livelihood, its proprietor had continually to appeal for support from men to whom his own idealistic aims and purposes meant little or nothing... Worst of all, ill-health a heritage of army days aggravated by the constant toil and anxiety of ten years began to gain the upper hand. At a time when the magazine was practically self-sustaining and its prospects brighter than they ever had been in the past, a complete physical break-down made its suspension imperative. Thus came to an end " The Lakeside Monthly," from that day to this the most creditable and distinguished magazine ever published west of the Atlantic seaboard. The six years immediately following, from 1874 to 1880, were largely spent in a search for health. During part of this time, however, Mr. Browne acted as literary editor of "The Alliance" (then a prominent and influential weekly journal), and as special editorial writer for some of the leading Chicago newspapers... May, 1880, appeared the first issue of THE DIAL... his death which occurred in Santa Barbara, California, on May 11... He was one of the small group of men who, in 1874, founded the Chicago Literary Club; and for a number of years past he has been an honorary member of that organization, as well as of the Caxton Club (Chicago) and the Twilight Club (Pasadena, Calif.). During the summer of 1893 he served as Chairman of the Committee on the Congress of Authors of the World's Congress Auxiliary of the Columbian Exposition... Ill-health dogged him remorselessly, from the time he left the army to the day of his death. Poverty walked always at his elbow. Yet none of these circumstances ever gained the upper hand of his will, or ever turned him from his purposes. Through a long and troubled life, he never struck sail to a fear, either from without or from within." Digital and printed version.

Size: 6.5 x 10

Pages: Pp 437-443

0120.09.0311

 
Date: 1913

Publication: The Dial - June 16, 1913 (Published on the 1st and 16th of each month by The Dial Company, Chicago)

Author: Muir, John

Description: Eulogy written by John Muir about his friend Browne, and published in the Dial. "Browne the Beloved.* Francis Fisher Browne, or Browne the Beloved as I like to call him, was one of the finest and rarest men I ever knew. During the last five or six years of his life, when I came to know him intimately, my love and admiration have been constantly growing as the noble strength and beauty of his character came more and more clearly to view. I have never ceased to wonder how he was able to do so vast an amount of downright hard work of lasting influence on our literature and at the same time lend a helping hand to hundreds of young aspiring writers, sympathizing with them in their struggles, and cheering them on with heartening advice while himself fighting an almost everyday battle against bad health, heavy enough utterly to disable most men. He was one of the literary pioneers of the old West who have made roaring commercial Chicago a centre of literature. His paper, The Dial, is regarded by far better judges than I am as the most..." Continued. Digital and printed version.

Original manuscript of Eulogy written by John Muir of his close friend Francis Fisher Browne, published in The Dial on June 16, 1913. Courtesy of The Newberry Library, University of the Pacific. (Full transcript.)

Size: 6.5 x 10.

Pages: Pp 492

0120.10.0311

   
Date: 1913

Publication: The American Review of Reviews, July 1913 (Published monthly by The Review of Reviews Company, New York)

Author: Edited by Shaw, Albert

Description: "The Dial’s Puritan Editor. On more than one occasion in years past the Review has made reference to the admirable editorial work of Mr. Francis Fisher Browne, of the Dial (Chicago). The recent death of Mr. Browne in Southern California, after many years of ill-health, has called forth many tributes from literary men and from those of other callings who know and appreciated the qualities of his work. A few pages of the Dial for June 1 are devoted to these expressions and to a brief summary of Mr. Browne’s career... One need not be a student of human nature to read in this face the essential characteristics of the man - the kindliness and sincerity and fearlessness, the mingled strains of gentleness and strength, of idealism and practicality, of frankness and reserve, of tolerance and pride... Simplicity, sincerity, courage, persistency – these were the predominant notes in his character." Includes one portrait. Digital and printed version.

Size: 7 x 9.5

Pages: Pp 115-116

0120.08.0311

   
Date: 1926

Title: The Chicago Literary Club, A History of its First Fifty Years (Digital Edition) (Published by The Chicago Literary Club, Chicago)

Author: Gookin, Frederick William

Description: "...Mr. Browne conceived the idea of forming a Club somewhat similar to the Century Club of New York, which should accomplish this result..." In a letter to Frederick Gookin, June 3, 1892, concerning the early days of the Literary Club, Browne recalled "I was not present at this meeting owing to serious illness, - from which cause also the magazine was, not long after, given up; and for the next few years I was absent from the city most of the time, and my membership in the club lapsed." Includes one photograph of Francis F. Browne. Digital and Printed version.

Size: 5.5 x 9

Pages: Pp 204

0172.11.0211

   
Date: 1985

Title: A Prophet Without Honor in His Own Country: Francis F. Browne and The Dial (Digital Edition) (Published by The Chicago Literary Club, Chicago)

Author: Regnery, Henry

Description: "...the fact that we are meeting here this evening as members of a club which he founded some 110 years ago is evidence that his influence continues, but however all that may be, I am strongly of the opinion that the achievement of Francis F. Browne as founder of The Dial and its editor for thirty-five years, in the present state of the cultural life of Chicago needs to be better known and appreciated..." (p1). "...but a complete breakdown of his health in 1874, just at a time the magazine was beginning to pay its own way, forced him to discontinue, which must have been a crushing blow. He moved away from Chicago for a time in an effort to regain his health..." (p2). "and not being able to attend a meeting of the club he had founded, we expelled for nonpayment of dues, which hurt him deeply. It was not until 1899 that the club realized its error and made him an honorary member..." (P13). Digital and printed version.

Size: 5.5 x 8.5

Pages: Pp 14

1985.33.0311
   
   
 
Browne's Bookstore Photographs
   
Date: 1901

Title: Fine Arts Building April 1901.

Description: Browne's Bookstore (1907 - S.141), which opened for business during the last few months of 1907, was located on the left side of the seventh floor as you faced the building. The W. Scott Thurber Art Gallery (1909 - S.154) occupied the fifth floor of the Annex adjacent on the right. The reader board above the door on the left reads "The Studebaker, Castle Square Opera Co. Pirates of Penzance". The May 1, 1901 issue of "The Dial" ran an ad, "The Studebaker. Fine Arts Building... 3D Year. Castle Square Opera Company. Week of April 29 - Pirates of Penzance." The "Pirates of Penzance" was performed two times. Construction began in late 1887 on the Auditorium building (left) and in late 1889 it held its grand opening. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 10

0048.01.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Exterior Entrance Circa 1908.

Description: Exterior view of entry from hallway. Glass, envelopes the entryway. Two doors allow customers to enter. "Browne's Bookstore" is on the glass above the left door. Two Copper Weed Holders are seen inside display case. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 8

0085.09.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Interior Entrance Circa 1908.

Description: The cashier's station is conveniently situated between the two entry doors. Wright designed every fixture and every piece of furniture. "Browne's Bookstore" is on the glass above the right door. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 10

0085.10.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Front Cove Circa 1908.

Description: View of front Cove. Browne sought to combine the best features of a well-equipped bookstore with those of a choice home library. Built-in seating, high-backed chairs and tables, stained glass windows and light fixtures, and a view of Lake Michigan from these seventh floor windows. Wall and ceiling trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 7 x 10

0085.11.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Viewed From Front to Back Circa 1908.

Description: Alcoves were arranged along the left side; each alcove had chairs, a table and reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom were easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye. Every fixture and every piece of furniture was specially designed by Wright and manufactured to order. The cases, tables, chairs, and wall trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Wright also lowered the ceiling in the main room. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 9

0085.12.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) Viewed From Entry to Back Circa 1908.

Description: View from entry to back. Alcoves were arranged along the left side; each alcove had chairs, a table and reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom were easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye. Set between every tier of shelves, at right angles to the wall are long library tables, with dependent reading lamps and high-backed chairs. The cases, tables, chairs, and wall trimmings were of quartered oak throughout. Wright also lowered the ceiling in the main room. Wright adorned the top of a book shelf with his familiar Winged Victory Statue and quotations on the wall. Moving from one room to the next, Wright would often lower the ceiling, giving the effect of immensity as you moved into the next room. Wright dropped the ceiling in the space between the two rooms, while continuing the ceiling above. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 10

0085.13.0311

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) View of Cove Circa 1908.

Description: Each Cove included a built in table, four high-backed chairs and a reading light. The shelves extend only part way up the walls, giving the effect of a home library. By a unique system of shelf-lighting, the title of every volume from top shelf to bottom could easily be read, while at the same time the lights were hidden from the eye (PW). The book tier on the left shows the design of the lighting system just above the top shelf. Not only were the upper shelves recessed, but the lower shelves were slightly slanted, angling the books upward. Storrer dates Bookstore as 1908. But November 1907 issue of The Dial announced that "Browne’s Bookstore... is now open". Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons.

Size: Original 8 x 9.8 B&W photograph.

S#: 0085.27.0712

   
Date: 1908

Title: Browne’s Bookstore (1907 - S.141) View Toward Fireplace Circa 1908.

Description: The smaller room contains no shelving other than on either side of the fireplace, and is arranged with cases and tables for the display of fine bindings and special editions. A large fireplace and comfortable easy-chairs give this the appearance of an attractive living-room. Every fixture and every piece of furniture in both rooms has been specially designed and manufactured to order. Photographed by Henry Fuermann and Sons. High res digital image.

Size: 8 x 10

0085.14.0311

 
 
Back
 
 
Additional Wright Studies
 
Adelman (S.344)    Banff National Park Pavilion (S.170)    Bitter Root Inn (S.145)    Blair Residence (S.351)    Blumberg Residence (Project) 
 
Boomer Residence (1953 - S.361)    Brandes Residence (S.350)    Browne's Bookstore (S.141)    Como Orchard Summer Colony (S.144)  
 
Cooke Residence (1953)    Copper Weed Urn & Weed Holder   
Disappearing City (1932)    Elam Residence (S.336)    "Eve of St. Agnes" (1896)  
 
Feiman Residence (S.371)    Frank L. Smith Bank (S.111)    Gordon Residence (S.419)   
Griggs Residence (S.290)    Hartford Resort (Project 1948) 
  Heller Residence (S.038)   
Henderson Residence (S.057)   
Hoffman Showroom (S.380)    Horner Residence (S.142)    "House Beautiful" 1896-98  
  Husser Residence (S.046)    Imperial Hotel (S.194) Silverware and Monogram    Japanese Print Stand (1908)    Kalil Residence (S.387)  
 
Lake Geneva Hotel (S.171)
   Lamp Cottage, Rocky Roost (S.021)    Lockridge Medical Clinic (S.425)    Lykes Residence (S.433)  
 
Marden Residence (S.357)    March Balloons    Midway Gardens (S.180)    Midway Gardens Dish (S.180)    Nakoma Clubhouse  
 
Nakoma Furniture    Opus 497    Pebbles & Balch Remodel (S.131)    Pilgrim Congregational Church (S.431) 
Loren B. Pope (S.268) 
  
Roloson Rowhouse (S.026)    Shavin Residence (S.339)    Sixty Years Exhibition 1951-56    J. L. Smith Residence (1955)    Steffens Residence (S.153)  
  Stohr Arcade (S.162)    Stromquiest Residence (S.429)    Sutton Residence (S.106)    Teater Studio (S.352)    Thurber Art Galleries (S.154)  
  Tracy Residence (S.389)    Trier Residence (S.398)    Usonian Automatic Homes    Williams (Way & Williams) (S.033)  
 
Wyoming Valley School (S.401)   
Zimmerman Residence, (S.333) 
 
Frank Lloyd Wright's First Published Article (1898)
 
Photographic Chronology of Frank Lloyd Wright Portraits
 
"Frank Lloyd Wright's Nakoma Clubhouse & Sculptures." A comprehensive study of Wright’s Nakoma Clubhouse and the Nakoma and Nakomis Sculptures. Now Available. Limited Edition. More information.
 
 
  BACK TO TOP 

HOME   ARTIFACTS   AUDIO   BOOKS   PERIODICALS   PHOTOS   POSTCARDS   POSTERS   STAMPS   STUDIES   ASSISTING   ABOUT   SEARCH

To donate or pass on information, comments or questions:
info@wrightlibrary.com
©Copyright 2001, 2017